How to live with disabilities

How to live with disabilities

I was born with Spina Bifida and one of the biggest challenges of having been born with a disability is that it’s sometimes difficult to separate yourself as a person from the physical condition you’ve always known.

I’ve learned that others who have acquired disabilities can struggle with the adjustment and adaptation that goes along with going from walking to a life on wheels or on crutches. These circumstances can make it more difficult for anyone with a disability to have a positive self-image and to develop self-esteem. Understanding this situation, here are some key insights that I think can help any person with a disability develop confidence.

1) Doctors do not know everything.
Medical professionals have tremendous skills that should be respected but they do not have all the answers. You know yourself and your family knows you. Seek input from those who know you well and stick with your own intuition. It’s usually right.

2) Don’t live up to other’s expectations.
Many people may have very small expectations of you because of your injury or disability but their judgments about you are wrong. If you don’t exceed these expectations you could find yourself not prepared with enough skills to deal with life independently. It may be hard to learn skills like cooking, cleaning and personal care while also balancing school and work but doing so will prepare you for a better future. To put it simply – be what you want to become.

3) Don’t measure yourself against anything else.
Be realistic yet hopeful about those dreams. You know your capabilities and if you think you can do it. You definitely can. Don’t let others convince you otherwise.

4) Understand that you’re in a costume all the time.
But your disability is not who you are. It has about as much to do with your soul as your hair color. Unfortunately, people may project uncertainty, emotional pain, anger and sadness onto you simply because you appear to be in a situation they fear and do not understand. So, like many people, they will cope by ridiculing or trying to ignore what they fear. Do not be intimidated by this even if people try to avoid you or try to silence you because you are seeking things that make them feel uncomfortable.

5) Be open to knowing new people.
By the nature of your circumstance, you will get to know people in fascinating and wonderful ways and some of your friendships will be deep but there will be those who can’t handle you and may be quite negative toward you. Stick with your friends and don’t get caught into the trap of trying to impress people for acceptance. It does not work. Ever.

6) You have the right to life, love, education and employment.
You will have to work hard to obtain these things but if you put in the effort and the time, just like everyone else, then eventually the opportunities that are right for you will come. Stick to it and don’t give up.

7) People may be afraid to tell you things honestly.
They may think you’re fragile and won’t want to hurt your feelings. Many will want to reward you for breathing or for being inspirational and they’ll accept whatever you give them without expectation of a better effort. This does not help you. Seek those who will tell you things honestly. Those who are honest with you are your friends. Cherish them and go back to them often for perspective and advice.

8) Seek great friends.
A friend who can prove they are reliable, unselfish and respectful toward you is the best friend you can have. Seek these qualities in the people you get to know well.

9) Don’t be too hard on yourself.
Very few people are dealing with everything you experience. You’ve already become an extremely strong person just by doing the things necessary to successfully live life with a disability. Gain confidence from the fact that you’re an expert on subjects most people have no clue about. You know how to problem solve, you know how to adapt and you are emotionally strong. In life that’s about 90% of all you need.

10) If you worry about the future, don’t.
Your disability is much less important than the way you choose to live your life. If you have hope, a sense of humor, ambitions and a positive outlook on yourself and other people than you will acquire all that is important in life. It likely won’t come to you quickly or easily. It’s likely to come over time through a series of small victories. Keep moving forward, if people stare at you, stare back and smile. Learn to communicate and always put the effort into first asking for and then working toward what you want.

11) Exercise regularly and drink lots of water.
Do what you need to do to stay active. If you stay on the couch you’ll remain on the couch even when you don’t want to be there.

12) Find ways to connect with people.
Lots of people are curious about you. Often, they admire and are inspired by you even if they don’t know enough about you to understand that you can help them see life from a perspective that no one else can. Understand what a great power that is and learn to connect with people on the things you have in common.

How to live with disabilities

I was born with Spina Bifida and one of the biggest challenges of having been born with a disability is that it’s sometimes difficult to separate yourself as a person from the physical condition you’ve always known.

I’ve learned that others who have acquired disabilities can struggle with the adjustment and adaptation that goes along with going from walking to a life on wheels or on crutches. These circumstances can make it more difficult for anyone with a disability to have a positive self-image and to develop self-esteem. Understanding this situation, here are some key insights that I think can help any person with a disability develop confidence.

1) Doctors do not know everything.
Medical professionals have tremendous skills that should be respected but they do not have all the answers. You know yourself and your family knows you. Seek input from those who know you well and stick with your own intuition. It’s usually right.

2) Don’t live up to other’s expectations.
Many people may have very small expectations of you because of your injury or disability but their judgments about you are wrong. If you don’t exceed these expectations you could find yourself not prepared with enough skills to deal with life independently. It may be hard to learn skills like cooking, cleaning and personal care while also balancing school and work but doing so will prepare you for a better future. To put it simply – be what you want to become.

3) Don’t measure yourself against anything else.
Be realistic yet hopeful about those dreams. You know your capabilities and if you think you can do it. You definitely can. Don’t let others convince you otherwise.

4) Understand that you’re in a costume all the time.
But your disability is not who you are. It has about as much to do with your soul as your hair color. Unfortunately, people may project uncertainty, emotional pain, anger and sadness onto you simply because you appear to be in a situation they fear and do not understand. So, like many people, they will cope by ridiculing or trying to ignore what they fear. Do not be intimidated by this even if people try to avoid you or try to silence you because you are seeking things that make them feel uncomfortable.

5) Be open to knowing new people.
By the nature of your circumstance, you will get to know people in fascinating and wonderful ways and some of your friendships will be deep but there will be those who can’t handle you and may be quite negative toward you. Stick with your friends and don’t get caught into the trap of trying to impress people for acceptance. It does not work. Ever.

6) You have the right to life, love, education and employment.
You will have to work hard to obtain these things but if you put in the effort and the time, just like everyone else, then eventually the opportunities that are right for you will come. Stick to it and don’t give up.

7) People may be afraid to tell you things honestly.
They may think you’re fragile and won’t want to hurt your feelings. Many will want to reward you for breathing or for being inspirational and they’ll accept whatever you give them without expectation of a better effort. This does not help you. Seek those who will tell you things honestly. Those who are honest with you are your friends. Cherish them and go back to them often for perspective and advice.

8) Seek great friends.
A friend who can prove they are reliable, unselfish and respectful toward you is the best friend you can have. Seek these qualities in the people you get to know well.

9) Don’t be too hard on yourself.
Very few people are dealing with everything you experience. You’ve already become an extremely strong person just by doing the things necessary to successfully live life with a disability. Gain confidence from the fact that you’re an expert on subjects most people have no clue about. You know how to problem solve, you know how to adapt and you are emotionally strong. In life that’s about 90% of all you need.

10) If you worry about the future, don’t.
Your disability is much less important than the way you choose to live your life. If you have hope, a sense of humor, ambitions and a positive outlook on yourself and other people than you will acquire all that is important in life. It likely won’t come to you quickly or easily. It’s likely to come over time through a series of small victories. Keep moving forward, if people stare at you, stare back and smile. Learn to communicate and always put the effort into first asking for and then working toward what you want.

11) Exercise regularly and drink lots of water.
Do what you need to do to stay active. If you stay on the couch you’ll remain on the couch even when you don’t want to be there.

12) Find ways to connect with people.
Lots of people are curious about you. Often, they admire and are inspired by you even if they don’t know enough about you to understand that you can help them see life from a perspective that no one else can. Understand what a great power that is and learn to connect with people on the things you have in common.

How to live with disabilities

2021 Changes to Medicare – Healthcare Business Today

How to live with disabilities

If An OCR HIPAA Audit Strikes, Will You Be Prepared?

How to live with disabilities

How to live with disabilities

Millions of people live with a disability in the United States.

In fact, roughly 13% of Americans have one form of disability or another.

Knowing you’re not alone with your disability may be reassuring. But it doesn’t necessarily improve the situation. The fact of the matter is that disability makes life difficult.

That’s never truer than when you were once able-bodied and wholly healthy. Getting used to living with a disability can take time.

However, it’s absolutely possible to live a fulfilled and happy life as a disabled person. We want to offer some tips and inspiration on how to live your best life from now on.

Keep reading for 6 tips on doing exactly that!

1. Seek Support

Adapting to a disability takes time.

Chances are, you’ll need some practical support as you adjust to your new circumstances. You might even need ongoing input.

This can be hard to ask for when you’re a proud and independent person. After all, you’re used to doing everything for yourself. Asking for help might not come naturally.

However, there’s nothing wrong with receiving a helping hand. Certain tasks and responsibilities may simply be unfeasible. Bringing in outside support can solve the problem and make your life that bit easier.

Friends and family are often a good source of help. However, trained independent living professionals are often a better option. They know what they’re doing and can help find the balance between what you can do yourself and what you need help with.

There may be local organizations who can provide the support you need. Indeed, you may be eligible for insurance claims too. Be sure to speak with a disability insurance lawyer for help in this department.

2. Consider Moving Property and Area

Again, this may not be an appealing idea.

But moving to a new house in a new area can have a host of benefits. Your current property may be ill-suited to someone with a disability. Imagine someone in a wheelchair living in a house with stepped access to the property.

Similarly, the indoors may be cramped and cluttered, with lots of obstacles to navigate. The bathroom may not be fitted with any disability support.

Likewise, you may be positioned far from hospitals and organizations that can offer support.

Moving property can provide a solution to these issues.

3. Give Yourself Time to Adjust

Be kind to yourself. Exercise self-compassion at every opportunity.

Give yourself time to mourn the loss of your previous life. Your newly acquired disability represents a huge loss. Adjusting to your new circumstances isn’t easy. Like suffering a bereavement, you need time to grieve.

It’s important to acknowledge how you’re feeling. It can be tempting to ignore negative feelings or push them to one side. You’re entitled to feel the way you do. Judging yourself negatively will only exacerbate the problem.

Know that things will get better. You can absolutely adapt and overcome this challenge. You’re likely to get there much quicker if you exercise self-compassion in the process.

4. Practice Empowerment

The immediate aftermath of a new disability is always difficult.

It can feel like you can no longer do anything you previously took for granted. It can be deeply challenging to ask for help and support. Focusing on the downsides is totally natural.

You hone in on what you’ve lost and the capabilities you’ve left behind.

If you can, try to remind yourself of the things you can still do. Focusing on the positive can help balance out the negative side of your predicament.

It’s empowering to realize that your disability doesn’t define you. There are, in fact, all manner of things available to you. Your disability is a hurdle to overcome, not a roadblock that stops you moving forward.

5. Embrace Life-Enhancing Technologies

Adapting to disability often entails finding workarounds to problems.

You quickly realize that you can do far more than you first thought. You just have to do them in a different way. This is where technology can play an enormous role.

These days, all sorts of technology and tools have been developed to support disabled people. There’s equipment to help people get dressed, use the bathroom, cook their meals, get around more easily, and so on.

One basic example is that of a high-end powered wheelchair. These life-enhancing pieces of dynamic technology promote newfound independence and freedom. They can also help you change posture. This leads to greater comfort and reduced pain from prolonged periods in the chair.

Try doing some research. What areas of life do you now struggle with most? What technology is available that might help? Incorporating it into your daily routine may significantly improve your level of independence and quality of life.

6. Look for Meaning and Purpose

As the old saying goes, when one door closes another opens.

You are by no means restricted to a substandard existence as a result of your disability.

You never know, you may discover all manner of new talents and skills you never knew about. Try and find new activities, hobbies, and ventures to get involved in. A sense of progress trumps any form of negativity. It provides a vital means of overcoming adversity.

You can still partake in sports, arts, education, volunteering, and so on. You could start a blog detailing your experience. You could write a book. You could turn your attention to any intellectual endeavor of interest.

Try looking out for the doors that have opened, rather than focusing on those that have closed. You can absolutely find opportunities to instill your life with meaning and purpose.

Final Thoughts on Living with a Disability

There you have it: some reassuring tips on living with a disability.

Millions of people live with a disability around the United States. Adapting to a disability and the new way of life isn’t easy though. The change to circumstances can take time to get used to. You can guarantee a fair share of ups and downs along the way.

However, having a disability shouldn’t entail a diminished existence. It’ll be different, for sure. But, as we’ve noted, you can absolutely find joy and meaning.

For anyone who has recently become disabled, we hope these tips will help you contend with the challenge ahead, and find positivity at the end of it.

Looking for more articles like this one? Be sure to check out our featured posts on the website.

How to live with disabilities

2021 Changes to Medicare – Healthcare Business Today

How to live with disabilities

If An OCR HIPAA Audit Strikes, Will You Be Prepared?

How to live with disabilities

How to live with disabilities

Millions of people live with a disability in the United States.

In fact, roughly 13% of Americans have one form of disability or another.

Knowing you’re not alone with your disability may be reassuring. But it doesn’t necessarily improve the situation. The fact of the matter is that disability makes life difficult.

That’s never truer than when you were once able-bodied and wholly healthy. Getting used to living with a disability can take time.

However, it’s absolutely possible to live a fulfilled and happy life as a disabled person. We want to offer some tips and inspiration on how to live your best life from now on.

Keep reading for 6 tips on doing exactly that!

1. Seek Support

Adapting to a disability takes time.

Chances are, you’ll need some practical support as you adjust to your new circumstances. You might even need ongoing input.

This can be hard to ask for when you’re a proud and independent person. After all, you’re used to doing everything for yourself. Asking for help might not come naturally.

However, there’s nothing wrong with receiving a helping hand. Certain tasks and responsibilities may simply be unfeasible. Bringing in outside support can solve the problem and make your life that bit easier.

Friends and family are often a good source of help. However, trained independent living professionals are often a better option. They know what they’re doing and can help find the balance between what you can do yourself and what you need help with.

There may be local organizations who can provide the support you need. Indeed, you may be eligible for insurance claims too. Be sure to speak with a disability insurance lawyer for help in this department.

2. Consider Moving Property and Area

Again, this may not be an appealing idea.

But moving to a new house in a new area can have a host of benefits. Your current property may be ill-suited to someone with a disability. Imagine someone in a wheelchair living in a house with stepped access to the property.

Similarly, the indoors may be cramped and cluttered, with lots of obstacles to navigate. The bathroom may not be fitted with any disability support.

Likewise, you may be positioned far from hospitals and organizations that can offer support.

Moving property can provide a solution to these issues.

3. Give Yourself Time to Adjust

Be kind to yourself. Exercise self-compassion at every opportunity.

Give yourself time to mourn the loss of your previous life. Your newly acquired disability represents a huge loss. Adjusting to your new circumstances isn’t easy. Like suffering a bereavement, you need time to grieve.

It’s important to acknowledge how you’re feeling. It can be tempting to ignore negative feelings or push them to one side. You’re entitled to feel the way you do. Judging yourself negatively will only exacerbate the problem.

Know that things will get better. You can absolutely adapt and overcome this challenge. You’re likely to get there much quicker if you exercise self-compassion in the process.

4. Practice Empowerment

The immediate aftermath of a new disability is always difficult.

It can feel like you can no longer do anything you previously took for granted. It can be deeply challenging to ask for help and support. Focusing on the downsides is totally natural.

You hone in on what you’ve lost and the capabilities you’ve left behind.

If you can, try to remind yourself of the things you can still do. Focusing on the positive can help balance out the negative side of your predicament.

It’s empowering to realize that your disability doesn’t define you. There are, in fact, all manner of things available to you. Your disability is a hurdle to overcome, not a roadblock that stops you moving forward.

5. Embrace Life-Enhancing Technologies

Adapting to disability often entails finding workarounds to problems.

You quickly realize that you can do far more than you first thought. You just have to do them in a different way. This is where technology can play an enormous role.

These days, all sorts of technology and tools have been developed to support disabled people. There’s equipment to help people get dressed, use the bathroom, cook their meals, get around more easily, and so on.

One basic example is that of a high-end powered wheelchair. These life-enhancing pieces of dynamic technology promote newfound independence and freedom. They can also help you change posture. This leads to greater comfort and reduced pain from prolonged periods in the chair.

Try doing some research. What areas of life do you now struggle with most? What technology is available that might help? Incorporating it into your daily routine may significantly improve your level of independence and quality of life.

6. Look for Meaning and Purpose

As the old saying goes, when one door closes another opens.

You are by no means restricted to a substandard existence as a result of your disability.

You never know, you may discover all manner of new talents and skills you never knew about. Try and find new activities, hobbies, and ventures to get involved in. A sense of progress trumps any form of negativity. It provides a vital means of overcoming adversity.

You can still partake in sports, arts, education, volunteering, and so on. You could start a blog detailing your experience. You could write a book. You could turn your attention to any intellectual endeavor of interest.

Try looking out for the doors that have opened, rather than focusing on those that have closed. You can absolutely find opportunities to instill your life with meaning and purpose.

Final Thoughts on Living with a Disability

There you have it: some reassuring tips on living with a disability.

Millions of people live with a disability around the United States. Adapting to a disability and the new way of life isn’t easy though. The change to circumstances can take time to get used to. You can guarantee a fair share of ups and downs along the way.

However, having a disability shouldn’t entail a diminished existence. It’ll be different, for sure. But, as we’ve noted, you can absolutely find joy and meaning.

For anyone who has recently become disabled, we hope these tips will help you contend with the challenge ahead, and find positivity at the end of it.

Looking for more articles like this one? Be sure to check out our featured posts on the website.

Living with Someone with a Disability

The term disabled refers to someone who is unable to complete everyday tasks or has difficulty completing the tasks due to an illness or injury. This ranges greatly from physical to mental disabilities and again varies widely for each individual. No two people’s disabilities are the same. With this in mind, we have put together our top three tips of things to consider when living with someone who has a disability.

Stay Active!

Staying active is important for everyone, whether they are disabled or not. Whilst some people may be required to regularly rest, it is also vital that they keep active where possible to keep them in good general health. Getting regular exercise has a profound impact on anxiety, depression and your overall mood! Why not start a weekly activity like walking or an exercise class together? Not only will you feel the health benefits but it’s a great way to get out, enjoy some fresh air, a change of scenery and is a great bonding experience.

Have Patience

At times, disabilities can be extremely frustrating especially when an individual is still coming to terms with not being able to carry out tasks they’re used to doing for themselves. The frustration can overboil into anger or snappiness and be delivered to the nearest person, and unfortunately, it could be you on the end of those angry words. It’s important to be empathetic and understanding in these situations, keep in mind that the anger is misdirected, rather than antagonism towards you. Try not to take things personally, and always after allowing someone to calm down take the time to talk about these situations.

Kit Out The House

If a loved one is living in the same house as you, it’s important to ensure that the house is suitably adapted for them to live with their disability. If there are any hazards or areas that you believe need to be modified for their ease of life, make sure you bring it up with them or with support professionals. Even making small changes can have a positive effect.

Where to Live When You Don’t Need a Nursing Home

Isaac O. Opole, MD, PhD, is a board-certified internist and a current teaching professor of medicine at the University of Kansas.

For a young adult with disabilities, living at home alone isn’t always an option. Changes in your health or medical condition may take you from living well on your own to needing some assistance to perform daily activities. Whether you’re young or old, there are a variety of housing options to choose from when considering assisted living options. Also, some types of housing arrangements can be funded in whole or in part by Medicare, Medicaid, or private insurance.

How to live with disabilities

Care at Home

Some people with disabilities can live in their own homes or apartments but need help with certain activities like cooking, cleaning, and shopping. When there are no family caregivers or other volunteers available, outside assistance is necessary. Home healthcare agencies are a resource that can provide these services.

Depending upon the needs of the individual, Medicaid may cover these costs. Medicare will only pay for these services based on specific criteria, including which parts a patient has additional coverage for (i.e., Medicare Part C).

Accessory Dwelling Units

Accessory Dwelling Units (ADUs) are also known as a second unit or “in-law apartment.” These are apartments exist within a primary house or apartment and have a separate living area, kitchen, and bathroom. These units provide a private residence for friends or family members to live independently, but close enough for a loved one to provide daily care as needed. If you’re interested in building an ADU within an existing home, be sure to check with local zoning boards.

Assisted Living Facilities

Assisted living facilities vary greatly from location to location, and so do the services they offer. Some common services include assistance with daily care, meal preparation, and transportation. Residences may be an apartment, a shared dwelling, or separate, one-floor dwellings within a larger community of similar buildings.

Some facilities provide onsite healthcare services, while others offer transportation for residents to their offsite medical appointments. Most assisted living facilities are not funded by Medicaid or Medicare.  

Continuing Care Retirement Communities

Continuing Care Retirement Communities (CCRCs) provide progressive care as a person’s condition progresses and they need a higher level of care. The resident may live in an assisted living area of the community and then move into the nursing home area of the community when they need a higher level of care.

The contracts of CCRCs usually require that residents must use the nursing home care area of the community if they ever need this level of care. Residents usually pay a large down payment and a monthly fee. Be sure to look for an accredited facility if you are choosing this type of care.

Subsidized Housing

Subsidized housing, in some instances, offers additional services to disabled and elderly residents. Services may include room cleaning, laundry, and shopping. Typical subsidized housing is often found within apartment complexes. The housing is for individuals who have low to moderate incomes, and the rent is based on a sliding scale. State and federal programs usually help to subsidize the rent for residents.

Boarding Homes or Group Homes

Boarding homes are for individuals who need more care than living at home by themselves, but they aren’t quite ready for a nursing home. A boarding home or group home may provide bathing, assistance with dressing, housekeeping, meals, and transportation. Depending upon location, these homes may be covered by Medicare or Medicaid; otherwise, other state and federal programs may provide assistance with covering the cost of staying in a boarding or group home.

More Assisted Living Options

To learn more about assisted living options in your area, contact the following organizations in your state or county:

Everyone needs care until they reach a particular age. But there are even those who need extra care all throughout their lives because of some form of disability. Whether you are born with it or because of some incident, being disabled requires extra care to navigate through life.

How to live with disabilities

Sometimes family members can’t fully take care of their loved ones who have special needs because they also have their own lives to live. Whether you are a person with disability or you have a loved one who has a disability, you will need help. Consider signing up for disability home care services because of the following reasons.

Getting Dressed

If your loved one cannot get dress on their own, there will be staff available to help them out. It is best to leave the dressing task to someone who is trained on it.

If you do it, there is a tendency that you might end up rushing because of the other things you have to take care of. You should not rush a person living with disability. They already have difficulty with everything else. Do not make them feel like they are a burden.

Feeding

You may not always be available to feed your family member who is living with disability. If you have a family of your own or is busy with your work, feeding can be hard to juggle, especially since there are three meals to prepare in a day.

However, if you decide to hire staff to do it for you, they will be there whenever your loved one is hungry. You will not have to drop everything to help your loved one eat since the staff will be the one to do it. If your loved one feels hungry an hour after you are out of the house, the in-home staff will take care of it so your loved ones will not go hungry.

Movement

For a person with disability, from the bed to the door is already a struggle. Imagine having to move from one room to another. It will be even worse if they try to go outside. If you have kids to take care of, you might not always be there to assist them in moving to the bathroom or the kitchen.

The staff will assist your loved one with disability in moving from one place to another. They are trained to handle any disability, so you do not have to worry. They will help with the mobility of the person living with disability.

Living Alone

Your loved one can choose to live on their own if they have home care help. They do not have to live with you or other family members if they do not want to. They can live on their own as long as they have someone there to help them navigate through simple tasks such as moving from one room to another, going to the bathroom, cooking food, or even running simple errands such as going to the grocery store. Disability home care services allow them to remain independent of their families.

Where to Live When You Don’t Need a Nursing Home

Isaac O. Opole, MD, PhD, is a board-certified internist specializing in geriatric medicine. For over 15 years, he’s practiced at the Kansas University Medical Center, where he is also a professor.

For a young adult with disabilities, living at home alone isn’t always an option. Changes in your health or medical condition may take you from living well on your own to needing some assistance to perform daily activities. Whether you’re young or old, there are a variety of housing options to choose from when considering assisted living options. Also, some types of housing arrangements can be funded in whole or in part by Medicare, Medicaid, or private insurance.

How to live with disabilities

Care at Home

Some people with disabilities can live in their own homes or apartments but need help with certain activities like cooking, cleaning, and shopping. When there are no family caregivers or other volunteers available, outside assistance is necessary. Home healthcare agencies are a resource that can provide these services.

Depending upon the needs of the individual, Medicaid may cover these costs. Medicare will only pay for these services based on specific criteria, including which parts a patient has additional coverage for (i.e., Medicare Part C).

Accessory Dwelling Units

Accessory Dwelling Units (ADUs) are also known as a second unit or “in-law apartment.” These are apartments exist within a primary house or apartment and have a separate living area, kitchen, and bathroom. These units provide a private residence for friends or family members to live independently, but close enough for a loved one to provide daily care as needed. If you’re interested in building an ADU within an existing home, be sure to check with local zoning boards.

Assisted Living Facilities

Assisted living facilities vary greatly from location to location, and so do the services they offer. Some common services include assistance with daily care, meal preparation, and transportation. Residences may be an apartment, a shared dwelling, or separate, one-floor dwellings within a larger community of similar buildings.

Some facilities provide onsite healthcare services, while others offer transportation for residents to their offsite medical appointments. Most assisted living facilities are not funded by Medicaid or Medicare.  

Continuing Care Retirement Communities

Continuing Care Retirement Communities (CCRCs) provide progressive care as a person’s condition progresses and they need a higher level of care. The resident may live in an assisted living area of the community and then move into the nursing home area of the community when they need a higher level of care.

The contracts of CCRCs usually require that residents must use the nursing home care area of the community if they ever need this level of care. Residents usually pay a large down payment and a monthly fee. Be sure to look for an accredited facility if you are choosing this type of care.

Subsidized Housing

Subsidized housing, in some instances, offers additional services to disabled and elderly residents. Services may include room cleaning, laundry, and shopping. Typical subsidized housing is often found within apartment complexes. The housing is for individuals who have low to moderate incomes, and the rent is based on a sliding scale. State and federal programs usually help to subsidize the rent for residents.

Boarding Homes or Group Homes

Boarding homes are for individuals who need more care than living at home by themselves, but they aren’t quite ready for a nursing home. A boarding home or group home may provide bathing, assistance with dressing, housekeeping, meals, and transportation. Depending upon location, these homes may be covered by Medicare or Medicaid; otherwise, other state and federal programs may provide assistance with covering the cost of staying in a boarding or group home.

More Assisted Living Options

To learn more about assisted living options in your area, contact the following organizations in your state or county: