How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

Your rocket will fly up, up and away with vinegar and baking soda!

Big Idea
Everyday kitchen items can be used to create simple chemical reactions.

Materials

  • Empty plastic bottle
  • Duct tape
  • Cork that fits the bottle
  • Toilet paper or tissue paper
  • 3 pencils/pens (for tripod)
  • Vinegar
  • Scissors
  • Funnel
  • Baking Soda

Setup
At a table lined with newspaper, set out the empty plastic bottle, 3 pencils or 3 pens, and duct tape.

Directions

1)

      Begin by creating your rocket. Use an empty plastic bottle, three pencils or pens and duct tape. Make sure that your bottle is corked and standing on the three pencils or pens creating a tripod.

2)

      Next, step is creating the rocket fuel or baking soda packets. Cut a square piece of toilet paper or ½ piece of tissue then put 1 scoop of Baking Soda in the middle and roll it together tight. Be sure to twist the ends of the toilet paper or tissue so it will fit inside the opening of the bottle. Make several baking soda packets.

3)

      Go outside to an open area about six feet away from buildings or cars and find a flat, safe launching “pad”. Set up a video recorder so you can record your rocket launch (and send your results back to KCM!).

4)

      Next, have an adult with safety glasses fill the empty plastic container with vinegar using the funnel.

5)

      Very carefully place one of the baking soda packets into the plastic container, put cork on and quickly get away.

6)

      Watch what happens. Guess how high you think the rocket will go? How long does it take to happen? When the lid pops off the rocket should launch. This could take several tries. Tip: Make sure your cork is secure and your rocket is standing on the pencils or pens.

7)

      Then try changing the amount of baking soda to vinegar ratio. What do you think will happen?

Baking soda and vinegar mix together to create a reaction resulting in water and carbon dioxide gas. The pressure of the carbon dioxide gas forces the cork to pop off and the rocket to launch. This is an example of Newton’s third Law of Motion. When you apply a force in one direction, the opposite equal reaction will take place in the opposite direction.

8) Be good to the earth and rinse away the baking soda and vinegar residue left behind the experiment.

Investigation Questions:

Q.

        What do you think will happen when the baking soda and vinegar are in the rocket?

Q.

        Guess how high you think the rocket will go.

Q.

        How long does it take to happen?

Q.

      What happens when you change the ratio of baking soda to vinegar?

Learning Standards

1.A Demonstrate understanding through age-appropriate responses.
Children will create their own unique Baking Soda Rocket following the teacher’s simple one, two, and three step directions.

7.A Measure objects and quantities using direct comparison methods and non-standard units.
Children will measure out 1TBS baking soda to put into the packets.

10. A Generate questions and processes for answering them.
Children will begin to make and ask meaningful questions and answers with a little teacher support

12.C Explore the physical properties of objects.
Children will explore and discuss simple chemical reactions with the baking soda and vinegar with the teacher assistance

Location

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Glenview, IL 60026
(847) 832-6600

Hours

Open today from 9:30 am-5:00 pm

Open tomorrow from 9:30 am-5:00 pm

Admission

General Admission Prices

  • Children (1 – 16): $15
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All children must be supervised by an adult at all times.

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All Museum coupons and paper passes expiring in 2020 or 2021 will be honored through 2022.

Here at Science Sparks we love anything space related, especially rockets! This baking soda rocket is one of our favourites as it’s super easy to set up and can be launched over and over again!

How to make a baking soda rocket

To make a baking soda rocket you will need

Small 500ml bottle – empty

Cork which fits tightly inside the bottle neck

Half a piece of kitchen roll

1 tablespoon baking soda – bicarbonate of soda

Vinegar or lemon juice

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

Instructions

Use the tape to attach 3 straws to the side of the bottle so it stands up, upside down.

Pour about 2 cm of vinegar into the bottle.

Wrap the baking soda up in the kitchen roll to make a little parcel.

Choose a launch area outside. It needs to be a hard surface.

When you’re ready to launch, drop the baking soda parcel into the bottle, quickly add the cork, put the rocket down and stand back!

Warning – make sure you have a clear empty space and keep observers well back from the launch site as the rocket shoots up very quickly.

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

Baking soda rocket ready to launch

Baking Soda Rocket Top Tips

The cork needs to be a tight fit, so the gas cannot escape.

To slow down the reaction wrap the baking soda ( bicarbonate of soda ) in half a sheet of kitchen roll before adding it to the bottle. This slows down the reaction and gives you time to put the cork in and stand the rocket up.

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

Why does a baking soda rocket work?

Baking soda and vinegar react to neutralise each other which releases carbon dioxide gas.

The carbon dioxide gas builds up inside the plastic bottle. When the pressure of the gas in the bottle is high enough the cork is forced out of the bottle.

The downward force of the cork being forced out of the bottle creates an upward thrust force which makes the bottle shoot up into the air. This is an example of Newton’s Third Law.

For every action there is an equal and opposite reaction.

Warning – Take care when setting this up and wear eye protection as the bottle can shoot up very quickly!

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

Baking Soda Rocket Extension Tasks

Different combinations of vinegar and baking soda

Try experimenting with different amounts of vinegar and baking soda to find the perfect combination. Remember you don’t want the reaction to happen too quickly, but enough gas needs to be produced to force the cork out of the bottle!

Lemon juice as rocket fuel

Try lemon or lime juice instead of vinegar. Investigate to find out whether lemon/lime juice is an effective as vinegar.

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

More Space Science Experiments for Kids

Discover how craters are formed using marbles, flour and hot chocolate powder.

Or why not set up your very own space camp!

If you’re looking for EVEN more space science ideas you can find SEVENTY exciting space themed experiments in my book This IS Rocket Science!

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

Last Updated on January 27, 2022 by Emma Vanstone

Safety Notice

Science Sparks ( Wild Sparks Enterprises Ltd ) are not liable for the actions of activity of any person who uses the information in this resource or in any of the suggested further resources. Science Sparks assume no liability with regard to injuries or damage to property that may occur as a result of using the information and carrying out the practical activities contained in this resource or in any of the suggested further resources.

These activities are designed to be carried out by children working with a parent, guardian or other appropriate adult. The adult involved is fully responsible for ensuring that the activities are carried out safely.

Reader Interactions

Comments

October 09, 2020 at 11:29 am

Tried this today with my children at nursery. It went so well we had to do it 3 times. They loved it and was a great way to celebrate space week!

October 12, 2020 at 11:30 am

That’s brilliant to know, thank you!

July 23, 2021 at 9:42 pm

What is ‘kitchen roll’?

July 24, 2021 at 7:38 pm

Sorry, it’s maybe known to you as kitchen towel? Basically a disposable roll of thick tissue used in the kitchen!

March 15, 2022 at 5:19 pm

Daughter loved these experiments! Great way to pass March Break. Playing and learning…. 🙂

Never underestimate baking soda rockets. The chemical reaction used to launch Blast-Off Bottle Rockets produces enough carbon dioxide to propel the bottle high into the sky! So high that one of the three rockets I made is currently sitting in our persimmon tree 30 feet above ground. I may see it again in December when the tree loses its leaves.

This post is sponsored by Arm & Hammer. All opinions are my own.

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

Today’s Arm & Hammer Summer Camp science project will require adult supervision at launch time. Of all the experiments we did for camp this one elicited the most gasps and excitement. I mean how can you not love the anticipation of a good rocket launch?

Today’s project is the fourth science experiment in a fantastic summer resource, Arm & Hammer Summer Camp. I’ve enjoyed being the camp science counselor so much!

Downloadable directions here

Materials

Instructions

Time needed: 30-45 minutes

Secure 3 pencils to the bottle using duct tape to make “legs” for your rocket. The bottle opening should be facing down when the bottle is placed on its legs. Make sure the legs are placed high enough to allow for 1-2” of space between the bottle opening and the flat surface below. How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

Decorate the rocket

Decorate the bottle with duct tape, paper, and/or cardboard to make a rocket as desired. How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

Turn the bottle over so that the pencil legs are facing up. Add 2-3 cups of vinegar to the bottle and cork it. Set aside. How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

Make the rocket “fuel”

Cut a paper towel into a square. Add 2-3 tablespoons of ARM & HAMMER Baking Soda onto the paper towel. Roll the paper towel tightly enough so that it will fit inside bottle opening. DON’T add it to the bottle yet!How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

Add duct tape to one end to keep the baking soda from spilling out. How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

Take everything outside to clear open area.How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

Launch the rocket

Adults or older kids only: I highly recommend wearing safety goggles for the following steps. Place the rocket upside down and remove the cork. Working quickly, place your paper towel packet inside the bottle and plug with cork. Turn the bottle over, place on its ’legs’ and STAND BACK! Watch as the rocket soars into the sky.How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

  • Safety Note: It may take a moment for the reaction to build up enough gas to launch the rocket. Give it time!
  • The weight of your rocket will affect how far it launches. Our rocket covered in cardboard launched about 15 feet into the air while the rocket without any decorations fellow about 30 feet high.

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

The science behind baking soda bottle rockets

Similar to yesterday’s experiment we are working with an acid base chemical reaction in this project. When the vinegar and baking soda react one of the bi-products of the reaction is the production of carbon dioxide gas.

When we cork the bottle while the reaction is occurring, the gas has nowhere to escape. It builds up inside the bottle until it reaches a point where the pressure inside the bottle is great enough to push the cork out and launch the bottle into the sky! Head over to the science section of yesterday’s post here to learn even more about what is happening in this reaction.

Conclusion

I have to admit that I had never made the classic baking soda and vinegar rockets before this. I honestly thought that the amount of gas produced in this reaction would never be enough to really launch a bottle rocket…but I was completely wrong!

And if you missed them, see the past three experiments in our camp series here:

  • Tie Dyed Slime
  • DIY Lava Lamp
  • Fizzing Hands

Baking Soda And Vinegar Powered Toy Car – Putting Baking Soda And Vinegar together can generate interesting chemical reaction. You can harness that reaction and power a Toy Car or rocket. It is a very.

This science experiment can be a great one to inspire kids to become big dreamers, innovators, and problem solvers. By making this baking soda and vinegar powered car and rocket, kids can also learn how different materials can be mixed together to create a product that is greater than some of its parts.

Video advice: Chemical Reaction Car

Science makes this recycled car really go! A chemical reaction car is a perfect STEM project for school, after-school, scouts, or camp.

Video advice: DIY Baking Soda & Vinegar Rocket! – Meet Me at the Reck

Most fun thing in the world is to shoot something up into the air! Right? Andrew W.K. teaches Reckers how to make a Do-It-Yourself rocket that will blast your party into the next galaxy. Party on! Watch the entire season now! ► http://mker.tv/mmatrseries

How do you make a car with vinegar and baking soda?

Twist open the water bottle and pour 1 cup vinegar into the water bottle. Cut a 5”x4” rectangle of tissue paper and pour in 1 tablespoon of baking soda. How to Race the Chemical Reaction Car

  1. Now head outside!
  2. Place bottle upright and QUICKLY! .
  3. Shake the bottle and place car wheels on the ground.
  4. Let it ride!

How does vinegar and baking soda make rocket fuel?

  1. Fill the bottle about 1/4 to 1/3 of the way with vinegar. .
  2. Put baking soda in a time-release container. .
  3. Prepare a balloon to cover the mouth of the rocket. .
  4. Carefully put the baking-soda container inside the bottle. .
  5. Center the balloon over the mouth of the rocket and secure it around the neck with the rubber band.

How do you make a rocket with vinegar and soda?

0:000:58How to Make a Baking Soda and Vinegar Rocket – YouTubeYouTubeStart of suggested clipEnd of suggested clipFull take your rocket. Outside to a wide open area drop the pack of baking soda into the bottle. AndMoreFull take your rocket. Outside to a wide open area drop the pack of baking soda into the bottle. And quickly close the bottle with the cork shake the rocket. And stand it up on the ground.

What is the best ratio of baking soda to vinegar for a rocket?

12 to 1 ratioAdding baking soda to vinegar, the reaction is delayed, but then fizzes the same amount. More vinegar is better. A 12 to 1 ratio of vinegar to baking soda caused a fizzing explosion!

How do you make a homemade rocket car?

0:4913:22Build Your Own Rocket Car – YouTubeYouTube.

Video advice: How to make Homemade Rocket with Vinegar and Baking Soda

In this video, we will show you how you can make a Rocket using only Bottle, Vinegar and Baking Soda.

This post may contain affiliate links.

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

How to Make a Bottle Rocket

Supplies you’ll need:

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

Corks
Small plastic bottles (water bottles or small soda bottles work great)
Baking Soda
Vinegar
Small squares of tissue paper or toilet paper
Funnel

Pour about an inch worth of vinegar into the bottom of the bottle.

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

Put about a teaspoon of baking soda onto the tissue square and fold it up (this will create a time-release packet).

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

This is most definitely an outside project! You can get as messy as you want. When you are ready to watch it explode, drop the baking soda packet in, put on the cork- tight, but not too tight- and let it explode. Place it cork side down to watch it fly!

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

You can do it two different ways. Right side up, the cork just pops out. If you do it with the cork side down, the bottle flies up- that is lots more fun! It happens so quickly that it surprises you!

published
March 24, 2019
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Ages 8-10 Summer STEM Activities

Warmer weather means its time to do some science experiments outside! Kids will love making a soda bottle rocket with simple household materials. This fun science demonstration is easy to do and will definitely impress your kids. Our rocket flew higher than our two story house!

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

This post was originally published in April 2016 and was updated March 2019.

This is a fun outdoor science project for kids of all ages. Use a simple baking soda and vinegar reaction to launch your rocket. Who knew that baking soda and vinegar had that much power?

At the bottom of this post, I have an explanation of the science behind it.

Want to see our bottle rocket in flight? Here’s a video demonstration!

Here is what you need to make one:

  • A 2 liter soda bottle
  • 3 pencils (unsharpened is best)
  • Duct tape
  • A cork that fits the soda bottle
  • Paper towels
  • Baking soda
  • Vinegar – we went through an entire large bottle, so get a lot!

First, prepare your rocket. Basically, all we did was to build a stand for the rocket. We were concerned that adding decorations would make the rocket heavier, which would not allow it to go as high.

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

We went to a birthday party a couple weeks ago and made a bottle rocket with a water bottle. They used pencils as “feet” for the rocket to stand on, and I thought it was a brilliant idea!

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

Once your rocket is ready, it’s time to launch!

I failed to get a good photo of our baking soda packets, but what you need is a small square of paper towel (we used half of a select-a-size paper towel). Dump in some baking soda (we didn’t measure) and fold the paper towel around it. It needs to be narrow enough to fit through the mouth of your bottle. You can kind of see our baking soda packet in the photo below.

Pour in some vinegar. We used about two inches worth, but again we didn’t measure.

(Turn this into a science experiment by using different quantities of baking soda and vinegar and recording how high your rocket goes!)

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

After pouring in the vinegar, quickly push in the baking soda packet and then push in the cork. Turn the bottle over and wait for it to launch! It can take up to 30 seconds.

Be careful of pushing in the cork too tightly – our first rocket did not launch because of that, and when we pulled the cork out it had a LOT of pressure behind it. Once Aidan got the hang of how tightly to push it in, our launches were all successful after that.

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

Be sure to stand back… It’s starting to foam!

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

LIFTOFF! What a great demonstration of Newton’s 3rd law of motion!

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

The Science Behind It:

The baking soda and vinegar that we used in this bottle rocket create an acid/base reaction. Baking soda is sodium bicarbonate, and the chemical formula is NaHCO3. Vinegar, or acetic acid, is HCH3COO. A baking soda and vinegar reaction is actually two parts. It happens so fast that we don’t realize that it’s actually two reactions. First, carbonic acid is formed. This quickly breaks down into water and carbon dioxide gas. The other product of the reaction is sodium acetate, which you can use to make Hot Ice. All the CO2 gas that is formed by the reaction creates pressure inside the bottle. The pressure builds up until it pushes the cork out of the opening of the bottle. Then WHOOOOSH! We have liftoff!

The rocket flies high because of Newton’s 3rd Law of Motion, which states that for every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction. The CO2 gas and liquid push out of the bottom of the rocket, which pushes the rocket upwards with great force!

It’s a great time of year to get outside! Here are more fun backyard projects:

  • Make a Pool Noodle Rocket Flinger – easy homemade toy!
  • Build Your Own American Ninja Warrior Obstacle Course – Kids can change this around to create a new obstacle course every time!
  • Here are several fun Backyard Projects from One Crazy House. Love these ideas for creating a fun play space!

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

28 Comments

Amanda Jun 4, 2016

Can I ask why you didn’t just pour the baking soda in the bottle?

Cindy Taylor Jul 13, 2016

You don’t want the reaction to start immediately. You need to have time to put the cork in, stand up the rocket and get back before it starts.

breanna Dec 13, 2018

how high did you get the rocket to go?

Erick Jun 3, 2019

Amanda,
The baking soda would react with the vinegar so fast that you would not have time to add the Cork and set the rocket.
The paper towel was to slow down the reaction time.

Here’s an exciting one that your kids will love! Any form of bottle rocket might seem like a challenge, but the ‘Baking Soda Rocket’ experiment uses only common household items and objects. It’s a nice blend of DIY and household Science. Just be sure to take charge of the trickier steps to avoid mishaps.

You will need:How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

  • Materials for a launch pad (e.g. cardboard, building sticks/blocks)
  • An empty plastic bottle
  • Baking Soda
  • Vinegar
  • Strong Tape
  • A table spoon
  • A paper towel
  • A cork (optional)

Method:How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

  • Whether you want to start with building the rocket first or the launch pad is up to you. But for the latter, there’s a number of different ways to do so. I simply stuck with cardboard, rolling one side to form a cylinder and then taping it so it wouldn’t unravel. When doing this, it’s important to keep in mind the size of your bottle and the sturdiness of your cardboard. Just to note: your bottle will be placed upside-down on the launchpad, so you have to make sure it can stand upright.
  • Next up is the rocket itself, if you haven’t done so already remove the lid and rinse the bottle. Take your vinegar and pour in roughly one or two cups worth into the bottle. Depending on the size of your bottle, adjust the amounts to how you see fit. This will simply be part of the “rocket fuel”, so you can experiment with different amounts.How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket
  • The second part to creating your fuel will involve the baking soda and paper towel. Grab a large spoonful of baking soda and place it in the middle of the paper towel. Once again, you can experiment with different amounts, but the more you use the BIGGER the blast off! After that, wrap the baking soda in your paper towel and firmly fit it into the mouth of the bottle.
  • The final step in making your rocket is sealing the bottle back up with a cork. If you don’t have one, you can make a homemade one using thick cardboard. Just be weary when doing this, as if you don’t seal the bottle properly or your cardboard is too thin, the fuel of your rocket may leak out when tipped upside-down. How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocketYou can also substitute the cork for other objects, such as aluminium foil or a pool noodle piece. Just be careful in not accidentally dislodging the paper towel wrap baking soda from the mouth of the bottle.
  • With that, your bottle rocket should be ready for lift-off! Find a big, open space outside and prepare your launch pad and bottle rocket. When you’re good and ready, tip the bottle upside-down, place it onto your launch pad and quickly step back and watch your rocket fly (hopefully). And that’s the ‘Baking Soda Rocket’ experiment – I hope you enjoyed it!

The Science Bit:

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocketSo, how does the fuel in your rocket work to make it fly? For this, we’re going to be learning about chemical reactions! The fuel in your rocket is composed of baking soda and vinegar, which (when exposed to each other) releases carbon dioxide that builds up inside the bottle. This CO2 (carbon dioxide) causes pressure to build up inside the bottle due to the cork trapping the reaction inside. Eventually, the gases contained in the bottle will build up too much pressure for the cork to handle and will explode out of the end of the bottle. This sudden release of built up pressure will LAUNCH the rocket into the sky, propelling the rocket in the opposite direction to where the gas was released. The more pressure that was built up beforehand, the higher the rocket will fly!

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

  • baking soda
  • tissue to wrap baking soda in
  • vinegar (can also do with lemon juice)
  • rocket
  • cloth for clean up
  • water to rinse out rocket
  • open site to set off rocket
  • sturdy flat base to stand rocket on if grass is bumpy
  • optional: molecule models – 3 red oxygen atoms, two white hydrogen atoms, one black carbon atom and 6 bonds for each student/student pair

It is a rocket powered by a chemical reaction.
Baking soda and vinegar react to make gas, which is trapped in the corked bottle. When the gas pressure is great enough to push the cork out, the rocket flies up in the air.

Pour 200ml vinegar into the bottle.
Add a couple of teaspoons of baking soda to the tissue, and twist the ends to package it, but so that it is narrow enough to fit through the mouth of the bottle.
Make sure that you are away from the students, then push the baking soda package into the bottle. Cork the bottle, then stand it up for take off.
Stand back. Even if it takes a little time, the tissue will eventually disintegrate and release the baking soda into the vinegar, and set off the rocket.
If you think gas is escaping more slowly (around the side of the cork, for example) and the rocket will not fly, kick it over with your foot before reaching down to take it apart (so the rocket does not go off in your face), and reset it.

A rocket nicely demonstrates Newton’s 3rd Law – for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction. The gas and liquid shooting downwards out of the bottle (the ‘action’) pushes on the bottle (‘reaction’) sending it upwards.

For a dramatic demonstration of Newton’s 2nd Law, set the bottle right-side-up for take off (with the cork pointing upwards), making sure there is a mound of gravel or something around the base of the bottle so that it will not tip over. With the same amount of baking soda and vinegar, the cork flies way higher than the bottle (be careful with set up – the cork shoots out of the bottle really fast). With the same force, the smaller mass of the cork accelerates more than the larger mass of the bottle.

With older students, model the chemical reaction that powers the rocket:
Give each student a model of HCO3 (baking soda) and H (the atom that makes vinegar acidic). We started with these in the rocket.
The baking soda and vinegar molecules react and rearrange to make two new molecules. Ask students to figure out what these molecules are, giving them the hint that one of them is water.
The products of the reaction are water (H2O) and carbon dioxide (CO2).
Carbon dioxide is a gas, and as more and more of it is made by the chemical reaction, the gas builds up in pressure until it blows the cork out of the bottle.
Once the cork is released, the gas can escape by shooting out of the bottom of the rocket. This force propels the rocket upwards.

A rocket that goes to space acts on the same principal of action and reaction: the exhaust is expelled out of the back of the rocket, and this force is countered by a force on the rocket that propels it upwards.

How do you make a simple rocket?

To build a homemade rocket ship you’ll need:

  1. A plastic 2-litre pop bottle, empty and rinsed out, with the label removed.
  2. Tape.
  3. Poster paint in various colours.
  4. Scissors.
  5. A cardboard box, cut into squares.
  6. A toilet roll tube.
  7. A narrower, thicker cardboard tube (such as a cling film or wrapping paper tube)
  8. Tin foil.

How can I make a small rocket at home?

Make a rocket from a bottle.

Reduce the drag of the water bottle by taping a paper cone to the top of the rocket (the bottom of the bottle). Tape paper or cardboard triangles on either side of the bottle to act as fins. The triangles should come about halfway up the bottle.

Is making rocket fuel illegal?

Yes. Making model rocket fuel and engines is legal in the United States according to Federal law, but your specific state and local laws may differ. Some of the materials you may want to use to build an engine may require a permit from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives.

How do you make a rocket out of junk?

1. Collect your supplies

  1. A plastic 2-litre pop bottle, empty and rinsed out, with the label removed.
  2. Tape.
  3. Poster paint in various colours.
  4. Scissors.
  5. A cardboard box, cut into squares.
  6. A toilet roll tube.
  7. A narrower, thicker cardboard tube (such as a cling film or wrapping paper tube)
  8. Tin foil.

Can I build a rocket and go to space?

As to your question, yes, it is theoretically possible. In fact, there have been a few amateur made rockets that have reached the Kármán line. The first happened May 17, 2004, by the Civilian Space eXploration Team (CSXT). This is the only known amateur rocket to make it past 100 km.

What are the 4 main parts of a rocket?

There are four major systems in a full scale rocket; the structural system, the payload system, the guidance system, and the propulsion system. The structural system, or frame, is similar to the fuselage of an airplane.

Which fuel is used to rocket?

Hydrogen — a light and extremely powerful rocket propellant — has the lowest molecular weight of any known substance and burns with extreme intensity (5,500°F).

How much vinegar and baking soda do I need for a rocket?

Add one tsp. of vinegar to the canister at a time, filling it almost to the top. You need to add as much vinegar to the canister as possible—just enough to keep the vinegar and the baking soda from coming into contact when you later snap the lid onto the canister. Depending on the canister, this may be about five tsp.

Set up a mega science experiment to figure out what baking soda and vinegar ratio works best for you and your preschooler!

We love a good baking soda and vinegar experiment, don’t you.

I don’t know how many times the kids and I have done experiments with baking soda and vinegar.

But I’ve always questioned how much to use of each…

I’ve always just guessed and it turned out however it turned out.

Sometimes it was a great fizzy explosion, other times it just plain fizzled out.

However, the boys have always had a good time with our experiments.

But I thought it was time to figure out the ratio to make the best fizzy “explosion” using just baking soda and vinegar.

And letting the kids decide what worked the best.

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

First of all, why do baking soda and vinegar react the way they do?

I’m not all science-y and understand chemical reactions, so I had to look up a good answer for you from Steve Spangler Science.

The bubbles and foam you see are filled with carbon dioxide gas (CO2) that’s being released by an acid/base reaction. Vinegar is acetic acid dissolved in water and baking soda is a base called sodium bicarbonate. Initially, the reaction makes carbonic acid which is unstable. It quickly breaks down into CO2 and water. The gas then rapidly leaves the water creating foam and bubbles along the way.

You can read more about how the science behind this experiment as well as learn how to make and amazing rocket propelled by baking soda and vinegar over on Steve Spangler Science.

What ratio of baking soda to vinegar is best?

I set up an experiment for Henry and I to discover how to get the best baking soda and vinegar results.

We kept it a simple mixture, with just these 2 ingredients:

  • baking soda
  • vinegar

No added food coloring to worry about stains or anything like that. Keeping it very simple.

It might be handy to set this up on a tray, or outside and keep a sponge or towel handy to clean up the fizzy overflow.

I set up 3 glasses (clear).

Then, I had Henry write the numbers 1-2-3 each on a piece of paper to label the glasses so he could write down the results of his experiment.

The More Vinegar Experiment

First, I started by pouring vinegar in each glass.

I corresponded the number of tablespoons of vinegar to the number on Henry’s papers.

  • 1 tablespoon
    2 tablespoons
  • 3 tablespoons

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

For this initial experiment, we used one tablespoon of baking soda as our constant for this round of experimenting.

Henry measured one tablespoon of baking soda and dumped it into the first glass with one tablespoon of vinegar and observed what happened.

We kept doing this (always with one tablespoon of baking soda) through all three glasses and found that the fizzing got bigger and better with each additional tablespoon of vinegar.

Another round of testing would be done to see the reaction with even more vinegar!

Does Even More Vinegar Get a Better Fizz?

Another setup was done with more vinegar, to see if the explosions would keep getting biger.

This time we tried more vinegar in each glass:

  • 4 tablespoons
  • 5 tablespoons
  • 6 tablespoons

Each still with one tablespoon of baking soda poured in to test.

We found once again that the fizzing was quite a bit bigger and better with 6 tablespoons as a result.

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

Yes! More vinegar equals more fizz!

Yet another round of testing needed to be done. This time I skipped numbers and didn’t do consecutive counting so we could really see the difference.

I set up the cups each with different amounts of vinegar:

  • 3 tablespoons
  • 6 tablespoons
  • 12 tablespoons

Whoa! 12 tablespoons of vinegar to 1 tablespoon of baking soda overflowed our glasses!

(Told you the sponge may come in handy for cleanup! However, baking soda and vinegar make excellent detergents, so maybe you could do this in the bathtub and scrub the soap scum off in the process! Ha!)

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

I can’t help but wonder if we were to try it with even more vinegar what the result would be.

But our glass was overflowing the way it was, so that was the end of our experimenting to find out the best ratio.

The next question I had…

Is it better to add baking soda to vinegar? Or vinegar to baking soda?

Would twelve tablespoons of vinegar have the same reaction if the roles were reversed and we added it to one tablespoon of baking soda, or does it not matter?

Would the chemical reactions be the same?

We HAD to find out!

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

So we tested that as well with the best ratio of baking soda to vinegar above.

The amount of fizzing was the same for both.

However… there is a difference in the time of reaction between the two.

When you add baking soda to vinegar like we did the first experiment above, the reaction it creates is sort of delayed, building up to a big fizz. But it’s slow building.

On the flip side, when you flip flop the roles and add the vinegar to the baking soda , the reaction is immediate and almost explosive.

Depending on the experiment you’re doing, you may want to do it one way over the other.

Our Mega Baking Soda and Vinegar Experiment Results:

Adding vinegar to baking soda gives you an immediate reaction. Adding baking soda to vinegar, the reaction is delayed, but then fizzes the same amount.

More vinegar is better. A 12 to 1 ratio of vinegar to baking soda caused a fizzing explosion!

We could have kept going with this all afternoon! Henry was getting a kick out of the experiment and loved watching it overflow the cup.

Do you add baking soda to vinegar or vinegar to baking soda when you do these experiments?

When we do our blow up a balloon experiment, it is adding the baking soda to the vinegar that is already in the bottle. Which is a delayed fizz. I wonder what would happen if we did the opposite and reversed the roles? Would the balloon blow up more rapidly? Would the balloon explode?

That sounds like an experiment we need to try, or you need to try and report back and tell me how it turns out!

Back to Activities

Introduction

In this activity, you will be able to create your own baking soda rocket. First you will be able to create your own rocket and then you will experiment with different chemicals (baking soda and vinegar) and try to determine how far you can launch your rocket.

Materials List

  • A two-liter soda bottle
  • 3 pencils (unsharpened is best)
  • Duct tape
  • A cork that fits the soda bottle
  • Paper towels
  • Baking soda
  • Vinegar
  • Protective eye covering (goggles)

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

Procedure

  1. First, prepare your rocket. Place three unsharpened pencils around your bottle. Make sure they are equal spaced.
  2. Using duct tape, tape the pencils to your pop bottle.
  3. Pour in some vinegar into your bottle. We suggest starting with 2 cups of vinegar (feel free to change the mixture after your first test).
  4. Then you need a small square of paper towel (we used half of a select-a-size paper towel). Place 2 tablespoons of baking soda in the towel and fold the paper towel around it. It needs to be narrow enough to fit through the mouth of your bottle.
  5. Place the towel with baking soda in your bottle, but have a bit of the paper towel sticking out of the bottle.
  6. Gently push in the cork (NOT TOO TIGHT). Make sure a little bit of towel is sticking out so that the baking soda does not fall into the vinegar (yet).
  7. Turn the bottle over and wait for it to launch! It can take up to 30 seconds. Be careful of pushing in the cork too tightly

What happened? How do you think you can change up this experiment? Can you make it into a competition? It’s up to you to explore and experiment!

Here are the materials you need:

  • An empty 2-liter soda bottle
  • 3 pencils (unsharpened is best)
  • Duct tape
  • A cork that fits the soda bottle-A wine bottle or a #10 cork from Hobby Lobby should work
  • Paper towels, a roll of select-a-size
  • Baking soda
  • Vinegar, Large bottle, 64 ounces or larger

Step 1. Remove the label from the soda bottle, and wash and dry the bottle so there are no traces of soda left.

Step 2. Place the eraser end of the pencils toward the top of the bottle so that they will be the feet of the tripod. Make sure that with the cork inserted in the bottle, there is approximately one-inch ground clearance when the pencils are taped to the bottle. Tape the pencils firmly at 3 equal locations around the bottle.

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

Step 3. Carefully pour approximately 1 heaping tablespoon of baking soda onto a folded select-a-size paper towel sheet. Then, fold and roll it so it will fit into the neck of the soda bottle.

Step 4. Mark a line 2 inches from the bottom of the soda bottle, pour the vinegar to that line.

Step 5. Stuff the baking soda packet into the neck of the bottle, leaving room for the cork. Make sure the paper towel does not tear, exposing the baking soda. If it tears, make a new packet.

Step 6. Place the cork in the bottle, being careful not to place it too tightly. Doing so will keep the cork from ejecting, thus the bottle will be pressurized, making it hazardous to manually remove the cork.

Step 7. Use a large heavy, flat piece of wood, or a concert block, to provide a smooth, stable launching surface.

Step 8. Turn the bottle upside and quickly place it on the launching surface. Move to a safe area, and watch the rocket “Lift off!”

Note: You may experiment with the amounts of baking soda and vinegar, and record how high the rocket goes.

Read more about this experiment and see photos at Frugal Fun 4 Boys

Is it illegal to launch model rockets?

While model rocketry and high power rocketry, when conducted in accordance with the NAR Safety Codes, are legal activities in all 50 states, some states impose specific restrictions on the activity and many local jurisdictions require some form of either notification or prior approval of the fire marshal.

What is the best material to make a model rocket?

Cardboard is your best friend in amateur model rocket building. Choose a high-quality cardboard for the body tube, launch lugs, centering rings and bulkheads. You can substitute cardboard in many cases with a thin and durable sheet of plastic. You can also use high-quality cardstock or paper in some instances.

What materials do you need to make a model rocket?

Model rockets are usually made from lightweight materials. The body tubes can be cardboard with fins made from balsa wood. They usually have plastic nosecones and parachutes. As you get into more high-powered rocketry, you may use thicker wood or composite materials for the body and plywood or even 3-D printed fins.

How can I make a small rocket at home?

Make a rocket from a bottle.

Reduce the drag of the water bottle by taping a paper cone to the top of the rocket (the bottom of the bottle). Tape paper or cardboard triangles on either side of the bottle to act as fins. The triangles should come about halfway up the bottle.

How do you make a rocket with vinegar and baking soda?

(Turn this into a science experiment by using different quantities of baking soda and vinegar and recording how high your rocket goes!) After pouring in the vinegar, quickly push in the baking soda packet and then push in the cork. Turn the bottle over and wait for it to launch! It can take up to 30 seconds.

How high can a hobby rocket go?

Estes model rockets fly from 100 feet to 2,500 feet high! It all depends on the size and design of the model rocket and the Estes engine(s) used to launch it.

How high can a homemade rocket go?

By the early 1960s, more than 5,000 amateur rocket clubs with more than 40,000 active members operated in the United States. As the rocket builders became more sophisticated, some built rockets that weighed up to 75 pounds and could reach an altitude of over five miles.

Is it legal to build a rocket and go to space?

Originally Answered: Is it legal for me to build and launch my own rocket into space? Yes it is legal. However, in order to get to space, your rocket must pass through either some country’s airspace, or through airspace above the ocean.

What fuel do rockets use?

The petroleum used as rocket fuel is a type of highly refined kerosene, called RP-1 in the United States. Petroleum fuels are usually used in combination with liquid oxygen as the oxidizer.

How do you make homemade flying rockets?

Baking soda and vinegar rocket

Rockets made of baking soda and vinegar are a great chemistry lesson for kids. All you need is baking soda, vinegar, a paper towel, three pencils, some tape, and a plastic soda bottle. This basic chemical reaction can launch the rocket up to 100 feet.

What is the best nose cone shape for a rocket?

If the speed of a rocket is less than the speed of sound (1,200 km/h in air at sea level), the best shape of a nose cone is a rounded curve. At supersonic speeds (faster than the speed of sound), the best shape is a narrower and sharper point.

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

The reaction between baking soda (sodium bicarbonate) and vinegar (dilute acetic acid) generates carbon dioxide gas, which is used in chemical volcanoes and other projects. Here is a look at the reaction between baking soda and vinegar and the equation for the reaction.

Key Takeaways: Reaction Between Baking Soda and Vinegar

  • The overall chemical reaction between baking soda (sodium bicarbonate) and vinegar (weak acetic acid) is one mole of solid sodium bicarbonate reacts with one mole of liquid acetic acid to produce one mole each of carbon dioxide gas, liquid water, sodium ions, and acetate ions.
  • The reaction proceeds in two steps. The first reaction is a double displacement reaction, while the second reaction is a decomposition reaction.
  • The baking soda and vinegar reaction can be used to produce sodium acetate, by boiling off or evaporating all the liquid water.

How the Reaction Works

The reaction between baking soda and vinegar actually occurs in two steps, but the overall process can be summarized by the following word equation: baking soda (sodium bicarbonate) plus vinegar (acetic acid) yields carbon dioxide plus water plus sodium ion plus acetate ion

The chemical equation for the overall reaction is:

with s = solid, l = liquid, g = gas, aq = aqueous or in water solution

Another common way to write this reaction is:

The above reaction, while technically correct, does not account for the dissociation of the sodium acetate in water.

The chemical reaction actually occurs in two steps. First, there is a double displacement reaction in which acetic acid in the vinegar reacts with sodium bicarbonate to form sodium acetate and carbonic acid:

Carbonic acid is unstable and undergoes a decomposition reaction to produce the carbon dioxide gas:

The carbon dioxide escapes the solution as bubbles. The bubbles are heavier than air, so the carbon dioxide collects at the surface of the container or overflows it. In a baking soda volcano, detergent usually is added to collect the gas and form bubbles that flow somewhat like lava down the side of the ‘volcano.’ A dilute sodium acetate solution remains after the reaction. If the water is boiled off of this solution, a supersaturated solution of sodium acetate forms. This “hot ice” will spontaneously crystallize, releasing heat and forming a solid that resembles water ice.

The carbon dioxide released by the baking soda and vinegar reaction has other uses besides making a chemical volcano. It can be collected and used as a simple chemical fire extinguisher. Because carbon dioxide is heavier than air, it displaces it. This starves a fire of the oxygen needed for combustion.

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

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Looking for a fun science experiment to keep your little Einsteins busy? This simple baking soda and vinegar experiment is a perfect outdoor activity and demonstrates how a chemical reaction can really get things moving. Read on to find out to discover how to make a baking soda vinegar powered steam boat.

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

You’ll need:

– Sharpeez (optional) for decorating the boat

– Hot glue (not pictured)

– Baby pool or bathtub (not pictured)

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

Step 1: Decorate your “boat.”

Take the labels off the plastic bottles and let your kids decorate their “boats” using permanent or (oil-based) paint markers. This is optional, but fun—especially if you’ve got more than one little captain at the helm.

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

Step 2: Drill a hole in the bottom of the boat—then put a straw in it.

Using a drill or soldering tool, make a small hole (the size of a straw circumference) in the bottom edge of your plastic bottle. Caution: Wear safety glasses—and keep kids at a distance—to make sure bits of plastic don’t fly into your eyes).

Place a three or four-inch straw into the hole so that about an inch of sticks into the bottle and the rest sticks out the back). To secure the straw so that no liquid drips out the sides, apply hot glue around the edges.

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

Step 3: Fill it up and watch it go!

Turn the bottle sideways, and cover the straw end with your fingertip while you pour about 1 cup of vinegar into the bottle. Then, keeping the bottle flat and the straw side up (so nothing spills out), drop a few spoonfuls of baking soda into the bottle. Make sure to keep the baking soda on one end and the vinegar on the other.

Give the bottle one quick shake, and place it quickly into your pool or tub. And it’s off!

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

The science of it: What’s happening?

When vinegar (an acid) meets baking soda (an alkali), they react to form a gas (carbon dioxide). This gas must escape the bottle, so it pushes out through the straw, which in turn powers your boat across the pool. Once all the gas has escaped, your boat slows down.

Step 4: Tinker with the steps (and let your kids take over!).

Now that you’ve done the experiment once, it’s time to hand over the ingredients to your kids. Let them try to figure out (on their own, hopefully!) how to get the boats moving as fast as they can. Some things kids can explore include:

Does more baking soda change how fast the boat moves?

Does more vinegar change anything?

What about how you combine the ingredients? For instance, does a quick shake help things move? Or a slow fizz?

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

Story and photos by Melissa Heckscher

a.k.a Film Canister Rockets

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How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

  • University of Maine

If your child has tried the Naked Egg Experiment, he has seen how the chemical reaction between calcium carbonate and vinegar can remove an eggshell. If he’s tried The Exploding Sandwich Bag Experiment, then he knows a little bit about acid-base reactions.

Now he can harness that reaction create a flying object in this Antacid Rocket Experiment. With some open space outdoors and a little caution your child can send a homemade rocket into the air by the power of a fizzy reaction.

Note: The Antacid Rocket Experiment used to be called the Film Canister Rockets, but with digital cameras taking over the market, it’s become harder and harder to find empty film canisters. If you can film canisters, that’s great, but this experiment recommends you use mini M&M tubular containers or clean, empty glue stick containers instead.

What Your Child Will Learn (or Practice):

  • Scientific inquiry
  • Observing chemical reactions
  • The Scientific Method

Materials Needed:

  • Mini M&Ms tube, a clean used-up glue stick container or a film canister
  • Heavy paper/card stock
  • Tape
  • Markers
  • Scissors
  • Baking soda
  • Vinegar
  • Tissues
  • Antacid tablets (Alka-Seltzer or a generic brand)
  • Soda (optional)

Tissues are not a necessity for this experiment, but using tissue can help to delay the chemical reaction long enough to give your child some time to get out of the way.

Make Baking Soda and Vinegar Rockets

  1. Have your child sketch out and decorate a small rocket on a piece of heavy paper. Ask her to cut out the rocket and set it to the side.
  2. Help your child cut the “hinge” holding the cover to the M&Ms tube so it comes on and off. This will be the bottom of the rocket.
  3. Give her another piece of heavy paper and have her roll it around the tube, making sure the bottom of the rocket is easily accessible. Then, have her tape it tightly in place. (She may need to cut the paper to make it fit better).
  4. Glue the rocket she drew and cut out to the front of the tube to make the whole thing look more like a real rocket.
  5. Move outside to a clear, open area and open the container
  6. Fill it one-quarter full with vinegar.
  7. Wrap 1 teaspoon of baking soda in small piece of tissue.
  8. Warning: You must act quickly in this step! Stuff the folded tissue in the tube, snap it shut and stand it up (with the lid down) on the ground. Move away!
  9. Watch the rocket pop right up into the air after the tissue dissolves in the vinegar.

Make an Antacid Rocket

  1. Use the same rocket from the baking soda and vinegar experiment, making sure to clean it thoroughly first.
  2. Take off the cover and put an antacid tablet into the tube. You may have to break it into pieces to get it all to fit. You can use generic antacid tablets but Alka-Seltzer works better than generic brands.
  3. Add a teaspoon of water to the tube, snap on the cover and put the rocket — lid down — on the ground.
  4. Watch what happens once the water dissolves the antacid tablet.

What’s Going On

Both rockets are working under the same principle. A baking soda and vinegar mixture and the water and antacid combination create an acid-base chemical reaction that releases carbon dioxide gas. The gas fills the tube and the the air pressure builds to a point where it is too great to be contained. That’s when the lid pops off and the rocket flies up into the air.

A family activity for all future NASA rocket engineers!

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

Grownups aren’t the only ones that can design, build, and fly a rocket. No need to buy expensive model rockets, engines, or generators to send creations skyward, either. Kids can just choose their propulsion style — air, fire, rubber band — and hit up a hardware store to create a DIY rocket they can launch from their own backyard. or any safe, obstacle-free area close to home.

Baking Soda and Vinegar Rocket

What do volcanoes and rockets have in common? Answer: kids can make DIY versions of both with everyone’s favorite reactive chemicals, baking soda and vinegar. Andrew W.K. show will show them how they can launch a rocket made of a two-liter bottle using pantry staples for power. (We do not recommend launching this rocket indoors—this thing really moves.)

DIY Stomp Rockets

Even NASA scientists love stomp rockets, the birthday-party-activity favorite that uses your own jumping, stomping power to send foam-and-plastic rockets onto your friends’ roof—or up into nearby trees. We have some available at the Camp store, or you could give your kid these instructions from a scientist at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory at CalTech. (Yeah, that’s some real rocketeering street cred right there.) They can create their launch pad from PVC pipes and the ever-so-useful two-liter soda bottle, and make their rocket out of paper, then take the whole set-up outside and start the countdown!

Alka Seltzer Film Canister Rocket

Little rockets can still be big fun, especially when kids want to make a rocket they can safely launch indoors. They’ll need to acquire some plastic film canisters — these will form the body of the mini-rocket. A little water and an Alka Seltzer tablet will serve as the reactive rocket fuel to propel those film canisters into the air.

Matchbox Rocket

Air pressure and chemicals are all right, but sometimes what you really want is firepower. Grant Thompson, a.k.a. The King of Random, can teach your kid how to build a tiny yet mighty rocket using match heads, wooden skewers, and aluminum foil. His clever design is portable — because they’ll definitely want to find an open space, like an empty parking lot, to launch these little missiles. Thompson claims they can fly up to 40 feet and leave an impressive smoke trail in their wake. (Check out the rest of his YouTube channel for more advanced home rocket building that definitely requires parental supervision.)

Water Bottle Rocket

Newton said, “For every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction.” If knowledge is power, you kid can use their knowledge of his third law of motion to power a water bottle rocket. Their soda bottle design will be similar to the baking soda-and-vinegar rocket, but the propulsion won’t come from a chemical reaction. Instead, the Sci Guys demonstrate how to use a bike pump to increase the air pressure in the rocket, which forces the plug out of the bottle, sending the water pouring out of the bottle (action) and the rocket soaring into the sky (reaction). This experiment is dubbed NSFH (not safe for home), so have the kids take the launch party outside.

Plastic Straw Rocket

Our friends at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Lab might spend their time inventing technology to aid in space exploration, but they also know how to liven up a rainy day with easy DIY plastic straw rockets. Your kid won’t need a Texas-sized launch site to shoot off these tiny paper rockets. A big breath and a straw will send them soaring across the living room. Once they master the design, then let the competition begin! Have kids experiment with the size and design of the rocket’s fins and nose cone, or even the type of paper they use to build the body, so they can see which design will fly the farthest.

Foam Rocket Flinger

Yes, the very serious folks at the Arizona Science Center will teach you how to build a rubber-band powered rocket that kids can fling — ahem, launch, at their siblings, friends, and dog. The fuselage is a pool noodle, the fins are cardboard, and the fuel is that rubber band they may already know how to let fly with a quick finger flick. This easy indoor rocket will teach them about science, but it’s probably best if they don’t launch it at family members and pets.

This post may contain affiliate links. See my disclosure .

What better science experiment to do when discussing the earth’s atmosphere than the classic baking soda & vinegar experiment?

This idea I credit to my middle son.

You see, I bought adorable earth balloons and stashed them away in my secret science shelves (also known as “my pantry”). Well, he discovered these balloons and begged for a “baking soda vinegar reaction activity” and how could I not deliver?

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

My boys would choose to do science experiments all day long and that is quite all right with me. They tinker, they build, and they iterate along the way. This type of activity is critical. The iteration as an experiment fails is key to embracing failure a la Carol Dweck’s Growth Mindset approach (an amazing book by the way – see below for a list of resources mentioned in this post).

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

Baking Soda & Vinegar Reaction

What happens when you mix baking soda & vinegar?

My second born discovered these balloons and probably thanks to some youtube video begged to have access to the baking soda and vinegar. My sons cannot get enough of science.

We are a lab on most days experimenting with various substances and reactions.

Celebrate Earth Day with this fun baking soda and vinegar experiment with balloons!

How could a mom resist? Really?

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

Seriously, look at that face? Such awe. I can’t resist.

Baking Soda Vinegar Science

This experiment is so incredibly easy to put together. Plus the learning is hands-on and kids’ jaws drop when they observe the reaction.

Materials for this Activity

  • Earth balloons
  • White vinegar
  • Baking Soda
  • Funnel
  • Plastic Bottle

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

Baking Soda and Vinegar – Science Process

  • Gather your materials
  • Place the balloon opening around the opening of the funnel
  • Pour a cup of baking soda using a funnel to fill the balloon halfway or so
  • Use the funnel to fill the plastic bottle with a cup of white vinegar
  • Place the balloon opening around the mouth of the bottle
  • Hold the balloon up so the baking soda falls into the bottle
  • Observe & grab some paper towels

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

Nothing has such power to broaden the mind as the ability to investigate systematically and truly all that comes under thy observation in life.

The Science Behind Baking Soda & Vinegar Chemistry

Baking soda and vinegar have chemistry. Furthermore, we know that these two substances react with each other because of an acid-base reaction. Baking soda is bicarbonate (NaHCO3) and vinegar is acetic acid (HCH3COO). One of the products this reaction creates is carbon dioxide, which makes the bubbles.

When the baking soda meets the vinegar, there is a chemical reaction as carbon dioxide gas is created and fills the balloon causing it to inflate. Carbon dioxide is an important gas in the earth’s atmosphere. Carbon Dioxide plays a vital role in regulating the earth’s temperature. Baking soda and vinegar have an acid-based reaction, which results in the gas that fills the balloon.

Baking Soda and vinegar react chemically we know that much simply by observing the experiments. We can see the chemical reaction. What it is about the two ingredients that react in such phenomenally cool ways?

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

Carbon Dioxide & the Earth’s Atmosphere

Before I go I have to equip you with some back pocket scientific knowledge to impart to your children.

What is the role of carbon dioxide in our atmosphere?

Well, I am glad that you asked because carbon dioxide plays several important roles in our environment. First of all, carbon dioxide is found in the air but also in water as part of the carbon cycle. Carbon dioxide is a greenhouse gas that traps infrared radiation heat in the atmosphere. Furthermore, it plays a crucial role in the weathering of rocks. Carbon dioxide is the carbon source for plants.

Why is Carbon Dioxide So Important?

Carbon dioxide plays a critical part in plant and animal processes. Examples include photosynthesis and respiration. Photosynthesis occurs as green plants convert carbon dioxide and water into food compounds, such as glucose, and oxygen.

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

How Do Humans Interact with Carbon Dioxide?

Carbonated beverages, of course! Well, that is certainly one example but there are many additional ways human beings use carbon dioxide. We also rely on carbon dioxide in baking. For instance, it is released by baking powder or yeast makes cakes and other delicious food items rise.

Other uses include putting out fires with fire extinguishers. Carbon dioxide is denser than air so it works well to extinguish the fire as it suffocates or blankets the fire because it is heavier. If oxygen cannot get to a fire, it will die out.

Carbon dioxide exists predominantly in the form of gas, but it also has a solid and a liquid form. It can only be solid when temperatures are below -78 o C. The solid form of carbon dioxide, commonly known as Dry Ice, is used in theatres to create stage fogs, to do super cool science experiments, and make things like “magic potions” bubble.

Liquid carbon dioxide mainly exists when carbon dioxide is dissolved in water. Carbon dioxide is only water-soluble when pressure is maintained. After pressure drops the CO2 gas will try to escape to the air. This event is characterized by the CO2 bubbles forming into the water.

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocketIt is an ideal home experiment and science fair project. In this experiment, you will learn how lava is ejected from a volcano, and about the chemical reaction of vinegar and baking soda. We will use the materials from the kitchen to build a model of a volcano. It will look like a lava erupting mountain.

Precaution: Always wear safety goggles and hand gloves when dealing with chemicals. Also, take the permission from your parents for the experiment, or involve them.

Things You Will Need

  • Baking soda
  • vinegar
  • empty plastic bottle
  • clay or wheat flour
  • cardboard sheet

How to Make

  1. Place the cardboard sheet on a clean surface, and put the empty plastic bottle on the center of the sheet.
  2. Use wet clay or wet wheat flour to cover the plastic bottle. Try to shape the clay like a rough mountain, and place stones around it. Be careful, clay/wheat flour should not be dropped inside the bottle, and also don’t cover the opening of the bottle.
  3. Dry your structure in sunlight until it is hard to break.
  4. Add 2 to 3 spoonful of baking soda and 4 drops of red food coloring in the bottle that you have covered with clay.

Your Volcano is ready for eruption!

Take your model where you want to perform it, then add some vinegar in the bottle to start the volcano. You will see, a red fountain of foamy liquid will come out of the volcano model.

How it works

When baking soda (sodium bicarbonate) and vinegar (acetic acid) are mixed, they react with each other. As a result, gas bubbles made of carbon dioxide are produced. These bubbles build the pressure inside the bottle. This pressure force the foamy liquid out from the bottle.

Along with erupting volcanoes, magic milk, and a lava lamp, film canister rockets are a must do science experiment for kids of all ages. they are also perfect for learning about Newton’s Laws of Motion.

Why make a film canister rocket?

  • Film canister rockets are perfect for demonstrating Newton’s Laws of Motion. First the rocket lifts off because it is acted upon by an external force ( Newton’s First Law ) caused by the buildup of gas produced inside the canister. This causes the lid to blow off, launching the film canister into the air.
  • The rocket travels upward with a force that is equal and opposite to the downward force propelling the water, gas and lid (Newton’s Third Law).
  • The amount of force is directly proportional to the amount of water and gas released from the canister and how fast it accelerates (Newton’s Second Law).
  • They are great fun!

How to make a film canister rocket

What you need for a film canister rocket

Film canister or effervescent vitamin tablet container.

Alka seltzer or effervescent vitamin tablet

How to set up your alka seltzer film canister rocket

Fill your canister about a third full with water.

Drop in one tablet.

Place the lid on firmly.

Stand well back!

We managed to get three rockets from one tablet, so have some water standing by to replenish quickly before the tablet disintegrates.

Make it an investigation

The rockets are great fun just to set up and watch but you could turn the activity into a full investigation.

What happens if you add more or less water?

Does alka seltzer work better than a vitamin tablet?

Can you think of way to measure the height reached?

How many launches can you get from one tablet, by adding more water after the each launch?

What would happen if you added a weight to the canister?

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

Would this work with baking soda and vinegar?

Don’t forget that for your experiment to be a fair test you need to change just one condition and keep the rest constant, for example if you’re investigating whether a vitamin tablet works better than alka seltzer, you’ll need to keep the amount of water in the canisters the same, and shake each the same amount ( or not shake at all ).

Why does the film canister fly?

When the alka seltzer or vitamin tablet reacts with the water it releases carbon dioxide ( a gas ). The carbon dioxide builds up inside the canister, increasing the air pressure so much that when the canister can take no more it pops off and shoots up into the air.

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

Film Canister Rocket

You can see in this photo where we trapped the gas in a balloon just how much gas is released, it’s no wonder the canister flies with such a bang.

More rocket science for kids

The creative opportunities with film canister rockets are almost endless. Try theming them like our Minion Rocket or The Science Kiddo did some painting with their rockets.

Another awesome rocket experiment to try is a water powered bottle rocket, these shoot very high into the air so make sure you have a lot of space.

I’ve also got a list of 10 science experiments every child should try at least once with a FREE printable checklist you might like!

Did you know we have a book available? This Is Rocket Science is full of easy and exciting space themed activities perfect for kids of all ages.

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

Film Canister Rockets

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Last Updated on May 3, 2021 by Emma Vanstone

‘Baking Soda and Vinegar Powered Boat’ is a fascinating STEM activity.

This super cool science activity can keep your little scientists engaged for hours and also helps them understand how jet engines and aeroplanes work.

Baking Soda and Vinegar Powered Boat

Continue reading to learn about homemade steam-powered boat using baking soda and vinegar.

Materials required

Just collect the materials listed below and carry out the activity anytime and anywhere. You can try the experiment right from your home, classroom, outdoor locations, science camps, to science fair events.

3) Straw that has a bend at one end

6) Soldering Iron / Sharp object

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

Directions

Discover the easy steps that create a steam-powered boat, which run by the chemical reactions happening between baking soda and vinegar.

Here is the Optional step: Decorate the empty bottle considering the horizontal angle to make it look like a boat.

Step-1: In the first step, keep a tiny hole to the empty bottle on its bottom side using soldering iron.

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

Step-2: Insert the straw into the empty bottle through the hole almost 3/4 th part of it. And seal the gaps if any using hot glue. Make sure the straw is position at an angle so that vinegar would not get in the straw.

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

Step-3: The next step is to fill the empty bottle with vinegar and close the lid. The quantity of vinegar depends on the size of the bottle you take. Usually, one cup of vinegar is good enough to run the boat.

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

Step-5: It is time to put baking soda inside the bottle. Pack some amount of baking soda in tissue paper and roll it up to put baking soda inside the bottle. Immediately, close the lid of the water bottle after placing the baking soda packet.

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

Step-6: Shake the bottle and slowly place the bottle set up into the large tub of water in a horizontal position. Make sure the outside of the straw is immersed in water.

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

Step-7: You will see the bubbles inside the bottle after the chemical reaction between baking soda and vinegar. You can witness that the boat is moving in the tub with bubbles coming out of the straw end.

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

Science behind the Baking Soda and Vinegar Powered Boat

The baking soda once added to the vinegar initiates a chemical reaction. Due to the chemical reaction between vinegar and baking soda – carbon dioxide is released in the bottle.

Since the carbon dioxide gas doesn’t have anywhere else to go, the excess gas is released through the straw.

The straw attached to the bottle at the back side helps the gas to come out of the bottle. In the process of sending the gas outside the bottle, the bottle exhibits movement from its original position.

The baking soda and vinegar powered boat show its movement until the chemical reaction stops inside the bottle.

The release of carbon dioxide gas at backward direction creates the pushing force, which helps the boat to move in forward direction.

This is the same principle used in Jet engines and Airplanes where hot air is released in high pressure which makes the planes to move forward.

Related Experiments using baking soda and vinegar:

Important Questions to discuss about the experiment

Discussing questions and answers about the experiment is always helpful for children to analyse the science behind it.

1) What are the forces acting on the boat and support its movement?

2) Find out whether there are any other possible forces that help boat movement on the water?

3) Discuss about how wind impacts the movement of boat.

4) Tell students about the type of chemical reactions happening between baking soda and vinegar.

5) What is making the boat move faster or slower?

6) Find out alternate ways and chemical substances that create chemical reactions to run the boat.

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

Extension Ideas

  • Change the quantity of vinegar (either lesser or higher amounts) and find out its impact on the movement of the boat.
  • Follow the same with the baking soda quantities and check the fastness of the boat.
  • Check for other chemical substances that help to run the boat as effectively as baking soda and vinegar.
  • Close the opening of the straw and run the boat. And discuss why there is no movement of the boat.

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How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocketHow to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

  • water
  • measuring cup
  • zipper-lock plastic sandwich bags
  • paper towel
  • tablespoon
    baking soda
  • vinegar

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket
How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocketFigure out where you want to explode your Bubble Bomb. Sometimes the bags make a mess when they pop, so you may want to experiment outside. If it’s a rainy day, you can explode your Bubble Bombs in the bathtub or sink.
How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocketIt’s very important to use a bag without holes. To test the zipper-lock bag, put about half a cup of water into it. Zip it closed and turn it upside down. If no water leaks out, you can use that bag. Unzip it and pour out the water. If the bag leaks, try another one. Keep testing bags until you find one that doesn’t leak.

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocketTear a paper towel into a square that measures about 5 inches by 5 inches. Put 1 1/2 tablespoons of baking soda in the center of the square, then fold the square as shown in the picture, with the baking soda inside. This is your “time-release packet.”

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocketPour into your plastic bag:

1/2 cup of vinegar
1/4 cup of warm water

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocketNow here’s the tricky part. You need to drop the time-release packet into the vinegar and zip the bag closed before the fizzing gets out of control.

You can zip the bag halfway closed, then stuff the packet in and zip the bag closed the rest of the way in a hurry. Or you can put the time-release packet into the mouth of the bag and hold it up out of the vinegar by pinching the sides of the bag. Zip the bag closed and then let the packet drop into the vinegar.

One way or another, get the packet in the vinegar and zip the bag closed. How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocketShake the bag a little, put it in the sink or on the ground, and stand back! The bag will puff up dramatically and pop with a bang.

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket
Why does the Bubble Bomb explode?

The bubbles in the Bubble Bomb are filled with carbon dioxide, a gas that forms when the vinegar (an acid) reacts with the baking soda (a base).

If you’ve ever made a cake or baked a loaf of quick bread (the kind that doesn’t use yeast), you’ve already done some experimenting with the bubbles that come from an acid-base reaction. Most cakes and quick breads rise because of bubbles in their batter. Those bubbles, like the ones in your Bubble Bomb, are created by the chemical reaction of an acid and a base.

Take a look at a recipe for quick bread. If the recipe includes baking soda but no baking powder, it will probably also include an ingredient that’s acidic-such as buttermilk, sour milk, or orange juice.

Quick-bread recipes may call for baking powder in addition to or instead of baking soda. Baking powder is made by combining baking soda with an acidic ingredient, such as tartaric acid or calcium acid phosphate. When you add water to baking powder, it will fizz as the acid and base interact. In fact, if you ever run out of baking powder, you can make your own by mixing two teaspoons cream of tartar (it provides the acid), one teaspoon of baking soda (it’s the base), and a half-teaspoon of salt.

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

  • Try using a different size of zipper-lock plastic bag. What do you think might happen? Do you think you’ll need to use more baking soda, vinegar, and water to make the bag explode? Try it and see.
  • In the original experiment, we asked you to use warm water. Try using cold water or hot water. Does changing the temperature change your results? How?
  • The first time you tried this, you mixed the vinegar with water. Try doing the experiment again with just vinegar. How did this change your experiment?
  • Instead of using paper towel, make your “time release packet” using a different kind of paper, like toilet paper, tissue paper or notebook paper. What happened?

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

Any baked goods that rise rely on carbon dioxide bubbles to get the job done. You can make these bubbles either by using yeast or by using the acid-base reaction like you did in the experiment.

Yeast is a one-celled fungus which converts sugar to carbon dioxide gas. Because this process takes a while, bakers use yeast in doughs that they leave alone for several hours.

Another method that cooks use to make something rise is a combination of baking soda and an acidic ingredient, like orange juice or buttermilk. This is the same kind of chemical reaction that took place in your bubble bomb.

Next time someone you know is baking, check the recipe to see if you can figure out what ingredients make the bubbles that make the cake or bread or cookies rise.

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

This and dozens of other cool activities are included in the Exploratorium’s Science Explorer books, available for purchase from our online store.

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

Published by Owl Books,
Henry Holt & Company, New York,
1996 & 1997

ISBN 0-B050-4536 & ISBN 0-8050-4537-6 ,
$12.95 each

Here’s a super cool science experiment for kids that requires only a few common materials. In this experiment you’ll create a chemical reaction using baking soda and vinegar that will make a baggie explode!

Follow our Science for Kids Pinterest board!

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

With school out for summer we’ve been busy doing all kinds of outdoor learning activities! One of our favorites is this baking soda and vinegar experiment

Exploding Baggies! Not only is it the experiment itself really exciting, but the process is perfect for encouraging all kinds of predictions and theories. (This post contains affiliate links.)

Check out even more science activities in the video below!

Materials for Exploding Baggies

  • Ziploc plastic sandwich baggie
  • Water
  • Vinegar
  • Baking soda
  • Paper towel
  • Food coloring (optional)

Directions for Exploding Baggies

1. Tear a paper towel into a square shape. (We ripped off one piece of a select-a-size roll and then tore that piece in half to make a square. It doesn’t have to be perfect!)

2. Place 1 1/2 tablespoons of baking soda onto the center of your paper towel square.

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

3. Fold your paper towel up so you’ve created a little packet of baking soda and set it aside.

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

4. Place 1/2 cup of water and 1/4 cup of vinegar into your baggie. (Add some food coloring if you’d like!)

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

5. Head outside and find a spot to explode your baggie. Carefully and quickly drop the packet of baking soda into the baggie and seal it shut completely. Give it a little shake, set it down, move away, and watch what happens!

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

The baggie begins to fill up…

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

…. and fills up with even more carbon dioxide.

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

After a few seconds your baggie should explode with a loud “POP”!

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

Our first baggie didn’t explode so we had to hypothesize as to why it didn’t work. We think we let too much of the carbon dioxide out before we go the bag sealed.

After quite a few successful explosions, Lucy used our extra materials to try out other ideas. She wondered what would happen in you didn’t use a paper towel or if you changed the amounts of the different ingredients. She was busy for quite a while testing out all her ideas!

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

What’s Going On?

The mixing of the baking soda and vinegar are creating a chemical reaction! The two ingredients are creating carbon dioxide gas. The gas fills the baggie and then runs out of room causing the explosion- POP!

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

Want to Go Even Further?

Even more activities to inspire creativity and critical thinking for various ages.

1. Let your child experiment with baking soda and vinegar on his or her own (with supervision of course).

2. Try out another experiment that creates a chemical reaction with pennies.

This baking soda and vinegar powered boat was such a fun way to build and explore movement powered by science. My kiddos and a nephew built this boat using recycled materials, (a lot like we did last week with our evaporation experiment). This boat required a baking soda and vinegar reaction to power movement across water. It’s the perfect outdoor STEM activity!

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

Baking Soda and Vinegar Powered Boat

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My kids LOVE baking soda and vinegar reaction STEM activities. They’ve tried a rocket and volcano so I knew they would love this boat activity.

This recycled boat was pretty easy to put together. We a recycled used Styrofoam egg carton to cut a triangular shape. To that, we taped a plastic lid. We used two small pieces of straws and taped them to the back of the boat and coming from the lid. With that, our boat was ready for power.

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

A tip for the boat construction: Be sure the straws are taped securely in the lid and parallel to the water surface. We used electrical tape for this job.

Next, fill the lid with baking soda. We have this HUGE bag of baking soda and love it. The quantity is perfect for experiments that kids want to do over and over again.

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

Carefully pour in vinegar and watch the boat sail across the water. We noticed that our first run was the best and we think it was because the straws were better positioned at the start of our STEM activity. We also tried aiming the straws down into the water and that seemed to help with powering movement, better too.

We did this boat activity in a tub outside, but want to try it in a larger area like a baby pool very soon. One of the kids said we should build a cruise ship and make it go with baking soda and vinegar. I’ll be sure to share how that project pans out 😉

This post is part of the 31 Days of Outdoor STEM series. Stop by and see all of the STEM fun!

Presented by Danielle and Michael, this fizzy bottle rocket experiment is a fantastic outdoor science activity. It is all about how chemical reaction creates high pressure, which is sufficient enough to push an object.

Do you know how rockets fly? Are you aware that they can not escape the gravity of Earth unless they are covering at least 7 miles per second? Kids often think about launching a rocket, or fly high in the sky like a bird! Although it is not possible to fly in the sky, unless you are in a hot air balloon or in an aircraft. You can launch your rocket and that too without any powerful jet engine! Does this sound unbelievable? Let’s learn about the fizzy bottle rocket experiment to launch your bottle rocket.

Steps to Make Fizzy Bottle Rocket

Raw materials

  • One fruit shoot bottle (500 ml)
  • Few fizzy tablets (Alka Seltzer/Berocca tablets)
  • 1 Mug or jar large enough to fit the bottle in an upside-down position
  • Some warm water

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Steps to follow

  • Take the fruit shoot bottle and unscrew its lid
  • Fill half of the fruit shoot bottle with warm water
  • Take two fizzy tablets and break them in half
  • Now drop the broken pieces of fizzy tablets into the bottle
  • Quickly put the lid firmly on the bottle and shake it
  • Put the fruit shoot bottle inside the mug or jar in an upside-down position
  • Make sure the bottle lid touches the bottom of the jar
  • Stand back and wait for at least three minutes
  • Your fizzy bottle rocket will get launched!

Observation

You will observe that when you put the half-filled fruit shoot bottle upside down inside the jar after shaking it hard, the lid opens within no time, and the bottle shoots up like a rocket high up in the sky. Now, you must be curious to understand how small pieces of fizzy tablets can push your bottle enough to launch it like a rocket. To understand the science behind this, you need to know how do the fizzy tablets work and act as fuel for your bottle rocket.

What makes the bottle rocket fly?

You all may have noticed that fizzy tablets or vitamin tablets get dissolved in water, but do you know while getting dissolved, they release bubbles of colorless carbon-dioxide gas. The phenomenon occurs because fizzy tablets contain agents that are capable of releasing CO2 when they react with water.

So, when you shake the bottle and turned it upside down inside the jug, the gas builds up rapidly and expands. This chemical reaction of the agents of a fizzy tablet with water exerts a pressure on the lid of the bottle and eventually pushes it to let the CO2 gas escape from the bottle.

When this pressure becomes enough, it pushes the lid. As every action has an equal and opposite reaction as per Newton’s third law of motion, the liquid and gas coming out of the bottle in a downward direction push the bottle in the opposite direction like the gases emitting out of a real rocket push it high in the sky. Now, did you ever wondered, if the bottle can fly high as a rocket, what is the need to half-fill the bottle with warm water? Isn’t a little amount of water enough to dissolve the fizzy tablet pieces? Let’s discover the answer.

Why does a bottle rocket need water?

Well, water is heavier than air. So, although air will produce enough pressure to push the bottle in an upward direction, adding water means more pressure to produces more thrust. Thrust is the force that is generated by the rocket propulsion system to move the rocket through space. It has an impact on all things that fly in the air, including birds and aircraft!

Remember, if you do not have access to fizzy tablets, you can also conduct the bottle rocket experiment with baking soda and vinegar. You have to replace warm water with vinegar and fizzy tablets with one tablespoon of baking soda. You can also use lemon juice if vinegar is not available.

Here are the steps to follow.

Raw materials

  • An empty 500ml plastic bottle
  • A cork that fits firmly on the bottleneck
  • A small piece of kitchen roll
  • One tablespoon baking soda
  • One small cup of vinegar
  • Three straws
  • 1 Tape

Instructions

  1. Take the empty plastic bottle and attach three straws to its side with the help of a tape in such a way that it can stand upside down
  2. Choose an outdoor open space to conduct your experiment
  3. Now pour approximately 2 cm of vinegar into the bottle.
  4. Wrap the baking soda in the piece of kitchen roll and drop it inside the bottle.
  5. Now, quickly add the cork and place the bottle on the ground or any hard surface in an upside-down position.
  6. Your rocket will shoot up high in the sky.

This fantastic video of the fizzy bottle rocket experiment gives a deep insight into how a chemical reaction triggers enough pressure to push an object. So, the next time when you hear a hissing sound while opening a can of soda, know that it is because of the escape of millions of CO2 molecules. Kids can also try to conduct with more warm water and different sizes of bottles to know whether the temperature of the water or the size of the bottle affects the chemical reaction in any way or not.

Baking soda and vinegar science experiments are some of the best simple science activities for children! Pull out the kitchen ingredients for these simple yet magical activities for kids!

Another name for baking soda is sodium bicarbonate if you are not familiar with the term baking soda.

I save these for the times that I want to wow the kids. It’s honestly so simple to do, but they ask for them over and over again. Plus, they are super affordable to make too!

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

Vinegar and Baking Soda Science Experiments

These vinegar and baking soda science videos are some of our favorite science activities for kids!

Baking Soda and Vinegar Volcano

The key to my bright colors is using tempera paint instead of food coloring or liquid watercolor. We just use baking soda, vinegar, water, dish soap, and paint! Get all of the directions to my baking soda and vinegar volcano!

Baking Soda and Vinegar Fine Motor Activity

This bottle cap fine motor play is sure to be a winner! I highly recommend using some pipettes or medicine droppers for this activity to start the fun!

Baking Soda and Vinegar play recipe

This Magic Puffing snow play recipe uses baking soda and turns it into “snow.” Add some vinegar when you’re done, and watch the reaction!

Colorful Vinegar and Baking Soda Science Reactions

This mom is also a science teacher, so she gives a great baking soda and vinegar experiment explanation. She makes it super for us to understand so now you can tell kids all about the chemical reaction taking place.

Baking Soda and Vinegar Balloon Experiment

Watch a balloon inflate with the magic of baking soda and vinegar! This is sure to amaze the kids!

Exploding Bag Experiment

This science experiment is too fun for trying outside because an exploding Ziploc bag is incredible! Read all of the instructions to make your own exploding bag experiment.

Baking Soda and Vinegar Color Experiment

This vinegar and baking soda color science experiment from Busy Toddler is so fun and irresistible. We love to do it over and over again!

Baking Soda and Vinegar Rocket

Make a baking soda and vinegar rocket! I would say adult supervision is a must on this one, but it is so cool and well worth it!

Baking soda and vinegar science experiments for kids are hands-down awesome and so fun to watch! If you’ve not tried them yet, give it a shot!

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

This classic science experiment is always a favorite activity for kids. And it’s easy to put together too! You only need baking soda, food coloring, water and vinegar. Kids will loving making this fizzy rainbow.

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

Table of Contents

Rainbow Baking Soda and Vinegar Experiment

Kids love doing this easy science experiment. Not only is it a fun activity but it’s a great learning exercise too. They also get to practice fine motor work by using a pipette or dropper.

To save steps, you can also do this experiment by using regular baking soda shaped into a rainbow. Then just add a few drops along the arches of the food coloring.

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

The Science

What happens when you mix vinegar and baking soda?

You see the bubbling and foaming but what is causing this reaction? The baking soda (sodium bicarbonate) is a base while the vinegar (acetic acid) is an acid and what you are seeing is an acid/base reaction. Initially, the reaction makes carbonic acid which is unstable and breaks down into carbon dioxide (CO2) and water which is what creates all of the fizzing and bubbles as the gas leaves the water.

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

Supplies Needed to do a Baking Soda and Vinegar Experiment

– Baking Soda – we like this large 5 lb bag for activities

– Food Coloring Gel (one in each color of the rainbow) – we like to use this liquid food coloring gel since it’s concentrated and makes the colors really vibrant

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

Watch the Video Tutorial Here!

How to Do a Fizzy Baking Soda and Vinegar Experiment

1. Start by placing 1 cup of baking soda into a bowl.

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

2. In a pouring cup, add 3 tablespoons of water. Mix in 1-2 drops of red food coloring into the water. If using regular food coloring, you may need to add more drops to make it more vibrant.

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

3. Pour the food colored water into the bowl with baking soda and mix until the baking soda is dyed.

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

It should still be a powdery-like texture and look like the following:

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

Repeat the above steps for Yellow and Orange.

For Green, Blue and Purple, mix only 1/2 cup of baking soda to 1.5 tablespoons of water (you don’t need as much of these colors to make the rainbow so you can halve the recipe above.

4. Lay out the colors onto a white tray or baking sheet. Protect your table if needed so the food coloring does not go onto your table.

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

5. Put vinegar in a bowl and then let kids use a dropper to drop the vinegar onto the rainbow.

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

Kids love seeing the reaction the baking soda and vinegar makes together!

How to make a baking soda and vinegar rocket

We love how easy this science experiment is to set up. And kids love to use the droppers to make the vinegar/baking soda reaction.

The rainbow version is a lot of fun to try! We hope you enjoy this easy science experiment!

More Science Experiments

Try this fun and easy Grow a Rainbow Experiment. You only need washable markers and paper towel!