How to learn brazilian jiu‐jitsu

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How to learn brazilian jiu‐jitsu

How to Learn Brazilian Jiu Jitsu

Of the various martial arts and combat sports, Brazilian Jiu Jitsu is often favored because of its techniques that allow weaker and smaller fighters to take on stronger and bigger opponents. This martial art teaches how to successfully defend oneself from an attacker without killing him or her. Evolve Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, which teaches Brazilian Jiu Jitsu in Fort Worth, has helped explain the most important preparations to make before getting started in the martial art.

A Brief History of Brazilian Jiu Jitsu

Brazilian Jiu Jitsu traces its roots to Japan. Evolve Daily, an online resource for martial arts and combat sports, explains that Brazilian Jiu Jitsu is a modification of ancient Jiu Jitsu, a system of defense developed for Japanese samurai in the event that they found themselves without their horse or weapons. This martial art focused on chokes, locks and grappling—moves that were not impossible to make in their heavy samurai armor.

After much evolution from Japanese Jiu Jitsu to Judo, this form of martial arts made its way to Brazil when martial artist Matsuo Maeda taught Judo to Carlos Gracie. Gracie eventually passed on his knowledge to his brothers until the youngest Gracie, Helio, modified the techniques to allow any fighter of any size or strength be able to take down a much bigger or stronger opponent. This would then become the foundation of the Brazilian Jiu Jitsu that we know now.

How to Learn Brazilian Jiu Jitsu

Choose a Training Program

You can choose to take up Brazilian Jiu Jitsu on your own or in a training center. When choosing a training program, check the trainer’s and training center’s credentials and reputation. It is important that you not only learn the proper techniques but that you are also in the safe hands of an experienced and reputable instructor.

Learning on your own or training under an instructor both have their own advantages and disadvantages that you need to recognize. If you wish to self-learn, Jiu Jitsu Legacy recommends 10 handbooks for beginners, including “Zen Jiu Jitsu”, “Jiu Jitsu University” and “Mastering the 21 Immutable Principles of Brazilian Jiu Jitsu: The Ultimate Handbook for Brazilian Jiu Jitsu Students”. The Internet is also a treasure trove of online resources, with YouTube as the primary go-to for instructional videos.

Choose a Good Brazilian Jiu Jitsu Training School

Before making a decision of which training school to enroll at, it is best to search around and make a list of the pros and cons of each center in your area. Take advantage of the free trials that training centers offer so that you get a feel of the place and can observe if you’re comfortable with the instructors’ teaching style. You can also interview current students about what they like and dislike about the training school.

Enroll in a Class that Fits Your Schedule

Brazilian Jiu Jitsu classes often run for an hour to three hours a day. You will most likely stick to your program if you enroll in a class that fits your schedule, habits and lifestyle instead of having to adjust your routine to accommodate your class. For example, if you’re a morning person who enjoys getting a workout before heading to the office, morning classes will be perfect for you.

Get a Brazilian Jiu Jitsu Gi

A gi is the uniform that Brazilian Jiu Jitsu fighters wear in training and competitions. It is vital that you have a gi not because it makes you look good and professional, but because it provides comfort when performing different stances and techniques. When purchasing a Jiu Jitsu gi, remember to get it in your size, because anything smaller or bigger defeats the purpose of wearing the outfit.

Purchase Protective Gear

Wearing a protective gear helps ensure your safety as you begin your Brazilian Jiu Jitsu training. While some may argue that Jiu Jitsu techniques, when employed precisely and accurately, will not beat up your opponent’s body, it should always be taken into consideration that students, especially beginners, may not always perfectly execute each move and routine.

Brazilian Jiu Jitsu fighter and author Stephan Kesting wrote a guide to grappling gear for beginners who wish to keep their bodies protected in training and tournaments. His number one recommendation for protective gear is a mouth guard, as he has observed that it is always the head, including the mouth area, that gets “banged up” in classes and competitions.

Have a Zen Mindset

An impatient mind has no room in Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, as this brings about aggression and sloppy movements. As you embark on your Brazilian Jiu Jitsu journey, remember to keep a Zen mindset and not rush through your training. As did all the BJJ experts before you, you will start with a white belt, work yourself through all other belt colors until you reach black belt, the highest level of all martial arts.

Every Brazilian Jiu Jitsu student learns at his own pace; some learn fast while some learn slow, but the key is to stick with the program with full determination, focus and diligence.

Image Gallery

Discover Places

How to learn brazilian jiu‐jitsu

How to Learn Brazilian Jiu Jitsu

Of the various martial arts and combat sports, Brazilian Jiu Jitsu is often favored because of its techniques that allow weaker and smaller fighters to take on stronger and bigger opponents. This martial art teaches how to successfully defend oneself from an attacker without killing him or her. Evolve Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, which teaches Brazilian Jiu Jitsu in Fort Worth, has helped explain the most important preparations to make before getting started in the martial art.

A Brief History of Brazilian Jiu Jitsu

Brazilian Jiu Jitsu traces its roots to Japan. Evolve Daily, an online resource for martial arts and combat sports, explains that Brazilian Jiu Jitsu is a modification of ancient Jiu Jitsu, a system of defense developed for Japanese samurai in the event that they found themselves without their horse or weapons. This martial art focused on chokes, locks and grappling—moves that were not impossible to make in their heavy samurai armor.

After much evolution from Japanese Jiu Jitsu to Judo, this form of martial arts made its way to Brazil when martial artist Matsuo Maeda taught Judo to Carlos Gracie. Gracie eventually passed on his knowledge to his brothers until the youngest Gracie, Helio, modified the techniques to allow any fighter of any size or strength be able to take down a much bigger or stronger opponent. This would then become the foundation of the Brazilian Jiu Jitsu that we know now.

How to Learn Brazilian Jiu Jitsu

Choose a Training Program

You can choose to take up Brazilian Jiu Jitsu on your own or in a training center. When choosing a training program, check the trainer’s and training center’s credentials and reputation. It is important that you not only learn the proper techniques but that you are also in the safe hands of an experienced and reputable instructor.

Learning on your own or training under an instructor both have their own advantages and disadvantages that you need to recognize. If you wish to self-learn, Jiu Jitsu Legacy recommends 10 handbooks for beginners, including “Zen Jiu Jitsu”, “Jiu Jitsu University” and “Mastering the 21 Immutable Principles of Brazilian Jiu Jitsu: The Ultimate Handbook for Brazilian Jiu Jitsu Students”. The Internet is also a treasure trove of online resources, with YouTube as the primary go-to for instructional videos.

Choose a Good Brazilian Jiu Jitsu Training School

Before making a decision of which training school to enroll at, it is best to search around and make a list of the pros and cons of each center in your area. Take advantage of the free trials that training centers offer so that you get a feel of the place and can observe if you’re comfortable with the instructors’ teaching style. You can also interview current students about what they like and dislike about the training school.

Enroll in a Class that Fits Your Schedule

Brazilian Jiu Jitsu classes often run for an hour to three hours a day. You will most likely stick to your program if you enroll in a class that fits your schedule, habits and lifestyle instead of having to adjust your routine to accommodate your class. For example, if you’re a morning person who enjoys getting a workout before heading to the office, morning classes will be perfect for you.

Get a Brazilian Jiu Jitsu Gi

A gi is the uniform that Brazilian Jiu Jitsu fighters wear in training and competitions. It is vital that you have a gi not because it makes you look good and professional, but because it provides comfort when performing different stances and techniques. When purchasing a Jiu Jitsu gi, remember to get it in your size, because anything smaller or bigger defeats the purpose of wearing the outfit.

Purchase Protective Gear

Wearing a protective gear helps ensure your safety as you begin your Brazilian Jiu Jitsu training. While some may argue that Jiu Jitsu techniques, when employed precisely and accurately, will not beat up your opponent’s body, it should always be taken into consideration that students, especially beginners, may not always perfectly execute each move and routine.

Brazilian Jiu Jitsu fighter and author Stephan Kesting wrote a guide to grappling gear for beginners who wish to keep their bodies protected in training and tournaments. His number one recommendation for protective gear is a mouth guard, as he has observed that it is always the head, including the mouth area, that gets “banged up” in classes and competitions.

Have a Zen Mindset

An impatient mind has no room in Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, as this brings about aggression and sloppy movements. As you embark on your Brazilian Jiu Jitsu journey, remember to keep a Zen mindset and not rush through your training. As did all the BJJ experts before you, you will start with a white belt, work yourself through all other belt colors until you reach black belt, the highest level of all martial arts.

Every Brazilian Jiu Jitsu student learns at his own pace; some learn fast while some learn slow, but the key is to stick with the program with full determination, focus and diligence.

When you don’t have accessible facilities to learn jiujitsu because of financial, location, or current events than look no further than Brazilian Jiu Jitsu at Home. Brazilian Jiu Jitsu is the most effective martial art to learn.

A new method of training Brazilian Jiu Jitsu is through watching a standardized video structure, along with having an accessible partner. This website is here to help you get some insights on getting started in the right direction. There is certainly no-one only way of training, but many ways to improve your skills in a self-defense and/sports combat.

At first glance, training Jiu Jitsu requires training partners. It is difficult to train without partners so finding somebody committed to working with you for training is key.

How to learn brazilian jiu‐jitsu

Here You Can Learn to use this Free Information on How to:
  • Find resources to learn Brazilian Jiu Jitsu techniques, videos, booklets, lectures, educational materials.
  • Start self-defense and/or combat sports
  • Look for training partners
  • How to train with partners
  • setup an area to train and use equipment

You would need to keep a positive mindset that would keep you motivated. Or else you won’t be able to keep up with progress. At first, you may not fully understand your mistakes, but your motivation can overcome the failures.

It is in the best interest to set long term and short term goals so you can visualize, say 3 months to 6 months to a year, what your progress in training may look like. Once you established your goals, you can begin this learning from Brazilian Jiu Jitsu at Home as a marathon.

Additional Insights on Jiu Jitsu Environment

Having an accessible Jiu Jitsu training facility in a nearby city is such a privilege that did not exist long ago, It is always best to work your way over to a training center with professionals so you can practice with different people with different body types. The Gracie family always had a motto when training in a family-friendly place, Keep it playful”

I hope you find this blog informative to get you started on the right track. Keep this in mind, focus on progress rather than trying to do things perfect. This blog, like your training, is a current work-in-progress, Have fun, be patient, keep progressing, and stay safe.

On this page you can download the Roadmap for Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu Book for free and within minutes without any obligations.

Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu (and grappling in general) is a complex and sophisticated martial art, but getting good at BJJ doesn’t need to be confusing! There IS an underlying logic to the techniques. There is a method to the madness. There is an optimal way to go about learning this amazing martial art, and it’s all laid out for you in this free illustrated book.

How to learn brazilian jiu‐jitsuA Roadmap for Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu

This free book was written by me (Stephan Kesting), and includes…

  • Explanations (with photos) of how to use the six most important positions in Brazilian Jiu-jitsu to dominate your opponents.
  • Tips and strategies that can be applied in sparring right away.
  • How to figure out which techniques you need to learn and practice next.
  • What the highest percentage submissions and escapes are for each position.
  • The knowledgeyou need to avoid asking stupid questions in class.
  • My best tips to maximize your training time, and to avoid injuries on the mat.
  • Tons of illustrations, photos, and links to important articles and techniques you must know.

The Beginning BJJ Online Course.

In addition to the free BJJ book, you’ll also receive This consists of a series of email lessons that you will receive every couple of days. These email lessons are also 100% FREE – you will never be charged for them.

Below are a just a few topics that are covered in this free online course. Most are applicable to any kind of ground fighting, whether you do BJJ, submission grappling, MMA, Judo, etc.

  • The guard posture mistakes that’ll get you killed on the mats,
  • The six positions you must know in groundfighting
  • The biggest mistake people make with their chokes
  • How NOT to do the closed guard (and how to correctly transition to the open guard)
  • How to stay injury free in a highly physical sport,
  • The seven things every blue belt must know,
  • Why talent is totally overrated in BJJ
  • How to triple your endurance on the ground,
  • And a ton more.

IMPORTANT NOTE: In order to send you all this book I’ll need your email address. But I hate spam as much as you do. That’s why I will never, ever share your name or email with anyone else.

Also, if you don’t like what I’m sending you – if it’s too advanced, or you quit grappling, or you just don’t want any more BJJ-related emails – just hit the ‘unsubscribe button at the bottom of EVERY SINGLE EMAIL and you’ll never hear from me again.

If you want this book and to receive the online course, COMPLETELY FOR FREE AND WITH NO OBLIGATION EVER, just enter your name and address below and then follow the easy-to-follow instructions.

01/11/2015 | Escrito por: Carlos Arthur Jr.

Whether you are a white-belt just starting out in 2015 or have been practicing BJJ for many years now, it doesn’t matter. We all should read these 10 tips in order to get the most out of our BJJ training and make sure we’re up to speed in the future.

1. Trust and be trustworthy.

NEVER hold a sub past the tap-out. When in doubt as to whether your training partner has tapped, let go—better safe than sorry. By striving to be a more reliable training partner and trust your teammates and coaches, the environment becomes a safer and more pleasant place in which to learn. If you’re not having fun, none of it makes any sense. BJJ is something you carry with you for the rest of your life. Each stage should be great; after all, the art is the most wonderful addiction you could possibly have.

2. Brazilian jiu-jitsu is done in a gi.

As much as no-gi is a sport in its own right, make sure to have a good understanding of the techniques in classical BJJ before venturing into no-gi. It’s easier to adapt your gi techniques to no-gi than the other way around.

3. Don’t ask black-belts to roll.

You can train with black-belts, but make sure you’re invited. This tip is kind of old-fashioned and is often resented by recently promoted students. What happens is that the higher-ranked feel like they are being challenged when a lower-belt fighter asks them to roll. You have to realize that they know who is available just by the way the person looks at them. Look at them humbly and make it clear you’re available—if they want to, they’ll invite you. And take my word: it’s always more rewarding to roll when you’ve been invited than when you do the inviting.

4. Find the best instructor for you.

Students are often discouraged when their start in jiu-jitsu is less than ideal, so it would behoove the beginner to do some research before committing to a class, making sure the instructor they pick enjoys what they do and is kindly to all students, not just their best ones. If after starting classes you get the feeling the instructors aren’t paying you enough attention, don’t accept that as being normal—it isn’t. A much better alternative to quitting is to switch to a gym where you feel welcome.

5. Have faith.

Believe in the techniques. As frustrating as it may be at first, try your best to defend by using the techniques already in your repertory. If you feel like you’ve run out of options, have a word with your instructor; they’ll be glad to get input on your needs.

6. Communicate.

One of the coolest things about jiu-jitsu is the exchange of ideas on how to perform a technique. Feel free to ask the more experienced students questions. Ask what you could have done to foil an attack or pull off that submission you were so close to getting. They’ve surely been through those situations before and can clue you in on all the ins and outs. Higher-ranked students tend to enjoy being appreciated and get a kick out of being able to help.

7. Do your homework.

It’s frustrating to a teacher when they do their best to teach a new move or concept, and then a short while later a student has already forgotten it. Doing lots of repetitions is essential, even if you feel a particular technique doesn’t fit your style. Keep in mind that as a beginner, you don’t have a set style yet, so what seems useless to you today may turn out to be your greatest asset tomorrow. Besides doing repetitions, take a few minutes each day to go over the techniques in your head.

8. Tap out.

Nobody wants to see a student intentionally tap out, but good students aren’t afraid to take chances or put themselves in positions of disadvantage. If you do tap, so be it; let it serve as a lesson. During moments of real danger, your chances of prevailing are all the greater when you’re accustomed to such harrowing situations.

9. Try new things.

There’s no point in sparring like you’re fighting in a championship final the whole time. Sure, there are times when you should go hard, but let your coach be the judge of when that should be. Generally speaking, I recommend always trying new things, putting the move of the day to practice. The more diversified your game is, the better the tools you’ll have at your disposal in the future.

10. Self-defense is of the essence.

There are plenty of teachers out there who are oblivious to the importance of teaching even basic self-defense techniques—some for lack of familiarity, others because they feel they moves are outdated. Down the road, self-defense techniques will provide you with an understanding of moves you so far haven’t a clue about. Not to mention that they’re fun. Keep in mind that each of the current techniques, even the tournament-level techniques, in some way or another originated from the basics. Knowing and understanding the basics is like a lesson in history, and will keep you from making basic mistakes.

To help us keep making quality content in English, support us here.

How to learn brazilian jiu‐jitsu

How many Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu techniques do you know? And how many of them do you really use on a regular basis, against opposition of all levels? In reality, you do not need nearly as many techniques as you might think. Take a look at the very best grapplers of today. Go to a seminar of theirs, and you’ll think they know everything. Yet see them compete, and you’ll notice that they only perform a handful of select techniques time and time again. It is not as much about the choice of techniques, as it is about whether or not you can make them work. That leaves a lot of space for adjusting and figuring out what your arsenal should hold. It should, however, fit in your pocket, sort to speak.

Nobody alive is able to learn all the Brazilian Ju-Jitsu techniques. Even if, hypothetically, someone could, they’d have a pretty hard time accessing whatever needs to be accessed in a specific moment of rolling or a match. That brings us to the notion that in reality, you only need a few Brazilian JIu-Jitsu techniques, at any given moment. Of course, that will depend on your level, personal preferences, etc. Still, the less you go for quantity, the more you’ll get in terms of quality, which is what you actually need to be good at Jiu-Jitsu.

The Techniques Vs. Concepts Debate

When it comes to learning Jiu-Jitsu, there are two main avenues to do so at the moment. One is to go and collect as many Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu techniques as you can and build a game around them. Another is to go completely in the opposite direction and base your BJJ on concepts and principles of body mechanics and the goals of grappling. The most usual approach is blending both to a certain degree, but there are those that go to the extremes of either of those directions.

In truth, we can’t really learn concepts if there are no techniques that makeup Jiu-Jitsu. However, we couldn’t master techniques either, or evolve them, unless we can figure out why and how they work. So, Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu techniques and concepts have a complicated relationship. However, they can’t function separately, so there’s really no point in separating them. The idea here is that both techniques and concepts are parts of Jiu-Jitsu that we need to learn. Finding out the perfect blend for you will take time. In fact, it will take a lifetime and it will constantly change. So, embrace both.

That said, you might feel as your workload has doubled now. How do you learn both concepts and techniques? Isn’t it too much? It won’t be too much if you decide to focus on things that make sense. The notion that simple is best applies here perfectly. Choose a few basic concepts that make sense, pair them with a few high percentage techniques that you like and start having fun seeing how many combinations of them you can make. That is how you start to learn and discover Jiu-Jitsu for real, instead of just being a collector of moves.

How Many Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu Techniques Do You Really Need?

There’s no precise number I can offer as the answer to this question. Roger Gracie has this down to perfection. According to him, there’s no need to spend your time in Jiu-Jitsu, collecting all kinds of different techniques. That will not make you any better. In fact, it will hold you back.

How to learn brazilian jiu‐jitsuAccording to Roger, “All the top Jiu-Jitsu players are great at a few moves”. he is definitely right about that, as we already discussed before. At the highest levels of the game, it is all about baiting someone towards what you’re best at, not trying to catch them at their own game. The key here is to appraoch learning Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu techniques completely. that means trying to figure out every single detail behind a certain move. Give this a try, and you’ll find out that learning details only uncovers more and more tiny details that really make or break BJJ moves. What you need to be looking for in any move, is that “click” when everything starts to make sense. then, you have your go-to move.

Let’s take a Kimura for example. If you’re great at a Kimura from side control, you don’t really need more side control submissions. In fact, you don’t even need to have a good Kimura from any other position. Instead, look to be unbeatable at that particular Kimura. That’s all you need. Remember how Roger beat everyone in his division and the absolute at the Worlds using nothing but the cross collar choke?

Evolving Your Game

Many people think that the more techniques they know, the faster they’ll get to the next belt. Jiu-Jitsu does not work like that. you do not need many moves to get to the next belt. You need to make the moves you know and like work against everyone in order to see a progression in your game.

That said, if you decide you’ll learn two new techniques each week, in a year, you should know 104 new Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu techniques. Let’s say you need 10 years to get to black belt. That amounts to 1040 techniques. Do you really think you can learn so many and be able to apply them when you need to?

How to learn brazilian jiu‐jitsuEvolving your BJJ game is something you have to do. However, all you need to do is build on the moves you already have working. If you know that Kimura from side control, for example, you can start exploring the concept of the kimura trap in order to open up the transition to the back off of your favorite submissions. And vice versa, of course. The key is to keep working on concepts and techniques at the same time. that means that you need to know how to hold side control and a Kimura, in order to be able to apply al the finishing details you’ve been figuring out.

Final Thoughts

Do an experiment. Try and reduce the number of Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu techniques you do. For starters, have fun with just one technique, from each of the main positions. If you factor in offensive and defensive moves, you already have quite the number in there – in fact, you have everything you’ll ever need. Now go and research them as deep as possible and become the authority on them. Progression, belts, an understanding of BJJ and host of other benefits will inevitably come your way.

01/11/2015 | Escrito por: Carlos Arthur Jr.

Whether you are a white-belt just starting out in 2015 or have been practicing BJJ for many years now, it doesn’t matter. We all should read these 10 tips in order to get the most out of our BJJ training and make sure we’re up to speed in the future.

1. Trust and be trustworthy.

NEVER hold a sub past the tap-out. When in doubt as to whether your training partner has tapped, let go—better safe than sorry. By striving to be a more reliable training partner and trust your teammates and coaches, the environment becomes a safer and more pleasant place in which to learn. If you’re not having fun, none of it makes any sense. BJJ is something you carry with you for the rest of your life. Each stage should be great; after all, the art is the most wonderful addiction you could possibly have.

2. Brazilian jiu-jitsu is done in a gi.

As much as no-gi is a sport in its own right, make sure to have a good understanding of the techniques in classical BJJ before venturing into no-gi. It’s easier to adapt your gi techniques to no-gi than the other way around.

3. Don’t ask black-belts to roll.

You can train with black-belts, but make sure you’re invited. This tip is kind of old-fashioned and is often resented by recently promoted students. What happens is that the higher-ranked feel like they are being challenged when a lower-belt fighter asks them to roll. You have to realize that they know who is available just by the way the person looks at them. Look at them humbly and make it clear you’re available—if they want to, they’ll invite you. And take my word: it’s always more rewarding to roll when you’ve been invited than when you do the inviting.

4. Find the best instructor for you.

Students are often discouraged when their start in jiu-jitsu is less than ideal, so it would behoove the beginner to do some research before committing to a class, making sure the instructor they pick enjoys what they do and is kindly to all students, not just their best ones. If after starting classes you get the feeling the instructors aren’t paying you enough attention, don’t accept that as being normal—it isn’t. A much better alternative to quitting is to switch to a gym where you feel welcome.

5. Have faith.

Believe in the techniques. As frustrating as it may be at first, try your best to defend by using the techniques already in your repertory. If you feel like you’ve run out of options, have a word with your instructor; they’ll be glad to get input on your needs.

6. Communicate.

One of the coolest things about jiu-jitsu is the exchange of ideas on how to perform a technique. Feel free to ask the more experienced students questions. Ask what you could have done to foil an attack or pull off that submission you were so close to getting. They’ve surely been through those situations before and can clue you in on all the ins and outs. Higher-ranked students tend to enjoy being appreciated and get a kick out of being able to help.

7. Do your homework.

It’s frustrating to a teacher when they do their best to teach a new move or concept, and then a short while later a student has already forgotten it. Doing lots of repetitions is essential, even if you feel a particular technique doesn’t fit your style. Keep in mind that as a beginner, you don’t have a set style yet, so what seems useless to you today may turn out to be your greatest asset tomorrow. Besides doing repetitions, take a few minutes each day to go over the techniques in your head.

8. Tap out.

Nobody wants to see a student intentionally tap out, but good students aren’t afraid to take chances or put themselves in positions of disadvantage. If you do tap, so be it; let it serve as a lesson. During moments of real danger, your chances of prevailing are all the greater when you’re accustomed to such harrowing situations.

9. Try new things.

There’s no point in sparring like you’re fighting in a championship final the whole time. Sure, there are times when you should go hard, but let your coach be the judge of when that should be. Generally speaking, I recommend always trying new things, putting the move of the day to practice. The more diversified your game is, the better the tools you’ll have at your disposal in the future.

10. Self-defense is of the essence.

There are plenty of teachers out there who are oblivious to the importance of teaching even basic self-defense techniques—some for lack of familiarity, others because they feel they moves are outdated. Down the road, self-defense techniques will provide you with an understanding of moves you so far haven’t a clue about. Not to mention that they’re fun. Keep in mind that each of the current techniques, even the tournament-level techniques, in some way or another originated from the basics. Knowing and understanding the basics is like a lesson in history, and will keep you from making basic mistakes.

To help us keep making quality content in English, support us here.

Brazilian jiu-jitsu (BJJ), also known as the ‘gentle art’, is a favourite among people of all ages. This martial art form is based on striking and kicking; movements that develop your overall physical strength. If you are a fitness enthusiast who wants to be able to defend yourself from attackers, think about learning BJJ. This blog discusses why you should train in this form of martial art.

How to learn brazilian jiu‐jitsu

Image Source – https://bit.ly/2pZH7nW

11 Major Reasons to Train in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu

  1. Self Defence

Regular BJJ sessions train you to defend yourself against attackers. This martial art allows weaker and smaller opponents to dominate bigger ones. Brazilian jiu-jitsu teaches you how to use your legs to control a stronger opponent and increases your flexibility to escape a difficult confrontation. Every time you train, you are challenged both mentally and physically.

  1. Increased Fitness

BJJ boosts your fitness and works for all body types. It provides the requisite strength to attain your desired skill and fitness level. Workout sessions are fun-filled and engaging. Brazilian jiu-jitsu gets you in shape as you learn effective life-saving skills.

  1. Methodical Approach

BJJ training is systematic. You start by learning to tie your belt which you then teach to others. The detailed techniques and drills help you become an expert. When you help your training partners, you receive help in return. Be understanding, patient and empathetic when explaining techniques to fellow students. When you teach, you understand more.

  1. Developing Patience

It takes time to become proficient in any martial art. A minimum of six months of training is required to give you a feeling for the sport. For best results, you need to work hard and maintain discipline. Putting in a lot of effort and patience will gradually allow you to grow into an expert.

  1. Building Character

While you train in Brazilian jiu-jitsu, you get exposed to different kinds of emotions, such as anger and anxiety, which makes you physically and mentally stronger. You learn to accept or deal with failure and move on.The training offers exceptional experiences that trigger rich yet subtle psychological changes in its practitioners, encouraging you to keep returning to the mat.

  1. Mental Stimulation

Martial arts are often likened to a physical chess match as every move has a countermove. As you progress through your training, you will start thinking two to three moves ahead. BJJ develops your mind as much as your body.

  1. Stress Relief

Once you start training in Brazilian jiu-jitsu, you eliminate much of your stress and tension. The dedication and focus jiu-jitsu training alleviatemany of your anxieties. You may even start enjoying the strenuous exercise and training demands. When you stick to this combat sport system, you will experience greater inner peace.

  1. Improved Mental Health

Besides reducing stress, Brazilian jiu-jitsu can improve mental health. If you suffer from depression, engaging in jiu-jitsu training sessions may impact those feelings in a positive way. It also teaches you toendure uncomfortable situationsand get through pressure. Thus, BJJ training help you to be a more flexible thinker and provides mental balance.

  1. Better Sleep

To get the sleep you need, think about learning Brazilian jiu-jitsu. Training sessions sync your body and mind which provides the physical and mental calm required to get a good night’s sleep. As BJJ involves a balanced workout, including aerobic activity and strength building,it promotes better and more frequent sleep.

  1. Lowered Blood Pressure

Do you have high blood pressure? BJJ training helps lower it whichwill positively impact your overall fitness level. This allows you to more easily develop the strength and flexibility you need to endure vigorous training sessions.

  1. Boost in Confidence

Once you start performing Brazilian jiu-jitsu moves, you gain confidence and happiness. When you get close to your opponent during grappling, it releases the hormone oxytocin. This gives you a deep sense of satisfaction and makes you feel happy.

Brazilian jiu-jitsu is a martial art accessible to adults of all ages. It is much more than a sport; it can improve your life. Train with experts to learn the right techniques to protect yourself from opponents and come out a stronger, more confident and happier person.

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