How to get used to waking up early for school

This article was co-authored by Alicia Oglesby and by wikiHow staff writer, Amber Crain. Alicia Oglesby is a Professional School Counselor and the Director of School and College Counseling at Bishop McNamara High School outside of Washington DC. With over ten years of experience in counseling, Alicia specializes in academic advising, social-emotional skills, and career counseling. Alicia holds a BS in Psychology from Howard University and a Master’s in Clinical Counseling and Applied Psychology from Chestnut Hill College. She also studied Race and Mental Health at Virginia Tech. Alicia holds Professional School Counseling Certifications in both Washington DC and Pennsylvania. She has created a college counseling program in its entirety and developed five programs focused on application workshops, parent information workshops, essay writing collaborative, peer-reviewed application activities, and financial aid literacy events.

wikiHow marks an article as reader-approved once it receives enough positive feedback. In this case, several readers have written to tell us that this article was helpful to them, earning it our reader-approved status.

This article has been viewed 413,559 times.

Waking up early for school is hard! If you hit the snooze button on your alarm too many times, you may find yourself rushing to make it to class. Fortunately, by preparing a few things the night before and streamlining your morning routine, you can get to school on time and avoid frantic mornings.

How to get used to waking up early for school

Amy Morin, LCSW, is the Editor-in-Chief of Verywell Mind. She’s also a psychotherapist, international bestselling author and host of the The Verywell Mind Podcast.

How to get used to waking up early for school

Adah Chung is a fact checker, writer, researcher, and occupational therapist.

How to get used to waking up early for school

Waking up early for school is difficult for most teens. And there’s research that suggests they aren’t just being oppositional—their inability to wake up may be biologically based.

Teens need about nine hours of sleep for optimal performance and development. However, research has shown that most teens are actually getting less than seven hours of sleep each night. Other studies also show that most teens’ natural sleep patterns cause them to stay up late, until around 11 p.m., which makes it difficult for them to wake up early for school.

Despite teen’s natural sleep cycles, learning how to wake up in the morning and get out of bed on the days you don’t feel like it is a life skill. Teach your teen how to do so now, so when they’re an adult, they can make it to work on time even on the days when they don’t feel like it.

How to Get Your Teen to Wake Up

Getting teens up on time for school is a perpetual struggle for many families. Below, are multiple ways you can help you teen get out of bed.

Remove Electronics From the Bedroom

Create rules that limit your teen’s electronics use. Too much screen time can interfere with sleep in more ways than one. Don’t allow your teen to take his cell phone or laptop into his bedroom at night. If your teen receives a text message from a friend at 2 a.m., he may be tempted to reply. He may also be tempted to check his social media accounts in the middle of the night if he has access to it.

Sometimes, teens want to sleep with the TV on at night. But keeping the TV on can also interfere with getting a good night’s sleep. If your teen has a TV in his bedroom, establish a mandatory time that it must be shut off.

Set a Bedtime

Most parents relax a little bit about bedtime during the teenage years. While offering more freedom is developmentally appropriate, a complete lack of bedtime rules may lead to teens staying up until the wee hours of the morning. Provide some guidance about bedtime to encourage healthy sleep habits.

Create Weekend Sleeping Rules

It can be tempting for teens to stay up all night and sleep all day on the weekends and during school vacations. This can wreak havoc on their schedules during the school week. Don’t allow your teen to sleep all day when he has days off. Establish a reasonable bedtime and enforce a reasonable wake-up time.

Discourage Afternoon Naps

Your teen may want to take a nap when she gets home from school. But that can interfere with her nighttime sleep and reinforce the cycle of staying up late and feeling tired during the day. If your teen comes home from school feeling tired, encourage exercise and outdoor activity along with an earlier bedtime.

Provide Consequences

If your teen’s refusal to get out of bed is leading to more problems—like he’s late for school—you may need to start instilling consequences. Use logical consequences, like taking away privileges. If your teen is bothered by the fact that he’s late for school, the natural consequence of being late may be consequence enough.

Offer Incentives

Link your teen’s privileges to their responsible behavior. If they want to use the car on Friday night, you’ll need to know he can be responsible enough to get ready for school on time. If they want rides to spend time with friends, tell them they can when they show they can get out of bed on time. Create a reward system to link positive behavior to incentives.

Increase Your Teen’s Responsibility

Waking your teen up repeatedly and arguing with him to get out of bed won’t be helpful to him in the future. Teens need to learn how to get themselves ready independently—unless you plan to still be dragging him out of bed when he’s an adult. Problem-solve together how he can get himself ready more independently.

Seek Professional Help

If your teen’s ability to get out of bed is interfering with his life you may need to seek professional help. Start by talking to your teen’s doctor to rule out any potential medical issues. Sometimes teens can experience sleep disorders or other medical issues that increase fatigue.

Once you’ve ruled out physical health problems, it may be helpful to speak with a mental health professional. Sometimes mental health problems, like depression or anxiety disorders, can interfere with sleep.

Author

Honorary Associate in Sleep, Circadian and Memory Neuroscience, The Open University

Disclosure statement

Paul Kelley does not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organisation that would benefit from this article, and has disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond their academic appointment.

Partners

The Open University provides funding as a founding partner of The Conversation UK.

How to get used to waking up early for school

Languages

  • Bahasa Indonesia
  • English

In societies the world over, teenagers are blamed for staying up late, then struggling to wake up in the morning. While it’s true that plenty of teenagers (like many adults) do have bad bedtime habits, researchers have long since proven that this global problem has a biological cause.

In 2004, researchers at the University of Munich proved that teenagers actually have a different sense of time. Their study showed that the 24-hour cycle which determines when you wake and sleep gets later during your teens, reaching its latest point by the age of 20.

After 20, the body’s waking and sleeping times gradually get earlier again, until at 55 you naturally wake about the same time as you did when you were 10. The link between the movements of this biological clock and the process of puberty was so strong that the researchers suggested this “peak lateness” at the end of the teenage years could be the biological marker for the end of puberty.

Sleep deprived

At about the same time the Munich study came out, Russell Foster at the University of Oxford made a key breakthrough in the neuroscience of time. By raising blind mice, Foster was able to show that all mammals’ sleep times depended on sunlight only. This means that biological time – which determines when you feel sleepy – is different from social time, which is set by clocks and customs about when things should be done.

How to get used to waking up early for school

When biological time and social time clash, it can lead to sleep deprivation. The social starting times for school and university – typically between 7.30am and 8.30am – are too early for teenagers the world over. The biological changes that teenagers go through mean they need to go to bed later, wake up later and get up to eight or nine hours of sleep.

As it stands, many teenagers are losing two to three hours of sleep every school night. As Steven Lockley at the University of Harvard concluded, this is systematic, unrecoverable sleep loss – and a danger to teenagers’ health.

An easy fix?

The solution is simple in theory: starting times should be adjusted to reflect the fact that teenagers need later starts as they get older. But in practice, there are three major challenges: proving that early starts directly damage teenagers’ health, identifying the best starting time, and overcoming education officials’ reluctance to change traditional early starts.

How to get used to waking up early for school

The US Centres for Disease Control and Prevention has drawn together many scientific studies to demonstrate that US schools should set later starting times. There is extensive medical evidence about the harms of starting school or university too early: doing so places teenage students at greater risk of obesity, depression, drug use and bad grades.

The American Medical Association now recommends that no classes for teenagers should begin before 8.30am. Yet early starts are still common in many countries around the world, among them Australia, UK, France and Sweden. There is further evidence that later starts are even better: studies show there are clear health benefits for 13 to 16-year-olds who start school at 10am.

Mariah Evans at the University of Nevada, Reno used new methods to identify the best times for teenagers aged 18 to 19. Her conclusion was dramatic: much later starting times of 11am or even 12pm are best for cognition.

Schools and parents all over the world need to change how they treat teenagers: rather than blaming them for being sleepy in the mornings, let them wake and sleep later to match their biological time. By starting schools and universities later we’ll raise safer, healthier and smarter teens at no real cost. It’s only a matter of time.

How to get used to waking up early for school

Waking up early and getting enough sleep seems like an impossible task. Find easy tips and ideas here on how to wake up early.

The old proverb says: “Early to bed, early to rise makes a man healthy, wealthy, and wise.”

But learning how to wake up early and feel rejuvenated is quite a challenge for most.

It seems that many great men from the past took this proverb seriously.

Benjamin Franklin and Theodore Roosevelt would wake up very early in the morning to plan their activities. Ernest Hemingway claimed that he did his best writing early in the morning. But, no matter how bad some people want to have more productive mornings, they simply do not know how to wake up early in the morning.

Waking up early and getting enough sleep seems like an impossible task these days. But if you’re yearning to become an early bird, we have a few tricks in store.

Here are some ideas to get you started.

How Do I Wake Up Early Without Being Tired?

People tend to keep their alarm far from their beds so that they’re forced to get out of bed once it goes off.

But if you are trying to learn how to get up early easily and feel positive, this may not be an effective strategy.

If you want to wake up early and enjoy your morning without being tired, you don’t need this type of stress.

Instead, set up two alarms; one to wake you up and the other as a reminder to get out of bed, in case you fall asleep. Set the first alarm 5 or 10 minutes before you actually need to get up.

Then, after your first alarm goes off, spend some time in bed stretching, taking long, refreshing breaths, and conjuring up a few reasons to be grateful.

When you’re ready, sit up in bed and let your feet touch the floor.

How can I wake up easier in the morning?

Have you ever woken up a few minutes before the alarm? You likely felt well-rested, more alert, and in a much better mood.

We all have our own circadian rhythm. It’s what makes us feel alert in the morning and sleepy in the evening. And the circadian rhythm is what can help us wake up easier in the morning.

When we allow this rhythm to wake us up naturally, we will feel alert, relaxed, and ready to start the day. But for too many of us, our alarms interrupt our natural circadian rhythms.

The solution? Try a sleep app designed to monitor your circadian rhythm as you sleep.

You simply tell your app when you need to wake up in the morning, and it will pick a time within a designated window that is the most optimal time for you to wake.

3 Ways to Wake Up Feeling Refreshed

1. Get enough sleep

According to research, an average adult needs 7 to 9 hours of sleep.

While we sleep, we go through five stages of a sleep cycle. The first stage is light sleep, followed by a stage that prepares us for deep sleep. Then comes the stage of deep sleep, and it continues to the fourth stage. After these four stages, comes the REM stage.

Sleep cycles last for about 90 minutes and it is recommended to get five sleep cycles each night (7.5 hours).

If you have to go to bed very late, then it is recommended that you ensure at least three sleep cycles or 4.5 hours of sleep.

2. Be consistent

Once you’re getting enough sleep, you need to focus on consistency.

The human body loves consistency. Both your body and your mind will be grateful if you go to bed and wake up every day at the same time. By doing so, hormones and chemicals that our organs release will get used to a regular pattern.

And when you change that pattern, it takes time for your body to adapt. This is the reason why people suffer from jet lag after they change time zones and completely disrupt the pattern organs were used to.

Every time you change your sleep pattern, your body will suffer from something that resembles a micro jet lag. You will have a much harder time waking up, you will feel groggy, and you definitely won’t perform your daily tasks as well as you could.

3. Make sure you relax at night

After you’ve decided to go to bed and wake up at the same time every day, ask yourself the following question:

“What do you do before you go to bed?”

Many people tend to collapse into bed immediately after they come home late from work or from a night out on the town.

This is not healthy for the body or mind.

What you should do instead is devote an hour every night to proper sleep hygiene.

Read a book, take a bath, or listen to some music. And at all costs, stay away from screens. The blue light from mobile devices, computers, tablets, and TVs disrupts the production of melatonin in the brain – the sleep chemical that helps you drift off to dreamland.

How Do You Go to Sleep Late and Wake Up Early?

It’s not always possible to get a full 8 hours if you’re used to going to sleep late. And this can become a regular habit on weekends.

But one of the great tips for waking up early is to do it on the weekends as well.

We use our weekends as our time off, so it may seem pointless to wake up early. But, by sleeping in, you will disrupt your consistent routine.

Use the extra time you get by waking up early during weekends to do something fun. Sign up for some morning class, go out and grab coffee with your friend, or, if you want to improve your health, go jogging.

Make sure that you actually plan your leisure activities.

If you don’t, then you probably won’t have a good enough reason to wake up.

Learning to wake up early at the top of your game is as simple as sticking to good sleep hygiene, setting a consistent sleep schedule, and doing your best to wake up at the ideal time in your circadian rhythm.

Once you get these strategies working for you, you’ll be amazed by how easy it is to wake up feeling refreshed and ready to start the day.

It’s that time of year again… How, after months of sleeping late, do you get the kids used to waking up early? Getting kids to stick to a back-to-school routine can be a struggle that’s bound to make even the most patient parent want to scream. Well, summer holidays can throw out the whole family’s sleep pattern but a few clever tips can really help you get your little ones out the door faster.

The bedtime routine

Routines help your kids to know what to expect and how to stay organized. Establish a predictable, relaxing bedtime routine that works for your little night owls. For example, taking a bath, brushing their teeth, and getting into their pajamas every evening before they go to bed, is a set routine that can give them a strong sense of consistency.

A gradual return

Yes, you have to start earlier than the day before school! Don’t make all the changes at once; have your kids go to bed 15 minutes earlier each night leading up to the first day of school and get up 15 minutes earlier each day. Bear in mind that it generally takes about three weeks to get back on a schedule; about a month before the first day of school, you should start setting a standard bedtime and wake-up time.

A new clock

One item you should definitely purchase for your kids at the beginning of the school year is an alarm clock. By giving your little ones a clock, you’re making them responsible for getting up on time. Yes, you’ll still have to nudge them to get them out of bed, but a fancy, new clock can encourage them to react positively when the alarm sounds!

A hug

Wake them up and then hug them; it will make your kids so happy and will start you off on the right foot!

*extra tip: If that doesn’t work, the tickle monster can always get them up!

Sun and light

Aim for lots of bright, natural light in the morning. Any lack of light inhibits the body’s ability to produce melatonin, upsetting the sleep-wake cycle. Let your children soak up some rays as soon as possible after you wake them up.

A little reward

Rewarding your little ones for getting up on time may serve as a good motivation. And don’t forget that kids love to play games; you can transform each morning into a race, with each family member racing against the clock.

In Nannuka, everyday new babysitters and nannies make their profile, get their official papers screened and wait for you to discover them… Find the one that truly meets your family’s needs!

Virgin Group chairman Richard Branson is up out of bed each day at 5 a.m. AOL CEO Tim Armstrong gets up by 5:15 each day. Michelle Obama wakes up before dawn, often at 4:30 in the morning. Apple chief Tim Cook rises at 3:45 a.m.

And writer Steven John is usually up and out of bed before 6 a.m. Also, he usually doesn’t refer to himself in the third person, and will now stop.

I wake up well before my alarm every weekday, which I leave set for 6:45 a.m. just to be sure there is enough time to get my son ready for school without rushing the process. Truth be told, he and his baby sister are the reason my wife and I wake so early these days, but even before we had kids, I still got up early.

The early-morning hours are the only time during the day when I feel ahead of things rather than feeling like I’m playing catch-up. Later in the day, everything turns into a constant rush, between the emails piling up in my inbox, the empty coffee pot that needs cleaning, the looming phone calls, and the beckoning errands.

While many execs report to their desks before most people are even awake, I try not to do anything work-related until the 8 o’clock hour. That’s when my son heads off to school, my wife and daughter start their daily routines, and the emails start coming in heavy.

In those early hours before work, I balance taking care of family needs with working on those projects that usually take a back seat to other responsibilities. I’ll straighten my desk, read an article or two, tend to a plant in the garden, or anything else that I want to do but that’s not a necessity. And contrary to what many highly successful people do, I never exercise in the early morning — I save that for shortly after lunch, breaking up the day and giving my mind a reset.

How you choose to spend your time after an early morning wake-up is your call — you can go for a run, read a book, or get right to work. But the benefits of regularly waking up early include better eating habits, improved concentration, reduced stress, and more energy.

Here’s how you can train yourself to start waking up early:

1. Move to an early wake-up time slowly and steadily

Once you have identified a time as your daily wake-up goal, consider it relative to when you currently rise and move toward the new time slowly. Say you want to get out of bed at 6:30 a.m., but you normally haul yourself off the mattress at 8:15 a.m. Tomorrow, set the alarm for 8 a.m.. The next day, set it for 7:45 a.m.. And so on.

2. Once you’re awake, get up

Snoozing can be a great pleasure, but it’s a bad habit. Once you are awake, force yourself to get up and out of your bed as quickly as you can, even if you’re still groggy. You do yourself a great disservic e lingering under the covers, no matter how warm and cozy it feels: You will likely end up feeling sluggish all morning, and you can undo the progress you have made in establishing an earlier rising time by throwing off your body clock.

3. Be consistent, even on weekends

Unless you went out hard on Friday, wake-up time should be the same on Saturday as it is during the week. So too on Sunday. Once your body learns to get up early, you won’t even want to stay in bed longer. And think of all that free time.

4. Create a healthy sleep environment

You can’t wake early and refreshed if you didn’t sleep well. Make sure your room is dark, cool, and either quiet or with noise moderated by a sound machine.

5. Create a healthy wake-up routine

If you can let the sunshine into your room in the morning, do it. If not, consider getting a light that simulates the sun’s glow. And have the coffee ready to go, your toothbrush and toothpaste, face wash, and other hygiene products easy to access, and, if possible, your clothes already picked and laid out. The less effort you have to put into such necessary steps, the more benefit you gain from your time.

6. Do something you enjoy early

If you’re waking earlier up just to get to work earlier, unless you absolutely love your job, you’re doing it wrong. Set aside early morning time to do something you enjoy, from reading to a puzzle to a bike ride, and you will start to enjoy getting up early.

7. Limit booze, screen time, and food at night

Your nighttime habits play a direct role in your morning wake-ups. Go easy on alcohol, don’t eat within the hour before bed, and try not to look at a screen in that time, either. (Or wear glasses that block blue light if you must. Truth be told, I rarely stick to this one, but you and I both should.)

Also, try to go to bed at about the same time each night. You can’t expect a pleasant scheduled early wake-up if your bed time changes erratically.

How I Became an Early Riser

By Leo Babauta

I’ve found that waking early has been one of the best things I’ve done as I’ve changed my life recently, and I thought I’d share my tips. I just posted about my morning routine, and thought you might like to know how I get up at 4:30 a.m.

For many years, I was a late riser. I loved to sleep in. Then things changed, because I had to wake up between 6-6:30 a.m. to fix my kids’ lunches and get them ready for school. But last year, when I decided to train for my first marathon, I decided that I needed to start running in the mornings if I was to have any time left for my family.

So, I set out to make waking up early a habit. I started by getting up at 5:30 a.m., then at 5 a.m. When that became a habit, and I had to wake up at 4 a.m. or 3:30 a.m. for an early long run, it wasn’t a problem. And last November, when I decided to participate in NaNoWriMo, I decided to get up at 4 a.m. to write for at least an hour a day. Now that I completed that novel-writing goal, I don’t need to wake that early anymore, but have settled on a happy compromise of waking at 4:30 a.m. Some days, when I’m really tired (if I go to sleep late), I’ll wake at 5:00 or 5:30, but that’s still earlier than I used to wake up.

Here are my tips for becoming an early riser:

  • Don’t make drastic changes . Start slowly, by waking just 15-30 minutes earlier than usual. Get used to this for a few days. Then cut back another 15 minutes. Do this gradually until you get to your goal time.
  • Allow yourself to sleep earlier . You might be used to staying up late, perhaps watching TV or surfing the Internet. But if you continue this habit, while trying to get up earlier, sooner or later one is going to give. And if it is the early rising that gives, then you will crash and sleep late and have to start over. I suggest going to bed earlier, even if you don’t think you’ll sleep, and read while in bed . If you’re really tired, you just might fall asleep much sooner than you think.
  • Put your alarm clock far from you bed . If it’s right next to your bed, you’ll shut it off or hit snooze. Never hit snooze. If it’s far from your bed, you have to get up out of bed to shut it off. By then, you’re up. Now you just have to stay up.
  • Go out of the bedroom as soon as you shut off the alarm . Don’t allow yourself to rationalize going back to bed. Just force yourself to go out of the room. My habit is to stumble into the bathroom and go pee. By the time I’ve done that, and flushed the toilet and washed my hands and looked at my ugly mug in the mirror, I’m awake enough to face the day.
  • Do not rationalize . If you allow your brain to talk you out of getting up early, you’ll never do it. Don’t make getting back in bed an option.
  • Allow yourself to sleep in once in awhile . Despite what I just said in the previous point, once in awhile it’s nice to sleep in. As long as it’s not a regular thing. I do it maybe once a week or so.
  • Make waking up early a reward . Yes, it might seem at first that you’re forcing yourself to do something hard, but if you make it pleasurable, soon you will look forward to waking up early. My reward used to be to make a hot cup of coffee and read a book. I’ve recently cut out coffee, but I still enjoy reading my book. Other rewards might be a tasty treat for breakfast (smoothies! yum!) or watching the sunrise, or meditating. Find something that’s pleasurable for you, and allow yourself to do it as part of your morning routine.
  • Take advantage of all that extra time . Don’t wake up an hour or two early just to read your blogs, unless that’s a major goal of yours. Don’t wake up early and waste that extra time. Get a jump start on your day! I like to use that time to get a head start on preparing my kids’ lunches, on planning for the rest of the day (when I set my MITs), on exercising or meditating, and on reading. By the time 6:30 rolls around, I’ve done more than many people do the entire day.
  • Enjoy the break of dawn ! As much as you can, look outside (or better yet, get outside!) and watch the sky turn light. It’s beautiful. And it’s quiet and peaceful. It’s now my favorite time of day. Getting up early is a reward in itself for me.

English grammar practice exercise for intermediate level: used to vs. be used to and get used to.

Used to + verb infinitive refers to a state or habit in the past:

We used to live there when I was a child.
I used to hate vegetables but now I love them.

If you are used to something, it is not strange, new or difficult for you:
I am used to waking up early in the morning. It doesn’t bother me.

There’s a full explanation of this grammar at the bottom of the page.

Exercise instructions

Choose the best answer to fill the gap in each of the following.

🖨 Printable version

Are you a teacher? Need a PDF handout of this exercise for your classroom or for your online teaching?

Grammar: used to, be used to, get used to

Used to
Used to + verb infinitive refers to a habit or state in the past. It is used only in the past simple tense.
Past habits
If you used to do something, you did it for a period of time in the past, but you don’t do it any more.
We used to live there when I was a child.
I used to walk to school every day when I was a child.
Past states
We also say used to to express a state that existed in the past but doesn’t exist now. States are NOT actions. We express states with stative verbs such as have, believe, know and like.
I used to like The Beatles, but now I never listen to them.
He used to have long hair, but now it’s very short.
I used to believe in magic when I was a child.
Structure of questions:
did(n’t) + subject + use to be
Did(n’t) he use to work in your office?
Structure of negative:
subject + didn’t + use to be
I didn’t use to like wine, but now I love it.
Be used to
If you are used to something, you have often done or experienced it; it is not strange, new or difficult for you.

Speakspeak – your free resource

Speakspeak.com is a free site. We reach thousands of teachers, learners and other users every day and rely on the support of visitors to keep the site running.

You can support us by purchasing worksheets or one of our e-books. You’ll learn something and keep us going at the same time! Thanks.

How to get used to waking up early for school

For some mysterious reason, waking up early is one of the hardest habits to cultivate. Here are 21 tips you can use to wake up early and stay up. 🙂 The ones that work best for me are #1, #5, #6, and #12:

  1. Have a compelling reason to wake up early. Why do you want to wake up early? To get more work done? To get a head start in your day? To be healthier? Almost all attempts to wake up early fail because there isn’t a strong enough reason driving this habit change. Back when I just wanted to wake up early for the sake of it, I failed miserably. But after I got clear of my real motivations, including because I want to be healthier and I’ve seen how waking earlier makes me more productive, I started to do so successfully. If you really want to wake up early, get clear of why you want to do it.
  2. Cut out the stimulants that affect your sleep schedule, namely caffeine and alcohol. These factors mess around with your sleep cycle and the quality of your sleep, which subsequently affects your waking time.
  3. Make a transition. If you always wake up at 10-11am, waking up immediately at 5am the next day may be a big jolt. Start off by improving your waking time by 30 min each day until you reach your goal.
  4. Create accountability. Share your goal with your friends/family/acquaintances. This creates accountability on your end to wake up early.
  5. Understand what’s causing you to wake up late. And tackle them. Maybe you keep waking up late because you tend to work late. Shift these work items to the morning. If you exercise late at night, then change your exercise to the morning. A study has shown that doing high-intensity exercise before sleep increases the time you take to fall asleep. If you’re always playing games or doing stimulating work activity before sleep, then have a cut off 30 minutes before you sleep, to wind down and prepare for sleep.
  6. Understand that sleeping late doesn’t make you more productive. I used to sleep late because I would be working, which led me to wake up late. However, I later realized that sleeping late doesn’t make me more productive. Ultimately when you sleep late, you wake up late — or you wake up on time (due to work) and become tired the next day and can’t operate at your highest level. I realized that when I wake up early, even when my waking hours are the same, I’m significantly more focused and hence productive. Read: Why I Wake Up Early
  7. Plan a non-negotiable agenda for the next day. This agenda should start right from the point you are supposed to wake up, right till your day ends. If you don’t wake up, you will mess up your schedule for the day and end up with a backlog of work at the end.
  8. Create urgency. Set up extremely important and urgent tasks as the first items of the day so you have to wake up and finish them. Rather than sleep late to do these, wake up early to do them instead. Another way is to fix an appointment with someone early in the morning. This should be someone important whom you cannot cancel on. This has always been an effective way for me. But if you have a chronic inability to wake up early, please try other methods first. You don’t want to risk ruining your reputation and your relationship with the person if you end up oversleeping!
  9. Place your goal in a prominent spot: Environmental reinforcement of your goal will reinforce it consciously and subconsciously in your mind. If you have a notice board, put your goal to wake up early on the board. Other options are to stick a post-it note in front of your computer or set it as your wallpaper.
  10. Get a morning call service. Examples are Wake Up Land and Wake Up Dialer. Or you can ask someone whom you know will be awake at that time to call you.
  11. Work on the goal with someone. If you have a friend who wants to wake up early too, this will give you more motivation to wake up early. If you know someone who is an early riser, get inspiration from their lifestyle.
  12. Sleep earlier. Be realistic. If you target to wake up at 5am, don’t turn in at only 2am the night before and expect to wake up on time. You are more than likely going to fail in your goal! It is the times when I sleep early and have sufficient rest when waking early becomes an easy task.
  13. Set your alarm clock (with the correct time). Probably goes without saying, but you can’t believe the number of times people told me that they woke up late because they forgot to set their alarm or they had set their alarm time wrongly! If you are trying to create a new sleep routine, an alarm clock will be essential in the first few weeks. Once you get into the routine, you will likely wake up automatically at around the same time without an alarm.
  14. Set multiple alarm clocks at the same or different times (5 minutes apart from each other). If you are a heavy sleeper, this is for you.
  15. Put your alarm clock(s) really far (but still audible) such that you need to get off your bed to reach it. Of course, don’t go back to bed after you turn it off!
  16. Switch your alarm to your favorite music (most mobile phones today have this function). What better way to wake up to a new day than to listen to your favorite song? By the time the music finishes playing, you will be more awake and ready to get up.
  17. Before you sleep, mentally recite the time you want to wake up. This may sound bogus, but it works for me. Initially I thought it was just me, until someone told me recently that he was able to wake up early using this method (which he learned from his friend, who was able to wake up early using the same method too). Our subconscious works in mysterious ways. Of course, you need to ensure you have enough sleep (#12), otherwise it is pointless.
  18. Meditate before you sleep. Meditation helps clear mental clutter, something that our sleep does too. This makes it easier to sleep. I find that when I meditate before I sleep, I fall asleep much easier. I also wake up earlier, like 30 minutes to an hour earlier, and feel much clearer in my mind the next morning. Read: How To Meditate in 5 Simple Steps
  19. Get out of the bed once you hear the alarm. You all know how it feels in the morning when you wake up – the voice in your head is coaxing you to go to sleep despite your best intention to want to wake up. Instead of giving it the chance to speak, haul yourself out of your bed the second the alarm rings. While you may feel like a zombie for the first 10 minutes, the sleepiness wears off after that. Before you know it, you will be awake and ready to start the day.
  20. Establish it as a daily habit. Make it a daily habit. It’s much easier to maintain a daily habit than one that’s only 5 days a week. If you have to keep balancing different timing schedules on weekdays and weekends, your body clock has to constantly adjust and this makes your task much harder.
  21. Use a combination of the tips above. Don’t be modest and use only 1-2 of the tips above. As you already know, waking up early can be difficult in itself. Combine as many of the tips to drive up your chances of success! This is also known as the military tactic of ‘overwhelming force’ where you overinvest your resources to ensure your success.

No matter what happens, don’t give up. Waking up early can be difficult, but as long as you keep trying, you will get there. Good luck! 🙂

Get the manifesto version of this article: 21 Tips To Wake Up Early [Manifesto]

This is part of the Cultivate Good Habits Series. Check out the full series:

How to get used to waking up early for school
In societies the world over, teenagers are blamed for staying up late, then struggling to wake up in the morning. While it’s true that plenty of teenagers (like many adults) do have bad bedtime habits, researchers have long since proven that this global problem has a biological cause.

In 2004, researchers at the University of Munich proved that teenagers actually have a different sense of time. Their study showed that the 24-hour cycle which determines when you wake and sleep gets later during your teens, reaching its latest point by the age of 20.

After 20, the body’s waking and sleeping times gradually get earlier again, until at 55 you naturally wake about the same time as you did when you were 10. The link between the movements of this biological clock and the process of puberty was so strong that the researchers suggested this “peak lateness” at the end of the teenage years could be the biological marker for the end of puberty.

Sleep deprived

At about the same time the Munich study came out, Russell Foster at the University of Oxford made a key breakthrough in the neuroscience of time. By raising blind mice, Foster was able to show that all mammals’ sleep times depended on sunlight only. This means that biological time – which determines when you feel sleepy – is different from social time, which is set by clocks and customs about when things should be done.

When biological time and social time clash, it can lead to sleep deprivation. The social starting times for school and university – typically between 7.30am and 8.30am – are too early for teenagers the world over. The biological changes that teenagers go through mean they need to go to bed later, wake up later and get up to eight or nine hours of sleep.

As it stands, many teenagers are losing two to three hours of sleep every school night. As Steven Lockley at the University of Harvard concluded, this is systematic, unrecoverable sleep loss – and a danger to teenagers’ health.

An easy fix?

The solution is simple in theory: starting times should be adjusted to reflect the fact that teenagers need later starts as they get older. But in practice, there are three major challenges: proving that early starts directly damage teenagers’ health, identifying the best starting time, and overcoming education officials’ reluctance to change traditional early starts.
How to get used to waking up early for school

The US Centre for Disease Control and Prevention has drawn together many scientific studies to demonstrate that US schools should set later starting times. There is extensive medical evidence about the harms of starting school or university too early: doing so places teenage students at greater risk of obesity, depression, drug use and bad grades.

The American Medical Association now recommends that no classes for teenagers should begin before 8.30am. Yet early starts are still common in many countries around the world, among them Australia, UK, France and Sweden. There is further evidence that later starts are even better: studies show there are clear health benefits for 13 to 16-year-olds who start school at 10am.

Mariah Evans at the University of Nevada, Reno used new methods to identify the best times for teenagers aged 18 to 19. Her conclusion was dramatic: much later starting times of 11am or even 12pm are best for cognition.

Schools and parents all over the world need to change how they treat teenagers: rather than blaming them for being sleepy in the mornings, let them wake and sleep later to match their biological time. By starting schools and universities later we’ll raise safer, healthier and smarter teens at no real cost. It’s only a matter of time.

Author Bio: Paul Kelley is Honorary Associate in Sleep, Circadian and Memory Neuroscience at The Open University

Waking up early is not anyone’s favorite thing to do if we’re being completely honest. If waking up on time is something comes naturally easy to you, you’re very lucky. For those of us that lack this skill, here are 10 tips on how to wake up early for class, a meeting, work, or just to get our day started:

1. Try not to eat after 9pm

This can be hard for people who get out of class or work late and still need to eat dinner, but it’s super important not to eat a lot of food this late. Digesting can take longer at this late hour and leave you up tossing and turning in bed, which will result in you having a harder time waking up when you finally fall asleep.

2. Drink a cup of cold water as soon as you get up

It’s really important to start drinking water the second you wake up so you can stay hydrated throughout the day, but drinking one glass or bottle of cold water right when you wake up will alarm your senses with the cool liquid and cause you to wake up easily.

3. Try NOT to press snooze

This is definitely really hard. Pressing snooze the second our alarm goes off is something we’re all guilty of. However, try not to. If you press snooze and go back to sleep, waking up the second time will be even harder. Try an app like Sleep Cycle, which I’ve personally used and love. It measures your movements during your sleep so it can tell when you’re at the lowest and highest points of sleep. At your lowest points, it will signal an alarm and you’re more likely to wake up for it—and stay up.

4. Stretch as soon as you wake up

There are some great stretching moves you can find on YouTube that will make you wake up. You can even do them in bed! By stretching your muscles and moving around, you’re going to wake up a lot easier and not be so grumpy. Plus, you’ll feel looser and more comfortable throughout the day!

5. Attempt to wake up at the same time everyday

This may seem impossible for you, but if you wake up at the same time everyday, you’ll get into the routine of waking up then and you’ll no longer have trouble getting out of sleep. Therefore, if you have a 9am class everyday, try to get up at 8:15 every single day, even on weekends and days off. Soon, you’ll be so used to waking up then that your body will just naturally get you out of sleep.

How to get used to waking up early for school

5 reasons to wake up early in the morning for students in a boarding school

    CSKM Public School 2020-05-13 01:35

Waking up early is a bit difficult for most of us. It takes a lot of effort, will power, and dedication to wake up early in the morning. But once you start doing it, your lifestyle changes instantly. You start doing things properly and at the right time.

Here are the five reasons to wake up early in the morning:

Helps you schedule your daily activities

Students who wake up early can make a perfect schedule for study and sports. It helps them to adopt a well-balanced lifestyle for sure. Waking up early allows you to organize daily tasks properly and utilize the time efficiently.

Keeps your health in check

Whether you are focused towards your health or not, rising early in the morning offers great health benefit to you. It lowers down the stress level from students’ mind and empowers them with an extra active mind to capture information quickly in their classes.

Improves quality of sleep

Waking up early makes you sleep early in the evening and hence improves the quality of your sleep. The quality sleep relieves stress and gets your mind into more action for catching things fastly during school classes.

Make you smile & confident

Waking up early leads to a good schedule, which significantly leads to a good smile and confidence the whole day in the class. The smile comes from huge confident, which comes from the little exercise or walk early in the morning.

Way to success

We all have heard “Early to bed and early to rise makes a man healthy, wealthy and wise”, which is written by Ben Franklin. It means a lot and takes you to the right track of life.

The hostel facilities and staff at CSKM boarding school teach all the students to wake up early in the morning. The day boarding school stands on the pillars of discipline and detailed knowledge to prepare the best future making students for this country.

I refer to the suggestion by a letter writer for schools to start later (“For working parents, more time to spend with children if school starts later”; Feb 28).

How to get used to waking up early for school

TODAY file photo

I refer to the suggestion by a letter writer for schools to start later (“For working parents, more time to spend with children if school starts later”; Feb 28).

It is useful for students to start school early because it is part of the training to instil discipline in their lives.

Adult Singaporeans who have gone through this regime in their school years, including myself, would have benefited from this habit and to know that, as with most important things in life, difficulties can be overcome when you have the discipline. There are often important jobs or tasks which require you to wake up early.

In the army, for example, soldiers undergoing training will not be tough and disciplined if they are allowed to wake up late or as they please. For boys in school now who are accustomed to waking up early, they will likely not have a problem adjusting to National Service.

Above all, it is when a child is young that he can be trained. Like the Chinese saying goes: Bend the bamboo when it is a shoot.

The older the shoot grows, the harder it will be to bend it. So let us not undo the good training that our school students have been getting.

Laureen Miles Brunelli is an experienced online writer and editor, specializing in content for parents who work at home.

How to get used to waking up early for school

Ann-Louise T. Lockhart, PsyD, ABPP, is a board-certified pediatric psychologist, parent coach, author, speaker, and owner of A New Day Pediatric Psychology, PLLC.

How to get used to waking up early for school

Verywell / Nusha Ashjaee

Those first mornings of the school year can be tough. But if you don’t get an efficient school morning routine in place as the kids go back to school, it may not get better later in the school year. Plan and streamline your school morning routine, and you will get everyone back to school with less stress.

Wake Up Early

On the first days back to school, start your morning 15 to 20 minutes earlier than you think you need to. As the school year goes on, you may be able to adjust your wake-up times. But having a little extra time is a great cushion for those unexpected hiccups everyone experiences.

Some parents find that it’s helpful for them to get up earlier than their kids, especially if they are trying to get out the door to work. Figure out how much interruption-free time you need before your kids get up. For instance, do you need your morning coffee before you see their bright, cheery faces?

Of course, other parents can roll out of bed, wake their kids, and get started on the day together. Regardless of what works for your family, a few extra minutes in the morning as you adjust to the beginning of the school year can be a real lifesaver.

Wake-up time is directly related to bedtime, especially with younger kids. You may want to start the school year with an early bedtime and adjust later​ if it seems warranted.

Get It Done the Night Before

For a smooth school morning, it helps to plan ahead. Encourage your kids to do what they can the night before. Before bed, make sure lunches are packed, clothes are laid out, breakfast is planned, devices are charging, and homework and other necessities are packed for school.

Some families find that taking showers and baths in the evenings are helpful, especially if your kids still need help with these. If this is the case for your family, consider making these things part of the kids’ bedtime routine.

Depending on your child’s age, they may be able to do many of these tasks on their own, with supervision from you. Encouraging kids to prepare for the next day teaches important life skills like independence and time management. So don’t shy away from assigning your kids some of this work.

Many families find it useful to have a designated space in their home where they keep everything that is needed for the next day: backpacks, chargers, electronics, keys, shoes, water bottles, and any other necessities. Doing so saves them from running around the house the next morning looking for what they need.

Learn to Delegate

When kids are little, parents often do most everything for them, and sometimes they just stay in that habit even as they get older. A new school year is an ideal time to take a look at your child’s skills and add new jobs to their morning routine.

Start practicing over the summer or on the weekends first. Teaching new skills on a hectic school morning may not be effective.

If you want your kids to take care of a chore that you’ve previously done for them, like feeding the dog, making their own lunch, or getting dressed, spend time teaching these skills when you’re not rushed. Don’t try to squeeze lessons into an already busy school morning.

Don’t Sweat Breakfast

” data-caption=”” data-expand=”300″ data-tracking-container=”true” />

Verywell / Nusha Ashjaee

While it’s true that breakfast is important—some even argue that it’s the most important meal of the day—it doesn’t have to create extra pressure for you or your kids. Plan some easy breakfast meals that you can have on hand for your family.

Aside from cereal and milk, hard boiled eggs, yogurt, fruit, oatmeal, whole-grain bread or waffles, and smoothies make great breakfast options and are easy to grab in a rush. You even can make use of the breakfast offered by your child’s school or daycare, if this option is offered. The key is that you aren’t allowing breakfast to throw a wrench into getting the day started.

Another way to solve breakfast issues is to ask your kids what they want for breakfast the night before. Some kids can’t plan that far in advance, but just starting them thinking can be helpful. Kids will respond much better if they know the night before that you’re out of their favorite cereal, rather than when they are still foggy from sleep.

Make having breakfast every day a priority. Not only will it help nourish your kids, but it gives them a good start for the day and will allow them the energy they need to adjust to a new school year.

Have a Checklist

Trying to remember everything that needs to be done can be a challenge, especially at the beginning of the school year. Some families find it useful to develop a checklist for their morning routine. You might include items such as:

  • Brush hair and teeth
  • Wash face
  • Get dressed
  • Eat breakfast
  • Put on shoes
  • Grab lunch and devices
  • Double-check backpack
  • Use the bathroom
  • Turn off the lights

Even after kids get used to all the elements of the morning routine, you may need to double-check to be sure all the items have been completed. Some kids like to skip steps, like brushing their teeth.

Give Kids an Incentive

Sometimes kids need a little more motivation to get through their morning routines, especially if they don’t like school, are grumpy in the mornings, or are simply slow movers. To keep your mornings from becoming a battle, consider developing some incentives for your kids to get ready on time.

For instance, some kids will be sure they accomplish all their tasks if they know they are going to be allowed to play a game, read a book, or watch television before school. If you plan to motivate your kids with these types of rewards, make sure you build in a little extra time so they can enjoy them.

Having some time to relax before school can be a great way to decompress and may even help facilitate better focus and learning.

A Word From Verywell

You may need to tinker with your morning routine until it works for everyone involved. Be creative in your solutions and do what works best for your family. There are no right and wrong answers when it comes to establishing your family’s morning routine. With a little time and creativity, you will soon have a morning routine that works for the entire family.

How to get used to waking up early for school

How to get used to waking up early for school

by Jordan Lejuwaan

It is well to be up before daybreak, for such habits contribute to health, wealth, and wisdom.
– Aristotle

Are morning people born or made? In my case it was definitely made. In my early 20s, I rarely went to bed before midnight, and I’d almost always sleep in late. I usually didn’t start hitting my stride each day until late afternoon.

But after a while I couldn’t ignore the high correlation between success and rising early, even in my own life. On those rare occasions where I did get up early, I noticed that my productivity was almost always higher, not just in the morning but all throughout the day. And I also noticed a significant feeling of well-being. So being the proactive goal-achiever I was, I set out to become a habitual early riser. I promptly set my alarm clock for 5AM…

… and the next morning, I got up just before noon.

I tried again many more times, each time not getting very far with it. I figured I must have been born without the early riser gene. Whenever my alarm went off, my first thought was always to stop that blasted noise and go back to sleep. I tabled this habit for a number of years, but eventually I came across some sleep research that showed me that I was going about this problem the wrong way. Once I applied those ideas, I was able to become an early riser consistently.

It’s hard to become an early riser using the wrong strategy. But with the right strategy, it’s relatively easy.

The most common wrong strategy is this: You assume that if you’re going to get up earlier, you’d better go to bed earlier. So you figure out how much sleep you’re getting now, and then just shift everything back a few hours. If you now sleep from midnight to 8am, you figure you’ll go to bed at 10pm and get up at 6am instead. Sounds very reasonable, but it will usually fail.

It seems there are two main schools of thought about sleep patterns. One is that you should go to bed and get up at the same times every day. It’s like having an alarm clock on both ends — you try to sleep the same hours each night. This seems practical for living in modern society. We need predictability in our schedules. And we need to ensure adequate rest.

The second school says you should listen to your body’s needs and go to bed when you’re tired and get up when you naturally wake up. This approach is rooted in biology. Our bodies should know how much rest we need, so we should listen to them.

Through trial and error, I found out for myself that both of these schools are suboptimal sleep patterns. Both of them are wrong if you care about productivity. Here’s why:

If you sleep set hours, you’ll sometimes go to bed when you aren’t sleepy enough. If it’s taking you more than five minutes to fall asleep each night, you aren’t sleepy enough. You’re wasting time lying in bed awake and not being asleep. Another problem is that you’re assuming you need the same number of hours of sleep every night, which is a false assumption. Your sleep needs vary from day to day.

If you sleep based on what your body tells you, you’ll probably be sleeping more than you need — in many cases a lot more, like 10-15 hours more per week (the equivalent of a full waking day). A lot of people who sleep this way get 8+ hours of sleep per night, which is usually too much. Also, your mornings may be less predictable if you’re getting up at different times. And because our natural rhythms are sometimes out of tune with the 24-hour clock, you may find that your sleep times begin to drift.

The optimal solution for me has been to combine both approaches. It’s very simple, and many early risers do this without even thinking about it, but it was a mental breakthrough for me nonetheless. The solution was to go to bed when I’m sleepy (and only when I’m sleepy) and get up with an alarm clock at a fixed time (7 days per week). So I always get up at the same time (in my case 5am), but I go to bed at different times every night.

I go to bed when I’m too sleepy to stay up. My sleepiness test is that if I couldn’t read a book for more than a page or two without drifting off, I’m ready for bed. Most of the time when I go to bed, I’m asleep within three minutes. I lie down, get comfortable, and immediately I’m drifting off. Sometimes I go to bed at 9:30pm; other times I stay up until midnight. Most of the time I go to bed between 10-11pm. If I’m not sleepy, I stay up until I can’t keep my eyes open any longer. Reading is an excellent activity to do during this time, since it becomes obvious when I’m too sleepy to read.

When my alarm goes off every morning, I turn it off, stretch for a couple seconds, and sit up. I don’t think about it. I’ve learned that the longer it takes me to get up, the more likely I am to try to sleep in. So I don’t allow myself to have conversations in my head about the benefits of sleeping in once the alarm goes off. Even if I want to sleep in, I always get up right away.

After a few days of using this approach, I found that my sleep patterns settled into a natural rhythm. If I got too little sleep one night, I’d automatically be sleepier earlier and get more sleep the next night. And if I had lots of energy and wasn’t tired, I’d sleep less. My body learned when to knock me out because it knew I would always get up at the same time and that my wake-up time wasn’t negotiable.

A side effect was that on average, I slept about 90 minutes less per night, but I actually felt more well-rested. I was sleeping almost the entire time I was in bed.

I read that most insomniacs are people who go to bed when they aren’t sleepy. If you aren’t sleepy and find yourself unable to fall asleep quickly, get up and stay awake for a while. Resist sleep until your body begins to release the hormones that rob you of consciousness. If you simply go to bed when you’re sleepy and then get up at a fixed time, you’ll cure your insomnia. The first night you’ll stay up late, but you’ll fall asleep right away. You may be tired that first day from getting up too early and getting only a few hours of sleep the whole night, but you’ll slog through the day and will want to go to bed earlier that second night. After a few days, you’ll settle into a pattern of going to bed at roughly the same time and falling asleep right away.

So if you want to become an early riser (or just exert more control over your sleep patterns), then try this: Go to bed only when you’re too sleepy to stay up, and get up at a fixed time every morning.

This sounds like a stupid question but how do some of you wake up early? (As in 5-6AM) I really want to do this so I can fit in revision time but I’m either too tired to get out of bed, or (most of the time) it’s way too cold for me to get up so I end up getting out of bed at 7AM.

I’m in 2nd year A levels and I’m struggling to fit in time to catch up with college work, I’m willing to try out literally any suggestions, thankyou How to get used to waking up early for school

(Original post by sam72016)
This sounds like a stupid question but how do some of you wake up early? (As in 5-6AM) I really want to do this so I can fit in revision time but I’m either too tired to get out of bed, or (most of the time) it’s way too cold for me to get up so I end up getting out of bed at 7AM.

I’m in 2nd year A levels and I’m struggling to fit in time to catch up with college work, I’m willing to try out literally any suggestions, thankyou How to get used to waking up early for school

I wake up at around 5 daily for my commute. Although in my last job I had to wake up at 2am to start my 4am shift.

First thing is routine. Forcing yourself up early enough times will make you used to it. Even on the weekends when I don’t need to wake I still do very early.

The hardest part for me is kicking myself into gear once I’m actually awake. I just want to lay in bed most of the time. My solution to this is to keep a bottle of water, some vitamin b12 and Vitamin D sprays by my bed. I’ll drink some water, take some vits, and if needed take a sip of red bull too which definitely helps.

(Original post by abcthe123)
I wake up at around 5 daily for my commute. Although in my last job I had to wake up at 2am to start my 4am shift.

First thing is routine. Forcing yourself up early enough times will make you used to it. Even on the weekends when I don’t need to wake I still do very early.

The hardest part for me is kicking myself into gear once I’m actually awake. I just want to lay in bed most of the time. My solution to this is to keep a bottle of water, some vitamin b12 and Vitamin D sprays by my bed. I’ll drink some water, take some vits, and if needed take a sip of red bull too which definitely helps.

Beware of drinking too many. They are really not good for you.
Is there anyone in your family who is up early? They could nag you
Try to make sure your room is warm so you’re not so reluctant.
Bit old fashioned but I like my little drinks maker.
It makes me a warm drink as the alarm goes off.
And you could try a daylight alarm. It brightens gradually for a few minutes to wake you naturally before the alarm rings

Swan STM200N Teasmade – Rapid Water Boiler with Clock and Alarm Featuring a Reading light and LCD Analogue Clock Light with Auto Dimmer and a 600ml Water Tank, 780-850W, White https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B00WOE4Z. _LHoiEbVVWQANY

FITFORT Alarm Clock Wake Up Light-Sunrise/Sunset Simulation Table Bedside Lamp Eyes Protection [New Generation] with FM Radio, Nature Sounds and Touch Control Function (White), Green https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B07CQVM7. _xIoiEbD2MK7WA

(Original post by Sammylou40)
Beware of drinking too many. They are really not good for you.
Is there anyone in your family who is up early? They could nag you
Try to make sure your room is warm so you’re not so reluctant.
Bit old fashioned but I like my little drinks maker.
It makes me a warm drink as the alarm goes off.
And you could try a daylight alarm. It brightens gradually for a few minutes to wake you naturally before the alarm rings

Swan STM200N Teasmade – Rapid Water Boiler with Clock and Alarm Featuring a Reading light and LCD Analogue Clock Light with Auto Dimmer and a 600ml Water Tank, 780-850W, White https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B00WOE4Z. _LHoiEbVVWQANY

FITFORT Alarm Clock Wake Up Light-Sunrise/Sunset Simulation Table Bedside Lamp Eyes Protection [New Generation] with FM Radio, Nature Sounds and Touch Control Function (White), Green https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B07CQVM7. _xIoiEbD2MK7WA

Firstly, take everything I’m saying with a grain of salt. I’m notoriously bad amongst my friendship group as having the worst sleep schedule and have even gotten so little sleep at nights that I’ve missed parties by sleeping through the next evening, so this advice could quite possibly be wrong.

Although, one thing I would say is that just because you get a lot of sleep “for an A-Level student”, doesn’t mean you should be getting less. Most A-Level students need more sleep but can’t sleep, some due to stress, others just procrastinating work until it’s 3am. If anything, you’re fortunate for getting enough sleep, and can always adjust your routine gradually if you want to get up earlier (say, go to bed 10 minutes earlier every night).

Whenever I do wake up early, like when I did the mock trial or coming in for morning revision before mocks, here are some of the things that I would do:

If you have an Android phone, there’s an app called AMdroid (I think). I found it through searching “alarm clocks for heavy sleepers”. Messing with the settings gives you an option to turn on two factor verification, so it’s essentially two alarms where you need to verify you’re awake (about 5-10 minutes after the initial alarm, although you can set it to whatever you want) or you’ll get woken up again. I assume there’s an Apple alternative, but I don’t know what it would be.

Secondly, it’s quite a common strategy but it’s certainly effective. Simply placing your alarm clock away from your bed so you’re forced to get out and move around.

If the temperature is a problem for you, leave out comfortable, thick clothes right by your bed. If possible, sleep in them so you wake up warm and can feel ready when you’re waking up. For me personally, the temperature is one of my main issues as well, so I always have a few hoodies easily accessible from my bed, but everyone has different clothing choices so anything would work, I imagine.

Also, as someone else has said, force yourself to get up for a few days despite the discomfort. After a few days or maybe a week, you’ll be in a routine and it’ll become a lot easier if you do it consistently

Sorry if these are ineffective, as I mentioned, I’m not really an early bird so I can’t say with certainty that these will work, but good luck regardless!

How to get used to waking up early for school

    Share article

Remove Save to favorites

Save to favorites

Common sense, as a general idea, seems easy to define. But when it comes to the time that middle and high school students start school in most places across the United States, the education community has been doing it wrong—with numerous, hard-to-ignore studies, sleep experts, and national organizations rightly blasting the negative impact on adolescents to begin class around 7:30 a.m.

On this topic, most schools have been in the Dark Ages, literally and figuratively. The vast majority of districts do not heed recommendations by the American Academy of Pediatrics to hold off beginning middle and high school until 8:30 a.m.

For advocates of a later start time for secondary schools, it was a brief ray of hope to learn of California’s recent progress on the matter, with lawmakers there approving a bill that would require all middle and high schools to begin after 8:30 a.m. Unfortunately, Gov. Jerry Brown, citing that the decision should be made by local school boards, vetoed the legislation late last month.

When you consider the negative impact of an early school day on adolescents and pre-adolescents, the facts can no longer be ignored.”

Even with the California setback, the movement to push back school start times is gaining momentum nationally. From Saco, Maine, to Seattle, many districts have already successfully pushed back the start times of high schools and middle schools—and with largely positive results. For instance, according to the nonprofit group Start School Later, Saco schools have seen a 40 percent drop in tardiness, an almost 50 percent reduction in student visits to the nurse, and staff reports that students are more alert and ready to learn since they moved to a later start time in 2016.

Scores rise, too, when schools align their schedules with adolescent biological clocks. In 2014, a three-year, 9,000-student study from researchers at the University of Minnesota found that students whose high schools changed their schedules to start at 8:30 a.m. or later improved their performance in English, math, science, social studies, and standardized tests .

So, if the research is clear that making this change yields an overwhelmingly positive outcome, the burning question is: Why has this taken so long? And: When will other districts follow suit?

The answers are muddied by a mix of factors, ranging from a shift in family schedules, potential budget adjustments to accommodate more buses, challenges with after-school sports and activities, and the prospect of having students complete their homework later at night than they already do. But the main issue, experts studying the change agree, is one of simple inconvenience. Schools and their communities have been so accustomed to the current schedule that many are resistant to change. It’s much easier to do what has always been done.

However, when you consider the negative impact of an early school day on adolescents and pre-adolescents, the facts can no longer be ignored. Thirteen- to 18-year-olds require 8 to 10 hours of sleep daily, according to the American Academy of Sleep Medicine. Circadian rhythms during puberty force teens to go to bed later and sleep later in the morning. Anyone who has taught middle and high school, or has a child in this age range, can attest to this. (Forehead on the dining room table during breakfast, anyone?) School start times forcing teens to wake up before 6 a.m. clearly do not align with teens’ sleep needs.

According to the American Academy of Pediatricians, adolescents who do not get the required amount of sleep are at risk for a host of serious physical problems, including obesity and diabetes; safety concerns, including drowsy driving; issues related to mental health, including increased anxiety, depression, and decreased motivation; and a decrease in school performance, such as cognitive impairment, problems with attention and memory, lower academic achievement, poor attendance, and higher dropout rate.

The author of the failed California bill, Democratic state senator Anthony J. Portantino, recently told The New York Times that forcing teens to get out of bed so early is “the biological equivalent of waking you or me up at 3:30 a.m. Imagine how you would feel if, 187 days a year, you had to get up at 3:30 a.m. You’d be miserable, you’d be depressed—you’d act like a teenager.”

With such compelling evidence, it makes one wonder how children in middle and high schools have been able to function well at all in school—at least during the early morning hours. It also calls to mind how an earlier start time could have helped millions of students who haven’t performed well, faced physical problems, or dropped out because they have had to wake up far earlier than they should have.

As author Daniel H. Pink states in his latest book, When, this is a remediable problem. “Starts matter,” he writes. “We can’t always control them. But this is one area where we can and therefore we must.”

Veteran educators know that, each year, communities throughout the country spend millions on costly new initiatives—technology, curriculum, new buildings, to name a few—many of which have marginal positive impact on student learning.

If school superintendents and boards of education were to examine the research behind secondary school start times, it is impossible to disagree: Outdated schedules are failing many students. We can no longer be complacent. As schools look for an answer to boost student attendance, performance, and engagement, making a change in start times for secondary students is an obvious solution.

Now, which districts will read the research and have the common sense—and the courage—to make the change?

A version of this article appeared in the October 03, 2018 edition of Education Week as School Start Times Matter

Here’s how to rise and truly shine in the morning — even if you aren’t a “morning person.”

Even as a child I hated waking up early in the morning. Something about being startled out of a deep sleep by a clanging alarm made me feel disoriented and lonely. Alas, now, as a working mother, I often have to wake early — to fit in a workout, check business emails, or make preparations for my children’s school days.

I still don’t like it.

For many of us, getting up before we would naturally is painful — because it’s too early, too sudden, or too dark. Is there a path to kinder, gentler awakenings? Yes, say sleep experts, but forging it is equal parts art and science.

Sleep Cycles

Humans go through four to six “sleep cycles” every night. Each cycle consists of five stages, ranging from very light sleep (stage 1) to very deep sleep (stage 4) and then the rapid eye movement stage, during which you are most likely to dream.

Waking up out of a deep stage 3 or stage 4 sleep is notoriously difficult. That’s why being awakened from a nap can be so disorienting. It’s also why waking too early in the morning can mean a miserable start to your day. “Most people hit their deepest sleep between 4 a.m. and 6 a.m.,” says WebMD sleep expert Michael Breus, PhD, D, ABSM, “so it’s very hard to wake up during that time.”

How Much Sleep Do You Need?

If you can avoid waking that early, the next step is to figure out what time you should go to bed to get a good night’s rest. Sleep cycles take, on average, about 90 minutes. “That means you need about 7.5 hours of sleep each night,” Breus says, “and if you count backwards from when you have to wake up, you can figure out what time you need to go to sleep in order to wake more easily.”

Of course, some people require six hours of sleep a night, while others need nine. To complicate matters further, sleep cycles range from 90 minutes to two hours. That’s where the “art” part of easy awakenings comes in. “Most people haven’t been told what time to go to bed since they were children,” Breus says. “So they have to listen to their body’s own rhythms to figure it out.”

After talking to Breus, I decided to stop trying to rise before 6 a.m. And since I have to get up at 7 a.m. to see my kids off to school, I made a firm “lights out at 11” rule for myself. Surprisingly, it works. After holding to this schedule for two weeks, I feel more rested, more relaxed, and more alert during the day.

Tips for Waking Up

Set your alarm for the latest possible moment so you’re not tempted to fall back asleep.

Lose the snooze button. You might go back to sleep for a few minutes each time you hit the knob, “but you’re getting crappy sleep,” Breus says. “You just feel worse.”

Sit up and swing your legs over the side of the bed.

Breathe deeply three or four times to orient yourself to the real world.

Exercise first thing in the morning to energize your mind and body and boost your fitness. But don’t choose exercise over getting the sleep you need.

Show Sources

SOURCES:
Michael Breus, PhD, D, ABSM, Scottsdale, AZ.

Re: “Pediatricians say later school starts will help teens” (Gazette, Aug. 28) Thursday’s Associated Press article describes the recommendation by the American Academy of Pediatrics to delay school start times for teenagers so that they can get more sleep.

Article content

Re: “Pediatricians say later school starts will help teens” (Gazette, Aug. 28)

Letter: Why teens have trouble waking up early for school Back to video

Thursday’s Associated Press article describes the recommendation by the American Academy of Pediatrics to delay school start times for teenagers so that they can get more sleep. Adolescents who have been studied in North America and Europe report having difficulty getting to sleep before 11 p.m. or midnight, generally require an adult to wake them for school, and are sleepy during class. Although teenagers require an average of 8-9 hours of sleep per night, they tend to average fewer than seven on school nights, according to research, resulting in serious cumulative sleep deprivation. Thus, delaying the start of the school day would allow teens to get needed sleep for optimal school performance, health, and driving safety.

Advertisement 2

Article content

The article in the Gazette does not, however, mention the reason for teenagers’ difficulties with the sleep/wake cycle that is dictated by school times. Many systems in the human body are on a “circadian,” or 24-hour, cycle such as body temperature, hormone secretion, alertness and sleep. The cues for sleep come from these circadian rhythms and are triggered by increases in the hormone melatonin; as daylight decreases, melatonin levels increase and we feel sleepy.

Ten years of research shows that this system changes after puberty such that adolescents do not start feeling sleepy until later in the evening — this is what’s called a sleep phase delay and is in response to a delayed increase in melatonin compared to the timing in children or older adults. The well-known tendency for teens to stay up late, have difficulty getting up for school, and to sleep until noon on weekends is not primarily due to personality issues but reflects natural biological changes; these delays in melatonin secretion are seen even in controlled laboratories without windows or clocks that manipulate artificial daylight.

Understanding that these changes in sleep patterns reflect biological changes in adolescence can go a long way to improving parent-teen relationships, and should indeed facilitate needed changes in the timing of the school day.

Suzanne King, Ph.D.

Professor of Psychiatry, McGill

Principal Investigator, Douglas Mental Health University Institute

Share this article in your social network

Share this Story: Letter: Why teens have trouble waking up early for school

Copy Link

  • Email
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Reddit
  • LinkedIn
  • Tumblr
  • Yup. Rise and shine! You read that right!
    As Wiz Khalifa’s tweet goes : “I used to think goin to sleep late was cool. Till i realized wakin up early is the real boss shit.”
    Take it from Wiz. Once you start waking up early you will not want to turn back.

    Once your alarm has gone off bright and early (and you ​haven’t​ hit snooze), it is an ideal time to pray, journal, reflect, or whatever else you can do to get yourself mentally prepared for the day. College can be difficult and draining at times, so it is essential for our mental health to take a moment each day to contemplate the day ahead and how to conquer it.

    The biggest reason that I wake up early, even and especially in college, is to allow ample time for me to get ready in the morning. My favorite part of the day is when I can wake up, shower and brush my teeth, and sit down and do my makeup while listening to a podcast or watching a morning talk show. Ambling my morning beauty routine while listening to or watching something that I enjoy gets me in a positive mood for the day while also giving me a daily dose of entertainment!

    After getting ready, you also will (finally) be able to have time to find a cute outfit! Digging through your dresser to find a clean pair of sweats and a t-shirt will be a thing of the past. Taking that extra five minutes to find a cute outfit to wear will leave you feeling confident throughout the day.

    With extra time in the morning, you can clean up the dorm or apartment before you head out the door. Studies have shown that a clean environment can result in a clean mind, so doing a quick pick up before I leave for class allows me to feel more relaxed when I get back. Yes, this even includes making the bed!

    Although it’s minor, it gives you time to double check that you have everything packed in your backpack that you will need for the day. It is pretty gut wrenching when you get to class and open your backpack only to remember that your textbook or laptop is sitting on your desk…

    That cup of tasteless coffee you quickly make in the dining hall? Forget about it. Wake up a few minutes earlier to prepare a ​good​ cup of coffee for yourself. If you would rather stop at The Brew or Starbucks on campus, now you have time and you don’t need to worry about being late to class.

    Along with a good cup of coffee, allowing extra time in the morning for a good breakfast will pay off throughout the day. Breakfast kick-starts your body’s metabolism, allowing you to burn more

    calories during the day. Eating a good breakfast — which you are able to do when you get out of bed just a few minutes earlier — gives your body an ample amount of energy to get you through the day. If you head to a dining hall in the morning before classes and eat a good meal, waking up early will not take as much of a toll on you as you’d think!

    Overall, you’ll just feel like you’re winning. It can take a lot of time and effort for someone to switch from waking up at 7:45 for an eight A.M. to someone who has a complete morning routine. Walking out of your building in the morning after being awake for an hour (or even longer!) will get you ready to take on your day.

    Waking up before you feel like you need to be can be a struggle in the beginning. For someone who loves to sleep myself, I have adapted over time to waking up early in the morning, and even on the first alarm without even thinking about it. Keep an open mind with it, and remember the benefits that it will bring as a college student and beyond.

    Author of Parenting With Presence (and Eckhart Tolle edition) and Parenting Without Power Struggles

    It’s almost impossible to wake my 17-year-old son up for school. He says that he wants my help getting up, but in the mornings, I have to threaten to leave without him to get him moving. We leave the house angry and out of sorts. How can I get him out of bed without having these daily battles?

    The adolescent brain would be much happier if school started at ten or eleven in the morning (if at all!). Instead of falling asleep at a reasonable hour that lets teens wake up cheerful and rested, many get their second wind at 10:00 p.m., staying up late and waking up cranky and out of sorts.

    Here’s my advice:

    • Find wake up alternatives. Many kids tune out a well-meaning parent’s efforts to get them to rise and shine, going back to sleep over and over. Others find it jarring to awaken to the piercing buzz of an alarm, launching them out of bed in a foul mood. Perhaps your son wants to waken to music; easy enough these days with alarm clocks that work off an iPod. Or he may want to gradually wake up with a clock that slowly introduces light into the room. Encourage your son to look for ways to awaken that aren’t dependent on you.

    • Give him a problem. If you are the only one who cares whether your son wakes up on time, you are going to come across as desperate and needy each morning. Instead, help him identify reasons for getting up on time that matter to him, so that he sees you as an ally who helps when he’s struggling with grogginess, rather than an enemy who is yanking him out of his warm and cozy bed.

    • Rule out other issues. Teens who are depressed find it difficult to get motivated to go to school. Those who are anxious may want to hide under the covers where they feel safe. And kids who are using alcohol, pot or other substances can also demonstrate significant difficulties with rolling out of the bed in the morning. Make sure your son is legitimately tired, and that there are no other factors influencing his sluggishness.

    • Don’t fuel the drama. The less you take your son’s behavior personally, the better able you’ll be to deal with him calmly. When kids are foggy and irritable, they to lash out at those they love. Don’t engage with him or defend yourself when he’s trying to blame you for his difficulties getting up. It will only make things worse.

    • Don’t talk too much! A sleepy adolescent is not capable of intelligent conversation or thoughtful reflection. Avoid reminding your son how foolish it was to stay up late the night before. Give up on having a meaningful discussion about how to make the mornings go more smoothly. While it will be important to strategize a new plan, the time do that is not when he’s rushed, angry, or barely able to function.

    • Wake up his brain. Play some loud rock and roll to help your son get out of his sleepy state. Offer him a protein shake or a few bites of breakfast to help give him a jump start. Some kids need nourishment to help them get moving in the morning when they haven’t eaten since the evening before.

    • Let go. Some parents have discovered that until their youngster suffers the consequences of sleeping through the alarm, they simply won’t make the effort to wake up on their own. Let your son know in advance that you are no longer willing to engage in power struggles with him in the morning, and that you will try once to wake him up and then he’s on his own. Missing the bus or having to walk because you’ve left for work may be what it takes for him to start taking responsibility for waking up without relying on you.

    While you can require a younger teen to shut off his computer and hand in his cell phone, at seventeen, your son is nearly an adult who may soon be out on his own. Help him move toward independence by taking responsibility for waking up, offering support but relinquishing control.

    Do you have a question for the Parent Coach? Send it to [email protected] and you could be featured in an upcoming column.

    Susan Stiffelman is the author of Parenting Without Power Struggles: Raising Joyful, Resilient Kids While Staying Cool, Calm and Connected. She is a family therapist, parent coach, and internationally recognized speaker on all subjects related to children, teens and parenting. To learn more, visit her Facebook page or sign up for her free newsletter.

    How to get used to waking up early for school

    Do you wake up at 5am every day?

    If not, I’m going to tell you how you can, even when you don’t feel like it.

    According to a new study, the time you decide to rise and shine could impact your overall mental and physical health.

    Let’s face it… getting up super early isn’t always fun, especially if you’re not used to doing it.

    Implementing a new habit into your life can be challenging. However, once you get passed the first few weeks, it becomes natural.

    Ready to discover how to wake up at 5am and the benefits that come with it?

    Watch the video below:

    Do you want to know 21 powerful morning rituals that will take your life to the next level? CLICK HERE to get instant access to my FREE morning rituals cheatsheet!

    This page contains affiliate links. If you purchase a product through one of them, I will receive a commission (at no additional cost to you). I only ever endorse products that I have personally used and benefitted from personally. Thank you for your support!

    Are you a morning person?

    Morning people tend to be “get up and go” types who feel proactive in the morning, wide awake at an early hour, and prefer to be productive before lunchtime. If this doesn’t describe you, but you have the desire to wake up earlier, I want you to know that I admire your commitment to personal growth.

    If you want to start waking up at 5am, you need to know the benefits of doing so and associate something positive to those benefits. Secondly, you need to know why you want to wake up at 5am. Your “why” is what is going to discipline you to get through the uncomfortable period of developing this new habit. Write down what those reasons are. They will motivate you to follow through.

    I know that by waking up at 5am, I am building discipline, willpower, and setting up my day for success. Psychologically, this gives me a huge advantage. Don’t get me wrong… waking up early didn’t always come naturally for me. I had to work at it. However, because I made it a core part of my morning ritual, over time it became easier. Today, I look forward to starting my day at 5am.

    Half of the battle of waking up at 5am is knowing what time you have to fall asleep.

    If you want to have a productive day, you must be getting a sufficient amount of sleep, at least 7 hours worth. I like to plan and schedule my bedtime. I do this by setting an alarm on my phone one hour before I intend to fall asleep.

    If you tend to be a nighthawk, I recommend taking Melatonin which is a natural supplement that helps make you drowsy. Similarly, if you are someone who tends to use your computer or phone before bed, I encourage you to invest in blue-blocking glasses. They will help make sure that your body continues to release melatonin.

    To ensure that you wake up at 5am, put your alarm clock on the other side of the room, so that you are forced to get out of bed to turn off the alarm. Also, try changing your alarm clock sound to a song that gets you pumped up and excited to start the day. When I hear my alarm go off, I smile. In doing so, I condition my mind to feel good about waking up early.

    If you want to take it a step further, find an early-riser friend and make a deal that you will call them at 5:10am. This is a great way to hold yourself accountable for waking up early. On that call, tell him or her 1-3 things that you will commit to accomplishing that day.

    This is how to wake up at 5am.

    Anyone can become a morning person. It starts with creating an empowering morning ritual and committing to sticking with it. I promise that once you become accustomed to waking up at 5am every day, your life will change for the better.

    Are you ready for the challenge? You can do it! I believe in you.

    Do you want to know 21 powerful morning rituals that will take your life to the next level? CLICK HERE to get instant access to my FREE morning rituals cheatsheet!

    How to get used to waking up early for school

    How to get used to waking up early for school

    Sanja Jelic, MD, is board-certified in sleep medicine, critical care medicine, pulmonary disease, and internal medicine.

    The goal of a good night’s sleep is to wake up in the morning feeling refreshed and ready to start your day. Unfortunately, due to a variety of factors, many people struggle with sleep inertia, which makes you want to go back to sleep. Here are seven things you can do to wake up easier and feel refreshed.

    Click Play for Tips to Wake Up Easier in the Morning

    This video has been medically reviewed by Rochelle Collins, DO.

    Put Your Alarm Clock Out of Reach

    Even from the deepest stages of sleep, an alarm clock will pull you back to consciousness. Hitting the snooze button, however, can return you to REM sleep. Though this phase of the sleep cycle is crucial and highly restorative, it is difficult to wake up when you’re in the middle of it.

    When your alarm goes off in the morning, you’re usually nearing the end of your last REM cycle, making it easier to wake up. When you hit snooze and go back to sleep, you can re-enter the REM phase and, as a result, wake up feeling foggy and disoriented.

    Get Light Exposure

    Exposure to morning light can have beneficial effects on promoting wakefulness by suppressing melatonin and increasing levels of serotonin. Our bodies follow a natural circadian rhythm and light has the strongest effect on this biological clock.

    Ideally, you would wake up to sunlight streaming in your window every day. Since that is not something most people can count on, sitting in front of a light box shortly upon awakening can mimic these favorable effects.

    Drink Caffeine

    Millions of people start their day with a caffeinated beverage like coffee or tea, and this is indeed an excellent way to wake up. Caffeine blocks adenosine, a chemical that makes us feel sleepy. Hence, a cup of coffee reduces fatigue and improves focus and concentration.

    The effects of caffeine can be felt 15 minutes after it’s consumed and generally continue for a few hours.

    Exercise and Be Active

    If you have trouble emerging from sleep and jump-starting your day, you may want to be active first thing in the morning. Scheduling a short period of exercise upon awakening can help get you going.

    Furthermore, getting regular exercise each day has been shown to improve your sleep overall.

    Eat Breakfast

    It seems like simple advice, but having breakfast is a great way to wake yourself up. Even a small morning meal can give you a burst of energy to get your day going. If you include a caffeinated beverage, you may get even more of a benefit. There is evidence that eating low-glycemic and high-protein foods at breakfast can increase morning energy levels.

    Maintain a Regular Sleep Schedule

    On average, adults need around eight hours of sleep per night, but the amount you need may vary.

    Our bodies prefer to follow regular patterns and our behavior can reinforce these natural circadian rhythms. One of the best ways to get a good night’s sleep and wake up on time is to establish a consistent sleep schedule. Research shows that too much variability in your bedtime and the time you wake up in the morning can lead to too little sleep.

    Treat Any Sleep Disorders

    Having a sleep disorder, such as insomnia or obstructive sleep apnea, may adversely affect your ability to get up in the morning.

    Alternatively, if you have a circadian rhythm sleep disorder such as delayed sleep phase syndrome, you may be prone to staying up late and sleeping in. Hence, being a night owl can have negative consequences.

    By seeking appropriate evaluation and treatment of any underlying sleep disorder, you may find it easier to wake up in the morning.

    Frequently Asked Questions

    How can you wake up more easily if it’s dark or cloudy outside?

    Expose yourself to as much light as possible. Morning light exposure is known to promote wakefulness. Natural sunlight is ideal, but bright light therapy (also called phototherapy) using a light box can have the same effect when it’s dark or cloudy outside.

    How can you wake up more easily if you’re a heavy sleeper?

    A variety of strategies have proven to be helpful for waking up more easily in the mornings. These include getting natural (or artificial) light exposure, putting your alarm clock out of reach (so you can’t hit the snooze button), and drinking a caffeinated beverage.

    Insomnia, Mood Disorders, and Circadian Rhythm Issues Can Be to Blame

    How to get used to waking up early for school

    How to get used to waking up early for school

    Keri Peterson, MD, is board-certified in internal medicine and operates a private practice, Age Well, in New York City.

    There’s something disappointing about waking up earlier than necessary. It may be nice to doze in and out of sleep in the early morning hours, but it is especially upsetting if you cannot fall back asleep. What might cause someone to wake up before the alarm clock goes off?

    There are specific conditions, including a fair number of sleep and mood disorders, which might cause chronic early morning awakenings to occur. By understanding these potential causes, you may be able to find a treatment that will keep you asleep until your desired wake time.

    How to get used to waking up early for school

    Insomnia

    The primary cause of chronic difficulty staying asleep near morning is insomnia, which is defined as difficulty falling or staying asleep and is frequently associated with early morning awakenings.

    These awakenings may occur throughout the night, but they tend to be more frequent in the second half of the night, due to a diminishing ability to sleep toward the morning hours.

    The ability to sleep is linked to two processes, one called the homeostatic sleep drive and the other being the circadian rhythm. The homeostatic sleep drive is the gradual desire for sleep that builds the longer a person stays awake, and relates to the gradual accumulation of a chemical in the brain called adenosine.

    This “sleepiness signal” eventually helps to initiate sleep; during sleep, it is cleared away so that midway through the night, the desire for sleep is depleted. By morning, it should be nearly gone.

    If a person wakes during the night—and especially if this awakening occurs toward morning—the ability to return to sleep will be compromised due to the lower levels of adenosine. Sleep may be greatly delayed, fragmented, or disrupted in insomnia, but awakenings near morning can be especially troublesome.

    Anxiety and Depression

    Any of the mood disorders, most notably anxiety and depression, can be associated with early morning awakenings, which typically occur in the several hours before the intended awakening.

    For example, if the alarm is set for 6 a.m., someone with depression may start waking at 4 a.m. for no good reason. How can this be addressed? As with insomnia, it is important to treat the underlying contributing factors that lead to these awakenings.

    In the setting of psychiatric distress, these problems can persist, so it is necessary to treat any coexisting depression or anxiety. This may require the use of medications or counseling, with assistance from a psychologist or psychiatrist.

    In fact, studies have shown that both used in combination are most effective. Insomnia is especially well-treated with cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBTI), an educational program that teaches a set of skills that improves chronic difficulty sleeping.  

    It is clear that sleep can undermine mood, and conversely, mood problems can greatly affect sleep. By working on both issues together, the complex relationship can be unraveled.

    Sleep Apnea

    It may seem peculiar to imagine that a breathing disorder such as obstructive sleep apnea may contribute to early morning awakenings.   To better understand this relationship, it is necessary to carefully consider the structure of sleep.

    It is artificial (but useful) to divide the night in half when considering the stages of sleep. In the first half of the night, slow-wave sleep occurs more frequently, especially among young people. In the second half, rapid eye movement (REM) sleep makes a more frequent appearance.

    Though the cycles of sleep occur regularly through the night, REM sleep becomes more prolonged towards morning. Therefore, we are more likely to awaken from it near morning and recall the vivid dreams associated with the state.

    Sleep apnea has many causes and is also more likely to occur during REM sleep. The muscles of the body are actively paralyzed during this stage, so we are unable to act out our dreams. (If this does not occur, a condition called REM behavior disorder may result.)  

    Muscles lining the upper airway are also paralyzed, which makes the throat more collapsible—and collapse manifests as disrupted breathing and sleep apnea. Sleep apnea is often worsened during REM for this reason.

    Morning awakenings may, therefore, occur in the setting of sleep apnea that is worsened during the periods of REM that become more frequent and prolonged towards morning. Sleep apnea may be what wakes you, and insomnia keeps you awake.

    Circadian Rhythms and Aging

    The last major contributor to early morning awakenings is the class of conditions that are collectively known as circadian rhythm disorders. These include the natural tendency to wake early in the morning (early birds or morning larks), advanced sleep phase syndrome, and natural changes that occur in sleep ability as we get older.  

    Some people are just naturally morning people: they may prefer to fall asleep earlier (such as at 9 p.m.) and wake earlier (by 5 or 6 a.m.). This may be a lifelong preference, and while it isn’t necessarily abnormal, it may lead to early morning awakenings.

    If a sufficient amount of sleep is obtained before getting up for the day, then there’s no reason to give it a second thought.

    As we get older, our ability to maintain a continuous, uninterrupted period of sleep diminishes. The “machinery” of sleep (whatever we might conceive this to be) isn’t working as well as it used to.

    Sleep may become more fragmented, and there may be more time spent awake in the transition to falling asleep and during the night. Slow-wave sleep diminishes, and total sleep time may be reduced.

    It is estimated that adults beyond age 65 need only seven to eight hours of sleep on average.  

    As part of a reduced need for sleep past age 65, early morning awakenings may occur, especially if too much time is spent in bed. It may be helpful to reduce time in bed to better reflect actual sleep needs, thus eliminating early morning awakenings.

    In some cases, a condition called advanced sleep phase syndrome may become apparent. In this circadian rhythm disorder, the onset and offset of sleep moves earlier by several hours. If it is disruptive to social life, it may be treated with the use of properly timed melatonin and light exposure at night.  

    A Word From Verywell

    If you are troubled by morning awakenings, you should reflect on your situation and consider what might be contributing to the occurrence. If there is evidence suggesting a mood disorder, this should be addressed by a doctor.

    When a clear explanation cannot be identified, it may be useful to speak with a board-certified sleep physician at a sleep clinic, who may be able to provide additional insight and recommend testing to identify other potential causes like unrecognized sleep apnea.

    Lianne is a licensed financial advisor, Registered Financial Planner, entrepreneur and book author. Read full profile

    How to get used to waking up early for school

    • Share
    • Pin it
    • Tweet
    • Share
    • Email

    You know what makes highly successful people less stressed, happier and more productive? They know that their personal priorities are worth more than other people’s priorities.

    Upon waking up, these significantly successful professionals don’t immediately check their email – they make it a point to claim the early hours of the day as their “me” time.

    After all, these extraordinary people believe that if their priority needs to be done, then it has to be done first.

    What do highly successful entrepreneurs and executives do upon waking up in the morning? Let’s learn from this morning routine for success:

    1. Wake up really early

    Surely you know that time is an invaluable asset. Highly successful people take it up a notch by waking up at 5:30 am, 4:30 am and even 4:00 am.

    Not only will they have more control in their early hours, they’ll also have more opportunities to do things that matter to them.

    Start with waking up 15 minutes earlier than your usual time. Then, gradually adjust.

    2. Burn your calories

    We don’t mean just the intense exercise regimen – you can simply do yoga, like Christies CEO Steve Murphy does.

    Exercise will not just make you think clearer, be healthier and scientifically happier, it allows you to combat stress as well.

    Make time for exercise. An hour-long routine seems too daunting, so try running, dancing or even walking around the neighborhood for at least ten minutes.

    3. Do an “Hour of Power”

    Motivation doesn’t last forever, so you need to replenish yours regularly.

    Highly successful people know this, so they dedicate ample time to increase their supply. You’re more likely to continue accomplishing a task once you’re emotionally invested in it, right?

    Spend thirty minutes listening to inspirational anecdotes and empowering quotes.

    4. Jot down on your gratitude journal

    Happiness is about wanting the things that you already have. By enumerating the blessings they’re grateful for, highly successful people become more open to optimism and inspiration and improve their outlook in life.

    Everyday, write down at least one thing that you’re thankful for. Learn to count the small wins.

    5. Ask yourself one important question

    “If today was the last day of your life, would you still want to do what you’re about to do today?”

    This hard-hitting question gets you right where it wants you.

    If you find yourself saying “no” several times in a week, then go out there and change something.

    You never know when you’ll have the opportunity to do it the next time.

    6. Eat that frog first

    It is a concept suggested by Brian Tracy, a great author for the book Eat That Frog.

    In the morning, the willpower of highly successful people is fresh and ready to go. So, this is the best time to take advantage of it – do your hardest task, your “frog” first.

    This way, you’re more likely to get it done and you’re more likely to finish it without other people barging in on you.

    Choose your “frog” of the day – only one – and stick to completing it before you even get to eat breakfast.

    7. Connect with your partner

    Use your morning hours to reconnect with your partner. Talk about your plans, your finances and even your beloved hobbies as a way to always be present in their lives.

    In the morning, highly successful people know that they’ll have more energy and more focus so making this a ritual is paramount.

    You can even set up one day of the week as your “breakfast date”. Go to the nearest cafe for breakfast or run around the neighborhood with your partner. It may do wonders for your relationship.

    8. Plan and strategize

    If you don’t take a few minutes of your time to map out the direction of your day, how will you know if you’re headed towards the right direction?

    Take at least 10 minutes of your day to visualize your life goals, review your tasks for the day and allot schedules for breaks.

    It’ll help your day be more manageable and less stressful.

    Check out these 7 daily hacks to help you better organize your life:

    9. Meditate and clear your mind

    Keep calm and let your inner peace guide you:

    Spend a few minutes to say a prayer or to meditate to keep you relaxed.

    Remember, 90% of illnesses are stress-related, so forget the rush, don’t dash and enjoy a few “hush” moments with yourself.

    Focus on your breathing. You may even recite an empowering mantra during your routine.

    10. Cuddle and bond with your kids

    If you have children, this is for you. Don’t be that parent who says, “Oh, my son/daughter grew so fast! I barely had time to enjoy with her/him.”

    In the morning, when there is less clutter in your mind and less stress in your system, make it a point to help them get dressed, cook a hearty breakfast (or bake a batch of cookies) and even talk to them about their dreams.

    After all, you’re working so that your family will have a better time. Don’t let work get in the way of family – make time for your priorities.

    They say the early bird catches the worm.

    And several successful people seem to be proving that adage true, from Navy SEALs to Apple CEO Tim Cook, who famously wakes up before 4 a.m. each day.

    For many of us, on the other hand, there’s no greater pleasure than sleeping in, staying in bed, and not getting up until you absolutely have to.

    But as it turns out, there may be more merit to getting up early.

    If you struggle to be up with the birds and consider yourself more of a night owl, here’s why you should ditch the snooze button and start getting up earlier in the morning. It might just change your life.

    You’ll actually give your body time to wake up before starting your day

    Studies prove that sleep inertia — that slow-moving period between sleep-induced brain fog and full wakefulness — can last anywhere from between two to four hours.

    If you’re rolling out of bed at 8:30 a.m. to get to work at 9, chances are, you’re not going to arrive ready to do your best work. Getting up early gives your body a chance to reach peak wakefulness naturally (which means you won’t have to depend on that triple shot of espresso to do your thinking for you).

    It may not be easy to start setting your alarm for an earlier hour, and you may have to drag yourself out of bed for the first couple of days or weeks, but once it becomes part of your routine, you’ll likely notice a major difference in your energy levels and mental clarity in the morning.

    You’ll be less likely to suffer from mental illnesses like depression

    This only applies if you’re a woman, unfortunately. Still, promising research published in the Journal of Psychiatric Research revealed that women who get up earlier are far less likely to develop mental health conditions like depression, anxiety, and other mood disorders than those who sleep later.

    This makes a lot of sense, especially given how restorative sleep is for our physical health — it makes sense that the benefits would carry over to our mental and emotional health, as well. It’s hard not to get frustrated, annoyed, or even downright upset when we’re exhausted. How many of us have overreacted when over-tired?

    Early to bed and early to rise makes a man healthy, wealthy, and wise.
    —Benjamin Franklin

    How to get used to waking up early for school

    For years, I wanted to wake up early. It seems almost all successful people get going before sunrise, and I wanted to be one of them. But when my morning alarm would go off, all the good intentions in the world couldn’t pull me out of bed.

    I understood the benefits of waking up early. I made plans to wake up early and write, just like the recent challenge in the 15 Habits series. But that discipline was gone in the morning.

    The groggy person hitting the snooze button wasn’t the same clear-thinking person that had set the alarm the night before.

    When I realized waking up early is a battle fought on two fronts, everything changed We must prepare our bodies, but we must also trick our sleepy minds.

    Here are eight tips to help you win the fight and wake up early:

    1. Take the first steps
    2. Cultivate a mental environment
    3. Develop a “get to” attitude
    4. Create some accountability
    5. Sleep well
    6. Never snooze
    7. Stick to your wake time
    8. Build momentum

    1. Take the first steps

    The toughest part of the morning is simply getting out of bed. An alarm across the room is an old trick, but I don’t want to wake up my wife in the process. So I have my iPhone next to my bed with a soft alarm that I can turn off quickly.

    To keep myself from falling back asleep in the morning brain-fog, I have another alarm across the room set for a few minutes later.

    It’s extremely loud and will jolt my wife awake if I don’t walk across the room and turn it off first. Even my foggy mind understands that, and the fear of a startled and cranky wife drives me to take those first few steps out of bed.

    2. Cultivate a mental environment

    Here are a few ideas to wake your brain up (and keep it alert all day long):

    • Listen to podcasts related to waking up early.
    • Read about people who were early risers.
    • Remind yourself about the importance of writing every day.

    Fill in the cracks of your day with inspiration on how and why to wake up early.

    You can rationalize a lot when your alarm goes off. But if you’ve immersed yourself in this environment, even your hazy morning mind will feel compelled to wake up.

    3. Develop a “get to” attitude

    Get excited about your day, and you’ll jump out of bed. Don’t drive yourself with guilt about why you have to wake early. Make waking early something you get to do.

    Of course, the joy of creating can drive you. But don’t be afraid to motivate yourself by doing something fun in the morning. Play games or indulge in leisure reading.

    Better yet, think of the benefits that others will receive from your work. You can also keep track of your progress and reward yourself when you reach a milestone.

    4. Create some accountability

    Recruit a friend to hold your feet to the fire. You can have weekly meetings or even call or text each other when you wake up.

    There are great online groups — such as the fellow artists here on this community, the upcoming Tribe Writers community, or groups such as the Hello Mornings Challenge for mothers on Facebook and Twitter.

    5. Sleep well

    The struggle isn’t all mental. There’s a strong physical component and the amount — as well as the quality — of sleep you get is the most important factor.

    Although it’s obvious, make sure you go to bed at a reasonable time if you want to wake up early. Also, pay attention to your diet and exercise. General physical fitness greatly impacts your sleep habits and energy levels.

    6. Never snooze

    Hitting your alarm’s snooze button doesn’t give you more of the restful REM sleep. Your body and mind aren’t recuperating youíre just wasting time.

    Personally, I noticed that regularly hitting snooze made my thinking even cloudier when the alarm went off. Your mind starts to ignore the alarm bells.

    7. Stick to your wake time

    Wake up at the same time every day.

    Your body becomes conditioned to this and regulates your sleep patterns accordingly. You get more of that precious REM sleep and when you have a regular wake time, your body actually begins the process of waking up long before your alarm sounds.

    8. Build momentum

    After you wake up early, the challenge is to stay up. Maybe you’ll love to relax and sip your coffee. But for me, getting too comfortable is dangerous.

    I used to start my mornings by reading the Bible and praying. It was a fight to keep my eyes open. Now, the first thing I do is exercise. My heart gets racing, and afterwards I can give what matters most my best focus and attention.

    Move through your routine quickly:

    • Have the coffee ready.
    • Set out your exercise clothes.
    • Keep a vigorous pace and you won’t feel as drowsy.

    When I depended on discipline and willpower alone, I had limited success waking up early. But I’m mastering my mornings now — all due to a few simple tricks. I hope they help you, too.

    Free Download: Want a free video with additional tips to help establish your early morning habit? Click here to watch the video.

    What are some tips that have helped you wake up early? Share in the comments.

    Articles

    How to get used to waking up early for school

    The Largeness of a Little Life

    I wake up to birdsong and soft light washing in through a window that no curtain can cover. I drink coffee and read a book, easing into the day. Work starts with an in.

    How to get used to waking up early for school

    Let It Be Easy!

    I struggle to find the right time to fit it all in, though, while honoring my professional and personal commitments. I want to be creative and do good work and make a .

    How to get used to waking up early for school

    Life is a Dream

    If our job is to build new worlds and imagine alternative realities, then awareness, I should think, is a vocational requirement. We have to be so tapped into life to .