How to get a government grant for a farm in the u. s

New to farming? Want to learn how to start a farm? USDA can help and offers additional assistance to beginning farmers and ranchers. USDA considers anyone who has operated a farm or ranch for less than ten years to be a beginning farmer or rancher. USDA can help you get started or grow your operation through a variety of programs and services, from farm loans to crop insurance, and conservation programs to disaster assistance.

On This Page

Get Started

Why Work with USDA

Advice and Guidance

A new farm or ranch business relies on good planning.

We can guide you to resources for your business plan.

We can also provide free technical assistance and help you develop a conservation plan for your land.

You might want to learn about the Score Mentorship Program to learn from a fellow farmer.

Local and regional agricultural organizations like Cooperative Extension offer training to beginning farmers.

Access to Capital

Access to capital enables you to buy or lease land, buy equipment, and help with other operating costs. Learn more about resources for access to land and capital.

See more information on other USDA funding for your operation or learn specifically about Farm Service Agency’s Beginning Farmers and Ranchers Loans.

Conservation, Insurance and Disaster Assistance

Conservation programs can help you take care of natural resources while improving the efficiencies on your operation.

Agriculture is an inherently risky business. It’s important to plan for everyday business risks and those brought on by natural disasters. Federal crop insurance and the Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program are good options for managing risk.

We also offer disaster assistance to help your farm recover.

How to Work with USDA to Start a Farm

Service Centers

Your first step should be to contact your USDA Service Center and make an appointment. Be sure to ask what documents you’ll need. Also consider — what is your vision for your land and farm? What are your challenges?

If you need information in a language other than English, we can offer free translation services.

Farmer Coordinators

Beginning Farmer and Rancher Coordinators are USDA team members that can help you understand the USDA process and find the right assistance for your operation. We have coordinators across the country.

Self-service Options

Learn how to sign up for a farmers.gov account. You can view loan information and manage conservation business online here.

We also have a number of tools to help you: find the right loan; learn about recovery options after natural disasters; or discover conservation options.

Specialty Farmer Groups

Historically Underserved Farmers and Ranchers

We offer help for the unique concerns of producers who meet the USDA definition of “historically underserved” — beginning, socially disadvantaged, limited resource, and military veterans. In addition, women in agriculture are helping to pave the way for a better future. Use this self-determination tool to determine if you’re a limited resource producer.

If you inherited land without a clear title or documented legal ownership, learn more about how USDA can help Heirs’ Property Landowners establish a farm number to gain access to a variety of programs and services.

If you are a producer with disabilities, organizations like Agrability offer services that can help adapt and modify farm equipment to be more accessible.

Urban Farmers

USDA has been helping more and more farms and gardens in urban centers. Learn about our Urban Farming funding and resources.

The NRCS Urban Agriculture webpage can help with things like high tunnels, composting, and pest management.

Organic Farmers

If you are an organic farmer, you can apply for the same loans and programs as conventional farmers. You may also apply for USDA to pay a portion of your certification through the FSA Organic Certification Cost Share Program.

For specific conservation assistance that may interest you, check out NRCS Assistance for Organics.

The USDA National Organic Program has resources from a comprehensive list of organic farms to certification information.

Learn more about USDA programs, services, and resources available for organic farmers.

USDA Support for Beginning Farmers

Watch Joshua Eilers, a beginning and military veteran farmer from Austin, Texas talk about his experience getting started in the cattle business through USDA support.

Get Involved

In addition to our farm programs, there are many leadership opportunities for beginning farmers to contribute their voices and experience. Through USDA, you can take advantage of several key opportunities like committee elections, research and promotion programs, and federal advisory committees.

Resources and News

  • Farmers.gov Blog: Beginning Farmers posts
  • Have a question? AskUSDA
  • February 8, 2022: Tax Webinar Video – Disaster and Casualty Losses: Related Income Tax Rules
  • February 7, 2022: Tax Webinar Video – Weather Related Sales of Livestock: Income Tax Management Issues
  • May 6, 2021: Listening Session on Impacts of Covid-19 on New Farmers
  • May 4, 2021 News Release: USDA Announces Listening Session on Impacts of COVID-19 on New Farmers
  • Nov 9, 2020: Blog: USDA Service Centers Provide Free, One-on-One Help for Farmers
  • Oct 1, 2020: Rural Energy for America (REAP) Guaranteed Loans & Grants
  • Aug 11, 2020 News Release: USDA Announces More Eligible Commodities for CFAP
  • July 9, 2020 News Release: Additional Commodities Now Eligible for Coronavirus Food Assistance Program
  • April 24, 2020: Ask the Expert: Beginning Farmer and Rancher Q&A with Sarah Campbell
  • Jan 2020: Rural Development Value-Added Producer Grants

Find Your Local Service Center

We are committed to delivering USDA services to America’s farmers and ranchers while taking safety measures in response to the pandemic. Some USDA offices are beginning to reopen to limited visitors by appointment only. Service Center staff also continue to work with agricultural producers via phone, email, and other digital tools. Learn more at farmers.gov/coronavirus.

USDA Service Centers are locations where you can connect with Farm Service Agency, Natural Resources Conservation Service, or Rural Development employees for your business needs. Enter your state and county below to find your local service center and agency offices. If this locator does not work in your browser, please visit offices.usda.gov.

Visit the Risk Management Agency website to find a regional or compliance office or to find an insurance agent near you.

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How to get a government grant for a farm in the u. s

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Starting a farm can be the beginning of a rewarding career in the agricultural industry. Unfortunately, the up-front costs can be somewhat steep and it may be necessary to obtain grant money to start a farm. In addition to other costs, you need to purchase land and seed and equipment and hire hands to help you with the eventual harvest.

There are, however, ways to obtain grants that cover some or all of the cost of your new farm. Grants are better than loans for one very important reason: you don’t have to pay them back.

Research Available Grants

Decide what kind of farm you would like to start and brainstorm how you will operate it. When you start searching for grants, you will find that there are many grants directed at specific types of farms. For example, there are grants for farms that will offer programs to educate the public about nature and how food gets from the farm to the plate.

Write a Business Plan

Many grant agencies require you to submit such a document with your application. Beginning Farmers, a website for farmers and relevant government agencies, advises you to include specific information about your estimated costs and estimated revenues. Further, you should describe how your farm will operate and include a list of how many people you plan on employing and what they will do, in addition to estimated salaries.

Review Available Government Grants

Search the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture’s list of recently opened grants to find sources of funding that may be available to you. Each grant listing provides an approximate amount for each grant and describes the type of farmers for whom the money is intended. The USDA Rural Information Center provides links to other state and federal programs for which you may be eligible.

Prepare a Grant Application

Take care that you include all of the information requested by the agency to which you’re applying. For example, Simply Organic’s 1% Grant is looking for applicants who are interested in farms and projects relating to organic agriculture. The American Sheep and Goat Center points out that the National Sheep Industry Improvement Center advises you to create a proposal that is broken up into sections containing vital information.

Define your project by listing your goals, including an executive summary in which you make a brief but strong case that you should receive funds. Your proposal should feature a description of your project, a listing of your partners, a prospective timeline for your farm and a budget where you estimate costs in the short- and long-term.

Submit Your Request

If you spend the first grant funds you receive wisely and document that you have done so, you may open up additional opportunities in the future. Therefore, you will want to maintain updated spreadsheets of your financial accounts and gather proof that the grant money you receive helps you achieve the results you thought it would.

You may wish to hire a professional grant writer to help you create the best possible application. She may also know about other grant opportunities and ways to secure the funds you need.

Information about funding for farmers, foresters, growers and contractors about grants for investing in new technology

Applies to England

Latest news

The Farming Transformation Fund Improving Farm Productivity online checker closed on 16 March 2022.

We have started to send the Farming Equipment and Technology Fund Round 1 Grant Funding Agreements to customers. You must accept your Grant Funding Agreement using the FETF acceptance portal, by midnight on 1 April 2022.

The Farming Investment Fund (FIF) provides grants to improve productivity and bring environmental benefits. FIF is made up of 2 separate funds:

  • Farming Equipment and Technology Fund (for grants between £2,000 and £25,000)
  • Farming Transformation Fund (for grants between £35,000 and £500,000)

Farming Equipment and Technology Fund

This fund provides grants towards the cost of equipment and technology to improve the productivity of farms in a sustainable way.

Round 1

The Farming Equipment and Technology Fund Round 1 is closed for new applications.

The FETF Round 1 manual explains what the FETF is for, who is eligible, the information needed to apply for Round 1 and, if an application is successful, how to claim funding.

Accept your Grant Funding Agreement

If you have received a Grant Funding Agreement you should check that items are available with your supplier and accept your offer by midnight on 1 April 2022.

You can accept (or withdraw) from the offer using the FETF acceptance portal.

Once you have accepted your Grant Funding Agreement, you can purchase your items and claim your money by midnight on 31 October 2022.

Some items have been very popular, so please make sure you order as soon as you can. If you do not order early, you may not be able to get your items by the claim deadline.

FETF contact details and accessibility information

Email [email protected] or call the RPA helpline on 03000 200 301 and select the option for the Farming Equipment and Technology Fund.

Farming Transformation Fund

This fund provides grants towards large capital items to help businesses improve productivity, profitability, and environmental sustainability. They are:

  • Water Management
  • Improving Farm Productivity
  • Adding Value

Water Management grant

The Water Management grant online checker closed on 12 January 2022.

If your project scored highly enough, we’ll invite you to submit a full application. The success of your full application will depend on the number and value of applications we receive.

Submitting a full application

If we invited you to submit a full application for your project, you must do this by 30 June 2022.

Before you submit a full application for your project, it will help you to read:

Any planning permission or abstraction licences must be in place by 31 December 2022.

Improving Farm Productivity grant

The Improving Farm Productivity online checker closed on 16 March 2022.

If your project scored highly enough, we’ll invite you to submit a full application. The success of your full application will depend on the number and value of applications we receive.

Submitting a full application

If we invited you to submit a full application for your project, you must do this by 14 September 2022.

Before you submit a full application for your project, it will help you to read:

What happens next

RPA will assess the information you submit. If your project is suitable, you will be asked to submit a full application.

If you submit a full application and it is successful, you’ll get a funding agreement and can begin work on the project.

We’ll let you know by email if your project did not score highly enough.

FTF contact details

Email [email protected] or call the RPA helpline on 03000 200 301 and select the option for the Farming Transformation Fund.

  1. 17 March 2022

Edited to confirm the closure of the IFP online checker.

The online checker for Improving Farm Productivity will close at midnight on 16 March 2022.

Edited to confirm the closure of the IFP online checker.

28 February 2022

Deadline to accept FETF Grant Funding Agreement extended to 1 April 2022.

16 February 2022

Farming and Equipment Technology Fund information updated with details of how to accept a grant funding agreement.

19 January 2022

Edited to announce the opening of the Farming Transformation Fund Improving Farm Productivity grant.

13 January 2022

Edited to confirm that the Farming Transformation Fund Water Management grant online checker closed on 12 January 2022

Edited – Round 1 of the FETF closed for applications on 7 January 2022.

23 December 2021

Link added to the Farming Transformation Fund Improving Farming Productivity grant manual.

Take our free Eligibility Quiz to see if you qualify for the 15 most popular funding programs for your farm, then browse our farm funding database

Get matched with a personal Farmer Success Advocate who will help you find the right funding opportunity for your farm

Our interactive FarmRaise applications help you apply for funding faster and take the headache out of all of the paperwork

We care because we’ve been there

FarmRaise co-founder, Jayce Hafner, grew up on her family’s cattle ranch and experienced firsthand the difficulties of securing farm funding. Now, she and our farmer-obsessed team help you make your agribusiness profitable.

Latest Posts

Calling all beginning farmers and ranchers! Take your operation’s profitability to the next level with federal grant funding like EQIP, REAP and VAPG.

We looked into the USDA’s new Climate-Smart Commodities program so you don’t have to. It’s a 2022 initiative to encourage non-UDSA entities to contribute in the fight against.

Did you know that you can use USDA farm grants to fund solar power initiatives on your farm or ranch? Solar panels can increase your operation’s profitability. One government grant for solar panels on farms is called the Rural Energy for America Program (REAP).

Grants

  • Manage a Grant
  • Submit a Project Report
  • About Project Reports
  • Funded Grants in Your State
  • Search Grant Projects

SARE offers competitive grants to fund research and education projects that advance sustainable agricultural practices in the United States.

Who Can Apply?

  • Farmers and ranchers
  • Researchers
  • Extension agents and other educators
  • Graduate students

Grants are available for projects within the United States and U.S. protectorates only.

Common Questions

Can SARE grants be used to fund projects outside the United States?

No. SARE grants may only be used to fund projects within the United States and its island protectorates.

Can I use a SARE grant to begin a farm?

No. SARE grants are intended for projects involving research and education only, not to defray the costs associated with starting a farm. USDA’s Beginning Farmer and Rancher Coordinators can help you get started or grow your farming operation through a variety of programs and services.

Can I use a SARE grant to buy land, equipment, farming materials, animals, etc?

A small percentage of SARE funding may be used to purchase the materials required to conduct a research or education project, but generally SARE funding cannot be used to make large purchases for land, equipment or capital investment. Contact your SARE region for specific rules.

How Do I Apply?

Visit Your Region for More Information

Grants are administered by SARE’s four regional offices. Visit the appropriate region to learn which grant type is right for you and to access application instructions.

North Central | Northeast | South | West

What Projects Are Eligible?

Visit your SARE region for detailed guidance on whether your idea qualifies for a grant, and search our database of project reports. Here are some examples of topical areas that SARE grants can address:

How to get a government grant for a farm in the u. s

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On October 22, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) opened its FY 2022 Farm to School Grant Program Request for Applications. The Farm to School Grant Program, administered by USDA’s Food and Nutrition Service (FNS), seeks to bring locally or regionally produced foods into schools, including sourcing local agriculture for school meal programs, providing hands-on learning activities and consolidating food-related education into standards-based classroom curriculum. FNS expects to award approximately $12 million in Farm to School Grants during this cycle. Eligible entities, including local government agencies, must submit their application by January 10, 2022.

Since 2012, the Farm to School Grant program has provided approximately $5 million in competitive grants each year to increase local food procurement for school meal programs and to expand educational activities related to agriculture and food. Along with schools and other community stakeholders, county government agencies are among the entities eligible to apply for funds to expand and implement existing farm to school initiatives. County agencies can also apply for turnkey grants, which have simplified application requirements and support four predefined activities: Action planning, edible gardening, agricultural education and producer-focused training projects.

More information about the Farm to School Grant Program is available here, and a list of Fiscal Year 2021 grantees can be found here. Counties interested in applying for the program can find additional resources here.

NACo supports the Farm to School Grant Program and other initiatives that promote access to healthy food in schools while supporting local agriculture.

On October 22, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) opened its FY 2022 Farm to School Grant Program Request for Applications. The Farm to School Grant Program, administered by USDA’s Food and Nutrition Service (FNS), seeks to bring locally or regionally produced foods into schools, including sourcing local agriculture for school meal programs, providing hands-on learning activities and consolidating food-related education into standards-based classroom curriculum. FNS expects to award approximately $12 million in Farm to School Grants during this cycle. Eligible entities, including local government agencies, must submit their application by January 10, 2022.

Since 2012, the Farm to School Grant program has provided approximately $5 million in competitive grants each year to increase local food procurement for school meal programs and to expand educational activities related to agriculture and food. Along with schools and other community stakeholders, county government agencies are among the entities eligible to apply for funds to expand and implement existing farm to school initiatives. County agencies can also apply for turnkey grants, which have simplified application requirements and support four predefined activities: Action planning, edible gardening, agricultural education and producer-focused training projects.

More information about the Farm to School Grant Program is available here, and a list of Fiscal Year 2021 grantees can be found here. Counties interested in applying for the program can find additional resources here.

NACo supports the Farm to School Grant Program and other initiatives that promote access to healthy food in schools while supporting local agriculture.

Farmers Got Billions From Taxpayers In 2019, And Hardly Anyone Objected

How to get a government grant for a farm in the u. s

A farmer operates a combine to harvest soybeans in Wyanet, Ill. Farmers got more than $22 billion in government payments in 2019. It’s the highest level of farm subsidies in 14 years. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

A farmer operates a combine to harvest soybeans in Wyanet, Ill. Farmers got more than $22 billion in government payments in 2019. It’s the highest level of farm subsidies in 14 years.

Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images

In 2019, the federal government delivered an extraordinary financial aid package to America’s farmers. Farm subsidies jumped to their highest level in 14 years, most of them paid out without any action by Congress.

The money flowed to farmers like Robert Henry. When I visited in early July, many of his fields near New Madrid, Mo., had been flooded for months, preventing him from working in them. The soybeans that he did manage to grow had fallen in value; China wasn’t buying them, in retaliation for the Trump administration’s tariffs.

That’s when the government stepped in. Some of the aid came from long-familiar programs. Government-subsidized crop insurance covered some of the losses from flooding. Other payments were unprecedented. The U.S. Department of Agriculture simply sent him a check to compensate him for the low prices resulting from the trade war.

” ‘Trump money’ is what we call it,” Henry said. “It helped a lot. And it’s my understanding, they’re going to do it again.”

Indeed, a few weeks later, the USDA announced another $16 billion in trade-related aid to farmers. It came on top of the previous year’s $12 billion package, for a grand total of $28 billion in two years. About $19 billion of that money had been paid out by the end of 2019, and the rest will be paid in 2020.

“President Trump has great affection for America’s farmers and ranchers. He knows that they’re fighting the fight and that they’re on the front lines,” Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue told reporters while announcing the aid package.

The announcement aroused little controversy. “I was surprised that it didn’t attract more attention,” says Joe Glauber, the USDA’s former chief economist, who’s now a senior research fellow at the International Food Policy Research Institute.

Glauber says it deserves more attention, for a whole collection of reasons.

For one thing, it’s an enormous amount of money, more than the final cost of bailing out the auto industry during the financial crisis of 2008. The auto industry bailout was fiercely debated in Congress. Yet the USDA created this new program out of thin air; it decided that an old law authorizing a USDA program called the Commodity Credit Corp. already gave it the authority to spend this money.

“What’s unique about this is, [it] didn’t go through Congress,” Glauber says. Some people have raised questions about whether using the Commodity Credit Corp. for this new purpose is legal.

Glauber sees a risk of “moral hazard” — a situation in which someone is shielded from the consequences of poor decisions. The decision to start the trade war was costly, he says, and the Trump administration, by tapping the federal Treasury, is avoiding the political fallout from that decision. “The sector that is hurt the most, and which would normally complain, all of a sudden it’s assuaged by these payments. To me, that’s a problem,” he says.

Also, the payments are quite generous. According to studies by several independent economists, the USDA is paying farmers roughly twice as much as the actual harm that they suffered from the trade war. And the payments are based on production; the bigger the farm, the bigger the payments. Thousands of farmers got more than $100,000 each. According to an NPR analysis of USDA records of payments made through July 2019, 100,000 individuals collected just over 70% of the money.

Catherine Kling, an economist at Cornell University, says the government could at least have demanded some public benefits in exchange for that money. “I think it’s a real lost opportunity,” she says.

What farmers do with their land has a huge impact on water quality, wildlife and climate change, Kling says. The USDA has programs that pay farmers to help the environment, doing things like restoring wetlands.

The budget for those environmental programs is just a quarter of the size of this year’s trade-related payments. So Kling’s reaction to this year’s farm bailout is, “Wow, [there are] so many things that money could get spent on that could really be beneficial to taxpayers, who are ultimately footing the bill.”

On Capitol Hill, there has long been a quiet alliance between lawmakers who support farm subsidies and those who support food stamps, or SNAP. Together, they’ve supported the budget of the USDA, which runs both programs.

Events in 2019 tested that alliance, as the USDA helped farmers while restricting SNAP payments.

“They’ve already given out $19 billion to farmers, but they’re cutting $5 billion from people in need,” says Rep. Marcia Fudge, D-Ohio, who sits on the House Agriculture Committee. “I don’t even know how to describe it except to say that it is cruel, it is unfair, and it is clearly designed to support the president’s base, as he sees it, as opposed to those whom he sees as being undeserving.”

The USDA has not yet announced whether it will deliver another round of trade-related payments to farmers in 2020.

A First Start Loan can provide you with concessional finance of up to $2 million to assist you in the initial years of establishing your Queensland based primary production business.

How to get a government grant for a farm in the u. s

Key program information

Total First Start and Sustainability Loan funding

Year loan terms

Total loan amount available

Low, fixed rates for 1, 3 or 5 years

No charges or fees on loan

New round of funding available

Program funding

  • Primary producer
  • Commercial fisher

First Start Loan for primary producers

Take the right step towards your future career in the agriculture industry.

A First Start Loan offers up to $2 million to aspiring producers ready to purchase their first block of land, carry out the family succession plan or achieve standalone viability.

What can I use the loan for?

A First Start Loan provides finance to help you:

  • buy your first farm, including from family members
  • become a partner in the family farm
  • enter into leasing or sharefarming arrangements
  • develop existing or purchase additional property to become viable
  • put succession plans in place.

Interest rates

View the current interest rates here.

Loan assessment and security

QRIDA will assess applications for the 2021-22 round in the date order they are received complete up to 30 June 2022 or until available scheme funding is fully committed.

Security must be provided commensurate with the amount of the loan. For most loans a mortgage over land provides adequate loan security. In some instances, loan security may also include other business assets such as water and livestock.

QRIDA may consider joint lending options with your bank or other commercial lenders.

When assessing your loan application, we always discuss this with you and your commercial lender.

Associated Press

Iowa farmer says that without federal money it would have been difficult to make ends meet but that it began to feel as if the government checks were motivated by politics with President Trump seeking support in his re-election effort

Then–U.S. Senate candidate Theresa Greenfield, a Democrat who lost to Republican Joni Ernst after leading in many pre-election polls, speaks with Phil Short at Short Family Farm, as Tuffy the dog plays nearby.

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DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — Thanks to the government paying nearly 40% of their income, U.S. farmers are expected to end 2020 with higher profit than 2019 and the best net income in seven years, the Department of Agriculture said in its latest farm income forecast.

Farmers faced challenges throughout 2020 that included the impact of trade disputes; low prices that drove down cash receipts for corn, cotton, wheat, chicken, cattle and hogs; and weather difficulties such as drought in some areas and an unusual August wind storm stretching from South Dakota to Ohio that centered on Iowa.

Farm cash receipts are forecast to decrease nearly 1% to $366.5 billion, the lowest in more than a decade, measured in real dollars. Direct federal government payments saved farmers’ bottom line: Farmers overall saw a 107% increase in direct payments from 2019, when a third of net income came directly from the government.

“ ‘In fact, some people say our farmers do better now than when they actually had a farm.’ ”

— President Donald Trump, at an October campaign rally in Nebraska, of farmers’ receipt of government agriculture subsidies

The impact of the money varies from one farm to another, depending on whether a farmer owns the land, has significant capital to draw from, has manageable debt and aggressively manages wide commodity price swings.

“The payment to one farm could be a matter of life and death of that farm and for another farm maybe just makes it not quite as bad of a year as it was going to be and everywhere in between,” said Mike Paustian, a farmer who raises hogs and grows soybeans and corn near Walcott in eastern Iowa. “I’ve described it as: If you’re drowning and somebody throws you a life preserver, you’re not going to argue too much about grabbing ahold of it.”

Excluding USDA loans and insurance indemnity payments made by the Federal Crop Insurance Corporation, farmers are expected to receive $46.5 billion from the government, the largest direct-to-farm payment ever. That includes $32.4 billion in assistance through coronavirus pandemic relief food assistance and Paycheck Protection Program payments to farmers. Additional support comes from more traditional revenue loss programs due to low commodity prices, compensation for trade disruptions resulting from tariff battles and conservation programs assistance.

Federal court bankruptcy data indicate 433 U.S. farms filed for reorganization as of Sept. 30, down from 454 during the same period the previous year.

Overall, net farm income in the United States is expected to increase 43% from 2019 to $119.6 billion, the USDA estimated. Farmers will see the highest level of net farm income, a broad measure of profitability, since 2013, the agency said.

One northeast Iowa farmer said without the federal money it would have been difficult to make ends meet this year but it began to feel like the government checks were motivated by politics from a president seeking support for re-election.

“At first it did help, but then we kept getting payments and I don’t know that those were warranted,” said Rick Juchems, 65, who grows corn and soybeans and custom raises hogs. “The markets had already recovered quite a bit and they’re recovering yet more, so it helps some but it’s one of those things that the second one was more than we needed.”

In a late October campaign appearance in Omaha, Neb., President Donald Trump said he believed farmers were better off getting government payments than relying solely on their farming receipts.

“In fact, some people say our farmers do better now than when they actually had a farm,” he said.

Many top farm states voted again for Trump in November, including Iowa, Nebraska, Texas and Kansas. Several, however, left Trump to vote for Democrat Joe Biden, including Wisconsin, Michigan and Georgia.

Bill Gordon, who with his father raises soybeans and corn in southwestern Minnesota, hopes for improved free trade agreements and a less confrontational approach under Biden in 2021.

“Volatility definitely causes volatility,” he said. “And so if we can get these free trade agreements set up, that are better, and not as confrontational but still benefit both sides, that just benefits agriculture and rural America.”

The Agriculture Energy Investment Plan includes:

Program Overview

Agriculture Victoria has rolled out free on-farm energy assessments and on-farm energy grants as part of implementing the $30 million Agriculture Energy Investment Plan.

The Agriculture Energy Investment Plan (AEIP) supports on-farm businesses to improve energy efficiency, manage energy costs, improve energy reliability and support own-generation capacity.

Potential assistance

On-Farm Energy Assessments

On-farm energy assessments provide eligible farms and agricultural businesses with independent expert advice on how to reduce energy use, improve energy efficiency and manage energy costs.

Fast Track Rebate

Up to $20,000 ex GST with matched funding for farm businesses that have received a Type 1 or Type 2 On-Farm Energy Assessment through the Agriculture Energy Investment Plan.

On-Farm Energy Tier 1 Grants

Government funding between $20,000 and $50,000 (excluding GST) will be available for grant proposals under this program. All funding must be matched by a minimum cash co-contribution of $1 for every $1 funded.

On-Farm Energy Tier 2 Grants

Government funding of between $50,000 and up to $250,000 (excluding GST) will be available for grant proposals under this program.

Eligibility

To be eligible for an On-Farm Energy Tier 1 Grant, applicants must first be a recipient of a type 1 or type 2 on-farm energy assessment or an approved equivalent energy assessment.

For full eligibility refer to:

Agriculture Energy Investment Plan

How to get a government grant for a farm in the u. s

More information on the plan can be found on the Agriculture Victoria Website.

On-Farm Energy Assessments

On-farm energy assessments analyse on-farm energy use (electricity, gas and diesel) and identify opportunities to make energy savings, improve output volumes per energy unit, and convert to renewable energy sources. The assessments will make recommendations tailored to the type and size of farms.

An on-farm energy assessment is a prerequisite for on-farm energy grants.

On-Farm Energy Grants

On-farm energy grants are tailored to suit the investment needs and scale of differing farm operations. On-farm energy grants support projects that will improve energy efficiency which may reduce energy costs and boost energy productivity.

On-Farm Energy Tier 1 grants support actions such as the purchase and installation of equipment that improves energy efficiency or enables own-generation capacity.

On-Farm Energy Tier 2 grants support projects that combine improvements in a connected way across farm systems and include large scale investment in improvements.

Food and beverage manufacturing companies with operations in Canada are eligible for financial support through federal, provincial and municipal government programs. A variety of programs provide financial assistance for infrastructure, human capital and the development and commercialization of advanced technologies.

Funding Programs and Services fall under the following categories:

Productivity and Competitiveness

The Partnership offers cost-share funding opportunities for processors and other agri-businesses to help modernize practices, equipment and operations.

A grant program to help businesses create new jobs, and invest in new technologies, equipment or skills training for workers; also supports projects that will attract or retain investment in eastern Ontario.

A grant program to help businesses create new jobs, and invest in new technologies, equipment or skills training for workers; also supports projects that will attract or retain investment in southwestern Ontario.

Northern Ontario

This program encourages business productivity, expansion, and global investment in northern communities.

A federal program that helps Northern Ontario’s businesses invest in projects that improve productivity, reach new markets, facilitate access to capital, foster investment, encourage entrepreneurship and cultivate industry collaboration.

Business Development and Growth

OMAFRA has developed resources and e-learning courses that support the adoption of practices that help the food and beverage sector respond to heightened consumer awareness of food safety.

Sector Specific Funding

The Canadian Dairy Commission operates with provincial authorities and industry stakeholders to provide ongoing support to the dairy industry.

Market Access

Enterprise Component (SME) – U.S. Addition

Administered by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, this program is for SMEs in agriculture, agri-food, and fish and seafood sectors with fewer than 250 employees and annual sales not exceeding $50M.

Sustainability: Greening the Industry

The IESO offers a range of funding programs to support communities, municipalities, public sector entities and co-operatives in the design and delivery of renewable energy and conservation initiatives.

Incentives to complete energy audits assessing the potential for energy savings to be achieved through equipment replacement, operational practices, or participation in Demand Response initiatives and other building systems and envelopes projects.

Research and Development

Financial support and consulting services to Canadian companies in all industry sectors to encourage innovative products, processes and technology.

This research program includes seven themes. The Principal Investigator must be a faculty staff member from the University of Guelph and are encouraged to partner with industry.

Eligible corporations can claim a 20% refundable tax credit for qualified expenditures on scientific research and experimental development work performed in Ontario.

Funding up to $20,000 to help solve small research hurdles or product standards testing.

Learn about the SR&ED incentives in Ontario. Attend a joint seminar offered by the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) and the Ontario Ministry of Finance to learn about the program, eligibility criteria, and eligible expenses.

A tax incentive program to encourage Canadian businesses of all sizes and in all sectors to conduct research and development in Canada that will lead to new, improved, or technologically advanced products or processes.

Workforce/Labour

Funding provided by the Government of Canada through the Canada Job Grant. Programs delivered by the Government of Ontario.

Career Edge is a self-sustaining social enterprise that connects leading Canadian employers with diverse, qualified talent through paid internships.

Young people or students can access programs and services to help them find a job.

Solve business challenges with research expertise, matching funds, and one-to-one support from Mitacs.

This program allows employers to apply for the approval of permanent, full-time positions to be filled by foreign nationals and recruit foreign nationals to fill those positions.

A refundable tax-credit available to employers who hire students enrolled in a co-operative education program at an Ontario university of college.

A program designed to help industry sectors and organizations to develop training programs, materials and standards for their workforces.

The National Research Council Industrial Research Assistance Program provides small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) with financial assistance to hire young talent. In addition to meeting the needs of innovative SMEs, this Program facilitates the transition of highly skilled young people to a rapidly changing labour market.

Issue Summary

USDA could improve the efficiency and effectiveness of its farm programs.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) administers a number of programs to support farm income, assist farmers after disasters, and conserve natural resources. USDA has also provided ad-hoc assistance to farmers who faced trade disruptions or who have lost sales due to the COVID-19 pandemic. In 2020, USDA spent about $46 billion in payments to farmers ($30 billion of which came from COVID-19 relief programs).

However, USDA could improve how it administers some of these programs.

  • USDA created the Farmers to Families Food Box Program to help with the COVID-19 pandemic. Between May 2020 and May 2021, USDA purchased fresh fruits and vegetables and meat and dairy products for distribution to food banks, community and faith-based organizations, and other nonprofits. It did this to achieve 3 goals: provide food to the needy, maintain food distribution jobs, and create alternative outlets for food producers who lost customers (like restaurants). The program achieved its first goal—USDA’s data shows that more than 176 million boxes were delivered to the needy. However, one lesson USDA learned during the program was that it should have been collecting data to assess the other 2 program goals. USDA could apply this lesson learned to better assess similar food programs.
  • For certain farm programs that help support farmers’ income, payment recipients are required by law to be actively engaged in farming. However, USDA has had difficulty in the past verifying whether recipients were actively farming. USDA has improved its reviews since then, but some issues remain. For example, USDA waived 251 reviews that it said had been done recently and didn’t need re-review yet. But there wasn’t a record of a recent review for 76 of them.
  • To implement the federal crop insurance program, USDA partners with private insurance companies that sell and service policies to farmers in order to subsidize these policies. In 2010, USDA negotiated a set rate of return with these companies—that is, how much companies can profit from these insurance policies. However, this expected rate of return was too high compared with market conditions. Reducing this expected rate of return could save the federal crop insurance program hundreds of millions of dollars a year.
  • Agricultural production can have harmful effects on natural resources, such as when animal waste runs off into waterways. Conservation practices (such as installing structures to store animal waste) can help mitigate these effects. USDA’s Environmental Quality Incentives Program provides financial and technical help to landowners who voluntarily implement conservation practices. This program provided about $1.4 billion in payments in FY 2019. However, it could develop and use better information to more effectively target program funds.
  • Draining wetlands can harm water quality and wildlife habitat. To receive certain farm program benefits, farmers must not drain wetlands on their property. USDA determines where wetlands exist on farmers’ land and checks farmers’ compliance for a random sample of land subject to this requirement. However, USDA could more efficiently ensure compliance by using a risk-based approach for its annual compliance check—i.e., checking land most likely to have violations rather than a random sample of land.

Wetland “Potholes” and Farm Land in North Dakota

How to get a government grant for a farm in the u. s

The goal is to add 4 million acres of farmland to the Conservation Reserve Program, which takes land out of production to blunt agriculture’s environmental impact.

The Biden administration announced on Wednesday that it would expand a program that pays farmers to leave land fallow, part of a broader, government-wide effort to cut greenhouse gas emissions in half by 2030. The new initiative will incentivize farmers to take land out of production by raising rental rates and incentive payments.

The Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) was created in 1985 to incentivize landowners to leave some of their marginal land unplanted, a plan meant to protect the environment by reducing agricultural runoff into streams and rivers, preserving wildlife habitats, and preventing erosion. Today, the Department of Agriculture (USDA) “rents” about 21 million acres of farmland from landowners, typically for 10 years at a time—a tiny fraction of the total land farmed nationwide. In recent years, the number of acres enrolled in CRP has fallen, possibly because USDA’s rental payments have not been competitive with the open market, Chuck Abbott reported for FERN News.

The new announcement is a bid to incentivize farmers to enroll 4 million more acres of land in the program to total 25 million acres, the current program limit. “Sometimes the best solutions are right in front of you,” said Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack in a press release.

“A huge amount of money was essentially paid and then lost when those acres go back into farming.”

All told, the increased rental rates and expanded incentive payments—which pay farmers extra for growing buffer strips and promoting wildlife habitats—will increase CRP spending by about 18 percent, totaling $300 million or more in annual spending.

“Overall, we think the changes are good, but also they could still be better,” said Anne Schechinger, senior economic analyst with the Environmental Working Group. CRP typically only takes land out of production for 10 years at a time, and many farmers opt not to renew after a decade—many of the environmental benefits are erased as soon as the soil is plowed under and crops are replanted. Schechinger published a report that found almost 16 million acres were taken out of the reserve between 2007 and 2014 after landowners opted not to re-rent them to USDA. The government had spent more than $7 billion to preserve those acres. “A huge amount of money was essentially paid and then lost when those acres go back into farming,” Schechinger said.

Asked about this issue in a press call on Thursday, Vilsack was vague. “The key here is to make sure that we continue to have a commitment to CRP as one strategy, one of many strategies,” he said. “An acre here may change, but there may be additional acres over there that weren’t in a program that are in a program. Over time you make significant improvement toward a net-zero future.”

So far, there’s been little motion from Vilsack’s office and the Democrat-controlled Congress on mandatory regulations designed to mitigate agriculture’s environmental impact.

To be clear, conservation is still a good thing, even if it only lasts for 10 years, Schechinger said. But from a climate perspective, plowing up land that has lain fallow for a decade will release a lot of the carbon that was sequestered in the soil. She’d like to see an expansion of the CLEAR30 pilot program, which rents land for 30 years at a time and requires farmers to implement water-friendly conservation measures. Other measures, like slightly higher payments for acreage that has been kept out production for one ten-year cycle, could further incentivize long-term conservation.

To date, the Biden administration has focused on voluntary, incentives-based programs like CRP to address climate change and the environment in the farming sector. Other Democrats have favored a less business-friendly approach: Senator Cory Booker introduced a moratorium on the construction of new Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations in 2019, which emit the potent greenhouse gas methane, and Senator Bernie Sanders championed broader enforcement of the Clean Air and Clean Water Acts during his presidential campaign. So far, there’s been little motion from Vilsack’s office and the Democrat-controlled Congress on mandatory regulations designed to mitigate agriculture’s environmental impact.

“I really think regulations are the only way we’re going to accomplish anything,” Schechinger said. “We can keep doing some voluntary—CRP is good, retiring land is a great thing—but it’s not going to be enough to get us where we need to be with mitigating climate change.”

Speeches Shim

How to get a government grant for a farm in the u. s

The John Ogonowski and Doug Bereuter Farmer-to-Farmer Program (F2F) provides technical assistance from U.S. volunteers to farmers, farm groups, agribusinesses and other agriculture sector institutions in developing and transitional countries with the goal of promoting sustainable improvements in food security, agricultural processing, production and marketing. The F2F program leverages the expertise of volunteers from U.S. farms, universities, cooperatives, private agribusinesses and nonprofit farm organizations to respond to the local needs of host-country farmers and organizations. Volunteers, recruited from all 50 states and the District of Columbia, are generally individuals who have domestic careers, farms and agribusinesses, or are retirees who want to participate in development efforts; volunteers do not have to be overseas development professionals to join the program. Volunteers tend to be senior or mid-career professionals with practical agro-industry experience. F2F represents the diversity, ingenuity and generosity of U.S. society to the world.

The F2F program was initially authorized by Congress in the 1985 Farm Bill and funded through Title V of Public Law 480. The program was designated as the “John Ogonowski and Doug Bereuter Farmer-to-Farmer Program” in honor of one of the pilots killed September 11, 2001 and of former Congressman Bereuter, who initially sponsored the program.

As aligned with Feed the Future, the U.S. Government’s global hunger and food security initiative, F2F works to support inclusive agriculture sector growth, facilitate private sector engagement in the agriculture sector, enhance development of local capacity and promote climate-smart development. Volunteer assignments address host-led priorities to expand economic growth that increases incomes and improves access to nutritious food.

The F2F program has demonstrated significant impact through high-quality services from volunteers. Volunteers help individuals and organizations build local institutions and linkages to resolve local problems. Since 1985, over 19,000 F2F volunteer assignments have supported more than 12,500 organizations, reaching 136 million people in 116 countries.

In the last five-year program alone, volunteers assisted more than 1,900 host organizations to increase their annual sales by over $414 million and raise annual incomes by $70 million. The program leveraged $28 million worth of volunteer time contributions to development efforts and mobilized $40 million from assisted local host organizations. Volunteers worked directly with more than 231,000 agribusiness professionals, with benefits accruing to over 30 million people. Approximately 41% of those assisted were women. Please see below for specific examples of volunteer successes.

Current Farmer-to-Farmer Program: FY19 – FY23

USAID has awarded cooperative agreements to eight organizations for implementation of the core F2F volunteer programs for international agricultural development for fiscal years 2019 – 2023. The program will extend services to 36 core countries, providing over 3,000 volunteer technical assistance assignments averaging three weeks each. An additional Agricultural Volunteer Opportunity Program will fund volunteer activities with new implementing organizations and special activities. The eight program implementing organizations will work closely with overseas USAID Missions and local partner organizations, supporting a variety of development programs aimed at reducing poverty and stimulating sustainable and broad-based economic growth. The core program agreements allow USAID country programs to provide additional funding for agricultural development projects using F2F volunteers.

Each F2F award is global in nature but implements core country programs in a specific region or technical area:

  • Winrock International – Ghana, Guinea, Mali, Nigeria, Senegal
  • Partners of the Americas – Colombia, Dominican Republic, Guatemala, Guyana, Jamaica, Burma
  • Catholic Relief Services – Benin, Ethiopia, Nepal, Rwanda, Uganda, Timor-Leste
  • ACDI/VOCA – Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan, Georgia, Armenia
  • Land O’Lakes Venture 37 – Bangladesh, Egypt, Lebanon
  • CNFA – Madagascar, Malawi, Mozambique, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Moldova
  • IESC – Kenya, Tanzania, Sri Lanka
  • NCBA/CLUSA – Ecuador, Peru, Honduras.
  • Partners of the Americas – Agricultural Volunteer Opportunity Program

F2F emphasizes achieving economic impact and measurable results by concentrating volunteer assignments in specific geographic areas and on specific agricultural value chains and service sectors. Programs go beyond simply placing volunteers on an individual basis and focus on developing specific market chains for which overall impact can be evaluated. Programs build institutions and transfer technology and management expertise to link smallholder farmers with markets that make use of comparative advantages in production, processing and marketing. Volunteers typically work with medium and small agro-enterprises, cooperatives, individual producers, agricultural extension and research agencies, and financial institutions.

Major areas of program focus are: horticulture, dairy and livestock, staple food crops, producer organization development, financial services, marketing and processing, agricultural education and training, and natural resources management.

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — Meatpacking workers and farm workers who were severely affected by the coronavirus pandemic will be eligible to get grants of up to $600 per person as part of a new $700 million aid program the U.S. Department of Agriculture announced Tuesday.

Officials said the grants are meant to defray some of the costs workers bore as many of them bought their own protective equipment or took unpaid leave as the virus tore through their industries even as they were required to keep showing up for work.

“While the rest of America could work from home, these brave men and women continued to show up for work every single day to ensure that we all food on our tables that we could eat,” said Marc Perrone, president of the United Food and Commercial Workers union. “Meatpacking plants experienced some of the most deadly COVID-19 outbreaks when the pandemic first came around and there were workers that are deserving of our help, and our thanks and our support.”

Last spring, the virus tore through meatpacking plants, where workers stand shoulder-to-shoulder on production lines. The UFCW union, which represents roughly 80 percent of the nation’s beef and pork workers and 33 percent of its poultry workers, estimates that at least 132 meatpacking workers died of COVID-19 and at least 22,000 workers have been infected or exposed to the virus.

At the height of the outbreaks last spring, the meat industry’s production fell to about 60 percent of normal levels as a number of major plants were forced to close temporarily for deep cleaning and safety upgrades or were forced to work at slower speeds because of a shortage of workers.

For instance, more than 1,300 Smithfield workers were sickened and four died last year when the virus rampaged the company’s Sioux Falls, South Dakota, plant. At a major pork plant in Waterloo, Iowa, more than 1,000 of the Tyson Foods plant’s 2,800 workers were infected and at least six died.

“I think it’s important that we recognize that doing this essential work has also come not only at a potential physical risk but also at a financial risk,” Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack said. “Many of these workers have had to out of their pocket pay for masks or personal protective equipment during the course of this pandemic. some have had to take unpaid medical leave.”

The grants to workers will be handed out by an assortment of nonprofit groups that apply to work with the government. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack said he hoped to keep administrative costs and requirements to apply for the money to a minimum so more workers could be helped.

“I’m hopeful that we’ll be able to provide as much help to as many people as possible,” said Vilsack.

A small part of the aid package worth $20 million will provide grants to grocery store workers as part of a pilot program.

In addition to the grants to workers, Vilsack said the USDA would soon be announcing another $700 million aid program to send money to food processors, farmers markets, distributors and other food vendors affected by the pandemic.

Nature recovery schemes are part of post-Brexit subsidies overhaul, but eco campaigners are sceptical

Farmers in areas such as Dartmoor in Devon, where there is a significant rewilding campaign, will be invited to bid for 10-15 pilot projects. Photograph: dpe123/Getty/iStockphoto

Farmers in areas such as Dartmoor in Devon, where there is a significant rewilding campaign, will be invited to bid for 10-15 pilot projects. Photograph: dpe123/Getty/iStockphoto

Farmers in England will be given taxpayers’ cash to rewild their land, under plans for large-scale nature recovery projects announced by the government. These will lead to vast tracts of land being newly managed to conserve species, provide habitats for wildlife and restore health to rivers and streams.

Bids are being invited for 10-15 pilot projects, each covering at least 500 hectares and up to 5,000 hectares, to a total of approximately 10,000 hectares in the first two-year phase – about 10 times the size of Richmond Park in London. These pilots could involve full rewilding or other forms of management that focus on species recovery and wildlife habitats.

Rare fauna such as sand lizards, water voles and curlews will be targeted, with the aim of improving the status of about half of the most threatened species in England.

The exact funding has not been disclosed, as bids will be compared to determine value for money before a final decision on which should go ahead is made this summer. However, the total amount available for such schemes is expected to reach £700m to £800m a year by 2028. By 2042, the government aims to have up to 300,000 hectares of England covered by such “landscape recovery” projects – an area roughly the size of Lancashire.

Ministers also plan to offer English farmers payments for “local nature recovery”. The smaller-scale actions taken on their farms could include planting more trees, restoring peatlands or wetlands and leaving space for wildlife habitats. These payments, which will be revealed later this year, should also reach up to £800m a year by 2028.

George Eustice, the secretary of state for environment, food and rural affairs, said the aim was for wildlife and nature protection to run alongside food production as a matter of course for most farmers. He is expected to tell farmers at the Oxford Farming Conference on Thursday: “We want to see profitable farm businesses producing nutritious food and underpinning a growing rural economy, where nature is recovering and people have better access to it. Through our new schemes, we are going to work with farmers and land managers to halt the decline in species, reduce our greenhouse gas emissions, increase woodland, improve water and air quality and create more space for nature.”

As well as the two new schemes – landscape recovery and local nature recovery – farmers will also be able to apply for payments to help them protect their soil and take other basic environmental protection measures, under plans announced last year. Funding for these measures will also reach about £800m a year, as part of the post-Brexit overhaul of the £2.4bn-a-year farming subsidies into a system of “public money for public goods”. This means farmers are paid for making environmental improvements, rather than the amount of land they farm.

The water vole is one of the rare species to be helped by the schemes. Photograph: Mark Smith/Alamy

Green campaigners were sceptical over whether the new payments would be enough to meet the government’s aim of halting the loss of wild species abundance and managing 30% of land for the good of nature by 2030, as well as ensuring that farmers help to solve the climate crisis rather than add to it. The Wildlife Trusts, RSPB and National Trust charities said detail on how the schemes would work was still lacking.

Craig Bennett, the chief executive of The Wildlife Trusts, said: “The real test of this agricultural transition is not whether it is a little bit better or moderately better than what came before, but whether it will be enough to deliver on [the government’s targets]. Anything less than that means that this historic opportunity will have been wasted. While we’re hearing the right noises from the government, the devil will be in the detail and the detail is still not published nearly six years after the EU referendum.”

The schemes would fail unless more was done to help farmers move away from intensive practices, said Jo Lewis, the policy and strategy director at the Soil Association. This could include the introduction of ambitious targets for reducing pesticide and fertiliser use.

“These schemes won’t work in isolation. They risk failure if they are forced to compete with mounting commercial pressures that encourage more intensive farming and cheap food production, for which the environment and our health ultimately pay the price,” she said.

Though some are benefiting from high grain prices, many farmers are facing a difficult outlook, with rising input costs, plummeting exports due to Brexit red tape, and potential new competition from prospective importers after post-Brexit trade deals.

Thanks to the US government paying nearly 40 per cent of their income, farmers in America are expected to end 2020 with a higher profit than 2019 and the best net income in seven years, the Department of Agriculture said in its latest farm income forecast.

Farmers faced challenges throughout 2020 that included the impact of trade disputes; low prices that drove down cash receipts for corn, cotton, wheat, chicken, cattle and pigs; and weather difficulties such as drought in some areas and an unusual August wind storm stretching from South Dakota to Ohio that centred on Iowa.

Despite government support, some US farming states voted against Donald Trump in the 2020 election. Bloomberg

Farm cash receipts are forecast to decrease nearly 1 per cent to US$366.5 billion ($472.3 billion), the lowest in more than a decade, measured in real dollars. Direct federal government payments saved farmers’ bottom line: Farmers overall saw a 107 per cent increase in direct payments from 2019, when a third of net income came directly from the government.

The impact of the money varies from one farm to another, depending on whether a farmer owns the land, has significant capital to draw from, has manageable debt and aggressively manages wide commodity price swings.

“The payment to one farm could be a matter of life and death of that farm and for another farm maybe just makes it not quite as bad of a year as it was going to be and everywhere in between,” said Mike Paustian, a farmer who raises pigs and grows soybeans and corn near Walcott in eastern Iowa. “I’ve described it as: If you’re drowning and somebody throws you a life preserver, you’re not going to argue too much about grabbing hold of it.”

Excluding USDA loans and insurance indemnity payments made by the Federal Crop Insurance Corporation, farmers are expected to receive US$46.5 billion from the government, the largest direct-to-farm payment ever. That includes US$32.4 billion in assistance through coronavirus pandemic relief food assistance and Paycheque Protection Program payments to farmers. Additional support comes from more traditional revenue loss programs due to low commodity prices, compensation for trade disruptions resulting from tariff battles and conservation programs assistance.

Some people say our farmers do better now than when they actually had a farm.

— Donald Trump, US President

Federal court bankruptcy data indicates 433 US farms filed for reorganisation as of September 30, down from 454 during the same period the previous year.

Overall, US net farm income is expected to increase 43 per cent from 2019 to US$119.6 billion, the USDA estimated. Farmers will see the highest level of net farm income, a broad measure of profitability, since 2013, the agency said.

One north-east Iowa farmer said without the federal money it would have been difficult to make ends meet this year but it began to feel like the government cheques were motivated by politics from a president seeking support for reelection.

“At first it did help, but then we kept getting payments and I don’t know that those were warranted,” said Rick Juchems, 65, who grows corn and soybeans and custom raises pigs. “The markets had already recovered quite a bit and they’re recovering yet more, so it helps some but it’s one of those things that the second one was more than we needed.”

In a late October campaign appearance in Omaha, Nebraska, President Donald Trump said he believed farmers were better off getting government payments than relying solely on their farming receipts.

“In fact, some people say our farmers do better now than when they actually had a farm,” he said.

Many top farm states voted again for Mr Trump in November, including Iowa, Nebraska, Texas and Kansas. Several, however, left Trump to vote for Joe Biden, including Wisconsin, Michigan and Georgia.

Bill Gordon, who with his father raises soybeans and corn in southwestern Minnesota, hopes for improved free trade agreements and a less confrontational approach under Mr Biden in 2021.

“Volatility definitely causes volatility,” he said. “And so if we can get these free trade agreements set up, that are better, and not as confrontational but still benefit both sides, that just benefits agriculture and rural America.”

A $4 billion federal fund meant to confront how racial injustice has shaped American farming has angered white farmers who say they are being unfairly excluded.

Shade Lewis at his cattle farm in LaGrange, Mo., on Friday. Mr. Lewis has spent the past decade scratching out a living as the only Black farmer in his corner of northeastern Missouri. Credit. Neeta Satam for The New York Times

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    • Published May 22, 2021 Updated June 24, 2021

    LaGRANGE, Mo. — Shade Lewis had just come in from feeding his cows one sunny spring afternoon when he opened a letter that could change his life: The government was offering to pay off his $200,000 farm loan, part of a new debt relief program created by Democrats to help farmers who have endured generations of racial discrimination.

    It was a windfall for a 29-year-old who has spent the past decade scratching out a living as the only Black farmer in his corner of northeastern Missouri, where signposts quoting Genesis line the soybean fields and traffic signals warn drivers to go slow because it is planting season.

    But the $4 billion fund has angered conservative white farmers who say they are being unfairly excluded because of their race. And it has plunged Mr. Lewis and other farmers of color into a new culture war over race, money and power in American farming.

    “You can feel the tension,” Mr. Lewis said. “We’ve caught a lot of heat from the conservative Caucasian farmers.”

    The debt relief is redress set aside for what the government calls “socially disadvantaged farmers” — Black, Hispanic, Indigenous and other nonwhite workers who have endured a long history of discrimination, from violence and land theft in the Jim Crow South to banks and federal farm offices that refused them loans or government benefits that went to white farmers.

    The program is part of a broader effort by the Biden administration and Democrats in Congress to confront how racial injustice has shaped American farming, which is overwhelmingly white. Black farm advocacy groups say that nearly all the land, profit and subsidies go to the biggest, most powerful farm operations, leaving Black farmers with little. But in large portions of rural America, the payments threaten to further anger white conservative farmers.

    The plans have drawn thousands of enraged comments on farm forums and are being fought by banks worried about losing interest income. And some rural residents have rallied around a new slogan, cribbed from the conservative response to the Black Lives Matter movement: All Farmers Matter.

    Mr. Lewis is part of a new generation of Black farmers venturing back into urban plots and small rural farms, driven by a desire to nourish their communities with healthy food and create wealth rooted in the land.

    Growing up in LaGrange, a city of 950 along the Mississippi River, Mr. Lewis would scoot a toy John Deere tractor through his mother’s apartment and pretend he was farming the carpet. He joined 4-H, farming and business groups in high school. He started farming at 19, with a few cows and dreams of ending the day with his own dirt on the soles of his boots.

    “I worried about him,” said his father, Kevin Lewis. “I watch him and shake my head and say, Is it worth it?”

    It can be a tough, lonely life. In 1920, African-Americans owned some 14 percent of the farms in the United States. But after a century of racial violence, foreclosures, migration into cities and farm consolidation, there are just under 49,000 left, representing 1.4 percent of American farmers. Most are concentrated in the Southeast and Texas.

    These days, Black farmers have forged online networks that function as their own digital homemade farm bureaus. They celebrate first turnip harvests, ask whether fertilizer made from fish can revive wilting plants and commiserate about navigating government programs and the isolation of being the only Black farmers in their counties.

    How to get a government grant for a farm in the u. s

    “You don’t have a network. You don’t have an infrastructure. There’s nothing,” said Sandy Thompson, who started an online directory of Black farmers in 2019 after abandoning a three-year quest to convert a five-acre plot outside San Antonio into a vegetable farm.

    Ms. Thompson spent $20,000 on equipment only to have her mower get stuck in the sandy soil. She called university extension offices, a vital source of guidance for farmers, but said she never got any help.

    “We are not competitive with white farmers,” she said. “We need any help we can get.”

    Nonwhite farmers, who make up about 5 percent of farmers, say they struggle disproportionately to get loans and government grants. They received less than 1 percent of the billions of dollars in subsidies that flowed into farm country last year under former President Donald J. Trump to compensate farmers hurt by the coronavirus pandemic and the trade war with China.

    Mr. Lewis said he spent years struggling financially and searching for credit as he built his cattle herd from a few cows on rented ground to about 200 cows and calves on more than 100 acres of his own land. At first, he said, farm agents did not return his calls. Banks scoffed at his plans. Some days, he could not afford to gas up the red pickup truck that would stall out as he went to fix fences and spread manure in his alfalfa fields. Like many farmers, he works a second job, on power transmission lines.

    Getting his government loan paid off now could change everything: He said he could pay down other loans on his livestock. Expand the patchwork of fields he owns to compete against established farmers. Get financing to build a home so he and his wife can escape their one-bedroom apartment.

    “It’ll open up a whole lot of doors,” he said. “Maybe these local banks that didn’t have time for minorities will open up to us.”

    But several of his white neighbors in Lewis County, where 77 percent of voters supported Mr. Trump in November, see it differently.

    Now, raw conversations about discrimination in farming are unfolding at farmers’ markets and on rural social media channels where race is often an uncomfortable subject.

    “It’s a bunch of crap,” said Jeffrey Lay, who grows corn and soybeans on 2,000 acres and is president of the county farm bureau. “They talk about they want to get rid of discrimination. But they’re not even thinking about the fact that they’re discriminating against us.”

    Even in a county that is 94 percent white, Mr. Lay said the federal government’s renewed focus on helping farmers of color made him feel like he was losing ground, a sign to him of the country’s demographic shifts.

    “I can’t afford to go buy that 5,000-acre piece of ground,” he said. “Shade Lewis, he’d qualify to get it. And that’s fine. That doesn’t bother me. But I can’t.”

    The mission of Black Farmer Fund is to nurture black community wealth & health by investing in black agricultural systems in the Northeast.

    How to get a government grant for a farm in the u. s

    Our Vision

    In our vision of freedom, we see Black people & all people in a right and healing relationship with the land’s food & medicine. Through centering ancestral wisdom, we practice community-led decisions and reciprocity. Together, with our community we aspire to see a thriving and racially just black agricultural ecosystem!

    How to get a government grant for a farm in the u. s

    How to get a government grant for a farm in the u. s

    We are all connected to the land—

    Even if that connection takes you a couple of generations back.

    Black Farmer Fund was formed out of a series of conversations among Black farmers in the Northeast who were seeking capital that did not replicate the discriminatory and predatory lending practices that have been driving Black farmers and land stewards off of their land for over a century.

    Stewarding land may feel distant to some, but simply put, a land steward is someone who cares for the land. Whether we are actively caring for the land, or not, we are all connected to it.

    Round One of the Value Add Investment Grants is closed.

    Congratulations to the below list of recipients of Round One of the Value Add Investment Grants (VAIG), a key component of the State Government’s $16.7 million four-year Food and Beverage Fund, which aims to stimulate growth and support economic recovery from COVID-19

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    How to get a government grant for a farm in the u. s

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    How to get a government grant for a farm in the u. s

    Funding of $10.2 million has been awarded to 18 agrifood businesses through Round One of VAIG in metropolitan and regional Western Australia to boost local food and beverage manufacturing and value adding.

    Australian Truffle Traders

    West Australian Truffle Collective

    D Trandos & Sons Pty Ltd

    Value added processing of fresh WA corn for local, national and international markets

    Cheeky Monkey Brewing Co Pty Ltd

    Increase manufacturing capacity to meet demand for new craft brewery products

    Canon Foods Services Pty Ltd

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    Some Say Corporate Welfare, Others Say National Necessities

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    How to get a government grant for a farm in the u. s

    Farm subsidies, also known as agricultural subsidies, are payments and other kinds of support extended by the U.S. federal government to certain farmers and agribusinesses. While some people consider this aide vital to the U.S. economy, others consider the subsidies to be a form of corporate welfare.

    The Case for Subsidies

    In 1930, according to the USDA Census of Agriculture Historical Archive, nearly 25% of the population—roughly 30,000,000 people—lived on the nation’s nearly 6.5 million farms and ranches. The original intent of U.S. farm subsidies was to provide economic stability to farmers during the Great Depression and ensure a steady domestic food supply for Americans.

    However, by 2017, the number of people living on farms had dwindled to about 3.4 million and the number of farms just over two million. These data suggest it’s more difficult than ever to make a living farming—hence the need for subsidies, according to proponents.

    Is Farming a Booming Business?

    But just because farming is difficult does not necessarily mean that it isn’t profitable. Back in April 2011, when the number of farms was also decreasing, a Washington Post article stated:

    “The Agriculture Department projects net farm income of $94.7 billion in 2011, up almost 20 percent over the previous year and the second-best year for farm income since 1976. Indeed, the department notes that the top five earnings years out of the past 30 have occurred since 2004,” (“Federal Farm Subsidies Should Be Slashed”).

    And this data has continued to be encouraging to farmers. Net farm income in 2018 dipped to $66.3 billion, which was significantly below the average set by the years 2008 to 2018 but still managed to be well above what it used to be. Even more recently, though, this income is on an upward trend again. In 2020, net farm income was predicted to increase by $3.1 billion to $96.7 billion.

    Yearly Farm Subsidy Payments

    The U.S. government presently pays about $25 billion in cash annually to farmers and owners of farmland. Congress typically legislates the number of farm subsidies through five-year farm bills. The Agricultural Act of 2014 (the Act), also known as the 2014 Farm Bill, was signed by President Obama on February 7, 2014.

    Like its predecessors, the 2014 farm bill was derided as bloated pork-barrel politics by a plethora of Congress members, both liberals, and conservatives, who hail from non-farming communities and states. However, the powerful farm industry lobby and members of Congress from agriculture-heavy states won out.

    Who Benefits Most From Farm Subsidies?

    Farm subsidies don’t benefit all farms equally. According to the Cato Institute, farmers of corn, soybeans, and wheat receive more than 70% of farm subsidies. These are also usually the largest farms.

    While the general public may believe that the majority of subsidies go to helping small family operations, the primary beneficiaries are instead the largest producers of certain commodities:

    “Despite the rhetoric of ‘preserving the family farm,’ the vast majority of farmers do not benefit from federal farm subsidy programs and most of the subsidies go to the largest and most financially secure farm operations. Small commodity farmers qualify for a mere pittance, while producers of meat, fruits, and vegetables are almost completely left out of the subsidy game.”

    According to the Environmental Working Group, from 1995 through 2016, reports the seven states received the majority of subsidies, nearly 45% of all benefits paid to farmers. Those states and their respective shares of total U.S. farm subsidies were:

    • Texas – 9.6%
    • Iowa – 8.4%
    • Illinois – 6.9%
    • Minnesota – 5.8%
    • Nebraska – 5.7%
    • Kansas – 5.5%
    • North Dakota – 5.3%

    Arguments for Ending Farm Subsidies

    Representatives on both sides of the aisle—in particular, those concerned with growing federal budget deficits—decry these subsidies as nothing more than corporate giveaways. Even though the 2014 farm bill limits the amount paid to a person who is “actively engaged” in farming to $125,000, in reality, reports the Environmental Working Group, “Large and complex farm organizations have consistently found ways to avoid these limits,” (“Farm Subsidy Primer”).

    Furthermore, many political pundits believe that subsidies actually harm both farmers and consumers. Says Chris Edwards, writing for the blog Downsizing the Federal Government:

    “Subsidies inflate land prices in rural America. And the flow of subsidies from Washington hinders farmers from innovating, cutting costs, diversifying their land use, and taking the actions needed to prosper in a competitive global economy,” (Edwards 2018).

    Even the historically liberal New York Times has called the system a “joke” and a “slush fund.” Although writer Mark Bittman advocates for reforming the subsidies, not ending them, his scathing assessment of the system in 2011 still stings today:

    “That the current system is a joke is barely arguable: wealthy growers are paid even in good years, and may receive drought aid when there’s no drought. It’s become so bizarre that some homeowners lucky enough to have bought land that once grew rice now have subsidized lawns. Fortunes have been paid to Fortune 500 companies and even gentlemen farmers like David Rockefeller. Thus even House Speaker Boehner calls the bill a ‘slush fund’,” (Bittman 2011).

    A number of federal and state agencies provide direct relief and recovery support for drought impacts. While NIDIS does not provide monetary relief resources, it does provide information and services to mitigate drought.

    The links on this page provide additional information about programs and resources available for drought mitigation, relief, and recovery.

    How Does the USDA Use the Drought Monitor?

    A 2019 fact sheet from the National Drought Mitigation Center summarizes U.S Department of Agriculture (USDA) drought recovery programs, including those triggered by the U.S. Drought Monitor.

    Short-Term Drought Relief and Recovery

    Disaster Assistance Programs

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Farm Service Agency provides financial and technical assistance to drought-affected areas through its Disaster Assistance Programs. This includes emergency assistance and loans for losses to crops, livestock, trees, and farm land. Use the Disaster Assistance Discovery Tool to explore programs.

    Environmental Quality Incentives Program

    The Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) provides financial and technical assistance to agricultural producers to address natural resource concerns and deliver environmental benefits, such as improved water and air quality, conserved ground and surface water, increased soil health and reduced soil erosion and sedimentation, improved or created wildlife habitat, and mitigation against increasing weather volatility and improved drought resiliency.

    Emergency Watershed Protection Program

    The Emergency Watershed Protection (EWP) Program, a federal emergency recovery program, helps local communities recover after a natural disaster strikes. The program offers technical and financial assistance to help local communities relieve imminent threats to life and property caused by natural disasters that impair a watershed, including drought.

    Rural Utilities Service Water and Environmental Programs

    Through USDA’s Rural Utilities Service Water and Environmental Program, rural communities can obtain the technical assistance and financing necessary to develop drinking water and waste disposal systems.

    Economic Injury Disaster Loans

    The U.S. Small Business Administration can provide Economic Injury Disaster Loans to sell businesses, small agricultural cooperatives, and private nonprofit organizations that have suffered substantial economic injury and are in a declared disaster area.

    Long-Term Drought Relief and Recovery

    Federal Crop Insurance Corporation

    The USDA Risk Management Agency (RMA) serves America’s agricultural producers through effective, market-based risk management tools to strengthen the economic stability of agricultural producers and rural communities. RMA manages the Federal Crop Insurance Corporation to provide innovative crop insurance products to America’s farmers and ranchers.

    Agricultural Conservation Easement Program

    The Agricultural Conservation Easement Program helps landowners, land trusts, and other entities protect, restore, and enhance wetlands, grasslands, and working farms and ranches through conservation easements. Under the Agricultural Land Easements component, NRCS helps tribal nations, state and local governments, and non-governmental organizations protect working agricultural lands and limit non-agricultural uses of the land. Under the Wetlands Reserve Easements component, NRCS helps to restore, protect, and enhance enrolled wetlands.

    Conservation Technical Assistance Program

    NRCS delivers conservation technical assistance through its voluntary Conservation Technical Assistance Program. Conservation technical assistance is the help NRCS and its partners provide to land users to address opportunities, concerns, and problems related to the use of natural resources and to help land users make sound natural resource management decisions on private, tribal, and other non-federal lands.

    WaterSMART Drought Response Program

    The Bureau of Reclamation’s WaterSMART Drought Response Program supports a proactive approach to drought by providing assistance to water managers to develop and update comprehensive drought plans and implement projects that will build long-term resiliency to drought. Program areas include contingency planning, resiliency projects, and emergency response actions.

    WaterSMART Water and Energy Efficiency Grants

    Through WaterSMART Water and Energy Efficiency Grants, the Bureau of Reclamation provides 50/50 cost share funding to irrigation and water districts, tribal nations, states, and other entities with water or power delivery authority. Projects conserve and use water more efficiently; increase the production of hydropower; mitigate conflict risk in areas at a high risk of future water conflict; and accomplish other benefits that contribute to water supply reliability in the western United States.

    Building Resilient Infrastructure and Communities (BRIC) Program

    FEMA’s new pre-disaster mitigation program, BRIC, supports states, local communities, tribal nations, and territories as they undertake hazard mitigation projects, reducing the risks they face from disasters and natural hazards. Eligible planning activities include integrating information from mitigation plans, specifically risk assessment or mitigation strategies, with other planning efforts, such as other long-term community planning initiatives around drought.

    Anna Caroline Ball is President and CEO of the 111-year-old Ball Horticultural Company, which specializes in all aspects of horticulture, including breeding, biotechnology, production, and marketing of hybrid flower seeds and other floriculture crops. Privately-held and now in its third generation of family management, Ball Horticultural Company is located in over 20 locations worldwide.

    Anna received her B.A. degree from the University of Colorado and her M.B.A. from Northwestern University. She is a Trustee for The Morton Arboretum, and is also Director of the Board of Career Vision. Anna lives in Glen Ellyn, Illinois.

    How to get a government grant for a farm in the u. s

    Paul B. Redman

    Co-Chair. President and CEO, Longwood Gardens

    Paul B. Redman is an award-winning leader of public gardens, known for his dedication to the beauty and sustainability of gardens, and to the training of future generations of horticulture professionals. A hallmark of Paul’s leadership is building a culture of planning to propel a shared vision forward.

    Over the last 12 years, Paul has implemented institutional and strategic reforms that have positioned the Gardens as a premier horticultural, cultural, and educational institution of the 21st Century, while respecting the values of its founder, Pierre S. du Pont. The result has been nothing short of astounding with overall attendance doubling to almost 1.6 million visitors per year; an incredible climb in Membership support from 17,000 to 66,000 households; and earned income that has almost tripled. Most recently and notably, Paul led one of largest projects in Longwood’s history: the $90-plus million revitalization of the Main Fountain Garden, which reopened in May 2017.

    A consummate professional, Paul freely shares his time and expertise, serving as the Vice President of the Board of Directors for the Garden Conservancy; Leadership Cabinet Co-Chair for Seed Your Future, a national initiative to promote awareness and careers in horticulture; and previously serving as Board President and Treasurer of the American Public Gardens Association. His honors include: 2018 National Garden Clubs Award of Excellence; 2017 Distinguished Alumnus from the Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources at Oklahoma State University; 2016 American Public Gardens Association Award of Merit; the International Garden Tourism Network’s 2015 Person of the Year; 2015 American Horticultural Society’s Professional Award; 2014 Wyck Strickland Award; 2014 American Society of Horticultural Science’s Dr. William A. “Tex” Frazier Lecturer; 2012 CEO of the Year by the Chester County Chamber of Commerce, Business & Industry; 2008 Distinguished Horticulture Alumnus from Oklahoma State University; and where his professional career first began, Franklin Park Conservatory, receiving the Ann Islay Wolfe Award for extraordinary contributions to the organization.

    Paul has been working and studying in the field of public horticulture for more than 25 years. He received his Bachelor of Science Degree and Master of Science Degree in Horticulture from Oklahoma State University.

    How to get a government grant for a farm in the u. s

    John Dole, Ph.D.

    Associate Dean & Director, Academic Programs North Carolina State Univ.

    John M. Dole is Associate Dean and Director of Academic Programs at North Carolina State University and past Chairman of the Board of the American Society for Horticultural Science. John began a lifelong interest in horticulture by working at a local farm market, growing cut flowers in his garden for sale, and picking strawberries, raspberries, apples, and pears for local commercial operations.

    He received a B.S. degree from Michigan State University and his Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota, both in the area of Horticulture. He began his academic career as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Horticultural Science and Landscape Architecture at Oklahoma State University. Dr. Dole moved to the Department of Horticultural Science at North Carolina State University in 2000, becoming Director of Graduate Programs in 2004 and Department Head in 2011.

    He has a long history of significant research, teaching, extension, and outreach contributions to the field of floriculture, most notably in the areas of production and postharvest handling of cut flowers, cuttings and poinsettias. His students have excelled in a variety of industry, public garden, governmental, or academic positions. As Department Head he focused on student recruitment into horticulture and spreading the word about the benefits of horticulture.

    Dr. Dole specializes in floricultural crops research and teaches floriculture courses including Greenhouse Management, HS 440, and Production of Floriculture Crops, HS 442 . In addition, he serves as Executive Advisor for the Association of Specialty Cut Flower Growers, and co-authored Floriculture Principles and Species, 2nd edition, 2005, with Harold F. Wilkins.

    Dr. Dole has been involved with the Seed Your Future movement since it’s founding in 2014. He was an inaugural member of the Steering Committee, and served on the Advisory Council until late 2018 when he joined the National Leadership Cabinet.

    Governments have employed various measures to maintain farm prices and incomes above what the market would otherwise have yielded. They have included tariffs or import levies, import quotas, export subsidies, direct payments to farmers, and limitations on production. Tariffs and import quotas can be effective only if a country normally imports some of its supply. Export subsidies result in higher prices to domestic consumers than to foreign purchasers; their use requires control over imports to prevent foreign supplies from entering the domestic market and bringing prices down. Direct payments to farmers have been used to maintain prices to consumers at reasonable levels, while assuring farmers a return above world-market levels. Limitations on production, intended to reduce supply and thus increase prices, have been used in Brazil (for coffee) and in the United States (for major crops).

    Accomplishments

    The effects of price and income policies are difficult to assess. The policies have unquestionably worked to raise agricultural production in the countries where they have been applied, but their usefulness as a means of enhancing the economic well-being of farm people is debatable. The governments of the industrial countries have been able to raise the returns from agriculture above the levels that would have prevailed in the absence of such intervention. In addition to maintaining prices, they provide subsidies for agricultural inputs such as tractor fuel and chemical fertilizers; they also gave assistance in consolidating small farms into larger ones and in improving farm buildings.

    The level of income and the economic well-being of farm people in general are determined by many factors, including not only the prices they receive for their output but also the rate at which the economy in general is growing, the ease with which people can move from farm to nonfarm jobs, the prices they must pay for their productive inputs, and their level of education. With respect to average income per person, as distinguished from total income, the prices received and paid are probably less important than the other factors mentioned. That becomes obvious when one compares farm incomes in developed countries with those in less-developed ones; the differences in real income have to do mainly with the levels of economic development and not with farm prices or subsidies. Government efforts to increase farm prices are likely to be offset, in the long run, by an increase in the number of persons engaged in farming, and that tends to keep the returns to farm labour from rising much faster than they would in the absence of such policies.

    There are two other reasons for believing that the income effects of higher farm prices or subsidies are relatively insignificant in the long run compared with other factors affecting incomes of farm workers. One is that an increase in farm prices induces farmers to use more fertilizer, machinery, fuel and oil, and other items. If a significant part of any increase in gross income is used for such things, the absolute increase in net farm income is much smaller than the increase in gross farm income. The second reason is that a given increase in government-supported farm prices generally occurs only once. After the increase in returns has been realized, the higher farm prices contribute nothing further to incomes. In contrast, general economic growth along with the continued reduction of the farm labour force has cumulative effects on the return to farm labour. If the returns to farm labour were to grow at an average annual rate of about 3 percent, for example, farm prices would have to increase at least 3 percent annually (assuming other prices did not change) to have the same effect on returns to farm resources.

    Costs

    The costs of the agricultural price and income policies of industrial countries are substantial; they include not only direct governmental outlays but also the increased costs to consumers in those countries, as well as the losses to developing countries of potential export markets.

    The organization of farming

    Ownership

    Except in the few countries with communist governments, most farmland is privately owned. That does not mean, however, that the land is owned by those who farm it. In most countries a major aspiration of farm people has been to achieve the ownership of the land they work. After World War II, for example, Japan and Taiwan underwent land reforms that were intended to broaden ownership, and similar reforms have been advocated in other countries.

    On a cooperative farm the land is owned jointly by the members of the group who farm it. The cooperative generally also owns all the major means of production, and the members supply all or most of the labour. While there are examples of cooperative farms in many countries, they loom large only in Israel, where the kibbutzim control about one-tenth of all agricultural land.

    In a collective farm, at least as organized in the former Soviet republics, the land was owned by the state but was permanently leased to the kolkhoz (collective farm). The kolkhoz owned its own equipment and livestock and was required to meet certain commitments to the state in the form of deliveries of farm products. In theory, the members of the kolkhoz were to elect the officers of the farm and establish the procedures by which the net product was to be divided among the members for services performed. In practice, however, their autonomy was severely limited by the economic plans. In most cases these plans were incredibly detailed, specifying the crops to be grown, the times of plowing, planting, and harvesting, the quantities of fertilizer and manures to be used, and the kinds of livestock to be maintained.

    On state farms the land and all other means of production are owned by the state. The workers are paid in wages, and management decisions are made by individuals directly responsible to the state.

    For many years, the ASPCA has provided animal welfare grants to organizations across the country. Since the disaster of Hurricane Katrina in 2005, the ASPCA has significantly increased its grant-making volume and reach. This has helped the ASPCA respond quickly to emergencies where financial assistance is needed most, and to carefully match resources with needs across the country.

    Today, the ASPCA is one of the nation’s largest animal welfare grant makers, providing support to U.S.-based nonprofit animal welfare organizations through cash grants, sponsorships, executive and technical assistance, and training. Since 2008, the ASPCA has given over $100 million in grants to over 3,000 animal shelters, municipal and governmental agencies, rescue groups, sanctuaries, and other animal welfare organizations nationwide. Organizations in all 50 states and U.S. territories have received funding and are eligible to apply.

    Grants are available for a wide range of activities that further the ASPCA’s mission.

    Animal Shelter & Rescue Grants

    The ASPCA’s funding priorities are focused on saving more lives through animal shelter and rescue grants that decrease the number of animals entering shelters and increase the number of animals going home.

    • Relocation programs to bring animals from high-supply/low-demand areas to areas of low supply and high demand
    • Special Requests for Proposals (RFPs) for specific programs, such as the New York State Animal Population Control Program and the ASPCA Northern Tier Shelter Initiative
    • Shelter and spay/neuter programs as solicited
    • Conference sponsorship and scholarships for training and education of animal welfare professionals

    Anti-Cruelty Grants

    The ASPCA’s anti-cruelty funding priorities include anti-cruelty grants for costs associated with the prevention of and response to animal cruelty toward animals, including but not limited to:

    • Animal cruelty investigation programs
    • Large-scale seizures and/or farm animals in cases involving puppy mills, hoarding, animal fighting, abuse and/or neglect
    • Expenses incurred as a result of cruelty seizures, such as veterinary care, housing, transport, spay/neuter and placement
    • Outreach programs aimed at preventing or eliminating animal cruelty
    • Advocacy for anti-cruelty ordinances and legislation
    • Conference sponsorship and scholarships for training and education of animal law enforcement professionals

    Equine Grants

    The ASPCA Equine Fund provides grants to animal welfare organizations that care for horses, mules, donkeys and ponies—both wild and domestic—in alignment with our efforts to protect all equines.

    • Housing and rehabilitation of the equine victims of cruelty seizures
    • Emergency and disaster support
    • Capital improvements, expansion programs, safety projects, and emergency repairs
    • Training programs
    • Safety Net programs, veterinary vouchers, and gelding and vaccination clinics

    Emergency & Disaster Response Grants

    The ASPCA provides emergency funding to animal welfare organizations and government agencies whose communities suffer the impact of natural and other disasters.

    Grants may be made for the following purposes:

    • Resources, including pet supplies and food for pet owners
    • Shelter/rescue supplies and equipment
    • Sheltering or temporary boarding and fostering of rescued or at-risk animals
    • Transfer or relocation of animals affected by the disaster/emergency
    • Veterinary expenses and medical care for animals
    • Infrastructure repairs and rebuilding

    For more information on how your local shelter can apply for one of our animal shelter grants, visit aspcapro.org/grants.

    The ASPCA currently does not provide financial assistance to individuals, but we encourage you to tell your local groups about our animal shelter grants, animal rescue grants and other funding opportunities!

    Please note that the Government is now in the caretaker period. Applications for Community Led Grants can continue to be submitted, however any decision on these applications will not be made until after in the election and the conclusion of the caretaker period. All enquiries relating to applications for NIAA grant funding during the caretaker period should be directed to the department using the contact form or by phone to the Regional Network on 1800 079 098.

    The National Indigenous Australians Agency funds projects aimed at helping Indigenous Australians.

    Funding is allocated through: the Indigenous Advancement Strategy (IAS), National Partnership Agreements, Special Accounts and Special Appropriations.

    For further information about the IAS, including grant opportunities, see funding under the IAS.

    Grant funding is also available through Indigenous-specific and mainstream programs delivered by other agencies.

    Information about all government funding opportunities is available at GrantConnect.

    Indigenous Entrepreneurs Fund (IEF)

    The IEF was a three year program that ended on 30 June 2019.

    Funding under the IEF is no longer available. Potential applicants can speak with their local NIAA office to discuss alternative options.

    Collection of personal information for administering grants

    NIAA collects personal information as part of its delivery of grant programs. This information may be used to assess and process grant applications, to administer grant agreements, for compliance and detection of fraud, or for research and analysis.

    For the same purposes, we may disclose personal information to those involved in the assessment of applications, contractors of the Commonwealth, Parliament and other government agencies. We may also use de-identified information for the purposes of reporting to other agencies, Parliament and the public.

    Details about the information we collect and who it may be disclosed to will be available in the Grant Opportunity Guidelines for each funding opportunity.

    The Agency will not provide the information collected from you to anyone else outside the Agency (other than the parties listed in the Grant Opportunity Guidelines), unless you have given consent for us to do this, or we are authorised or required to do so by law.

    Delivered on behalf of the Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment

    Selection Process Open

    Closing Date & Time 11 August 2021 – 9:00pm AEST

    National Farm Safety Education Fund: Improving Farm Safety Practices

    The Australian Government is inviting organisations via an open competitive grant process to apply to deliver services under the National Farm Safety Education Fund Program (the program) from 2021 to 2023.

    Funding will be available to eligible organisations to support projects that result in improved farm safety outcomes nationally.

    The objective of the grant opportunity is better and more effective communication to farmers and those that live and work on Australian farms and in related industries, to improve their understanding and take up of the behaviours and practices associated with farm safety.

    The grant opportunity will support projects focused on education and capacity building in 2 priority areas:

    1. the next generation of farmers
    2. industry-endorsed training and continued learning.

    The intended outcome of the grant opportunity is that farmers and those that live and work on Australian farms and in related industries have:

    • increased positive attitude shift towards farm safety practices
    • increased uptake of farm safety practices.

    More information

    More information about the National Farm Safety Education Fund: Improving Farm Safety Practices grant opportunity, as well as requirements for applicants, can be found in the following grant opportunity documents:

    • Grant Opportunity Guidelines
    • Questions and Answers
    • Sample Commonwealth Standard Grant Agreement
    • Sample Commonwealth Standard Grant Agreement Standard Grant Conditions

    Subscribe to receive updates

    Organisations and individuals interested in Community Grants Hub grant rounds are encouraged to subscribe to receive alerts when new information is made available.

    Other future grant opportunities are published on GrantConnect, the Australian Government grants information system.

    Contacting the Community Grants Hub

    If you would like assistance, please call the Community Grants Hub Hotline on 1800 020 283 (option 1) or email [email protected]

    More information about the Community Grants Hub can be found on the Community Grants Hub website.

    Please quote 2021-5277 – National Farm Safety Education Fund: Improving Farm Safety Practices when you phone or email the Community Grants Hub.

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    © 2022 Supported by the Australian Government

    The Department of Social Services (DSS) maintains this website.

    Explore grant opportunities for municipal agencies and nonprofit organizations

    Deadline: Check back for 2022 dates.

  • Animal Farm Foundation offers the People and Pets Together Grant and the Removing Breed Labels Grant, which are focused on addressing the human issues that keep dogs and people apart, as well as ways to bring dogs and people together to make the world better for all individuals.
  • ASPCA Grants program provides support to a variety of U.S.-based nonprofit animal welfare organizations through cash grants, sponsorships, and training.
  • Banfield Foundation funds U.S. programs designed to keep pets and owners together. Various opportunities exist for 501(c)(3) organizations.
  • The Binky Foundation offers a streamlined grant program for fledgling animal welfare organizations – shelters, rescue groups, TNR programs and others – providing $1000 “First Steps” grants.
  • Bissell Pet Foundation recognizes the lifesaving efforts of animal shelters and rescues of all sizes across the country. Grants will be considered for organizations working to reduce the homeless pet population through adoption, spay/neuter and microchipping.

    Deadline: Application will open Spring 2022

  • The Doris Day Animal Foundation funds nonprofit 501c3 organizations that need assistance in their work of caring for and protecting animals. A special focus for DDAF is on programs that benefit senior pets and the people who love them.
  • Friends for Pets Foundation (FFP) will be making one-time grants of up to $50,000 to selected animal rescue organizations located in the U.S.

    Deadline: April 1, 2022

    The Grey Muzzle Organization provides grants and special programs for 501(c)(3) organizations whose activities include helping senior dogs.

    Deadline: grant applications open February 15, 22022

    The Kenneth A. Scott Charitable Trust invites proposals from active 501(c)(3) humane organizations based in the USA for projects designed to enhance the well-being of animals in Ohio and in the Great Lakes region (IL, IN, MI, WI, Western PA, Upstate NY, and Northeastern MN).

    Deadline: September 15, 2021 and January 15, 2022.

    Laura J. Niles Foundation supports charitable initiatives that foster life enrichment through canine and other animal companionship. The foundation’s areas of concentration center around canine health research, animal protection & adoption, search & rescue training, human assistance and similar fields of interest.

    Deadline: Grants are reviewed in the order received on a rolling basis with no deadlines

  • Live Stream Camera Grant for Animal Welfare aims to provide non-profit organizations like animal sanctuaries a way to further their outreach efforts in these uncertain times. At CCTV Camera World we support animal conservation because we would like to see a world where our children can grow up with biodiversity. We welcome organizations that are serious about animal conservation and advocate for continued support of a diverse ecosystem. This grant provides a livestream camera with necessary cable to allow streaming to YouTube Live.
  • Maddie’s Fund BIPOC-led operating support grant.

    Deadline: March 14, 2022

  • Maddie’s Fund funds innovative solutions and creative thinking through inclusive and community-centric programs and projects for animal welfare.
  • National Dog Abuse Investigation and Prosecution Program provides prosecutors with the resources to ensure that canine cruelty and dogfighting cases are thoroughly investigated and properly adjudicated by addressing some of the financial barriers that exist for law enforcement and prosecutors.
  • Oxbow Animal Rescue Grant supports operating and programs for rescue organizations caring for specific species of small mammals, exotics and wildlife.
  • The Pedigree Foundation offers grants to 501(c)(3) organizations for programs that help dogs.

    Deadline: Check back for 2022 grant opportunities

    Petco Love supports non-profit animal organizations that care for animals in need, fight pet cancer, and celebrate our Helping Hero therapy and working animals.

    Deadline: Various, check website

  • Petfinder Foundation offers a variety of grants to Petfinder members in good standing.
  • PetSmart Charities, Inc. supports nonprofits, municipalities, and animal welfare organizations whose companion animal programs help enrich lives through the human-animal bond.

    Deadline: Various, check website

    The Rachel Ray Foundation partners with Best Friends Animal Society and has two grant opportunities available for Best Friends Network Partners.

    Deadline: Check website for 2022 application deadline.

    The Summerlee Foundation focuses primarily on cats in the U.S. and Canada, dogs primarily in Latin America, wildlife, marine life, sanctuary for captive animals, wildlife rehabilitation and emergency funding.

    Deadline: Closed to any additional grant proposals for fiscal year July 2021-June 2022. Check back early 2022 for further updates.

  • The USDA Rural Development Community Facilities Direct Loan & Grant Program offers loans and grants for essential community facilities, including municipal and private animal shelters, in communities with populations under 20,000.
  • The William and Charlotte Parks Foundation for Animal Welfare makes awards, usually not more than $10,000 per annum, to support projects, research, and other activities calculated to advance the welfare of animals.

    Deadline: Check website for 2022 application deadline