How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

This step-by-step article describes how to connect a Windows Server 2003-based terminal services client to a terminal server by using Remote Desktop Connection.

Applies to: В Windows Server 2003
Original KB number: В 814585

More information

Open Remote Desktop Connection

To open Remote Desktop Connection, select Start > All Programs > Accessories > Communications, and then select Remote Desktop Connection.

Create a Terminal Services connection

To create a Terminal Services connection, follow these steps:

Open Remote Desktop Connection.

In the Computer box, type the computer name or the IP address of a terminal server or a computer that has Remote Desktop enabled.

To connect to the console session of the remote computer, type computername or IP address/console.

Select Connect.

In the logon dialog box, type your user name, password, and domain (if necessary), and then select OK.

Save connection settings

You can save a connection as a Remote Desktop protocol (.rdp) file. An .rdp file contains all the information for a connection to a terminal server, including the Options settings that were configured when the file was saved. You can customize any number of .rdp files, including files for connecting to the same server with different settings. For example, you can save a file that connects to MyServer in full screen mode and another file that connects to the same computer in 800Г—600 screen size.

To save your connection settings, follow these steps:

  1. Open Remote Desktop Connection, and then select Options.
  2. Specify the connection settings that you want for this connection.
  3. On the General tab, select Save As.
  4. In the File name box, type a file name for the saved connection file, and then select Save.

To edit an .rdp file to change the connections settings it contains, select Start > My Documents, right-click the file, and then select Edit.

Open a saved connection

To open a saved connection, follow these steps:

Open Remote Desktop Connection, and then select Open.

Double-click the .rdp file for the connection that you want to open.

Copy files between the local computer and the remote computer

Open Remote Desktop Connection.

Type the computer name or the IP address of a terminal server or a computer that has Remote Desktop enabled.

Select the Local Resources tab, select the Disk Drives check box, and then select Connect.

Select Start on the task bar of the remote computer, and then select My Computer. Or double-click the My Computer icon on the desktop of the remote computer.

The drives on the remote server appear with the drives on your local computer. Your local drives appear as driveletter on tsclient, where tsclient is the name assigned to your (local) computer.

Locate the file that you want to copy, right-click the file, and then select Copy.

Locate the folder where you want to paste the file, and then select Paste.

Log off and end the session

To log off and end a session, follow these steps:

In the Remote Desktop Connection window, select Start, and then select Shut Down.

In the Shut Down Windows dialog box, select log off , and then select OK.

I am setting up Remote Desktop Services for use by one of our remote offices. The workstations at the remote office are all Windows 7 Pro, joined to the domain. There is nothing installed on the local workstation othern than the Win7 OS. The remote and main office are linked via VPN.

The workers will login to the local workstation, using their domain login, then right now double click an icon on the desktop which will do the RDP to the Remote Desktop Server. This does work fine, but requires some user education.

Is there a way that when the user logs into the local workstation, it will start the RDP session right away and pass their username/password through as well?

Would using a thin client PC do what I am asking?

2 Answers 2

You should be able to accomplish this pretty easy.

Setup the client to auto start, use one of these methods.

  • Drop an RDP file or shortcut in their startup group or the system startup group.
  • Set a group policy that will automatically start the terminal server client at logon
    • GPO: User Configuration \ Admin Templates \ System \ Logon \ Run these programs at logon
    • The user will have a local desktop, and there may be a short delay between the display of the desktop and the client automatically launching.
  • Set mstsc as the windows shell
    • GPO: User Configuration \ Admin Templates \ System \ Custom User Interface
    • The down-side is that the user will not have a local environment, and when they disconnect their system will logout.

Use thin client to access PC via RDP – no server infrastructure

Hey, Newbie here and not a server-dude 🙂

I have a simple need to connect to a host PC running Windows 10 pro (quite noisy and large so want to move it to another room at home) from a thin client/dumb terminal.

I haven’t bought it yet but thinking of one of the Dell Wyse clients (Suggestions welcome based upon requirement) I simply want to access it via RDP or similar, with a local keyboard, mouse, screen (and usb devices if needed)

I saw here that .rdp files can be loaded locally to a thin client/dumb terminal and I wanted to know exactly how? https://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/windowsserver/en-US/ec0b4452-ebbd-4a6a-bf2e-5c4acdafdc25/local-config-for-wyse-thinos-and-microsoft-server-2016-rds-sessionbased and if this would be the way to achieve the above?

I use VDI’s at work and they are perfect for what I need – but I don’t want the VDI part 🙂 no servers etc to manage, even if virtualised on the pc – I want the smallest config, storage and system footprint possible (a client running ThinOS (never seen it but seems simple?)

accessing a machine over RDP seems to be good enough). If I can install an rdp file to a wyse/similar (not running windows btw) then this will be perfect and I’ll go buy one!

2 Answers

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Hi DHD,
Thank you for posting your query. According to your description, could you please share more information? What is the version of your host and your terminal? Are you trying to use RDP? What apps are you going to run?(E.G. Microsoft 365)
In my opinion, VDI is a perfect solution for you. As others also comment that VDI has the benefit that the user gets the “own” PC, it runs a desktop OS and essentially is the same experience as if they were using a desktop, only its accessed remotely, normally through some sort of Remote Desktop app that launches automatically when the thin/zero client turns on.
Here are some related links you may refer to and give you some hints.
Step-By-Step: Deploying Virtual Desktops with Windows Server 2012
https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/archive/blogs/canitpro/step-by-step-deploying-virtual-desktops-with-windows-server-2012
Dumb Terminal options using Server 2012 R2 RDS.
https://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/lync/en-US/0d3df644-f4d9-4547-984e-b9b28e19c1bb/dumb-terminal-options-using-server-2012-r2-rds?forum=winserverTS
Dell WYSE thinos to Launch RDS RemoteApp
https://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/2c5ef048-0ed7-4e56-92a8-82fafc18f3a2/dell-wyse-thinos-to-launch-rds-remoteapp?forum=winserverTS
How does the PXE boot process work?
https://techcommunity.microsoft.com/t5/itops-talk-blog/how-does-the-pxe-boot-process-work/ba-p/888557

—If the suggestions above are helpful, please ACCEPT ANSWER. Really appreciate. This will also help others with similar issue to find this post quickly. —

I have updated my post to indicate the target PC is running Win10 Pro. As per my OP I do not have the thin client/terminal yet, hence my question.

I have a variety of applications I run – the point is to run them seemlessly, as per the RDP method I have mentioned.
What I want is achieveable by RDP from a PC to the host, but I dont want another PC to manage, so instead my OP asks about thin clients. I am seeking solutions to the requirement I have listed.

As such the server options you have listed are what I said I want to avoid.

The one link that looks relevant is the “thinos launch RDP remoteapp” – it seems familiar – I may have read it.. this solution mentions server infrastructure, domains, RemoteAppsm etc.

What I am asking for is a straight [thin client (no windows)] [HostWin10] setup with nothing more than RDP or similar being used to connect.

Hi,
Thank you for your feedback. Sincerely sorry for the delay of replying. This may be somewhat a complex issue. Via many researches, here are some hints may help you.

—If the suggestions above are helpful, please ACCEPT ANSWER. Really appreciate. This will also help others with similar issue to find this post quickly. —

IN THIS TASK

Summary

This step-by-step article describes how to gain access to local files when you are using a Remote Desktop session to a Windows XP or Windows Server 2003 host computer. For more information about client-side drive redirection with Windows NT 4.0 Terminal Server and Windows 2000 Terminal Services, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

272519 How to redirect a client drive in Terminal Services

The client portion of Remote Desktop is installed during the Windows XP and Windows Server 2003 installation process. If you are using Windows 95, Windows 98, Windows Millennium Edition, Windows NT 4.0, or Windows 2000 client computers to connect to a Windows XP or Windows Server 2003 host computer, then download and install the Remote Desktop Connection Software from the following Microsoft Web site:

To connect to the remote computer:

Click Start, point to All Programs (or Programs), point to Accessories, point to Communications, and then click Remote Desktop Connection.

Type the name of the Windows XP-based computer that has Remote Desktop enabled, and then click Connect.

Type your user name and password, and then click OK.

After you establish a Remote Desktop connection, your remote desktop is displayed in its own window. You can use the keyboard and mouse of the local host to control the remote computer.

You can gain access to your disk drives on the local computer during a Remote Desktop session. You can redirect the local disk drives, including the hard disk drives, CD-ROM disk drives, floppy disk drives, and mapped network disk drives so that you can transfer files between the local host and the remote computer in the same way that you copy files from a network share. You can use Microsoft Windows Explorer to view the disk drives and files for each redirected disk drive. Alternatively, you can view the files for each redirected disk drive in My Computer. The drives are displayed as “drive_letter on terminal_server_client_name” in both Windows Explorer and My Computer.

To view the disk drives and files for the redirected disk drive:

Click Start, point to All Programs (or Programs), point to
Accessories, point to Communications, and then click Remote Desktop Connection.

Click Options, and then click the
Local Resources tab.

Click Disk Drives, and then click
Connect.

After you are finished using the Remote Desktop connection:

Click Start in the Remote Desktop Connection window, and then click Shut Down.

Click Log Off, and then click OK.

References

For more information about Remote Desktop and how to install Remote Desktop on versions of Windows other than Windows XP, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

315328 How to use the Remote Desktop feature of Windows XP Professional

You can configure and connect a client to connect to the Terminal Server using the Remote Desktop Communication dialog box.

How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop clientTo connect a client to Terminal Server in Windows:

  1. Open the Remote Desktop Communication application.
  2. In the Computer field, enter or browse for your Terminal Server machine name or IP address. To configure optional parameters for your remote desktop connection, go to Step 3. Otherwise, go to Step 14.
  3. Click the Options button. The tabs for each of the options appear in the dialog box, as shown in the following figure.

How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

Remote Desktop Connection Dialog Box with Tabs Displayed

  1. In the Computer field, enter or browse for your Terminal Server machine name or IP address.
  2. In the User Name field, enter a valid Remote Desktop user existing on the Terminal server machine, using the format \ , for example, MyTSmachine\operator1 or 169.127.123.89\operator1.
  3. Click the Display tab.
  4. Leave the default remote desktop size, but change the color setting to the lowest color setting that the pictures were designed to use. By using the least amount of colors, you reduce the load on the network and enhance performance.
  5. Click the Local Resources tab.
  6. Select the options that your application requires.

For instance, you probably want to enable Printer sharing by selecting the Printer check box under the Local Device Settings. The other options you will probably set to the defaults, though you are not restricted to do so.

  1. Click the Programs tab.
  2. If you want to start a program when the designated user starts a Terminal Server session, select the check box and enter the name and path, along with the folder that you want the program to start in if it is different from the application path.
  3. Click the Experience tab.
  4. Select the performance options that your client requires. It is recommended that you clear all check boxes except Persistent Bitmap Caching and Reconnect if connection is dropped.
  1. Click Connect to connect to the remote Terminal Server.

How Do I.

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I have an AWS Lightsail server based on the Windows Server 2016 blueprint. I would like to have users log in via remote desktop, and be limited to using just one designated application, and have no access to the desktop or other features (including the File Explorer).

I tried setting up a group policy, both for the server (Computer Configuration) and users (User Configuration) under Administrative Templates -> Windows Components -> Remote Desktop Services -> Remote Desktop Session Host -> Remote Session Environment, and I enabled and configured Start a program on connection. That did not work.

I also tried the suggestions found at the following link: Can RDP clients launch remote applications and not desktops

including setting the following dword value in the server’s registry:

I also included the alternate shell and remoteapplication entries in an .RDP file, and pointed to that file in the user’s Remote Desktop Services Profile tab of the user’s Properties dialog.

None of that worked. Each time I logged in as the user, the configured application did not run and I had access to the desktop.

Nothing that I found in my Google searches worked either.

Can someone please point me in the right direction. I am pretty sure that what I am trying to do is possible, but I am stuck.

I am connecting to the server using the remote desktop client in Windows 10 Pro, though I am not sure that that has anything to do with the failure. I’ll also note that once I log into the server using remote desktop I can successfully run the application from the File Explorer or cmd prompt.

This tutorial is going to show you 3 ways to log into Linux server on Windows via SSH.

What’s SSH?

SSH stands for Secure Shell, which was invented in 1995 to replace the insecure Telnet (Telecommunication Network). It’s now the primary way for system administrators to securely log into remote Linux servers over the public Internet. Although it looks and acts the same as Telnet, all communications over the SSH protocol is encrypted to prevent packet sniffing.

If you are running a Linux or Mac computer, SSH client is installed by default. You can open up a terminal window and run the ssh command like below to connect to a remote Linux server.

Now let’s discuss how to use SSH on Windows.

Method 1: Windows 10’s Built-in SSH Client

The Microsoft PowerShell team decided to port OpenSSH (both the client and the server) to Windows in 2015. It finally arrived in Windows 10’s Fall Creator Update in 2017 and is enabled by default in the April 2018 Update.

To use the OpenSSH client on Windows 10, simply open a PowerShell window or a command prompt window and run the ssh command. For example, if I want to connect to my Ubuntu desktop in the LAN, I would run

linuxbabe is the username on my Ubuntu desktop and 192.168.0.101 is the private IP address for my Ubuntu desktop. The first time you connect to a Linux computer, you will be prompted to accept the host key. Then enter your password to login. After login, you can run Linux commands to do administrative tasks.

Note that if you want to paste a password into the PowerShell window, you need to right-click the mouse and press Enter.

How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

To log out from the Linux box, run the exit command or press Ctrl+D .

The default font size in PowerShell Window is very small. To change it, right-click the titlebar and select properties , then you can change the font size, and the background color.

How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

Method 2: Use SSH in Windows Subsystem for Linux

Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL) enables you to run native Linux command-line tools directly on Windows 10. If you are a system administrator, WSL is probably an overkill for just using SSH because it would install and run a Linux distro (without graphical user interface) on your Windows 10 desktop. WSL is created for web developers or those who need to work on open-source projects. You can use not only SSH but also other Linux command line tools (Bash, sed, awk, etc).

Open the Microsoft Store and enter WSL in the search box. Select Run Linux on Windows and install a Linux distro of your choice.

How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

For example, I choose Ubuntu and click the Get button to install it.

How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

Once your Linux distro is installed, open the Control Panel and select Programs -> Turn Windows features on or off . Tick on the checkbox of Windows Subsystem for Linux to enable this feature. (You may need to reboot your Windows PC for this change to take effect.)

Next, you can launch the Linux distro from the start menu by search the distro’s name. The first time you launch it, you need to create a user and set a password.

How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

After that, you can use the ssh command like below to connect to a Linux server or PC that runs a SSH server.

Method 3: Use Putty

Putty is a well-known and the most popular SSH client on Windows before the arrival of Windows OpenSSH client and Windows Subsystem for Linux. To use SSH with Putty, you need to download the Putty program from the official website and install it.

Launch Putty from the Start menu. Then enter the IP address or hostname of the Linux box and click the Open button to connect to it.

How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

Accept the host key and you will be prompted to enter the username and password.

How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

Please note that when you type in your password, the cursor doesn’t move, but it’s actually accepting your password. To paste text into Putty, first press Ctrl+C to copy the text, then go to Putty window and press the right button of your mouse.

How to Set Up SSH Key on Windows 10 (Optional)

There’re mainly two ways of authenticating user login with OpenSSH server:

  • password authentication
  • public-key authentication: also known as passwordless SSH login because you don’t need to enter your password.

To set up public-key authentication on Windows 10, follow the instructions below.

Open Windows Powershell, and run the following command to generate SSH keypair.

  • -t stands for type . The above command generates an RSA type keypair. RSA is the default type.
  • -b stands for bits . By default, the key is 3072 bits long. We use a 4096 bits key for stronger security.

When asked which file to save the key, you can simply press Enter to use the default file. Next, you can enter a passphrase to encrypt the private key, but you will need to enter this passphrase every time when you log into the Linux server. If you don’t want it, you can press Enter, so it will have no passphrase.

How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

  • The private key (your identification) will be saved in the .ssh/id_rsa file under your user directory.
  • The public key will be saved in the .ssh/id_rsa.pub file.

Now we need to upload the public key to remote Linux server. You can display the public key in the Powershell with the following command.

Then log in to your server via password authentication, and run the following command to create a .ssh directory under your home directory.

Create the authorized_hosts file

Copy your SSH public key and paste it to this file. Save and close the file. To save a file in Nano text editor, press Ctrl+O , then press Enter to confirm. To close a file, press Ctrl+X .

Next, change the permission of this file.

Log out of your Linux server.

Now you can SSH into your server without entering a password.

Next Step

I hope this article helped you use SSH on Windows. You might also want to protect SSH service from hacking, I recommend setting up public-key authentication or two-factor authentication.

Also, you can enable automatic security updates on your Linux server to patch vulnerabilities.

If you want FTP access to the Ubuntu server, you can set up pure-FTPd server.

As always, if you found this post useful, then subscribe to our free newsletter to get more tips and tricks. Take care 🙂

IN THIS TASK

Summary

This step-by-step article describes how to gain access to local files when you are using a Remote Desktop session to a Windows XP or Windows Server 2003 host computer. For more information about client-side drive redirection with Windows NT 4.0 Terminal Server and Windows 2000 Terminal Services, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

272519 How to redirect a client drive in Terminal Services

The client portion of Remote Desktop is installed during the Windows XP and Windows Server 2003 installation process. If you are using Windows 95, Windows 98, Windows Millennium Edition, Windows NT 4.0, or Windows 2000 client computers to connect to a Windows XP or Windows Server 2003 host computer, then download and install the Remote Desktop Connection Software from the following Microsoft Web site:

To connect to the remote computer:

Click Start, point to All Programs (or Programs), point to Accessories, point to Communications, and then click Remote Desktop Connection.

Type the name of the Windows XP-based computer that has Remote Desktop enabled, and then click Connect.

Type your user name and password, and then click OK.

After you establish a Remote Desktop connection, your remote desktop is displayed in its own window. You can use the keyboard and mouse of the local host to control the remote computer.

You can gain access to your disk drives on the local computer during a Remote Desktop session. You can redirect the local disk drives, including the hard disk drives, CD-ROM disk drives, floppy disk drives, and mapped network disk drives so that you can transfer files between the local host and the remote computer in the same way that you copy files from a network share. You can use Microsoft Windows Explorer to view the disk drives and files for each redirected disk drive. Alternatively, you can view the files for each redirected disk drive in My Computer. The drives are displayed as “drive_letter on terminal_server_client_name” in both Windows Explorer and My Computer.

To view the disk drives and files for the redirected disk drive:

Click Start, point to All Programs (or Programs), point to
Accessories, point to Communications, and then click Remote Desktop Connection.

Click Options, and then click the
Local Resources tab.

Click Disk Drives, and then click
Connect.

After you are finished using the Remote Desktop connection:

Click Start in the Remote Desktop Connection window, and then click Shut Down.

Click Log Off, and then click OK.

References

For more information about Remote Desktop and how to install Remote Desktop on versions of Windows other than Windows XP, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

315328 How to use the Remote Desktop feature of Windows XP Professional

Guides, tutorials, reviews and news for System Administrators.

How To Enable Remote Desktop In Windows Server 2019

By default in Windows Server 2019 remote desktop is disabled. This post will cover how to turn on and enable Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP) in Windows Server 2019, using either PowerShell or the GUI.

Note: In Windows Server 2019 Essentials edition, remote desktop is already enabled by default so you will not need to manually do this.

Remote desktop can be enabled through the graphical user interface (GUI) with the following easy steps.

Allowing Remote Desktop With The GUI

  1. Open Server Manager. This can be found by opening the start menu, as shown below.
    How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

If Server Manager does not show here, simply type “Server Manager” into the start menu to search for it. By default Server Manager will open when you log in to the GUI, otherwise you can select it from the task bar.
Within the Server Manager window, select Local Server from the left hand side. You may need to wait a little for it to detect the current state of your system. You should see that Remote Desktop is listed as Disabled as shown below.

How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

  • Click on the Disabled text which will open the System Properties window in the Remote tab.
  • From the System Properties window, select “Allow remote connections to this Computer” as shown below.

    How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

    Tip: You can also open the System Properties window shown above by entering “SystemPropertiesRemote” into a Command Prompt or PowerShell terminal.
    Once you select “Allow remote connections to this computer” the below warning message will appear, advising that this will create the required firewall rules in Windows firewall to allow remote desktop traffic in from any source address, select OK to proceed.

    How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

  • At this point you can optionally click the “Select Users…” button to define specific users or groups that have permission to connect via remote desktop. Select the OK button to close out of the System Properties window and enable remote desktop.
  • Back in Server Manager, Remote Desktop may still show as Disabled until you refresh the view. After clicking the refresh button as highlighted below (or pressing F5 on the keyboard), the status should update to Enabled.

    How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

    That’s it, remote desktop should now be ready to use!

    Allowing Remote Desktop With PowerShell

    While there isn’t currently an explicit PowerShell cmdlet used for enabling remote desktop, we can use the Set-ItemPropery cmdlet to modify the registry value that enables or disables Remote Desktop:

    Once complete we can use the ‘Enable-NetFirewallRule’ to configure Windows Firewall to allow remote desktop connections in:

    Remote Desktop should now be accessible in Windows Server 2019.

    By default this will allow all connections in, the same as if we had just enabled it using the GUI steps shown above. It is highly recommended that you configure more specific firewall rules where possible to only allow inbound traffic from known hosts.

    Summary

    By default Windows Server 2019 sets external remote desktop access to disabled as a security measure, we can easily optionally enable it from within the server console or via PowerShell to allow everyone or a specific set of users or groups.

    How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

    A terminal server, also sometimes called a communication server, is a hardware device or server that provides terminals, such as PCs, printers, and other devices, with a common connection point to a local or wide area network (WAN). The terminals connect to the terminal server from their RS-232C or RS-423 serial port. The other side of the terminal server connects through network interface cards (NIC) to a local area network (LAN), usually an Ethernet or token ring LAN, through modems to the dial-in/out WAN, or to an X.25 network or a 3270 gateway. (Different makes of terminal server offer different kinds of interconnection. Some can be ordered in different configurations based on customer need.) The use of a terminal server means that each terminal doesn’t need its own network interface card or modem. The connection resources inside the terminal server are usually shared dynamically by all attached terminals.

    Some terminal servers can be shared by hundreds of terminals. The terminals can be PCs, terminals that emulate 3270s, printers, or other devices with the RS-232/423 interface. Terminals can use TCP/IP for a Telnet connection to a host, LAT to a Digital Equipment Corporation host, or TN3270 for a Telnet connection to an IBM host with 3270 applications. With some terminal servers, a given terminal user can have multiple host connections to different kinds of host operating systems, such as UNIX, IBM and DEC.

    Although the concept of a terminal has its origins in the mainframe world, the Windows Server operating system has long had the ability to act as a terminal server.

    The way that a terminal server works tends to vary from one vendor to the next. In the case of a Windows terminal server, the Windows operating system is configured to support multiple user sessions. This is different from other multi-session environments such as a Windows file server because the operating system renders a user interface (UI) for each of the sessions.

    End users connect to a terminal server by using a remote desktop protocol (RDP) client, a desktop or mobile application whose job it is to connect to the terminal server, and display the session’s contents. The RDP client communicates with the terminal server through a connection port. A session manager component keeps all user sessions separate, and also handles tasks such as allowing a user to reconnect to their session after accidentally closing the RDP client. The sessions actually run as a part of the terminal server service, but the session manager is responsible for managing those sessions.

    When a user needs to interact with a session through keyboard, mouse, or touch inputs, those inputs are made within the RDP client. The RDP client then transmits the inputs to the terminal server for processing. The terminal server is also responsible for performing all graphical rendering, although it is the RDP client that actually makes the session visible to the user.

    A terminal Server and a remote desktop both serve a similar purpose. They allow a user to interact with a remote session through an RDP client. The main difference is that terminal servers run on a Windows Server, and the user is therefore provided with a Windows Server desktop. Conversely, remote desktop environments typically have desktop operating systems such as Windows 10 running within virtual machines (VM). As such, the user is provided with a true desktop operating system, rather than a session running on a server.

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    Related Terms

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    In this article, we explain how to use Remote Desktop software to access your Windows server’s desktop from anywhere in the world. On a normal Windows computer, you have a keyboard, monitor, and mouse that allow you to interact with the machine. For Windows VPS servers hosted on the Internet, things are a bit different because your server could physically be thousands of miles away. To access the desktop of an Internet-hosted server, Microsoft has created a feature known as Remote Desktop.

    How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

    For VPS servers hosted and accessible to the Internet, things are a lot different now than they were years ago because servers can now literally be thousands of miles away. To access the desktop of an Internet-hosted Windows server, Microsoft offers a feature known as Remote Desktop.

    Supported Operating Systems

    All of Liquid Web’s Windows VPS servers are capable of accepting Remote Desktop connections. However, not all client computers can utilize it. Here is a list of operating systems known to be capable of communicating with your Windows server with Remote Desktop:

    • Microsoft Windows 2000 Clients and Servers
    • Microsoft Windows 2003 Server
    • Microsoft Windows 2008 Server
    • Microsoft Windows 7 and later
    • Linux with the RDesktop application installed
    • Mac OS X with a Remote Desktop client:
    • (Mac OS X versions 10.9 and later: Microsoft Remote Desktop)
    • (Mac OS X versions 10.5-10.8 only: Open Source CoRD Client)
    • (Mac OS X versions prior to 10.7: Microsoft Remote Desktop Connection Client for Mac)

    Remote Desktop to Your Server From a Local Windows Computer

    Here are the directions to remote desktop into your server from a local windows OS

    1. Click the Start button.
    2. Click Run.
    3. Type “mstsc” and press the Enter key.
    4. Next to Computer: type in the IP address of your server
    5. Click Connect.
    6. If all goes well, you will see the Windows login prompt.

    Remote DesktopВ to Your Server From a Linux Computer with RDesktop

    1. Open a command shell using xterm
    2. Type ‘rdesktop‘ at the command prompt to see if you have rdesktop installed
    3. If rdesktop is installed, then proceed.В Otherwise, you will need to install the rdesktop package for your flavor of Linux.
    4. Type ‘rdesktop‘ followed by your server’s IP address. Then press Enter.
    5. If all goes well, you will see the Windows login prompt.

    Remote Desktop From Mac OS X

    Using Microsoft Remote Desktop (Mac OS X versions 10.9 and later)

    Step1.
    Install Microsoft Remote Desktop from the Mac App Store.

    Step 2.
    Next, click the New button or use the shortcut Command + N to set up a connection to your server.

    Step 3.
    Fill in the appropriate settings, then close the Edit Remote Desktops window.

    • PC name: You can use your server’s IP address or its hostname (if the hostname has an appropriate DNS record and resolves).
    • Username: To access the admin account, use “Administrator”.
    • Password: Enter the Administrator password.
    • Configure any other preference settings.

    How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

    Step 4.
    Select your connection under My Desktops and press the Start button in the menu to connect (or simply press the return key on your keyboard).

    How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

    Step 5.
    If your server uses a self-signed SSL certificate, a message will be displayed as Remote Desktop is negotiating credentials. You can either press Continue to proceed with the connection or, to permanently store the certificate and connect directly in the future. To accomplish this, click Show Certificate and then check the box next to Always trust . before clicking Continue to proceed.

    Using CoRD (Mac OS X versions 10.5 through 10.8 only):

    Step 1.
    Download and install the CoRD application to your Mac.

    Step 2.
    Open the application and click on the File menu, then New Server. You will be presented with a window where you can specify information about the server you are connecting to.

    Step 3.
    Enter the server’s hostname or IP address in the Address field. You can alter the other settings in this window if you wish but all you need to start the connection is the address.

    Step 4.
    When you are finished making changes, press the enter/return key on your keyboard or simply close the new server window.

    Step 5.
    Your new server profile will appear in the list to the left side of the application. Double-click on it, and start the connection to your server.

    Using the Microsoft RDP Tool (Mac OS X versions before 10.7 only)

    Step 2.
    When you open the application, you will be prompted for the “Computer:” you would like to connect to. You can enter the server’s hostname or IP address.

    Step 3.
    After you click Connect the client will ask for your username and password. If it fails to connect, you can try again inside the remote connection window.

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    Related Articles:

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    About the Author: Dan Silva

    I am a musician, an amateur cook, a gamer and a technology lover. After a few years of studying for a primary education teacher I realized that I liked computers better. Thus, I’ve been working as a professional Linux support tech for a bit over two years now and really liking it. Lately, I’ve been spending most of my free time behind the screen playing Ori, The Will of the Wisps, and learning Python. I would recommend both!

    How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

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    The Remote Desktop Procotol (RDP) is still strong and it’s not going away anytime soon, indeed there are companies like CITRIX that have built part of their success creating robust management for it.
    As you can imagine, there a lot of ways to manage RDP according to the type of implementations or tools involved, so some corner cases will not be cover in this article. There are also tools like gateways that will provide a central management point for all sessions, but let’s assume that these tools are not available to you or not part of your infrastructure design.

    Today, I will show you some of the available tools that we can use to manage a common issue like listing all “Disconnected RDP sessions” on your network from the CLI, every tool that has a GUI is out of scope in this case.

    You can easily realise why, if you want to create a report of all the disconnected sessions on hundreds of servers I don’t think that you want to login to each server to find out what are the connections and their state (active or disconnected), right?

    Let’s start with the obvious statement that scripting can’t resolve all your issues, but for sure will help you to understand it sooner than later if you’ve got one!

    If you want to get rid of all disconnected sessions from some of your servers or similar issues could be mitigated by automation, but scripting alone will not help you to solve it at scale. Sometimes the best way to solve it can involve GPOs, Configuration Management, or sometimes third-party solutions.

    But let’s start with gathering some information from all our network querying AD for all computer part of the TEST project :

    I have two machines, both running kubuntu: server & client. I’d like to connect to server from client and start the full graphical interface without fear that some commands would be run as client user.

    So, ssh -XC works and I can also start graphical programs from it just fine.

    However, when I type startkde in the ssh console, it says “KDE seems to be already running on this display.” Which is true, but not for the same user account.

    I tried exiting graphical interface and logging in from tty, but that then (unsurprisingly) failed to start any graphical programs, including kde.

    How then can I do this such that I could simply log in just as I log in with a local user? Use client machine as a dumb terminal.

    How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

    3 Answers 3

    XDMCP is designed for this. On your server, you need to enable XDMCP support in your desktop manager:

    if you’re using kdm , look for

    at the end of your kdmrc , change false to true and restart kdm ;

    if you’re using lightdm , add

    to /etc/lightdm/lightdm.conf and restart lightdm .

    Then on your client, start X using

    (with the appropriate IP address instead), and your server’s login screen should show up on your client.

    You can start a window manager over an SSH session, but you need to ensure that your X server isn’t running a window manager already then.

    This can be accomplished in two ways:

    Do everything manually, rather than using startx or a display manager:

    First, start your X server:

    now change to another virtual console (e.g., hit ctrl+alt+f2), and type:

    Now switch back to the first virtual console and use your X session normally. The downside of this method is that it doesn’t include xauth setup (so that in theory everyone on the remote machine will be able to connect to your X session, which is a security risk); you may wish to add that.

    Use the .xinitrc (for startx) or .xsession (for display managers) files to modify your window manager:

    If you have set up your system so passwordless SSH works, (e.g., through ssh keys, or by using Kerberos or some other authentication mechanism), you can add the following line as the final line in your .xinitrc or .xsession files:

    The thing to remember is that whatever you add to those files will be executed instead of your normal X11 session setup. In some cases, you may need to select the “standard Xsession” option on your logon screen.

    Even if you don’t have passwordless SSH, this may still work, provided you have ssh-askpass installed. If ssh determines that it doesn’t have a controlling terminal but it does have a $DISPLAY variable set, it will use that to ask for a password.

    Downside of this method is that it becomes harder to log in to the “local” machine.

    Applicable Products

    • XenApp

    Objective

    Requirements

    • Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP) client such as the Microsoft Remote Desktop Connection client (MSTSC.exe).
    • Additional configuration on the XenApp Server to accept these connection requests.

    Background

    For example, an application displays an error message when accessing through the Citrix ICA protocol. You can use RDP to compare the behavior of the application.

    This option works only if you are connecting to a Terminal Server or Remote Desktop Services. This Microsoft Windows role is installed on each Citrix Presentation Server or XenApp server.

    Instructions

    How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

    Click Options in the lower left corner to display additional tabs.

    On the General tab, specify the XenApp server hostname, Fully Qualified Domain Name (FQDN) or IP address.

    Activate the Programs tab.

    Select the Start the following program on connection: option.

    Type the path to the executable and the folder as shown in the following screen shot:

    How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

    Click Connect.

    Complete the Windows authentication if prompted.

    Additional Resources

    NOTE : For newer versions of OS, refer https://support.citrix.com/article/CTX218256
    You might receive the following error messages:

    How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

    How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

    To resolve this error, complete the following steps:

    Presentation Server 4.5 or XenApp 5 on Windows Server 2003

    Click Start > Programs or All Programs > Administrative Tools > Terminal Services Configuration.

    Right-click on RDP-Tcp listener in the Connections hive.

    Select Properties.

    Activate the Citrix Settings tab.

    Clear the Non-Administrators only launch published applications option.

    How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

    XenApp 6.x on Windows Server 2008 R2

    Open the Citrix AppCenter management console.

    Select Policies under the farm.

    Activate the User tab.

    Add a new or modify an existing user policy.

    In the Edit Policy Window, on the Settings tab, open ICA settings.

    Enable the Launching of non-Administrator programs during client connection option.

    How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

    How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

    Introduction

    Your database server contains tables full of important data. Querying this data graphically on your local computer is the easiest way to interact with your database. But connecting remotely to your database server usually entails configuring MySQL to listen on every interface, restricting access to port 3306 with your firewall, and configuring user and host permissions for authentication. And allowing connections to MySQL directly can be a security concern.

    Using tools like HeidiSQL for Windows, Sequel Pro for macOS, or the cross-platform MySQL Workbench, you can connect securely to your database over SSH, bypassing those cumbersome and potentially insecure steps. This brief tutorial will show you how to connect to a remote database using MySQL Workbench.

    Prerequisites

    To complete this tutorial, you will need:

    • A server running MySQL that is accessible via SSH. For example, you can follow the tutorial How To Install MySQL on Ubuntu 14.04 to get up and running quickly.
    • MySQL Workbench installed on your local machine, which is available for all major platforms, including Windows, macOS, Ubuntu Linux, RedHat Linux, and Fedora. Visit the MySQL Workbench Downloads page to download the installer for your operating system.

    You will also need the following information about the database server you plan to use:

    • The public IP address of the server running MySQL.
    • The server’s SSH Port if configured differently than port 22 .
    • A user account with SSH access to the server, with a password or public key.
    • The username and password for the MySQL account you wish to use.

    Connecting to the Database Server With SSH

    Once you’ve installed MySQL Workbench on your computer, launch the program. Create a new connection by clicking the + icon next to MySQL Connections in the main window.

    You’ll be presented with the Connect to Database window, which looks like the follwing figure:

    How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

    To create the connection, enter the following details:

    1. For Connection Name, enter any name you’d like that helps you identify the connection you’re making later. This might be something like database_for_myapp or something more descriptive.
    2. Change the Connection Method to Standard TCP/IP over SSH.
    3. For SSH Hostname, enter your MySQL server’s IP address. If your server accepts SSH connections on a different port, enter the IP address, followed by a colon and port number.
    4. For SSH Username, enter the username you use to log into the server via SSH.
    5. For SSH Password, enter the password you use for your SSH user. If you use public keys instead of passwords, select an SSH key for authentication.
    6. For MySQL Hostname and MySQL Server Port, use the default values.
    7. For Username, enter the MySQL username.
    8. For Password, you can either enter the password or leave it blank. If you do not store the MySQL password in MySQL Workbench, a prompt will request the password each time you attempt to connect to the database.
    9. Choose Test Connection to ensure your settings are correct.
    10. Choose OK to create the connection.

    Once you’ve connected to your database, you can view the details of the MySQL instance, including database status, current connections, and database configuration, as well as users and permissions. MySQL Workbench also supports importing and exporting of MySQL dump files so you can quickly back up and restore your database.

    You will find your databases listed under the SCHEMAS area of the left navigation bar. The dropdown arrow next to each database will allow you to expand and navigate your databases tables and objects. You can easily view table data, write complex queries, and edit data from this area of MySQL Workbench, as shown in the following figure:

    How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

    To manage your connections, select the Database menu and choose the Connect to Database option, or press ⌘U on the Mac or CTRL+U on Windows and Linux systems. To connect to a different database, create a new connection using the same process you used for your first connection.

    Conclusion

    Using MySQL Workbench to access your remote MySQL database through an SSH tunnel is a simple and secure way to manage your databases from the comfort of your local computer. Using the connection method in this tutorial, you can bypass multiple network and security configuration changes normally required for a remote MySQL connection.

    Want to learn more? Join the DigitalOcean Community!

    Join our DigitalOcean community of over a million developers for free! Get help and share knowledge in our Questions & Answers section, find tutorials and tools that will help you grow as a developer and scale your project or business, and subscribe to topics of interest.

    Here’s how to enable your audio or microphone on a Remote Desktop Connection with a few simple configuration tweaks.

    BitLaunch

    Read more posts by this author.

    BitLaunch

    How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

    Voice-over-IP (VoIP) applications may not play well with your Windows RDP server out of the box. More specifically, you may find that the audio and microphone from your local PC is not routed through to Discord, Skype, or Zopier. In most cases, getting audio or microphone input working on a VPS requires additional setup, which we’ll walk you through today.

    Enable the remote audio and microphone devices over RDP

    If your VoIP application isn’t detecting your microphone input or audio output, the first thing to check is your RDP client settings.

    1. Open advanced RDP settings

    In your Remote Desktop Connection window, press Show Options to access the advanced settings menu.

    How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

    2. Switch to the ‘Local Resources’ tab and open remote audio settings

    You’ll find the option underneath the Remote audio heading and the sub-text Configure remote audio settings. Press the Settings. button to continue.

    How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

    3. Tick ‘Record from this computer’

    While you’re there, ensure Play on this computer is ticked and press OK. At this point, check your VoIP application to see if the ‘Remote Output’ input and output devices are available. If they still aren’t working, continue to the next step.

    How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

    4. Add roles and features to your server

    In the Server Manager, click Add roles and features under the Configure this local server heading.

    How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

    5. Enable Remote Desktop services

    Move through the Roles and features wizard, selecting Role-based or feature based installation and then your server. On the find Server Roles screen, find Remote Desktop Services. Tick it and press Next three times.

    How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

    6. Choose the Remote Desktop service roles to install

    To ensure your microphone and audio function correctly, we recommend ticking Remote Desktop Connection Broker, Remote Desktop Gateway, Remote Desktop Session Host, and Remote Desktop Web Access.

    How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

    Press Next until you’re able to press the Install button. After installation, restart your server.

    7. Enable the Windows Audio service

    If the sound icon on your taskbar still displays a red cross, right-click it. Windows Server will surface a notification asking if you’d like to enable the Windows Audio Service. Click Yes.

    How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

    You should now be able to use your local audio and microphone seamlessly on your Remote Desktop Connection.

    Looking for a fast Windows RDP for VoIP? Sign up to BitLaunch today.

    To increase the security level of the Windows server, it is not enough to change the TCP port RDP . Consider configuring the remote desktop gateway in the Active Directory domain.

    Remote Desktop Gateway – what is it?

    Remote Desktop Gateway is a Windows server role that provides a secure connection using the SSL protocol to the server via RDP. The main advantage of this solution is that you do not need to deploy a VPN server, and this is what the gateway is for.

    It should be noted that starting with Windows Server 2008 R2, the names of all Remote Desktop Services were changed. The previously named Terminal Services were renamed Remote Desktop Services.

    Advantages of Remote Desktop Gateway

    • Using an encrypted connection, the gateway allows to connect to internal network resources without the need for a VPN connection by remote users;
    • The gateway provides the ability to control access to certain network resources, thereby realizing comprehensive protection;
    • The gateway allows connection to network resources that are located behind firewalls in private networks or NAT;
    • You can use the gateway manager console to configure authorization policies for certain conditions that must be met when remote users connect to network resources. As an example, you can specify specific users who can connect to internal network resources, as well as whether the client computer should be a member of the AD security group, whether redirection of the device and disk is permissible;
    • The gateway manager console contains tools designed to monitor the status of the gateway. Using them, you can assign monitored events for auditing, such as failed attempts to connect to the terminal services gateway server.

    Important! The terminal services gateway must be part of an Active Directory domain. Gateway configuration is performed only on behalf of the domain administrator, on any server in the domain.

    Setting the role.

    Open the server manager.

    Select “ Add roles and components ”.

    At the stage “ Installation type ”, select “ Installing roles and components ”.

    The next step is to select the current server.

    Server role – Remote desktop service .

    Go to the role service. Select “ Remote desktop gateway ”.

    We proceed to the confirmation step, click the “ Install ” button.

    Configuring the connection and resource authorization policy.

    In the window that opens, the remote desktop gateway manager, in the left part of the window, open the branch with the server name → Policies → Connection authorization policies.
    In the right part of the same window, select Create a new policy → Wizard .

    In the window that opens, “ Wizard for creating new authorization policies ”, select the recommended option “Create a policy for authorization of remote desktop connections and authorization of remote desktop resources.” Press the button “ Next ”.

    In the next step, enter a convenient name for the connection authorization policy. We recommend giving names in English.

    The next step will be to choose a convenient authentication method – password or smart card . In our case, we leave only “ Password ” checked. We add groups that can connect to this RD-gateway, for this, click the “ Add Group . ” button.

    In the group selection window, click on the button “ Additionally ”.

    The window will resize. Click the “ Search ” button. In the search results, we find ” Administrators of the domain ” and click on the button “ OK ”.

    In the group selection window, check the selected object names and click “ OK ”.

    The group is added. To go to the next step, click the “ Next ” button.

    In the next step, select “ Enable device redirection for all client devices” and click ” Next ”.

    Set timeouts – downtime and session time, values are indicated in hours. Click “ Next ”.

    Check the settings. Everything is correct – click “ Next ”.

    In the next step, configure the resource authorization policy. Specify the desired policy name. Click “ Next ”.

    The next step is to establish group membership. Usually, the group is already installed, but if this is not done, you should follow the steps above. Click “ Next ”.

    We select available network resources. To do this, select the group that contains the servers on which the required user groups could work with remote desktop. Press the button “ Overview ”.

    In the group selection window, click the “ Additionally ” button.

    In the changed window, click the “ Search ” button. In the result window, we find ” Domain controllers ”.

    We check the selected objects and click “ OK ”.

    Once again we check which network group is added and click “ Next ”.

    If the RDP port number has not changed, set the switch value to “ Allow the connection only to port 3389 ”. If the port has been changed, specify a new value.

    Click “ Done

    At the stage of confirming the creation of the policy, click the “ Close ” button.

    At the end of the setup, the window will look similar.

    Install the SSL certificate.

    In the same window “ Manager of the remote desktop gateway ”, in the left window, click on the server icon, in the main part of the window – “ View and change properties of the certificate”.

    In the opened window “Properties ”, go to the tab “SSL Certificate”. Set the switch “Create a self-signed certificate” and click on the button “Create and import certificate . ”.

    Although 2 more options are possible:

    • import of a previously uploaded certificate (self-signed earlier or third-party);
    • Download a third-party certificate (for example, Comodo) and import it;

    In the window “ Creating a self-signed certificate ” we check the settings and click the button “ OK ”.

    The system will notify that the certificate was created successfully, there is also information where you can find the certificate file itself. Press the button “ OK ”.

    In the server properties window, click the “ Apply ” button.

    The self-signed certificate is installed on TCP port 443 (SSL port by default).

    For security reasons, we recommend that you change the default SSL port. To do this, in the main menu of the window, select “ Actions” → “Properties ”.

    Go to the tab “ Transport settings ” and set the desired value for the field “ HTTPS port ”. Save the settings by clicking the “ Apply ” button.

    The system will ask for confirmation – answer “Yes”.

    Connecting via the gateway.

    Open the RDP client, go to the tab “ Additionally ” and press the button “ Settings ”.

    In the window that opens, select “ Use the following Remote desktop gateway server settings”. We indicate the domain name of the server and through the colon (:) indicate the SSL port. The login method is “ Request Password ”. Click “ OK ”.

    Go to the tab “ General ”. Specify the address of the computer and the user under which the connection will be made. Push the button “ Connect

    The program will ask for the password from the account.

    The results of the gateway can be checked by tracing – the tracert command.

    What is SSH?

    SSH means Secure Shell. With SSH you can access remote machines in a secure way since the connection is encrypted. With the ssh command from the Linux terminal, we can connect to remote Linux servers and work as if it were our computer. At the end of this tutorial, you should have a full understanding of how to use SSH to connect to a remote server in Ubuntu.

    Syntax

    The syntax is the rule of how you can use the ssh command. You can rearrange the syntax, but a direct format must be followed. Below is a syntax example for using the ssh command:

    The domain name or IP address you want to connect to is the remote_host as shown in the command above. This syntax assumes your username on the remote system and your local system are the same. However, in case the usernames are not the same, you can denote it with this command:

    You will need to verify your identity by providing a password immediately when you connect to the server. Type the command exit to go back to your local session.

    How To Configure SSH

    The main sshd configuration file in Ubuntu is located at /etc/ssh/sshd_config. If you change the SSH configuration, the SSHD server settings will automatically change. Before any configuration, make sure you backup the current version of the file using this command:

    Use a text editor to open it:

    You should leave most of the parameters alone in this file. However, there are a few things that you should pay attention to:

    The port declarations indicate the port on which the SSHD server is waiting for connections. The default is 22. Unless there are specific reasons, you don’t need to change this setting:

    The host key declaration indicates where the global host key is located:

    The level of logs that should be done is indicated with these two items. If you have problems using SSH, an excellent way to identify the problem is to increase the number of logs:

    These options define some information for the login to prevent unauthorized login when the configuration files are insecure:

    These parameter configurations are referred to as X11 forwarding functions. In this way, you can display the GUI of the remote system on the local system. You must enable this option on the server while connecting with the -X option to the SSH client.

    After making changes, save the file and close it by pressing CTRL-X and Y and then press Enter. If you change settings in / etc / ssh / sshd_config, you must restart the sshd server to execute the change:

    For systemd systems such as Ubuntu 16.04 or Debian Jessie use this command:

    Test your changes thoroughly to make sure that everything is working perfectly. You should probably keep some sessions active if you make any changes. In this way, you can restore the configuration if necessary.

    How do you login to SSH with keys? It is good to log on to a remote system with a password. However, it is best to set up key-based authentication.

    What is Key-based Authentication?

    Key-based authentication creates two pairs of keys called a private and a public key. The private key is found on the user’s computer and has been protected and kept secret. The public key can be made available to anyone or stored on any server that you want to access. If you try to connect using a key pair, the server uses the public key to generate a message for the user computer. The user can only read the message using a private key. The user computer then sends a response back to the server and the server knows that the user is genuine. After setting the key, the entire process automatically completes in the background.

    How To Create SSH Keys

    SSH keys should be generated on the computer you wish to log in from. This is usually your local computer. Enter the following into the command line:

    A jump host (also known as a jump server) is an intermediary host or an SSH gateway to a remote network, through which a connection can be made to another host in a dissimilar security zone, for example a demilitarized zone (DMZ). It bridges two dissimilar security zones and offers controlled access between them.

    A jump host should be highly secured and monitored especially when it spans a private network and a DMZ with servers providing services to users on the internet.

    A classic scenario is connecting from your desktop or laptop from inside your company’s internal network, which is highly secured with firewalls to a DMZ. In order to easily manage a server in a DMZ, you may access it via a jump host.

    In this article, we will demonstrate how to access a remote Linux server via a jump host and also we will configure necessary settings in your per-user SSH client configurations.

    Consider the following scenario.

    How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client SSH Jump Host

    In above scenario, you want to connect to HOST 2, but you have to go through HOST 1, because of firewalling, routing and access privileges. There is a number of valid reasons why jumphosts are needed..

    Dynamic Jumphost List

    The simplest way to connect to a target server via a jump host is using the -J flag from the command line. This tells ssh to make a connection to the jump host and then establish a TCP forwarding to the target server, from there (make sure you’ve Passwordless SSH Login between machines).

    If usernames or ports on machines differ, specify them on the terminal as shown.

    Multiple Jumphosts List

    The same syntax can be used to make jumps over multiple servers.

    Static Jumphost List

    Static jumphost list means, that you know the jumphost or jumphosts that you need to connect a machine. Therefore you need to add the following static jumphost ‘routing’ in

    /.ssh/config file and specify the host aliases as shown.

    Now try to connect to a target server via a jump host as shown.

    How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client Login to Target Host via Jumphost

    The second method is to use the ProxyCommand option to add the jumphost configuration in your

    .ssh/config or $HOME/.ssh/config file as shown.

    In this example, the target host is contabo and the jumphost is vps1.

    Where the command Proxy Command ssh -q -W %h:%p vps1 , means run ssh in quiet mode (using -q ) and in stdio forwarding (using -W ) mode, redirect the connection through an intermediate host (vps1).

    Then try to access your target host as shown.

    The above command will first open an ssh connection to vps1 in the background effected by the ProxyCommand, and there after, start the ssh session to the target server contabo.

    For more information, see the ssh man page or refer to: OpenSSH/Cookbxook/Proxies and Jump Hosts.

    That’s all for now! In this article, we have demonstrated how to access a remote server via a jump host. Use the feedback form below to ask any questions or share your thoughts with us.

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    How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

    We are thankful for your never ending support.

    Search our comprehensive collection of support articles in our knowledge base

    Windows Remote Desktop allows you keyboard and mouse control over another Windows PC while showing you everything that’s happening on the screen.

    Difficulty

    • Intermediate

    How long will it take me?

    • Around 10 minutes.

    What will I need?

    • A Fasthosts dedicated or cloud server.
    • Your server access details.

    Video guide

    In addition to allowing you to control your server remotely, you can also use the remote desktop tool to share resources such as printers or drives between the two connected computers.

    To access your remote server over RDP you will need to ensure that port 3389 is open in your server firewall.

    Step 1

    Click the Start button on your local PC, At the foot of your start menu you will see a text box. Enter remote desktop into this text box and click Remote Desktop Connection when it comes up.

    How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

    Step 2

    The Remote Desktop Connection wizard window will open. If you would like to share resources with the remote computer, expand the Show Options section.

    How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

    Step 3

    Click on the Local Resources tab. In the Local devices and resources section click More.

    How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

    Step 4

    Under drives, a list of your drives will appear. Select any drives that you would like to access while connected to your remote server and click OK.

    How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

    Step 5

    Select the General tab and enter the IP address of your server in the Computer text box.

    How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

    You can also save your remote desktop connection so that you don’t have to enter these details next time you want to connect to your server.

    Step 6

    Enter your password and click OK to connect.

    How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

    If prompted, you should configure your firewall to allow this connection.

    You are now connected to your remote server. If you shared any resources with your remote server they will be accessible as if they were installed directly on the remote server.

    How to enable remote desktop for console login on a Terminal Server?
    Jonathan Sprinkle, 19 Mar 2007
    Last updated: 7 Oct 2007

    Windows terminal servers allow arbitrarily many logins to remote terminals, but there is only one console login. In order to connect to the console, a few things must happen:

    1. The user must be in an administrators group of some kind
    2. The console remote desktop must be enabled.

    Enabling console remote desktop on the server-side is essentially the same as enabling it for a generic Windows XP machine: Control Panel->System->Remote->Enable Remote Desktop

    Connecting to the console, however, is another matter. Once terminal services is enabled, the default connection to remote desktop for the machine will enable a terminal service, not console connection. In order to get a console connection, you must create an *.RDP setting for the machine, and edit it to connect to the console.

    For example, for newton.eecs, call up a mstsc (Microsoft Terminal Services Client) or remote desktop connection, add all connectivity info to it, and (after enabling more options), save that remote desktop profile to the desktop as an RDP file, say newton.RDP

    Now, edit that file using notepad, and add the following line to the end: connect to console:i:1

    Using that connection will connect you to the terminal, if your username allows it. This should only be done with Administrative accounts. Jonathan writes:

    . one thing we can try before enabling remote login is to login remotely via the console version of remote desktop.

    I have setup a terminal server and I in the Remote Desktop group (win2003 server) I have placed all the users I want to be able to access the server needing to be accessed.

    The problem is that I have 3 users that are not able to to access the server. The other 15 users are fine.

    28 Answers

    Can you log on to the terminal server from some other machine using the credentials of one of those 3 users?

    I went through and setup all the users from my computer and only these 3 are not able to login. I am getting the message that is saying the person must be part of the Remote Desktop User group (which they are).

    Check your group policy. It could be a case that the Allow logon through terminal services has groups applied that the other 3 users are not a part of.

    It can be found under Local Policies > User Rights Assignment via Computer Configuration

    Let me know if that sorted out your issue

    I went through and setup all the users from my computer and only these 3 are not able to login. I am getting the message that is saying the person must be part of the Remote Desktop User group (which they are).

    I am wondering too if I have run into a ceiling of TS Licenses. I have a license for 10, but seems I have been allowed to setup a few more. Could this be the issue.

    I went through and setup all the users from my computer and only these 3 are not able to login. I am getting the message that is saying the person must be part of the Remote Desktop User group (which they are).

    I am wondering too if I have run into a ceiling of TS Licenses. I have a license for 10, but seems I have been allowed to setup a few more. Could this be the issue.

    Follow my advice and you should be OK. I got a gut feeling that’s the issue.

    Are your TS CAL’s per user or per device?

    nope…. Remote Desktop users is the group that is allowed to login via Terminal Services and all the rejected users are part of that group.

    Have them completely logoff there desktop and log back in, if this doesn’t
    resolve it then have them restart there pc to re authenticate to the domain.

    I have one side per device (the server hosting Terminal Server License server), the other per user (server hosting the application)

    Does this go for me as well?

    Yes, if you are experiencing the same issue.

    did this (on my computer) and no difference.

    I would create a desktop shortcut for the user pointing to ther Terminal server. Then do a run as Administrator.

    If that works for you as the Admin whilst logged in as user, then its definitely a group issue you are overlooking.

    I would set up a global security group in AD and add the users you want to have access to the Terminal Server. Then through gpedit.msc allow users to log on through terminal services add the global group.

    From: DMYoung via ms-server2003-l [mailto:[email protected]]
    Sent: Tuesday, August 03, 2010 1:40 PM
    To: Jerry Kane
    Subject: [ms-server2003-l] XP Remote Desktop not connecting to Terminal Server

    Posted by DMYoung
    on Aug 3 at 1:40 PM

    I have setup a terminal server and I in the Remote Desktop group (win2003 server) I have placed all the users I want to be able to access the server needing to be accessed.

    The problem is that I have 3 users that are not able to to access the server. The other 15 users are fine.

    I am setting up the users via my computer and it is only when I attempt logging in as them that I get the message.

    I have checked the RDP / Terminal Server Groups repeatedly and they are all there. I have even attempted logging is as people that were in this group last school year and they too are being rejected.

    is there some other place that I am overlooking?

    You have a terminal server licensing server with per device TS CALs and a terminal server with per user TS CALs?

    That does not make sense…..
    You only need one TS Server Licensing server for your domain. The TS hosting the app should be getting license info from that server…

    I have only 1 terminal server licensing server. When I commented on have two sides not agreeing, I had looked at the configuration of my licensing server (device) and my application hosting server (device).

    I have only 1 terminal server licensing server. When I commented on have two sides not agreeing, I had looked at the configuration of my licensing server (device) and my application hosting server (user).

    sorry, I messed up my last response. The license server was device and the host server was user.

    done….But so far…. nothing has changed

    I apologize. It’s still not clear to me. What type of Terminal Server Client Access License are you using for the rdp session on the server with which your users are trying to connect?
    Are they connecting to a per user or per device Licensed Terminal Server? I ask, because Server 2003 Terminal Server per user licensing will not limit your number of users as it would if your CAL was per device.

    In the end, it may not matter as this is most likely a group policy issue, however I was attempting to rule out licensing as an issue as you had questions about that possibility.

    I cannot figure this out. I keep looking Group policy and everyone is in the groups that I have allowed to login via RDP

    As I stated, each machine was different (but I changed that) The app host was set to user.

    I got this solved at 4:30 a.m. this morning. I was looking some posts on other websites and finally understood what someone mentioned earlier. (setting them up manually).

    I went to my TS Configuration and setup the users that were not able to login. I also read a post to setup users “Locally” in the RDP User group. I did this and now everyone is working fine. (I looked also and found that I had setup all the “working” users into the Local RDP user group.

    I think too the reason my looking at the GP for the domain did not make a difference is that my app server is only member server and is probably not getting GP information.

    If someone has an idea as to getting my App server to have GP settings transferred without it needing to become an AD it would be appreciated.

    Hi, I’m a little late jumping into your conversation but found it very interesting.

    Too many logged on!
    Just a hint: Time out>server is not unloading TS users, check the time out before logging off any remote users.

    Thank you,… that reminds me of an issue my users are getting. They are getting timed out on the hosting server via TS. Where do I check that out?

    With respect to your comment about GPO’s applying on a server. Once you join a system to a domain group policy should apply. This is one of the differences between a standalone server and a member server ( member servers are joined to the domain).

    For a test,
    Try the following steps:

    Add one of those users to the local administrator group on that very same server.
    If the issue is security related, that should bypass that issue.

    If that still does not work, how is the licensing setup for terminal services.
    per user or per device.

    Check if the same user can connect with their account from a PC that is used by a user that can connect normally

    Check if a user that can connect normally from another PC can connect to the server from the PC of one of the users that cannot connect.

    Since the “do not connect” message indicates that the user needs to be a member of the Remote Desktop User group and not the message that there is no license available, I would tend to think the issue is security and not license related.

    While they get the can not connect message, do you see any errors/warnings in the event viewer of the Terminal Server?

    How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

    Situation: One Windows Server 2003 R2 configured as Domain Controller, Terminal Server, File, Print, DHCP, DNS etc. This is the only server in a closed network, as in not connected to the internet, and it will have 6 thin clients (Wyse V30) connected to it.

    I’ve got the good ol’ problem when trying to logon as a normal user to the Terminal Server with the RDP client in Wyse:

    “To log on to this remote computer, you must hatve Terminal Server User Access permissions on this computer. By default, members of the Remote Desktop User group have these permissions. If you are not a member of the Remote Desktop User group or another group that has these permissions, or if the Remote Desktop User group does not have these permissions, you must be granted these permissions manually.”

    Ok – I can read. I could add all my users to the “Remote Desktop User”, but this is just extra work each time a user is added to the system. I want all domain users (and admins) to be able to log on and want this as a default setting. I’ve read I need to allow BOTH locally and TS logins. SO, I made two GPOs:

    1) Comp Security – Allow Log On Locally Policy:
    Windows Settings -> Security Settings -> Local Policies -> User Rights Assignment:
    Allow log on locally ==> MYDOMAIN\Domain Users, MYDOMAIN\Domain Admins, BUILTIN\Administrators

    2) Comp Security – Allow Log On Terminal Server:
    Windows Settings -> Security Settings -> Local Policies -> User Rights Assignment:
    Allow log on through Terminal Services ==> MYDOMAIN\Domain Users, MYDOMAIN\Domain Admins, BUILTIN\Administrators

    When I try to start the Terminal by clicking the menu item Applications > Accessories > Terminal, it does not start. I get a Starting Terminal entry in the taskbar. After a few seconds, it goes away. No terminal appears. Other applications launch correctly.

    I’m running Ubuntu 11.04, and connecting via Remote Desktop. On the client, I’m using Microsoft’s Remote Desktop Connection for Mac; on the server, sesman.

    I’ve checked the following log files, but no messages appear: debug, messages, sesman.log, syslog, and user.log.

    ps ax | grep -i term does not list the terminal — not even when the taskbar shows Starting Terminal. I can still get a command line by sssh’ing in.

    When I launch gnome-terminal from xterm, I get the error below:

    As for other terminals, I get the same error message when I run Byobu Terminal. And guake didn’t install properly from the Software Centre (fixing guake seems beyond the scope of this question). However, xterm runs OK.

    Also, I checked my .bashrc file, and it seems fine.

    What should I do now? I’d rather not use xterm as my primary terminal.

    Update
    This is apparently a known bug. The solution is to turn on a desktop background.

    How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

    10 Answers 10

    Try starting the terminal manually, e.g. from xterm and see what the output is.

    Press Alt + F2 and then enter xterm to get an xterm.

    There, simply type gnome-terminal to try to start the terminal.

    How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

    I had a similar problem after editing the file /etc/default/locale .

    The solution for me was changing the locale in /etc/default/locale back to the defaultc contents of that file to:

    How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

    I had set Python 3.6 as the default with

    I changed it back to 3.5 and just use the 3.6 Interpreter in PyCharm. It’s back and works fine.

    How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

    How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

    See if there is anything in your .bashrc file that shouldn’t be there. That could make the terminal not work. It’s a script that runs every time you launch the terminal, and when you log in with ssh a similar file may be executed on the remote machine.

    There should be an unmodified default system version of .bashrc in /etc/skel/.bashrc that you can compare with the one in your home directory (

    /.bashrc ) to see what changes have been made, if any, to the local file.

    How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

    I found that I can go to any folder in the file browser, right click, then select open in terminal.

    How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

    Switch to a virtual terminal by pressing ctrl + alt + f1

    Run this command

    to solve the problem.

    How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

    In my case this answer provided me the solution https://stackoverflow.com/a/36151686/1599129, basically:

    The error is caused by installing gi package on python3. It is a package for GIST Github commandline for python2. It is not related to gnome object or gnome introspection. Visit it here: python gi on package index

    It causes naming conflicts with gi.repository, rather than looking for gir in your python dist-packages, your system init the gi package. And hence the error shows

    ImportError: No module named ‘gi.repository’

    Uninstalling that package will resolve the error.

    where ### means all 3.x versions of pip you have in your system.

    How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

    In my case I could not open the terminal after I installed new languages and removed the default one. I founded out that I did not apply the changed to the system, after applying the changes, there was a button in the language settings gui, everything started working again.

    So, if your terminal (gnome-terminal) comes up and then disappears you can try a few methods that have helped me in the past. Mind you, I am working from a Linux Mint AMD64 OS using Cinnamon. This should work with most Linux 64-bit distributions and GUI types.

    Often times in the answers online for terminal failure questions are listed terminal commands, however, it’s hard to use terminal commands with no terminal, right? You will need a shell/terminal-emu/CLI to run said commands so use your package manager (Synaptic, etc.) to download xterm/uxterm terminal emulators. You can also use your file manager (Nemo, Nautilus, etc. to do some of these fixes) and finally you can run some commands using Alt + F2 .

    The widely used approach available immediately on most Google searches is this: to remove

    /.gconf/apps/gnome-terminal . Here’s how:

    (or possibly, Alt + Ctrl + F1 and then log back in and do sudo apt-get update if you don’t want to reboot)

    Another approach is to reinstall gnome-terminal and it’s dependent gnome-terminal-data. Please read the commands being as you can’t simply apt-get remove it most of the time.

    Using the often left out –purge command was the only thing that worked for me when I got the point of needing to do this. –purge additionally removes the configuration files together with the package. If you’ve tried to change those files and failed this will work.

    Note: Several package managers do not list gnome-terminal or will not work installing it after it’s marked. I personally haven’t had any luck in doing so.

    You can find the website of your distribution, find the gnome-terminal package listed there and manually download and install using your package-installer or by hand. (e.g. GDebi Package Installer and Aptitude Install). This method didn’t work for me but after doing some research it can, depending on the reason your terminal is toasted. I find this method the most ineffective for most of the common reasons gnome-terminal auto-closes or simply never opens for because that package will often ask for dependencies you already have or don’t exist (I don’t know why).

    If you’ve recently changed your terminal preferences, attempted to change the background color or attempted to log history/script your terminal there is sometimes a final option. Inside your Terminal>Profile Preferences>Command un-check all the boxes and be sure the drop-down menu reads “Hold the terminal open”. This worked for me, actually. My terminal was set to a profile that had a no-user-input-required command running, followed by an auto-exit terminal on the drop down preferences. (ex. ls, script, history, cd / , anything that doesn’t require you to put something else in after it’s run)

    I hope this helps some of you guys who are having this problem! I am a self-taught Linux user and web designer who has slowly been learning the -nix OS and shell. I use this site and Stack Overflow often and I want to give back what I can! One love.

    How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

    Remote Desktop Services 2012 allows you to publish two types of Session collection on a Remote Desktop Session Host. This can be either a Remote Desktop Session Collection or a Remote App Session Collection. By default you cannot have both types on the Same Session Host. In this post I am going to show you how to configure the Session Host to show both types in the same Session Collection by making a change to the registry.

    You can also create a shortcut using MSTSC which is shown in the following article (Click Here) Please see the section on Adding Remote Desktop Session to a Remote App Session Collection.

    Remote Desktop/App Session Collection on a Single RDSH Server

    This Lab has been built using Server 2012 R2, but the following actions can be completed on Server 2012 with the same outcomes.

    By default a Remote App Session Collection looks like this :

    How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

    As you can see from the image shown above, Only Remote Apps are shown.

    To show the Remote Desktop Session Collection you will need to make a change to the Registry.

    HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\Terminal Server\CentralPublishedResources\PublishedFarms\ \RemoteDesktops\

    How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

    To show the Desktop Session Icon, Change the value (ShowInPortal) to 1 from 0.

    You can also rename the Desktop Session Icon name to something more to your liking. To do this, change the value (Name).

    How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

    There you have it, a Remote Desktop Session Published in a Remote App Session Collection.

    Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP) is a protocol developed by Microsoft, that allows a user to access remote systems graphically. The default Windows servers allow only one remote desktop session at a time. But, in some cases, we are required to enable remote desktops for multiple users to allow access at a time.

    You can achieve this by making little changes to the system registry keys. Once the changes are done, multiple users can connect to your system using the RDP client. You can also limit the number of users who can connect at a time.

    In this tutorial, we will discuss enabling and disabling multiple remote desktop sessions in Windows servers in 2012, 2012 R2, 2016, 2019 and 2022.

    Enable Multiple RDP Sessions

    Follow the below steps to enable multiple remote desktop sessions on a Windows system.

    1. Log in to the Windows system.
    2. Open the start screen (press the Windows key) and type “Edit group policy” or “gpedit.msc”, and launch it.
    3. Navigate to Computer Configuration >>Administrative Templates >>Windows Components >>Remote Desktop Services >>Remote Desktop Session Host >>Connections.
    4. Double click on “Set Restrict Remote Desktop Services user to a single Remote Desktop Services session and set this to Disabled.
    5. Next, double click on “Limit number of connections” and set the RD Maximum Connections allowed to 999999. But, just use 2 sessions that is free with Windows license but to allow more than 2 session required CAL license.

    Below is the screenshots of changes being made:

    How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

    How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

    How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

    How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

    How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

    Disable Multiple RDP Sessions

    To disbale the multiple remote desktop sessions, follow below instructions:

    1. Log in to the Windows system.
    2. Open the start screen (press the Windows key) and type “Edit group policy” or “gpedit.msc”, and launch it.
    3. Navigate to Computer Configuration >>Administrative Templates >>Windows Components >>Remote Desktop Services >>Remote Desktop Session Host >>Connections.
    4. Double click on “Set Restrict Remote Desktop Services user to a single Remote Desktop Services session and set this to “Enabled.

    Wrap Up

    This tutorial helped you to enable for disable multiple remote desktop sessions on a single Windows system. That is useful for the teams working on the same remote systems.

    How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop clientAs a Windows systems administrator, there are plenty of situations where you need to remotely view who is logged on to a given computer. Many times you not only need to check who is logged on interactively at the console, but also check who is connected remotely via a Remote Desktop Connection (RDP). Fortunately Windows provides a way to do this. In fact, there are at least three ways to remotely view who’s logged on.

    Each of these methods for remotely viewing who is logged on to a Windows machine assumes your Windows login has sufficient permission to connect remotely to the machine. It’s also worth pointing out that each of these ways is non-invasive. This means you can use them to check on the given machine remotely without impacting any of the users currently logged on to the remote machine.

    The Remote Desktop Services Manager is part of the Remote Server Administration Tools (RSAT) suite of tools, so you’ll need to install RSAT before you can use the Remote Desktop Manager. We also touched on the Remote Desktop Services Manager in our article about how to manage remote desktop connections.

    After you have RSAT installed with the “Remote Desktop Services Tools” option enabled, you’ll find the Remote Desktop Services Manager in your Start Menu, under Administrative Tools, then Remote Desktop Services:

    How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

    Once the Remote Desktop Services Manager MMC is up and running, simply right click on the “Remote Desktop Services Manager” root node in the left pane tree view:

    How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

    Then when prompted, enter the hostname of the remote computer you want to view. After the MMC connects to the remote computer, you’ll see a list of users logged on to the machine and which session they’re each using:

    How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

    If you’ve read some of our previous articles you know that we’re big fans of the SysInternals suite of system utilities. Included in the PsTools set of utilities is a handy little command line app, PsLoggedOn.

    As with other SysInternals tools, you’ll need to download psloggedon.exe and place it somewhere accessible on your local computer (not the remote computer), for example, in C:\PsTools.

    Then, open a command prompt on your local machine and from any directory execute: C:\PsTools\psloggedon.exe \\server-a

    How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

    This of course assumes you put psloggedon.exe in C:\PsTools on your local machine, and replace “server-a” with the hostname of the computer you want to remotely view who is logged on.

    Last but not least, there’s the built-in Windows command, “query”, located at %SystemRoot%\system32\query.exe.

    Just open a command prompt and execute: query user /server:server-a

    How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

    As usual, replace “server-a” with the hostname of the computer you want to remotely view who is logged on.

    For more information on the query command see http://support.microsoft.com/kb/186592

    As you can see there are at least three ways to get the information you need to remotely view who is logged on in a totally non-intrusive way.

    Posted on December 10, 2019

      and tagged as
    • powershell,
    • rds

    If you’ve ever managed a terminal server or RDS chances are there has been a need to identify the IP address of connected clients.

    Task manager gives us the client hostname but sometimes DNS can have stale entries or the client can be on the remote side of a VPN. We can use tools like netstat, but this only gives us connected IPs, not the associated usernames. The old Remote Desktop Services Manager showed the client IP along with the username, but it is no longer present Server 2012 and newer.

    A simple way I’ve been using is to parse the Microsoft-Windows-TerminalServices-RemoteConnectionManager/Operational event log. This log, under EventId 1149 shows each successful RDS authentication event, and contains the username, IP address, and timestamp.

    How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

    The snippet below is essentially a shortcut to manually checking the RemoteConnectionManager logs. It pulls current users from quser so we only display data for existing sessions, then parses the event log (limiting the query to the last 31 days as we don’t need to pull everything), correlates the two, finally displaying the connected users, the IP they’re connecting from, and a timestamp of when they authenticated.

    Which results in the following sample output.

    One caveat with this method is that that if a user connected through an RD Gateway (keep in mind local connections bypass the RD Gateway by default), the event log entry will show the gateway IP address instead of the client. Gateway entries are logged in Microsoft-Windows-TerminalServices-Gateway/Operational , EventId 302 , however, this has not been incorporated into the script at this stage.

    Contents

    Related

    • Duo Authentication for RDS Overview
    • Duo Authentication for RD Web and RD Gateway 2012+
    • Duo Authentication for RD Web 2012+ Only
    • Duo Authentication for RD Gateway 2012+ Only
    • Duo RDS FAQ
    • Duo RDS Release Notes

    Feedback

    Was this page helpful? Let us know how we can make it better.

    Duo integrates with Remote Desktop Web Access (formerly Terminal Services Web Access or TS Web Access) or Remote Desktop Gateway (formerly Terminal Services Gateway or TS Gateway) to add two-factor authentication to RD Web and RD Gateway logons.

    Deployment Architecture

    Duo Authentication for RD Web and RD Gateway supports Windows Server 2012 and later.

    There are known issues with Duo and the Remote Desktop web client offered in Windows 2016 and 2019. Please continue to use the regular Remote Desktop client applications (e.g. MSTSC.exe) with Duo.

    RD Web and RD Gateway

    In this scenario Duo two-factor authentication protects logons via browser to the RD Web portal as well as logons via local RDP client and RemoteApp and Desktop Connections from the local system to an RD Gateway server. Users authenticate to Duo when logging on to the RD Web portal and then again when launching a RemoteApp connection through RD Gateway. Connecting to a computer directly from RD Web using the “Connect to a remote PC” feature with RD Gateway authentication is permitted. Downloaded RDP files may be saved for reuse. The RD Web and RD Gateway roles may be deployed on separate servers or on the same server.

    When logging on to the RD Web portal users are presented with the Duo enrollment or authentication page after primary authentication. Users connecting to RemoteApp or RDP via RD Gateway from a local client receive an automatic push or phone call from Duo after primary authentication.

    Install Duo Authentication for RD Web onto your RD Web servers then install Duo Authentication for RD Gateway onto your RD Gateway servers.

    How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

    RD Web Only

    In this scenario Duo protects logons via browser to the RD Web portal. RD Gateway connections do not require two-factor authentications. Downloaded RDP files may be saved for reuse, and will not require two-factor authentication from RD Web at launch.

    After your remote users pass primary login to the RD Web portal, they receive the Duo enrollment or authentication page. When Duo authentication succeeds, the users proceed to the RemoteApp and Desktop Connection web console and see any published RemoteApp programs and virtual desktops.

    Install Duo Authentication for RD Web onto your RD Web server. You may install Duo Authentication for RD Web onto a server hosting both the RD Web and RD Gateway roles but after completing installation only the RD Web portal will be protected with Duo two-factor authentication. To protect both RD Web and RD Gateway roles on the same server see RD Web and RD Gateway.

    How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

    RD Gateway Only

    In this scenario Duo protects logons via local RDP client and RemoteApp and Desktop Connections from the local system to an RD Gateway server. RD Web browser logons are not protected with two-factor authentication. However, RemoteApp connections initiated from an RD Web Access browser session that use the RD Gateway server with Duo installed are protected by Duo.

    Duo for RD Gateway has no browser interface, so inline user enrollment isn’t available. Enroll your users in Duo before they try to log in. If the user has activated the Duo Mobile app, Duo initiates an automatic push to authenticate after primary login to RD Gateway succeeds. Otherwise, Duo will call the user’s phone to complete two-factor authentication.

    Install Duo Authentication for RD Gateway onto your RD Gateway servers. You may install Duo Authentication for RD Gateway onto a server hosting both the RD Web and RD Gateway roles but after completing installation only RD Gateway connections will be protected with Duo two-factor authentication. To protect both RD Web and RD Gateway roles on the same server see RD Web and RD Gateway.

    How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

    Known Issues

    Please refer to the RDS FAQ for information about unsupported configurations and known issues.

    Troubleshooting

    Need some help? Take a look at the RDS Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) page or try searching our RDS Knowledge Base articles or Community discussions. For further assistance, contact Support.

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    Having RDS collections can be very useful if you have a situation where you are an administrator for a terminal server and need to “Shadow” users sessions or send them messages. This also helps to manage the access to the terminal servers.

    Step 1

    Go to the server that you would like to access the collection from and open Server Manager.

    Step 2

    Once server manager has opened up, you will need to go to your “Remote Desktop Services” tab. Once you are there, please ensure that the servers that you require to be in your collection are listed in the “Servers” list. If not, please add them accordingly.

    Step 3

    Then go to the “Collections” tab, and go to the top area and click on “Tasks” as per the below screenshot.

    How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

    Step 4

    You will then need to go to the option of “Create Session Collection”, once there it will present you with the following wizard.

    How to log in to a terminal server with remote desktop client

    The first step in the wizard will be to press next after you have read the information. You will then need to create a suitable name for the collection and (optional) description and press “Next”.

    Step 5

    The next step is to select the relevant servers from the server pool listed that you would like to become a part of the collection. For example, you may have multiple Terminal Servers which you may want to load balance between, this is where you would add them. Once you have added the servers, please press next.

    Step 6

    On this screen, you will be asked to select the user groups which will be granted access to log into servers within the collection. If all domain users are required to have access then you can add the group “Domain Users” to this list. On the next screen, you will be asked if you wish to set up User Profile Disks. This particular section is completely up to the admin who has set up the domain, if they have already set up redirected folders then there is no need to use User Profile Disks. Generally, this option is left unticked and folder redirection is used but if the admin wishes to use User Profile Disks, this would be the moment to enable them.

    Step 7

    The next screen will then confirm all of the settings that you have selected and ask you to confirm you are happy to proceed. Once you are happy, please proceed with the setup and it will complete.

    You will now see the collection listed under the “Collections” tab in Server Manager.

    Removing Collections

    If you wish to remove a collection for any reason, the process is quite simple. All you have to do is go to the collections tab, in the top area of the tab you should then see the collection/collections that you have put in place, you simply need to right click on the collection you want to remove and click “remove collection”. It may ask you to confirm if you are sure you want to remove it, but once you proceed the collection will be removed.

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