How to grade tests

How to grade tests

For classroom teachers, grading tests and papers is second nature. However, if you are a homeschooling parent, you may be unsure about the best way to figure percentage grades, letter grades, and grade point average. You may not even be fully convinced that assigning grades is necessary, choosing instead to work to mastery on each assignment.

How to Calculate Percentage and Letter Grades

If you decide to grade your students’ schoolwork, use these simple steps to determine the percentage and letter grade for any assignment or test.

To calculate a grade, you will need to figure out the percentage of questions that your student answered correctly. All you need to know to find the grade is the total number of questions on the assignment and how many answers are correct. After that, you will just need to plug a simple equation into a calculator and convert the percentage to a letter grade.

Here’s how:

  1. Correct the paper.
  2. Determine the number of total questions.
  3. Count the number of questions answered correctly.
  4. Take the number of correct answers and divide by the total number of questions. (Example: 15 correct answers divided by 20 total questions equals 0.75)
  5. Multiply this number by 100 to turn it into a percentage. (Example: 0.75 multiplied by 100 equals 75%)
  6. Grade ranges often vary among professors and teachers. However, a typical, easy-to-use grade scale is:
    • 90-100% = A
    • 80-89% = B
    • 70-79% = C
    • 60-69% = D
    • 59% and below = F

Using the examples above, 75% would earn a C letter grade.

How to Calculate GPA

If you’re homeschooling high school, you will likely need to figure your student’s overall grade point average (GPA) for his high school transcript. Calculate the cumulative GPA by dividing the total number of grade points earned by the number of credit hours attempted.

A typical grade point scale is:

  • A = 4.0
  • B = 3.0
  • C = 2.0
  • D = 1.0

There are variances for +/- grades that will vary based on the percentage grade scale you use. For example, if you use the ten points per letter grade scale, a 95% might indicate an A- which would translate to a grade point of 3.5.

Here’s how:

To figure out your student’s cumulative GPA:

  1. Determine the total number of grade points earned. For example, if your student received three A’s and one B, his grade point total would be 15 (3×4 = 12; 1×3=3; 12+3=15).
  2. Divide the grade point total by the number of credits attempted. In the example above, if each course reflected one credit hour, your student’s GPA would be 3.75 (15 grade points divided by 4 credit hours = 3.75)

Why Do Homeschoolers Need Grades?

Many homeschooling families choose not to bother with grades since they don’t move on until a child fully understands the concept. Working to mastery means that the student would ultimately never earn less than an A.

Even if your homeschooling family works to mastery, there are a few reasons you may need to assign percentage or letter grades for your students.

Some students find the challenge of getting good grades motivational.

Some kids like the challenge of seeing how many answers they can get correct. These students are motivated by earning high scores. This may be especially true for kids who have been in a traditional school setting or those who homeschool using a more school-at-home approach. They don’t see the point of completing worksheets or tests if they don’t receive a grade for their work.

Grades can provide valuable feedback for these students to understand how they are performing.

Grades provide an objective means of assessing student performance.

Many homeschooling parents find it difficult to strike a balance between being overly critical and overly lax about their student’s academic performance. It can be helpful to create a grading rubric so that both you and your student know what’s expected.

A rubric can help you assess your student’s work objectively and force you to focus on specific issues. For example, if you’re working on teaching him to write a descriptive paragraph, a rubric can help you stay focused on descriptive elements and ignore run-on sentences or grammar errors until another assignment.

High school students may need grades for their transcript.

Even if you prefer not to assign grades in your homeschool, homeschoolers who will be applying for college admission may need them for their high school transcripts.

Some courses may be difficult to assign a percentage grade, particularly more interest-led topics. An alternative is to assign a letter grade based on your student’s understanding of the topic and the effort put forth in doing the work.

For example, a strong understanding and effort might earn an A. Solid knowledge and a decent but not outstanding effort might earn a B. You might assign a C if your student understands the topic well enough to move on without repeating the course and/or you would have liked to have seen more effort applied. Anything less would mean repeating the course.

Some homeschooling laws may require grades.

Your state homeschooling laws may require submitting grades to the county or state school superintendent, umbrella school, or other governing bodies.

Assigning percentage and letter grades doesn’t have to be difficult. These simple steps can make it easy no matter which route you choose.

FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT

How to grade a test

There are about as many ways to test students as there are ways to teach them. And while summative assessments can effectively measure student performance at the end of a particular subject or time period, formative assessments can be instrumental in maximizing student performance along the way. The challenge for teachers, however, is figuring out how to grade a test quickly enough for that feedback to be helpful.

Often, teachers use simplified formats, like multiple choice, true/false, and matching tests, that can either be scored by hand using a printed answer key or automatically using an easy grader app, but not all material lends itself to those kinds of answer options. Sometimes, students need to show their work, demonstrate degrees and levels of competency, or articulate ideas and comprehension through writing – all of which require a closer review by the teacher in order to evaluate and score them appropriately.

Grade Calculator

Alternative scoring methods

Even when specific content or coursework doesn’t intuitively conform to a standard bubble test format, teachers still need to assess and respond to student work in a timely manner. Unfortunately, responses like spelling, fill-in-the-blank, short answers, graphs, multi-step processes, problem-solving, and essays can be significantly more time-consuming to grade without the assistance of a test grader.

Many teachers even use rubrics as a formative assessment tool, but scoring them quickly, by hand, is not an easy task. The good news is that there is a grading solution – created by teachers, for teachers – that simplifies and streamlines these kinds of assessments, too.

GRADING OUTSIDE THE BUBBLE

How to grade tests

GradeCam is a teacher grader app that offers all of the standard bubble test functionality, like multiple choice, true/false, number grids, etc. But it also does a whole lot more. In fact, the bubble contents themselves are customizable.

GradeCam also allows teachers to score rubrics using teacher-completed bubbles that can be instantly scanned and recorded, and the rubric with capture option will even scan answer content right into the app for grading on-the-go. Perhaps best of all, a revolutionary and proprietary handwriting recognition capability can read and score handwritten numbers, letters, and short answers, as well, making a whole host of new answer types automatically scannable and scorable.

How to grade tests

Hi! I’m Kara Cunningham, homeschooling mom to five living in Colorado. Our family has been using Abeka homeschool for seven years, and we have loved the flexibility and freedom that homeschool has offered us. Over the years I’ve learned that grading can be a tricky (and not so fun) topic for us busy homeschooling moms—but it doesn’t have to be as daunting as it seems.

Today I get to share with you a few things that I’ve learned over these past seven years that have helped me keep the grading side of homeschool doable.

First, let’s talk about tests. These are the big dogs in school, and it is essential that you grade them to know if your child has learned the specific content they are being tested on. It is preferable to grade tests within 1-2 days after administering the test. Thanks to Abeka’s straightforward answer keys, this task only takes a few moments for most tests, and then I log it in my teacher grade book. When time allows, I try to grade tests as soon as they finish them and then discuss any issues that might need to be addressed. If there seems to be an issue with a topic, we might rework some of the problems and discuss while it is fresh in their mind.

Quizzes we often grade together—again, as soon as they are complete when time allows, or else the following day before their lesson. I will tell them the answers to each quiz question as they grade it with a red colored pencil or pen, and then we go over any questions they have at the end.

Once you have children in older grades and they enter into book reports and essays, it is important to set aside more time to grade these effectively. I typically read them over 2-3 times to do a thorough job, marking as I go. These always seem daunting before I start, but to be honest, I love getting to see into child’s creativity and truly enjoy reading their view on different topics.

With daily work, I typically grade 1-2 worksheets a week to write in the grade book and then check and go over any wrong answers with the child on the other days. With workbooks, each child has a place to put their completed and ungraded pages. Once they complete a worksheet I try to check them at the end of each school day. It can get very overwhelming if they are left for more than a few days and also makes it impossible to know in which areas your child/ren might need some extra focus before they move on to the next topics.

If I do ever get behind, I will have my husband or mom help me get caught back up to do our work effectively and continue our lessons knowing where each student is.

It might take a little trial and error, but once you find a good grading plan that works for your family, what once seemed overwhelming becomes a natural part of your school days!

How to grade tests

How To Create Self Grading Assessments With Google Forms

by TeachThought Staff

Google Forms isn’t the first thing you think of when you think of assessment resources.

It’s not especially elegant, it won’t wow students, and the learning curve isn’t as mild as it might be. But with a little bit of work on the front-end, Google Forms can return the favor in spades on the back-end in the form of self-grading assessments.

While there isn’t an app (yet) that can uncover the true nuance of understanding, if you’re using multiple-choice assessments–even just as pre and summative assessments–this trick can save you time, allowing the real potential of assessment to shine through consistently extracting data to revise planned instruction.

How To Create A New Quiz In Google Forms

  1. In Google Forms, click Plus .
  2. At the top right, click Settings .
  3. Click QuizzesMake this a quiz.
  4. Optional: To collect email addresses, click GeneralCollect email address.
  5. Click Save.

With just a little work, you can make an answer key, assign points, and provide automatic feedback for students. You can also make an answer key for certain types of assessment items and question types, including:

  • Short answer
  • Multiple choice
  • Checkboxes
  • Dropdown
  • Multiple choice grid
  • Checkbox grid

How To Create An Answer Key In Google Forms

  1. To add a question, click Add question .
  2. Fill out your question and answers.
  3. In the bottom left of the question, click Answer key.
  4. Choose the answer or answers that are correct.
  5. In the top right of the question, choose how many points the question is worth.
  6. Optional: To add a written or YouTube video explanation to an answer, click Add answer feedback.
  7. Optional: To edit question or answer options, click Edit question.

Note: You can assign points and add feedback on all question types.

How to grade tests

How To Grade Individual Assessment Items & Responses

If you collect email addresses, you can assign points and leave feedback on individual responses. After you grade each response, be sure to save your changes.

  1. In Google Forms, open a quiz.
  2. At the top, click Responses.
  3. Click Individual.
  4. To move between individuals, click Previous or Next .
  5. Find the question you want to grade.
    • In the top right, enter how many points the response earned.
    • Under the answer, click Add feedback.
  6. Enter your feedback and click Save.
  7. To save your changes, at the bottom, click Save.

How To See Quiz Results

  1. In Google Forms, open a quiz.
  2. At the top, click Responses.
  3. Click Summary.

How To Create A Test That Grades Itself Using Google Forms

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The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) section 1112(e)(2)(B) requires school divisions to make available, in a clear and accessible manner, information on assessments required at each grade level served. The pages linked below provide this information for required assessments in grades PreK-12 in Fairfax County Public Schools (FCPS).

Grade Level Tests in FCPS

Please keep these general points in mind when reviewing information about test requirements at specific grade levels.

  • Assessments are part of the teaching and learning process. Teachers give assessments to students on an ongoing basis to check for understanding and to gather information about students’ knowledge or skills.
  • Students who are being reviewed for or are enrolled in special services may have further testing expectations as part of these services or may be eligible for alternative or substitute assessments.
  • Students in certain schools may be asked to take part in additional assessments as part of federal, state, or local data collection, such as the National Assessment of Educational Progress Assessment (NAEP).
  • Parents and guardians should contact their children’s schools with any testing questions or for additional information about how schools and teachers use test results to support student success.

Should your homeschooling student participate in end-of-year testing? Depending on the state you live in, you may or may not have a choice; some states require assessment tests for homeschoolers . If you’ve decided to participate, you may find yourself stuck trying to figure out how to squeeze in annual testing, when, and where. While it can feel overwhelming initially, we’ve pulled together the most important pieces of information to make it easier for you!

State Laws for Homeschool Testing:

Before you can decide whether or not you’ll have your students participate in annual testing, you’ll need to know if it’s mandatory in your state.

Alabama No testing requirements.
Alaska No testing requirements.
Arizona No testing requirements.
Arkansas Most students are required to take achievement tests selected by the state board of education. Failure to cooperate may result in prosecution for truancy.
California No testing requirements.
Colorado Students must be tested at the 3rd, 5th, 7th, 9th, and 11th grades or receive an evaluation by a qualified person.
Connecticut No testing requirements.
Delaware No testing requirements.
District of Columbia No testing requirements.
Florida Students must be tested or evaluated annually if parents are operating under the state homeschool law (as opposed to an umbrella school).
Georgia Beginning in 3rd grade, students must submit take an a national standardized achievement test every three years.
Hawaii Students in grades 3, 5, 8, and 10 must take a standardized achievement test chosen by parents.
Idaho No testing requirements.
Illinois No testing requirements.
Indiana No testing requirements.
Iowa Students (ages 8+) who aren’t taught by a certified teacher must submit annual assessments (which can be in the form of an exam if desired).
Kansas No testing requirements.
Kentucky No testing requirements.
Louisiana Students taught a “sustained curriculum of quality at least equal to that offered by public schools” must take annual achievement tests but those taught in a home-based private school are exempt.
Maine Testing is mandatory for students educated under the homeschool statute but those taught in a non-approved private school are exempt.
Maryland No testing requirements.
Massachusetts Students must take a standardized test or submit to an alternative (approved) type of assessment.
Michigan No testing requirements.
Minnesota Students must take annual assessments, but the results do not have to be reported.
Mississippi No testing requirements.
Missouri No testing requirements.
Montana No testing requirements.
North Carolina Required on an annual basis for grammar, reading, spelling, English, and math.
North Dakota Students in grade 4, 6, 8, and 10 must take standardized tests administered by a certified teacher.
Nebraska No testing requirements.
Nevada No testing requirements.
New Hampshire Parents must have an evaluation conducted annually, and standardized tests meet this requirement.
New Jersey No testing requirements.
New Mexico No testing requirements.
New York Most students must take a standardized test at certain intervals. There are five to choose from/approved tests.
Ohio Students must satisfy one of the three testing options but may obtain a waiver for “truly held religious beliefs.”
Oklahoma No testing requirements.
Oregon Students in grades 3, 5, 8, and 10 must complete a standardized test. Students who perform below level may be subject to closer monitoring.
Pennsylvania Required for students in grades 3, 5, and 8.
Rhode Island No testing requirements.
South Carolina Students must take annual assessments unless they are either a) members of the South Carolina Association of Independent Home Schools or b) part of a homeschool association with at least 50 members.
South Dakota Testing is mandatory for students in grades 2, 4, 8, and 11.
Tennessee Families my operate their homeschool under one of three options, and testing requirements vary based on the option chosen.
Texas No testing requirements.
Utah No testing requirements.
Vermont Students must be evaluated annually and there are several options to satisfy this requirement.
Virginia Students homeschooling under the homeschool statute must take standardized tests annually.
Washington Annual testing is required but results do not need to be submitted to the school district.
West Virginia Testing is required under the “notice” or “approval” option but there are options in how you meet that requirement.
Wisconsin No testing requirements.
Wyoming No testing requirements.

Where Can Homeschoolers Take Annual Tests?:

So, you’ve decided to have your student participate in homeschool testing . Just how do you go about doing that? In part, that depends on the test your student is taking. If your student needs to take an annual standardized test, you can actually order and administer that yourself if you have a four-year degree. Also, many homeschool support groups provide homeschool testing services . For this, parents get together each year and have a Test Day for the students. In those cases, one of the parents (or hired help) is certified to administer homeschool exams for all students. Often, this person holds a current teacher’s certification perhaps from a former career.

Another option for affordable homeschool testing is to become a certified Test Administrator through Bob Jones and have your student take the Stanford-10 Achievement Test. To do this, you must hold at least a four-year degree. You then fill out the online application and watch the training video.

Finally, there are many online options for homeschool standardized testing. Seton Testing offers the Stanford-10 for students in grades 3-12 (worldwide). In addition, Homeschool Testing Services (HTS) offers tests both online and on-site at various approved locations. HTS offers the CTP for students in grades 1-10 and the Stanford-10 for grades K-12. If taking timed tests isn’t ideal for your student, consider the CAT (California Achievement Test) through Academic Excellence .

Standardized testing is useful for homeschooled students, though it’s not required in all states. It provides parents with clarification on how their students are doing academically, and it prepares students for high-stakes tests like the SAT and the ACT . In the end, your student will be able to put another year of schooling behind him or her!

By Angie Nelson

Last Updated November 4, 2020 . Disclosure: We may receive compensation if you sign up for or purchase products linked below. Details on offers may change, and you should confirm them with the company prior to taking action.

One work-from-home job loved by many in my community is contracting as an online test grader. In this position, you are working online grading tests, essays and other papers. In many cases, these essays are submitted as part of a standardized test like the ACT or SAT. In some cases, they are in conjunction with Engish as a Second Language, or ESL, studies.

To qualify for many of these positions, you often need a bachelor’s degree. Some companies allow that degree to be in any subject. Others may be looking for specific degrees like English. Make sure you read through the company’s current job openings for specifics.

Online grading jobs are seasonal in most cases. We see many companies hiring in the fall and spring as this is when most standardized testing is done. That being said, don’t be afraid to check for openings in the off-season as well. And once you are accepted as an online scorer, most companies will invite you back year after year provided you do a good job and meet the workload requirements.

8 Legit Online Grading Jobs

1. Measurement, Inc.

How to grade testsMeasurement, Inc. is one of the most popular scoring jobs with my readers. They require a bachelor’s degree in any subject. Their projects include test items in English Language Arts, mathematics, science, and other areas.

For most remote positions with this company, they do expect you to work Monday through Friday for the duration of your temporary contract. Their busy season is March through June. Available hours may vary by project.

Onsite positions are usually open year-round. Hiring for remote work is typically done November through March. Openings were listed on the site at the time of writing this post.

2. Pearson

Pearson is a well-known name in the learning community. They hire tutors, at-home test developers, online scorers and more. The company was named as a Top 100 Company with Remote Jobs for 2019 by FlexJobs and they have a solid review rating on Glassdoor of 3.6 out of 5 stars.

Opportunities vary throughout the year and some may be location-specific. Most positions are temporary and project-based. A bachelor’s degree is required.

One of their most recent scoring openings was for an edTPA Scorer. This particular test makes sure new teachers are ready for the classroom. This was a more specialized scorer job and required not only a bachelor’s degree but also teaching experience or experience working with teachers.

You can often find Pearson’s most recent needs and requirements on FlexJobs.

3. ETS

Educational Testing Service, or ETS, provides scoring for a variety of tests from student leader proficiency tests to high school equivalency exams. As such, the requirements can vary greatly for each position. Some positions require a bachelor’s degree. Some require a Master’s. Some require applicants to possess a current teaching certificate while others do not.

As was stated previously, many of the current openings will be filled in spring and fall 2019.

4. Write Score

The Write Score site states that orientation for their scoring season will begin in late July to early August though positions are available throughout the year.

Unlike other companies, Write Score only requires a two-year degree and the ability to pass their qualifying test. They do accept resumes for their waitlist and applicants are contacted as needed.

5. ACT

ACT hires Readers to read and score student papers for the ACT Writing Test. This is an opportunity to read and score anytime and from any personal computer.

The site states this is performance-based work. Your earnings will depend on the accuracy and number of essays scored. The company does say Readers can earn $12 per hour or more.

To qualify, you will need a bachelor’s degree or higher, reside in the U.S., and have current teaching experience. Teaching English to high school junior and senior students is preferred.

6. Creative English Solutions

Creative English Solutions, or CES, provides evaluations for students wishing to take the TOEFL, Testing of English as a Foreign Language, and TOEIC, Test of English for International Communication. As such, applicants must be a native English speaker and possess a University degree.

Positions at CES offer a lot of flexibility. Though they do ask for a commitment of at least 10 hours per week, Evaluators can accept and decline assignments as they wish.

In addition to hiring Evaluators, CES also hires freelance writers and voice actors.

7. Literably

Literably is a little different in that their scorers evaluate oral recordings of elementary students. Transcriptionists listen to student audio recordings and transcribe errors.

This position does not require any experience or special degrees. You simply need to pass their sample tasks. As with most transcription jobs, pay is based on performance, speed and accuracy. The most recent job posting state “$10-20 per hour.” PayPal is required to receive payment.

This is a flexible position and you can set your own hours.

8. ALTA Language Services

If you possess native fluency in another language, ALTA Language Services currently has several testing evaluator positions available. These are typically on demand, part-time positions.

A degree is required, as is a minimum English proficiency level of a 2+/2+ on the ILR proficiency scale. As with most companies in this industry, training is required and paid.

At the end of the day, you aren’t going to get rich as an online test grader. At the time of writing this post, most positions offer around $10 to $13 per hour. That being said, it can be flexible, fulfilling work at home for the right person. Most people report being happy with these positions. The biggest complaint is often that the work isn’t available year-round, but many consider it a nice supplemental income source.

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About Angie Nelson

Angie Nelson began working from home in 2007 when she took her future into her own hands and found a way to escape the corporate cubicle farm. Today she balances several successful online ventures and loves to share her passion for home business with others.

How to grade tests

About Angie Nelson

Angie Nelson began working from home in 2007 when she figured out how to take her future into her own hands and escape the corporate cubicle farm. Angie’s goal is sharing her passion for home business, personal finance, telecommuting, and entrepreneurship, and her work has been featured on Recruiter, FlexJobs and Business News Daily.

How to grade tests

Hi! I’m Kara Cunningham, homeschooling mom to five living in Colorado. Our family has been using Abeka homeschool for seven years, and we have loved the flexibility and freedom that homeschool has offered us. Over the years I’ve learned that grading can be a tricky (and not so fun) topic for us busy homeschooling moms—but it doesn’t have to be as daunting as it seems.

Today I get to share with you a few things that I’ve learned over these past seven years that have helped me keep the grading side of homeschool doable.

First, let’s talk about tests. These are the big dogs in school, and it is essential that you grade them to know if your child has learned the specific content they are being tested on. It is preferable to grade tests within 1-2 days after administering the test. Thanks to Abeka’s straightforward answer keys, this task only takes a few moments for most tests, and then I log it in my teacher grade book. When time allows, I try to grade tests as soon as they finish them and then discuss any issues that might need to be addressed. If there seems to be an issue with a topic, we might rework some of the problems and discuss while it is fresh in their mind.

Quizzes we often grade together—again, as soon as they are complete when time allows, or else the following day before their lesson. I will tell them the answers to each quiz question as they grade it with a red colored pencil or pen, and then we go over any questions they have at the end.

Once you have children in older grades and they enter into book reports and essays, it is important to set aside more time to grade these effectively. I typically read them over 2-3 times to do a thorough job, marking as I go. These always seem daunting before I start, but to be honest, I love getting to see into child’s creativity and truly enjoy reading their view on different topics.

With daily work, I typically grade 1-2 worksheets a week to write in the grade book and then check and go over any wrong answers with the child on the other days. With workbooks, each child has a place to put their completed and ungraded pages. Once they complete a worksheet I try to check them at the end of each school day. It can get very overwhelming if they are left for more than a few days and also makes it impossible to know in which areas your child/ren might need some extra focus before they move on to the next topics.

If I do ever get behind, I will have my husband or mom help me get caught back up to do our work effectively and continue our lessons knowing where each student is.

It might take a little trial and error, but once you find a good grading plan that works for your family, what once seemed overwhelming becomes a natural part of your school days!