How to fly first class or business class for less

How to fly first class or business class for less

Goals shape most every corporate
decision, so we must be clear about our goals for traveling. The most obvious
travel goal is to earn a positive payback on the traveler’s time, the cost of
the trip, and the harm done to the climate. In short, the goal is to take
justifiable trips.

How to fly first class or business class for less

tClara’s Scott Gillespie argues a business class air policy is better for the environment.

He does the math on carbon emissions, but also on travel budgets, where he says the policy makes the biggest impact on carbon emissions by managing demand and forcing prioritization of high-value trips.

Let’s assume for a moment that our
main goal is to reduce airline-related emissions from our travel programs. We
must now re-think our cabin travel policy, as this is the single-most important
factor in a travel program’s ability to help achieve lower carbon emissions.

The traditional assumption is
that flying in economy is least harmful for the climate. I promoted this belief
back in 2007 when I led the development of TRX’s ground-breaking airline carbon
emission model. The TRX model allocated three times as much CO2 to a business
class seat compared to an economy seat because the floor space of the business
class seat was three times bigger.

Business class seats do take up
about three times the floor space of the typical economy seat. But it is not
floor space that matters, it is weight. It is the marginal weight of the seats,
the passengers and their luggage that matters. Why? Because the plane’s
operating empty weight, cargo weight and fuel load are the same, excluding the
weight of the passengers, their luggage and their seats. The key is recognizing
that a business class seat displaces not one but three to four economy seats,
depending on the cabin configurations.

Imagine an airline’s decision to
make room for one more business class seat on a flight by removing three
economy seats. The weight of the business class seat and its one passenger with
luggage is about half the weight of the three economy seats and their three
passengers with luggage. This means the flight needs marginally less fuel, not
more, so the flight now emits marginally less CO2 than it would if the flight
had been configured and sold with three economy seats. The same fuel-reduction
conclusion holds for first class seats.

The much bigger benefit of flying
business class, however, is simple supply-and-demand economics. Business class
fares are much more expensive than economy fares. The higher the fare, the
fewer number of trips that can be taken from the travel budget. So long as
business class fares are more than three times the price of an economy fare, our
travel budgets will produce significantly fewer emissions than if our budgets
were used on economy fares.

Let’s come back to our goals for
traveling. On the climate front, it must be to reduce overall emissions, not
emissions per passenger. An economy class policy does not reduce overall
emissions; a business class policy does.

If our primary goal is to enable
more successful trips, protect traveler health, safety and well-being, and
strengthen the recruiting and retention of travelers, then a business class cabin
policy is the obvious choice on this front.

The days of trying to squeeze the
greatest number of trips out of a travel budget are gone. We face new
constraints and expectations on climate concerns, travel budgets and traveler
well-being. Lower-value trips can’t be justified. We need our travelers to
succeed on their higher-value justifiable trips. A business class policy for
all travelers scores goals on all of today’s most important fronts.

How to fly first class or business class for less

Is flying First Class worth it? What can I expect from the latest Business Class cabin? How much better is Premium Economy than flying Coach?

How to fly first class or business class for lessAll fair questions for someone who’s never flown at the front of the plane. There are reasons why airlines separate their premium cabins from those travelling in Economy Class, and you can bet that adding mystery and intrigue plays a role. Who doesn’t want to see what’s being hidden from them?

Today, we pull back that dark, heavy curtain to give you a taste of the benefits of flying First Class, Business Class and Premium Economy with someone who sells these apartments in the sky exclusively.

Meet Julie Smigadis, Assistant Team Leader of our Flight Centre First and Business Queen West location in Toronto. Her travels have taken her to dozens of countries worldwide, from Australia to Vietnam, often in a premium cabin.

We caught up with Julie upon her recent return from Brisbane with Air Canada, to get the scoop on all things luxury. Enjoy!

How do you stay on top of the continuous enhancements airlines make to their First and Business Class cabins to offer the best option for your clients?

I believe that as a First and Business consultant, I have an obligation to keep very current with the ever-changing cabin configurations and enhancements of each airline. As a team, we have inspected Premium Economy and Business Class cabins at Pearson International Airport to best understand, first-hand, what we are offering our clients.

When a client is spending the money to upgrade, it’s important that we get it right for them, ensuring they are getting the seat they are expecting, or ideally, exceeding their expectations.

In Business Class, certain cabins have rear-facing seats, as well as ‘Honeymoon Pods’, where two Business Class seats are in proximity of each other, allowing two people travelling together to chat. Likewise, it’s important not to sit a single traveller who doesn’t want to be disturbed there. Understanding cabin configurations is essential in our business and imperative to servicing our clients properly.

How to fly first class or business class for less

What are airlines doing to differentiate their First and Business Class product?

It is the era of ultra-lux First and Business Class and I am loving all the work airlines are putting into these cabins. The ‘wow’ factor is in full effect.

Qantas is rolling out VR sets for First Class customers, Emirates has created a fully-enclosed suite, and Singapore Airlines has a full double bed in their suite. As they all try to one-up each other with amazing enhancements, the traveller is getting a state-of-the-art, cocooned experience that is more like a 5-star hotel room than an airplane seat.

First and Business travel is not just about the comfort or the seat, it is also about the elevated culinary experience. Can you tell us about the culinary experience on board?

One of my favourite stories is of my Air Canada Super Elite Status client calling me after getting off his Air Canada Dreamliner flight in Business Class, to tell me that his rack of lamb was one of the best he’d ever had.

He was raving that it was just as good as going to a Michelin star restaurant in a major city. Gone are the days of ‘airplane food’ in upgraded cabins. The food is just as much an experience as the lie-flat bed seats, soft leather and high-tech gadgets.

How to fly first class or business class for less

What does it mean to a customer to fly First or Business Class?

Besides the comfort, which is a major factor in choosing Business Class, it is mainly about the experience. First and Business Class cabins now offer guests the highest level of VIP treatment. Comfort, food, technology and service are all sky-high (no pun intended)!

How affordable is First and Business Class these days?

Well, if you have a great agent (like me!), they can source the best rates for Business and First Class seats, including some amazing contracted rates. Nowadays, travelling in these cabins is accessible to more than just the super-rich.

If you could fly in any First Class cabin tomorrow, which airline would you choose and why?

I would love to experience the new Singapore Airlines Suite Class. This isn’t Business Class and it isn’t First Class. It’s a whole new experience offering a fully-enclosed suite with a proper bed, lounge chair and cutting-edge technology.

How to fly first class or business class for less

I think they would need to kick me off the aircraft when we reached the destination because I wouldn’t want to leave willingly.

What’s the coolest First/Business Class Amenity Kit item you’ve ever gotten?

Etihad has a great amenity kit, with high-end products you’ll need to keep you fresh and comfortable during your flight, but their soft pajamas take it to another level of comfort.

Well, there you have it. Thanks, Julie!

Book your Premium Economy, Business and First Class flights with an expert. Visit Julie in-store or give her a call at 1844 801 6615 to book the flight of your life.

How to fly first class or business class for less

Whether you are traveling with colleagues or going it alone, when it comes to booking a flight for your next business trip, you should know the best options available to help you prep for success. We all know that economy class typically has smaller seats and less legroom than the other classes. But what’s the difference between first class and business class?

While choosing between first class and business class may be largely dependent on the cost, there are other factors to take into consideration. To save you time and help you make the best decision for your business trip goals, I’ve compiled a list of the differences between business and first-class seats (note that these will vary by airline and aircraft).

Domestic and international

A key distinction that I need to make is that most domestic business and first class seats pale in comparison to their international counterparts. Also, airlines typically sell business class seats as first class ones, unless an airplane has a three-class configuration.

On short-haul domestic flights, business class seats generally mean that you’ll have more comfortable seats and legroom compared to economy class. Unfortunately, that’s all it means. On long-haul flights such as from Los Angeles, California (LAX) to Queens, New York (JFK), business class on Delta means you’ll be seated in a 180° flat-bed seat that you can adjust to either sleep, relax, or work. It also comes with amenities such as earplugs, eyeshades, and lip balm.

Now that we’ve established that domestic flights don’t have much to offer for first class fares and seating, we can discuss international flights. On a long-haul international flight, a first class ticket costs at least twice as much as a business class one.

However, the price tag associated with first class seats comes with added benefits and perks included access to airport lounges, more luggage options, better seats, and better food.

Lounges

Airport terminals are loud, fast-moving areas where sleep is nearly impossible, the chairs are uncomfortable, and charging your phone is a less than enjoyable experience. Airport lounges provide a different experience for frequent flyers, premium members, and business and first class flyers alike. They’re not only private, they’re also designed to provide solitude and amenities to business travelers before departure.

These lounges typically offer a buffet or carefully curated menu options, coffee, teas, and a bar along with comfortable seats and WiFi access. Some even have showers and spa services! However, first class lounges are more exclusive with better dining options that provide a personalized experience that business class doesn’t always have.

Depending on who and where you’re flying, you might even arrive at your plane in style, via a private car.

Both business and first class tickets should get you access to lounges associated with your airline ticket. However, restrictions do apply so be sure to review in advance. Alternatively, select credit cards, including some small business credit cards, also come with lounge access options.

Seats

Both business and first class aims to let you get more rest while also having more privacy. Most business-class seats partially recline to give you a better night’s sleep. They also typically come with your own TV, bedding, and a decent sized width and pitch.

The majority of first-class seats turn into 180° flat-beds. Bedding on first-class seats involves luxury sheets and pillows in addition to a bigger TV. Depending on who you’re flying with, you might even have your own suite which typically comes with pajamas, slippers, noise-canceling headphones, and the opportunity to shower.

Food and beverages

Business class dining has an array of champagnes and wines and delicious restaurant quality food. You’ll also receive your food on real silverware. Emirates A380 planes have an entire bar where passengers can drink and relax.

While business class does provide high-quality dining, first-class provides the same in addition to a renowned chef who’ll cook mouthwatering food for you.

Each airline has unique aircraft and therefore unique experiences. Know that just because first-class is more on the luxury end of the spectrum, that doesn’t mean that business class doesn’t have merit. My advice is to use points and miles from credit cards to upgrade on long-haul flights. You’ll be better rested and able to maximize your business trip.

How to fly first class or business class for less

Whether you are traveling with colleagues or going it alone, when it comes to booking a flight for your next business trip, you should know the best options available to help you prep for success. We all know that economy class typically has smaller seats and less legroom than the other classes. But what’s the difference between first class and business class?

While choosing between first class and business class may be largely dependent on the cost, there are other factors to take into consideration. To save you time and help you make the best decision for your business trip goals, I’ve compiled a list of the differences between business and first-class seats (note that these will vary by airline and aircraft).

Domestic and international

A key distinction that I need to make is that most domestic business and first class seats pale in comparison to their international counterparts. Also, airlines typically sell business class seats as first class ones, unless an airplane has a three-class configuration.

On short-haul domestic flights, business class seats generally mean that you’ll have more comfortable seats and legroom compared to economy class. Unfortunately, that’s all it means. On long-haul flights such as from Los Angeles, California (LAX) to Queens, New York (JFK), business class on Delta means you’ll be seated in a 180° flat-bed seat that you can adjust to either sleep, relax, or work. It also comes with amenities such as earplugs, eyeshades, and lip balm.

Now that we’ve established that domestic flights don’t have much to offer for first class fares and seating, we can discuss international flights. On a long-haul international flight, a first class ticket costs at least twice as much as a business class one.

However, the price tag associated with first class seats comes with added benefits and perks included access to airport lounges, more luggage options, better seats, and better food.

Lounges

Airport terminals are loud, fast-moving areas where sleep is nearly impossible, the chairs are uncomfortable, and charging your phone is a less than enjoyable experience. Airport lounges provide a different experience for frequent flyers, premium members, and business and first class flyers alike. They’re not only private, they’re also designed to provide solitude and amenities to business travelers before departure.

These lounges typically offer a buffet or carefully curated menu options, coffee, teas, and a bar along with comfortable seats and WiFi access. Some even have showers and spa services! However, first class lounges are more exclusive with better dining options that provide a personalized experience that business class doesn’t always have.

Depending on who and where you’re flying, you might even arrive at your plane in style, via a private car.

Both business and first class tickets should get you access to lounges associated with your airline ticket. However, restrictions do apply so be sure to review in advance. Alternatively, select credit cards, including some small business credit cards, also come with lounge access options.

Seats

Both business and first class aims to let you get more rest while also having more privacy. Most business-class seats partially recline to give you a better night’s sleep. They also typically come with your own TV, bedding, and a decent sized width and pitch.

The majority of first-class seats turn into 180° flat-beds. Bedding on first-class seats involves luxury sheets and pillows in addition to a bigger TV. Depending on who you’re flying with, you might even have your own suite which typically comes with pajamas, slippers, noise-canceling headphones, and the opportunity to shower.

Food and beverages

Business class dining has an array of champagnes and wines and delicious restaurant quality food. You’ll also receive your food on real silverware. Emirates A380 planes have an entire bar where passengers can drink and relax.

While business class does provide high-quality dining, first-class provides the same in addition to a renowned chef who’ll cook mouthwatering food for you.

Each airline has unique aircraft and therefore unique experiences. Know that just because first-class is more on the luxury end of the spectrum, that doesn’t mean that business class doesn’t have merit. My advice is to use points and miles from credit cards to upgrade on long-haul flights. You’ll be better rested and able to maximize your business trip.

There are surprisingly good airfare deals for first class and business class out there.

While it’s true airfares have jumped due to post-pandemic demand (not to mention a pilot shortage ), the premium seats usually filled with business travel ers are an exception to the rule , mostly due to reduced corporate travel. That means you can more easily find deep discounts on first and business class fares for non-touristy destinations— sometimes up to 70% off. Here’s what you need to know when planning a trip .

Air travel demand is currently k-shaped

There are really two markets at play here, based on the type of trave ler: people with pent-up demand for economy-class travel, whether for leisure travel or to visit family, and business travel ers who usually have their flights expensed by an employer.

Airlines are struggling to keep up with the first category of passenger , which is why economy fare prices have spiked, particularly to tourist-friendly destinations like Miami and Las Vegas . On the other hand, airlines have struggled to fill premium seats on common business travel routes, especially for international flights, resulting in prices that are often deeply discounted by 20– 70%. According to The Wall Street Journal , some examples include:

  • Between Chicago and London, American Airlines has been offering business-class tickets as low as $2,389—less than 50% of the price for the same trip in 2019.
  • Between Chicago and Atlanta, a first class on Delta Airlines can be found for $407, a 40% discount on the same fare when compared to 2019.
  • Between New York and Paris, French airline La Compagnie has been offering business-class flights for $1,662—68% cheaper than the 2019 price.
  • Between New York and Vienna, Austrian Airlines in business class priced out at $1,861 for September travel, or 70% less than in 2019.

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What’s intriguing about these prices is that while they’re still pri cey compared to economy rates, the discounts are steep enough that premium seats might suddenly seem much more feasible , especially if you’re able to splurge for some extra comfort. As an example, the difference between economy and first class on a flight from Chicago to Atlanta is $250, whereas the difference used to be $413.

What to consider before you book air travel

Part of the downturn in business travel, and international travel in particular, is related to ongoing concerns about the pandemic. While the EU is expected to open most of its borders by September, it’s possible the spread of fast-moving COVID variants could change those plans . If you’re going to commit to a first-class ticket overseas, make sure it’s refundable, or that you’ll at least get a voucher for the cost, in case the flight is cancelled.

Also, the line between business and tourist destinations is not always clear cut (e.g., New York and Paris are both), so you’ll have better luck finding discounts when flying to less common tourist destinations—more Atlanta-Denver, less New York-San Francisco, as an example. Since the discounts can vary, your best option is to simply play around in Google Flights and see what kind of deals you can get for places you might want to go .

Another consideration is that you may not get the full first-class experience, as some airlines have yet to return to full meal service due to COVID-related cutbacks.

Bottom line

Since economy flights are selling out quickly, a premium seat might offer maximum flexibility when it comes to booking a flight on the date you intend to travel. But even discounted, flying this way isn’t cheap, and will still need to fit your budget— but the added comfort might be worth the expense , particularly when you’re able to take long-haul flights overseas again .

How to fly first class or business class for less

Is flying first class worth it?

With the current situation, flying first class seems more appealing than ever. You have more space and access to special lounges, making social distancing a lot easier.

But there are more reasons to consider flying first or business class.

Have you seen people walking carelessly through security, while you are waiting in a line a mile long? Have you noticed them passing through the frosted glass doors to exclusive lounges, while you are trying to find a place to sit in the crowded departure area? And have you seen them sipping on a cocktail, while you are carrying hand luggage to the back of the plane?

Yes, flying first class has its benefits, but are these perks worth the money?

In some cases they are, especially if you appreciate a more comfortable, pleasant way of traveling. And since most airlines have started charging additional fees for anything from luggage to a bottle of water, not being presented with these charges feels like a relief!

The price of first class and business class air tickets has fallen in recent years, according to the Wall Street Journal.

Besides, first class flights don’t have to be expensive if you do some research.

You’ll see that you can often upgrade the class of your flight for only US$ 100 or US$ 200 or occasionally even for free! And if your airline will make you pay for your luggage and for extra legroom, a first class flight will start to feel even more accessible.

If you’re not sure if flying first class is worth it, consider these five benefits you get when flying first class or business class.

Why Fly First Class or Business Class

1. Less Stress

How to fly first class or business class for less

Picture by Matthew Hurst – benefits of first class

If long lines for security checks and crowds of passengers waiting to board the flight annoy you, a first class flight will be an enjoyable escape from the stress and inconvenience of air travel.

The check in is faster with priority screening at many airports and priority boarding at the gate.

Lately I have been flying low cost carriers a lot. And because they charge for check-in luggage everyone now brings as much as they possibly can as hand luggage. Consequently, I am now waiting to board the plane, getting more and more stressed about whether or not there will still be space left in the overhead bins for my luggage by the time I finally get onto the plane. Because I’ll admit it, I too try to bring as much as I can as hand luggage and there is no way I can fit that underneath the seat in front of me…

Can you imagine not having that stress? You stroll from your comfortable airport lounge, where you just had a refreshing drink and a free snack, to the gate. You then don’t have to wait in line to board but simply go through priority boarding, get to your comfortable seat with more than enough space to fit whatever hand luggage you might have chosen to bring!

2. Don’t Arrive at Your Destination Exhausted

How to fly first class or business class for less

On a two hour flight this doesn’t make much of a difference, but if you, like me, often travel halfway across the world you know exactly how it feels to arrive at your destination absolutely exhausted.

Instead of being crammed into a small seat with very little legroom and a neighbor who is hogging the entire armrest you now have space to relax. And to sleep.

Your seat doesn’t recline just a tiny bit, it practically turns into a bed! I thankfully fall asleep quite easily but I still never manage to get enough sleep on an overnight flight in economy class and I definitely never leave the plane well-rested.

My body normally aches, I am dehydrated and all I really want is to go to bed. So yes, especially on a long-haul flight having a comfortable seat with better pillows and a nice blanket plus an attentive stewardess catering to your every need really does make a difference!

Whether you travel for business or for pleasure, flying first class will get you to your destination feeling much more rested.

3. Free Food and Drinks!

How to fly first class or business class for less

Picture by Andy Mitchell – perks of flying first class

Ok, nobody will say “I chose to fly first class because it gets me free food and drinks”. But isn’t it a nice extra?

I am still not used to having to pull out my credit card if I want a drink or a snack during a flight, but it seems to be the norm these days in economy class.

So, it’s a nice change to sit in first class and be free to order whatever you want!

Now of course that’s no excuse to go overboard on the cocktails but what the heck, you are spoiling yourself by flying first class so don’t forget to enjoy the freebies! ?

4. Opportunity to Work

How to fly first class or business class for less

It depends on your reasons for traveling but having the opportunity to work comfortably can be very valuable for certain travelers. And that includes myself.

I travel so often that losing 10 hours or more on a flight becomes very inconvenient.

With plenty of space, power outlets, and often free wifi, getting some work done or even planning a meeting while on a flight all of a sudden becomes very easy.

5. Network Opportunities

How to fly first class or business class for less

For business travelers, a flight can turn into a great opportunity to develop their business network.

As a first class or business class passenger, you will often find yourself surrounded by successful business people and can end up having some very interesting conversations.

According to Virgin Atlantic, 1 of 5 travelers becomes business partners with someone they have met on board a flight.

Good Reasons For Flying First Class or Business Class

Now of course, most of us can’t afford to fly first class or business class all the time.

But next time you are looking to book a special trip, do look into it. You might just want to splurge and you might find out it’s not as expensive as you thought to fly first class or business class!

Or, if you are looking for a cheap flight somewhere, check out my article 10 Tips For Finding the Cheapest Flights

Also Read:

How to fly first class or business class for less

Author: Sanne Wesselman
A traveler, wanderer, digital nomad, and entrepreneur. Owner of marketing company A to Z Marketing.
I spend most of my time living and working abroad and use this website to share “the good, the bad and the ugly” of traveling and living abroad. Visit the About Me page for more info.

Choosing to fly Business or First Class is not always an option, and it certainly never was for me. In my mind those plush seats and three-course meals were for next-level travelers only. The ones who were either well off or geniuses with their point programs—something I could only hope to one day be.

As a twenty-something, there really hasn’t been much opportunity to enjoy the luxuries of first class travel. Don’t get me wrong, I’ve taken every chance I could to see the world, but I’ve had to find creative ways to fund my adventures. I’ve volunteered, traveled with family, tagged along on friend’s vacations—I even worked three jobs in college just to study abroad in England and Kenya. And, during all of these adventures, I most definitely flew economy. I even learned how to survive the middle seat on an 18-hour flight to Africa.

Now, as an editor at Travel + Leisure—a position I am grateful to hold every single day—my love of travel has only increased as quickly as the items on my bucket list. So, when I recently got the chance to fly business class with Iberia on a flight from New York City to Madrid, I could barely contain my excitement.

Here are a few things that came rushing to my mind.

Whoa! Look at all that space.

When you first enter the Business Class cabin the first thing you notice is how roomy everything is, and you feel much more relaxed. When you get to your seatpod, you get excited again because you realize just how much space is actually yours.

I don’t have to put my carry on above me.

Yes, there’s a spot for it in the pod—easy access all flight long to anything I need.

And there’s a spot for my shoes!

There’s a nice compartment for shoes under the footrest. Yes, I have a foot rest. And, because in business class they give out socks in the amenity bag, lounging sans shoes is totally acceptable.

An Amenity kit?! What’s inside?

So. Much. Great. Stuff. This particular one had L’occitane skincare, a toothbrush, toothpaste, socks, and hair accessories.

What?! The seats lie flat?

Yes, they also recline to an extremely comfortable what I’d like to call “movie-viewing” position. I also got a little pillow and blanket.

I can’t wait to sleep the whole way there!

It’s amazing how much better it feels when I haven’t slept for hours with my neck all crooked.

This is like my own little movie theater.

Each pod has it’s own, fairly large touchscreen television with tons of popular shows and new movies to choose from.

I can’t sleep; I have to watch a movie.

Remember when I said sleeping was important? I watched “Secret Life of Pets.”

There’s a menu for dinner?!

Yes, I got to choose what you want from a freshly-prepared spread of food with multiple courses.

Do I skip the dinner and just sleep?

Again, sleeping is important.

No, I need to eat this three-course meal on an airplane.

The meal was delicious, and totally worth the one less hour of sleep.

Wine, champagne—that’s free?!

Ok, now I’ll sleep.

:Reclines seat and falls peacefully to sleep:

Wake up to the sound of plates and smell of fresh croissants—wait there’s breakfast, too?!

Fresh croissants, toast, jam, orange juice, and coffee was served. The breakfast was a great way to ease myself awake before we landed.

How to fly first class or business class for less

Is flying first class worth it?

With the current situation, flying first class seems more appealing than ever. You have more space and access to special lounges, making social distancing a lot easier.

But there are more reasons to consider flying first or business class.

Have you seen people walking carelessly through security, while you are waiting in a line a mile long? Have you noticed them passing through the frosted glass doors to exclusive lounges, while you are trying to find a place to sit in the crowded departure area? And have you seen them sipping on a cocktail, while you are carrying hand luggage to the back of the plane?

Yes, flying first class has its benefits, but are these perks worth the money?

In some cases they are, especially if you appreciate a more comfortable, pleasant way of traveling. And since most airlines have started charging additional fees for anything from luggage to a bottle of water, not being presented with these charges feels like a relief!

The price of first class and business class air tickets has fallen in recent years, according to the Wall Street Journal.

Besides, first class flights don’t have to be expensive if you do some research.

You’ll see that you can often upgrade the class of your flight for only US$ 100 or US$ 200 or occasionally even for free! And if your airline will make you pay for your luggage and for extra legroom, a first class flight will start to feel even more accessible.

If you’re not sure if flying first class is worth it, consider these five benefits you get when flying first class or business class.

Why Fly First Class or Business Class

1. Less Stress

How to fly first class or business class for less

Picture by Matthew Hurst – benefits of first class

If long lines for security checks and crowds of passengers waiting to board the flight annoy you, a first class flight will be an enjoyable escape from the stress and inconvenience of air travel.

The check in is faster with priority screening at many airports and priority boarding at the gate.

Lately I have been flying low cost carriers a lot. And because they charge for check-in luggage everyone now brings as much as they possibly can as hand luggage. Consequently, I am now waiting to board the plane, getting more and more stressed about whether or not there will still be space left in the overhead bins for my luggage by the time I finally get onto the plane. Because I’ll admit it, I too try to bring as much as I can as hand luggage and there is no way I can fit that underneath the seat in front of me…

Can you imagine not having that stress? You stroll from your comfortable airport lounge, where you just had a refreshing drink and a free snack, to the gate. You then don’t have to wait in line to board but simply go through priority boarding, get to your comfortable seat with more than enough space to fit whatever hand luggage you might have chosen to bring!

2. Don’t Arrive at Your Destination Exhausted

How to fly first class or business class for less

On a two hour flight this doesn’t make much of a difference, but if you, like me, often travel halfway across the world you know exactly how it feels to arrive at your destination absolutely exhausted.

Instead of being crammed into a small seat with very little legroom and a neighbor who is hogging the entire armrest you now have space to relax. And to sleep.

Your seat doesn’t recline just a tiny bit, it practically turns into a bed! I thankfully fall asleep quite easily but I still never manage to get enough sleep on an overnight flight in economy class and I definitely never leave the plane well-rested.

My body normally aches, I am dehydrated and all I really want is to go to bed. So yes, especially on a long-haul flight having a comfortable seat with better pillows and a nice blanket plus an attentive stewardess catering to your every need really does make a difference!

Whether you travel for business or for pleasure, flying first class will get you to your destination feeling much more rested.

3. Free Food and Drinks!

How to fly first class or business class for less

Picture by Andy Mitchell – perks of flying first class

Ok, nobody will say “I chose to fly first class because it gets me free food and drinks”. But isn’t it a nice extra?

I am still not used to having to pull out my credit card if I want a drink or a snack during a flight, but it seems to be the norm these days in economy class.

So, it’s a nice change to sit in first class and be free to order whatever you want!

Now of course that’s no excuse to go overboard on the cocktails but what the heck, you are spoiling yourself by flying first class so don’t forget to enjoy the freebies! ?

4. Opportunity to Work

How to fly first class or business class for less

It depends on your reasons for traveling but having the opportunity to work comfortably can be very valuable for certain travelers. And that includes myself.

I travel so often that losing 10 hours or more on a flight becomes very inconvenient.

With plenty of space, power outlets, and often free wifi, getting some work done or even planning a meeting while on a flight all of a sudden becomes very easy.

5. Network Opportunities

How to fly first class or business class for less

For business travelers, a flight can turn into a great opportunity to develop their business network.

As a first class or business class passenger, you will often find yourself surrounded by successful business people and can end up having some very interesting conversations.

According to Virgin Atlantic, 1 of 5 travelers becomes business partners with someone they have met on board a flight.

Good Reasons For Flying First Class or Business Class

Now of course, most of us can’t afford to fly first class or business class all the time.

But next time you are looking to book a special trip, do look into it. You might just want to splurge and you might find out it’s not as expensive as you thought to fly first class or business class!

Or, if you are looking for a cheap flight somewhere, check out my article 10 Tips For Finding the Cheapest Flights

Also Read:

How to fly first class or business class for less

Author: Sanne Wesselman
A traveler, wanderer, digital nomad, and entrepreneur. Owner of marketing company A to Z Marketing.
I spend most of my time living and working abroad and use this website to share “the good, the bad and the ugly” of traveling and living abroad. Visit the About Me page for more info.