How to make a kitten like water

How to make a kitten like water

by Deborah E. Linder, DVM, MS, DACVIM (Nutrition)
December 08, 2020
in Petfoodology Blog

Cats are historically desert animals and got most of their moisture they needed from their prey, which means they didn’t need to drink water as often as dogs. However, there are a variety of medical conditions that benefit from a cat increasing their water intake. Some common examples are kidney disease and bladder stones or crystals. Cats with kidney disease lose the ability to concentrate their urine and therefore urinate more than they would normally, which can lead to dehydration if they do not drink enough to compensate. In diseases that affect their bladders and urinary tract, cats can have inflammation and irritation and sometimes even develop bladder stones. Increasing water intake can sometimes help with many urinary conditions by flushing out the kidneys, the bladder, and the rest of the urinary tract. Unfortunately, this can be difficult and getting cats to drink more water can seem like an impossible task. That is why we have included some of the tips and tricks we have used to increase water intake in cats who need it.

Wet Food

If your cat already likes and is eating wet food, you are in luck! Wet food is a great source of water for cats. If your cat is already on wet food, but still needs to increase their water intake, you can try adding a small amount of extra water to the food. If your cat refuses to eat the food with water added, do not try to force it as the cat could develop an aversion to that food or worse – go on a hunger strike! If your cat currently only eats dry food, talk to your veterinarian about which wet food meets your cat’s nutritional needs. You can try to slowly introduce wet food to their diet. It is important to try different flavors and textures of wet food as cats can be very picky about what they will eat. Some cats will only eat paté while others will only eat chunks in gravy or loaf-style textures. The most important rule to follow is that if your cat does not like wet food, do not try to force them to eat it, but consider additional strategies like those listed below.

Dry Food

If your cat eats dry food and is not willing to switch to wet, you can try adding water to the kibble. The kibble will absorb the water and become softer. If you add the water very gradually, your cat may learn to eat the moistened kibble. But, if your cat refuses to eat the altered food, be sure to provide them with their dry food rather than letting them go without food.

Keep the Water Bowl Next to the Food

When water is placed next to their food, cats may be more likely to drink the water while eating. Many cats will switch back and forth between eating and drinking, especially if they only eat dry food. Another successful technique for some cats is to place the kibble in a timed feeder and have a bowl of water next to the feeder. As the cat waits for food, they may be more likely to drink the water since it is there.

Water Fountains

Filtered water fountains are a good way to get some cats interested in water. Some cats like flowing water and the filter helps keep the water fresh. Be careful to clean out the filter regularly (at least weekly or as directed by the product instructions) as bacteria can otherwise build up and discourage your cat from drinking as well as be harmful to them. Additionally, though unfortunately not environmentally friendly, some cats enjoy running water even more than fountains so leaving a faucet on at a light drip (if there is no water shortage) for periods of time when your cat is active can be another strategy to try if water fountains don’t do the trick.

Try Different Dishes

You can try using bowls that contain different materials and see which one your cat likes best. Options include glass, stainless steel, ceramic, etc. You can also experiment with the size and shape of bowls.

Increase Water Access

Place multiple water bowls in a variety of locations throughout your house. This way your cat has constant and convenient access to water.

Wash Water Dishes Frequently

Cats can be very sensitive to the smell and taste of water. Also, they can be very picky about water temperature. Changing the water often helps keep it fresh and at a temperature that they prefer. Wash all bowls daily to avoid bacterial build up.

Fill the Bowl Completely

When filling the water bowl, filling it to the top may make some cats more likely to drink it. Cat’s whiskers are very sensitive to touch and some cats do not like when their whiskers touch the edge of the bowl.

Adding Broth or Other Water

Adding broth to a diet can be a good way to add moisture for cats that need it, but check with your veterinarian before starting as some broths may have added nutrients like salt that your cat can’t tolerate (or have added garlic or onion that can be toxic to pets). Other options for adding moisture are using flavored water or bottled water. There are also products that can be given to cats to provide hydration but be sure to talk to your veterinarian about whether these products are appropriate for your cat.

Written in conjunction with veterinary student, Sasha Santiago.

Deborah E. Linder, DVM, MS, DACVIM (Nutrition)

Dr. Deborah Linder, a board-certified veterinary nutritionist, is the head of the Tufts Obesity Clinic for Animals and has had articles appear in Eating Well, the Boston Globe, AARP, SHAPE, and XM Sirius Radio Doctor Channel. She has spoken at national and international conferences and a Capitol Hill briefing, and is an expert in pet obesity, nutrition communication, and in the human-animal bond.

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The aversion cats have to water has been accepted as fact in the media and popular culture. However, you may be surprised to learn that just as the commonly accepted idea that all dogs love water isn’t necessarily true, all cats hate water has its exceptions as well.

Why cats (generally) don’t like water

One of the main reasons a cat may not like water is they aren’t usually exposed to it. Unless your cat is an outdoor cat, he or she won’t likely ever have been caught in a rainstorm and dealt with a sopping coat and wet skin. Some researchers believe cats have developed a distaste for water because house cat owners shield their beloved felines from the elements. If a cat has limited exposure to rain or water, it evolves to a point where it has no need to dip his or her feet into a tub, lake, or swimming pool.

Another reason a cat may hate water is there are some cat owners who use a spray bottle to discipline their cat. Imagine if you’re sprayed in the face with water for simply being a cat. Of course, you’d grow an eversion to it.

Cats are fastidious. If you live with a cat you’ve noticed they spend hours at a time grooming themselves. If you try to bathe them you’re taking away their natural scent. A cat may also think you’re making more work for them if you bathe them because then they will need to re-groom themselves.

Finally, cats don’t generally adapt well to change. If they are introduced to a new experience, they may not take to it as well as a dog would. If bathing isn’t part of their typical routine, they will avoid it. So, if you are able to get them accustomed to water when they’re young, it may not be as bad an experience for them—or for you!

Cat breeds and water

One specific breed of domestic cat that doesn’t mind the water is the Turkish Van. This breed originated in the Lake Van region of Turkey and enjoys the water just as their ancestors did. It’s believed these cats would jump into lake waters to cool off during the excessive summer heat.

While other cat breeds may look at swimming or bathing as more of a spectator sport, there are some breeds that require bathing. The hairless Sphynx, for example, is a breed that requires baths every few weeks because their body oils collect on the skin and attract dirt. The Sphynx tends to enjoy water, making regular bath time a more enjoyable experience for the pet parent and cat alike.

Cats like some water

I have two Devon Rex who are mesmerized by dripping water. They will jump up into the bathroom sink when the faucet is left dripping for them. They bat at the stream with their paws and seem to love drinking from running water more than they do from a bowl. Cats who love water from a faucet may do so because they look at it as a toy and the sparkling droplets fascinate them.

Here are tips for teaching your cat to love (or at least tolerate) water:

1. Put your kitty in an empty bathtub or sink and play with their favorite toy there. Talk softly to them and make the time in the tub or sink fun. Do this for several days. Use positive reinforcement and offer treats during the entire process.

2. After they’re comfortable in a dry sink or tub, you can start rubbing them with a wet washcloth. Not enough to soak them through, but to make them a bit damp.

3. Next, add a bit of room temperature water to the bottom of the sink and put them in, letting them feel it on their feet. You may want to put their favorite toy in with them.

4. Once they’re all right with the washcloth and water in the sink, you can use a cup, or your hand or the sink hose to gently wet them. Shampoo them with cat-safe products then rinse them thoroughly.

5. Take your time and talk calmly to them throughout. Once the bath is done, wrap them in a fluffy towel and dry them off as much as possible.

If you love the outdoors and want to take your cat on adventures that may involve getting wet or being exposed to lakes or streams, you will want to expose them to it as early as possible. Use positive reinforcement and don’t force your cat into water or you will pretty much guarantee them a lifetime of aversion.

Most cat parents are happy to simply let their cats sit on the side of the bathtub and play in the soap bubbles. Know your cat and their personality and approach water and bathing in a way that is enjoyable for both of you!

Robbi Hess, award-winning author, is multi-petual: She shares her home with two Devon Rex kittens, three adult rescue cats, a mini poodle, a Goldendoodle, three lizards and two ferrets. When not caring for her pets, she is an editor, speaker, time management and productivity guru, content creator, social media manager and blogger. She writes at All Words Matter, My Divas Dish, and is the story editor and chief cat herder at Positively Woof.

This article was co-authored by Natalie Punt, DVM. Dr. Natalie Punt is a Veterinarian and the Founder and CEO of mPet. She specializes in small animal emergency and general medicine and veterinary practice economics. Dr. Punt holds a BS in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology from The University of California, Davis, an MS in Biochemistry from The University at Buffalo, and a DVM from Western University of Health Sciences.

There are 8 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page.

This article has been viewed 93,911 times.

Cats and water. Not the best of friends. But, like any animal, cats need water to survive. If you want to make sure your new kitten is getting enough drinking water, you can learn to monitor your cat’s hydration habits and ensure that she’s getting enough. You can also learn some basic tips on introducing you cat to water, if there’s ever a need for a bath.

How to make a kitten like water

How to make a kitten like water

Natalie Punt, DVM
Veterinarian Expert Interview. 14 September 2021.
You can also offer your cat a saucer of bone broth, which may entice him to drink. [3] X Expert Source

How to make a kitten like water

How to make a kitten like water

How to make a kitten like water

Rita Reimers
Cat Behaviorist Expert Interview. 22 June 2021. They work like regular water fountains, which cycle water continuously in a little pond that burbles up for the cat to drink. Some cats go crazy for these products.

  • Typically, these range anywhere from $20-30 and are usually operated by plugging into an outlet. Most cats shouldn’t need these, but it’s a good way to pamper, if you want to give your cat a little extra.

How to make a kitten like water

Rita Reimers
Cat Behaviorist Expert Interview. 22 June 2021.

  • Wet cans of food are typically more expensive, making it difficult to feed a cat exclusively cans of Fancy Feast. Instead, try buying a few big cans and mixing a few spoonfuls into the cat’s dry food every day, to make sure your pet’s getting the water content it needs.
  • You can also add some water to the cat’s dry food. When you add some dry food to the cat’s bowl, add some water to the dish, mixing it in to make sure the cat gets the water it needs. Giving them about two tablespoons of water should be enough.
  • You can also mix some bone broth into your cat’s dry food. [8] X Expert Source

    Last updated: Jan 13 2022

    How to make a kitten like water

    It’s widely known that the majority of cats don’t like water. Their dislike for water is likely linked to their history. Cats were domesticated thousands of years ago in the arid climate of the Middle East.

    In a nutshell, cats don’t generally like water because they’re usually not exposed to it. If you have an indoor cat as many people do, he’s probably never been caught in a rainstorm and had to deal with sopping wet skin and fur. Some experts believe that cats have developed an aversion to water simply because their owners have shielded them from the elements.

    Cats can be acclimated to water but you have to start getting them used to it when they’re kittens. Here are four proven methods to get your kitten to like water. We’ve numbered the methods because it’s important to introduce your kitten to water gradually, one step at a time, so you don’t scare him.

    1. Play with Your Kitten in the Empty Bathtub

    How to make a kitten like water

    Image Credit: Irina Borodovskaya, Shutterstock

    A good way to get your kitten to like water or at least tolerate it is to put him in an empty bathtub and play with him. Play using his favorite toy and talk using a low voice. Make this tub time fun for your kitten and do this for a few days. You can reward your kitten after each play session with praise and a tasty treat.

    2. Expose Your Kitten to a Damp Washcloth

    How to make a kitten like water

    Image Credit: KDdesignphoto, Shutterstock

    After your kitten is comfortable being in the empty bathtub, start introducing him to water by rubbing his body with a damp washcloth. Take it slowly and don’t over-wet the cloth. Be sure the washcloth is dampened with warm water so your kitten is not shocked by cold water. Speak calmly using a reassuring tone when rubbing your kitten with the warm damp washcloth. Again, you can reward your kitty with a treat once you’re done with the process.

    3. Add Warm Water to the Bathtub

    How to make a kitten like water

    Image Credit: sophiecat, Shutterstock

    Once your kitten has played in the dry empty tub and has experienced having damp water rubbed on his body, it’s time to place your kitty in some water. Add about an inch of lukewarm water to the bottom of the bathtub and put your kitten in. Do this slowly using a reassuring tone so your kitten is OK with feeling the water on his little feet.

    Keep your kitten standing in the shallow warm water for a few minutes so he has time to get used to it. Do not leave your kitten alone in the water or he may panic and try to get out of the tub. Pet your kitty while telling him what a good kitten he is for being in the water.

    4. Bathe Your Kitten

    How to make a kitten like water

    Image Credit: 135pixels, Shutterstock

    Once your kitty is used to standing in the water, scoop some water from the tub with your hand or a cup and slowly wet your kitten’s body. Proceed slowly while speaking quietly and calmly to your kitten. You can shampoo him using a mild pet shampoo and rinse him off thoroughly.

    When shampooing your kitten, be gentle and quiet. Take things slowly and be careful not to make any sudden movements or loud noises that could frighten your kitty. Be sure you don’t pour water directly on the kitten’s head and avoid getting water in his ears. Once you’re done with the shampooing and rinsing, remove your kitten from the tub and wrap him up in a warm towel.

    Final Thoughts

    Once your kitten learns to like water or at least tolerate it, you may wonder how often you should bathe your kitten. Cats are very good self-groomers that use their rough tongues to clean themselves. However, if your kitten gets himself into a mess, you may need to help him out and bathe him.

    If you don’t feel comfortable giving your kitten a bath when he needs it, you can take him to a groomer. While this type of professional service will cost you anywhere from $20 to $50 for a shampoo, rinse, and blow-out, it will be money well-spent. Many groomers will even include ear cleaning and nail clipping in the cat shampoo service.

    Don’t expect your kitten to learn to love water because the odds are against that happening. If you follow the methods above, you should be able to get your kitten acclimated to water so he doesn’t learn to fear it. Just take your time, be kind, and don’t do anything that shocks or scares your sweet little kitty cat!

    Featured Image Credit: Dmitriy Burmatov, Shutterstock

    8 tips to encourage your cat to drink more water

    As with humans, water is a crucial part of a cat’s diet so it’s important that they have access to a fresh, clean supply at all times.

    Although cats are able to survive on less water than dogs – their desert-dwelling ancestry means they can adapt well to dry conditions – they are still prone to dehydration and this can lead to common health issues such as constipation, lower urinary tract disease and urinary blockages.

    Mature moggies (aged 11 or older) in particular will need to drink plenty of water each day as their kidneys will need a bit of extra help to function properly.

    It’s important to remember that milk, cream or any other liquid is no substitute for water in a cat’s diet. In fact, cats are lactose intolerant and have difficulty digesting dairy products, so drinking milk could make them unwell.

    If you’re worried that your cat is not drinking enough water, here are a few tips and tricks you can try.

    1. Refill their water bowl daily

    The thought of drinking from a glass of water that’s been sitting around on the floor for a few days probably doesn’t sound very appetising. Your cat is likely to feel the same, so they will appreciate a fresh, clean bowl each day.

    2. Place bowls throughout the house

    Cats prefer drinking in different locations. Give them plenty of options to choose from so that a bowl of water is never too far away.

    3. Try a different water bowl

    Cats may also have a preference for a certain type of bowl. Plastic and metal bowls can taint the water, so try using a ceramic or glass bowl instead. Cats usually prefer wide, shallow bowls as it allows them to keep an eye on their surroundings while they’re drinking and keeps their whiskers from touching the sides of the bowl. Allow the cat to be able to sit behind the bowl of water so they can see all around them.

    4. Try a water fountain

    Many cats are attracted by the movement and freshness of flowing water, which is why you may have witnessed them try to drink directly from the tap! There are many pet water fountains you can buy online or from your nearest pet store.

    How to make a kitten like water

    5. Keep water and litter trays separate

    Just as you would not want to drink right next to your toilet, cats aren’t keen on drinking near their litter tray. This is carried over from their African wildcat ancestors, who would toilet away from their water source to avoid contamination. Keep the two in separate rooms if possible.

    6. Separate the food bowl too

    Cats also don’t like to drink near to where they eat. This is also carried over from their African wildcat ancestors, as the gut contents of their prey could contaminate the water source. Place their food and water bowls in separate locations.

    7. Switch to canned food

    Canned food contains about 70-80% water so will help your cat get a good proportion of their daily water requirement just from eating. If they’re eating mainly dry cat biscuits, they will need to drink a lot more water. If you do switch your cat’s food, make sure you do it gradually as this will reduce the chance of loose stools.

    8. Add some flavour

    Adding a few drops of tuna juice (from tuna packed in water, not oil) or chicken broth will make the water more enticing for your feline friend. Just make sure the flavouring doesn’t include too much salt, as this is unhealthy for your cat.

    Why do cats stop drinking water?

    Many people put their cat’s water bowl next to their food bowl, but cats like to eat, drink and toilet in different places. It links back to domestic cats’ evolution (they are closely related to African wildcats) as they don’t want to contaminate their water with waste from their prey.

    Cats also like wide, ceramic or plastic bowls (although plastic bowls can taint the taste of water in the heat) – and often prefer running water.

    If you are concerned about any change to your cat’s behaviour, including changes to their normal eating and drinking habits, it can be a sign of a medical problem so please consult your vet.

    How to monitor how much your cat drinks

    How to make a kitten like water

    Sure Petcare’s Felaqua® Connect is a water bowl that monitors your cat’s water intake, giving you peace of mind. The bowl also refills with clean, fresh water automatically as your cat drinks.

    Thanks to our friends at Sure Petcare, you can receive a discount on their products, including the Felaqua Connect, and support Cats Protection at the same time.

    Learn more about Sure Petcare’s product range and how to receive your discount.

    For more guidance on cat drinking habits, visit our help and advice on cats and drinking.

    The idea of bringing your pet into any body of water may seem suspect.

    After all, cats loathe water, right?

    It may come as a shock to you, but cats can be taught to appreciate water if they get the right introduction. Several cat owners have pondered why cats can’t swim, but the truth is they can!

    If you are one of the brave cat owners out there who would like to teach your cat to swim, you are in luck! The team at Highway Veterinary Hospital is here to explain the basics of cat swimming, and how to slowly introduce your feline friend to being in the water.

    Can Cats Swim?

    It’s a long-held myth that cats hate water and can’t swim. The same myths abound around cats being too aloof or can’t be trained. These are not true, just as well as the myth of all cats hating water. If you have ever watched an episode of Animal Planet, you have probably seen lions or tigers traversing rivers and other bodies of water.

    Domestic cats, like their wild cousins, are born with the wisdom of swimming. If your cat seems afraid of water it is simply because they haven’t been introduced to it. Cats are creatures of habit and anything outside of the norm can seem scary to them. However, some cats, like the Maine Coon and American Bobtail, are well adapted to swimming. Some of these swimming breeds have specialized webbing between their toes to help in the water.

    Yet, not all cats are expert swimmers or can swim safely without having potential problems, such as fear or health issues that prohibit this form of exercise. It’s best to check with your veterinarian before taking the plunge with your purr face.

    Teach Your Cat to Swim: The Fundamentals

    Before dunking your cat in the water, remember that just when you learned to swim, it was a gradual process. If your cat hasn’t been in the water, they will need time to adjust to the feeling and form a sense of security and confidence. Follow these steps when training your kitty.

    1. Introduce your cat to water. If you have a pool or kiddie pool, bring them outside with you and allow them to hang out while you are in the water. Bring some treats to entice them to walk over to you and stand by the pool. If you don’t, allow your cat to come into the bathroom when you are bathing, so they can investigate the bath.
    2. If they are okay around water, carry them while you are in it. Walk your cat around with you while holding them in the pool. Slowly let their tail or belly dip down into the water. How are they doing?
    3. Once you can safely walk around with them, sit them down in the water while you are still holding them. They will probably start to paddle even before they hit the water.
    4. Let your cat go by gently hoisting them down into the water and observing them. Make sure you do this near an exit and in the shallow end.

    When you are training your cat to swim, make sure to supervise them around water. They may instinctively know the ropes, but they are not experienced enough not to have an accident. If your cat is behaving aggressively, don’t chance it with a bite or scratch. Simply put them back on solid ground and wait until they are more comfortable being held in the water.

    There are several useful ramps and steps that can be attached to the side of the pool that provide a quick escape if your pet or any other animal falls in.

    Lakes and Rivers

    Taking your cat to natural areas to swim may sound like a great choice since most cats want to be outdoors. Unfortunately, unless they are leashed and with you, they can make a run for it and become missing or prey for wild animals. Swimming with your cat in a moving body of water is also highly dangerous since they can be swept away.

    If you want to take them outdoors, choose a shallow body of water, like a still beach on a lake or pond. Keep them next to you and supervise them as they swim and roam around. A halter with a leash is a perfect choice, as well as a fitted cat life preserver, for exploring the great outdoors with a kitty.

    If you would like additional information on swimming with your feline friend, please do not hesitate to call us at (301) 249-2005.

    Published: August 13, 2020 / Author: Highway Veterinary Hospital Staff
    Filed In: Pet Health Tips

    It’s Worth the Effort to Keep Your Cat Healthy

    How to make a kitten like water

    How to make a kitten like water

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    Kittens learn to lick themselves when they are two to four weeks old and adult cats spend up to 50 percent of their awake time grooming themselves. So why should you still give your cat a bath? A bath stimulates the skin and removes excess oil, dander, and shed hair. It also offers an opportunity to teach your cat that being handled even in unexpected ways won’t hurt them. Cats will need to be touched by the vet, handled by vet techs, or cared for by house sitters and guests. Making the bath a pleasant experience helps cats “generalize” the event to future similar situations.

    Positive experiences with prior baths are especially beneficial if you ever find yourself having to give your cat medicated baths as part of a treatment plan for skin diseases like ringworm or if your cat gets into something particularly nasty.

    Before You Begin

    Some fastidious shorthaired cats may rarely if ever need a bath, while cats with longer hair often need a little more help with hygiene. Bathing too often can dry the skin, so try to avoid anything more frequent than every 4-6 weeks or so. Kittens accept baths most readily so start as soon as you adopt one, as long as it’s at least 4 weeks old. Elderly cats or extremely ill cats are not as adaptable to environmental changes even when temporary. They may be stressed by bathing so follow your veterinarian’s recommendation in these instances.

    What You Need

    For routine cleaning, you only need a few supplies, including:

    • A simple grooming shampoo labeled specifically for cats
    • Several towels
    • A rubber mat
    • A washcloth
    • Ping pong ball or other floating distraction

    Human shampoo (including those designed for babies) or dog products can be too harsh and dry the cat’s skin, and in some case may be toxic.

    Prepare to Bathe Your Cat

    Before getting your cat wet, brush its fur thoroughly. As for you, wear old clothes and expect to get wet.

    The bath area should be warm and draft-free. The bathtub will do, but you may be more comfortable if you can bathe your cat in a waist-high sink. Move all breakables out of reach and push drapes or shower curtains out of the way. Avoid anything (strong scents, scary objects, mirrors) that potentially frighten cats, so the bath is as pleasant as possible.

    Assemble your shampoo, several towels, and a washcloth near the sink or tub, and run warm water before you bring in the cat. The cat bath temperature should be around body temperature, in other words pretty warm but not so hot that it’s uncomfortable.

    Place a towel or rubber mat in the bottom of the tub or sink. Cats hate the insecure footing of slippery surfaces and this will make it less stressful. Or, try standing the cat on a plastic milk crate so your cat can grip it with its paws. This also allows you to more easily wash the cat from both above and below.

    Close the door to the bathing area, or you risk having a soapy cat escape.

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    The Spruce / Kyle Fewel

    Bathing Kittens

    For small cats or kittens, use the double sink in the kitchen, two or more large roasting pans, or a couple of buckets or wastebaskets set in the bathtub. Fill each with warm water, then gently lower your cat (one hand supporting its bottom, the other beneath the chest) into the first container to get it wet. Most cats accept this method more readily than being sprayed.

    Let your kitty stand on its hind legs and clutch the edge of the container as you thoroughly wet the fur. Then lift the cat out onto one of your towels, and apply the shampoo, using a damp but not soapy washcloth to clean its face.

    After lathering, dip the cat back into the first container to rinse. Get as much soap off as possible before removing and sluice off excess water before thoroughly rinsing in subsequent containers of clean water.

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    Waitforlight / Getty Images

    Choose Between the Adult Cat Dip or Spray Method

    Jumbo-size adult cats can be hard to dunk, and running water can be scary for them. Instead, you can use a ladle to dip water. If you have a spray nozzle on the sink, use a low force, with the nozzle close to the fur so the kitty doesn’t see the spray.

    Never spray in the face; use a damp wash rag to wipe down that area. Keep one hand on the cat at all times to prevent escapes. Rinse beginning at the neck and down the cat’s back; don’t neglect beneath the tail or on the tummy.

    Wrap the clean cat in a dry towel. Shorthaired cats dry quickly, but longhaired felines may need two or more towels to blot away most of the water. If your cat tolerates or enjoys the blow dryer, use only the lowest heat setting and keep the dryer moving to avoid burns.

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    Tatna Maramygina / EyeEm / Getty Images

    Preventing Problems With Your Cat During a Bath

    Some cats will truly enjoy the bath and others will not. Remain patient and don’t scold your cat during the bath. If your cat is really hating the bath, try plenty of praise, solicit some help, or rinse off the soap and try again next time. If bathing your cat at home seems too problematic, a professional groomer that is experienced with cats is your best bet for effective cleaning by a professional.

    Cats are known for their grooming habits. With their tongues, teeth, and paws, they’re usually able to keep themselves fresh and clean without any outside intervention. Sometimes, though, your cat might need help staying clean. If your feline friend is covered in something dangerous, smelly, or sticky, or if they have picked up some parasites, it might be a good idea to give them a bath. Here’s how to bathe a cat with a minimal amount of stress for both of you.В

    1. Trim the Toenails: Your cat’s claws are one of their main forms of defense. An upset cat may claw anyone nearby, including you, during the course of bath time. Cat scratches can easily become infected, so it’s in your own best interest to trim your cat’s nails before attempting a bath.В

    2. Brush Before: Cats shed frequently, all year long. That extra fur won’t be good for your plumbing, and it will make it more difficult to get your cat really clean. If you can, brush your cat thoroughly to remove any loose fur and mats before you begin the bathing process. You can also put cotton balls gently in their ears to keep water out.

    3. Time It Right: Cats generally don’t like to be in water. A cat that’s full of energy is going to object more strongly to a bath. Schedule the bath for a time when your cat is tired and mellow, such as after a long play session with a cat dancer or some catnip. If you can schedule your cat’s bath so someone else is around to help you out, even better.В

    4. Get Traction: Your cat appreciates traction just as much as you do in the shower. Give your cat a folded towel in the bottom of the tub or a rubber bath mat to stand on so they don’t panic when they can’t stand easily. Once the mat is in the tub, add three to four inches of comfortably warm water to the tub, then have your helper put the cat in the tub. You may need your helper to hold onto the cat for the whole bath to avoid scratches.

    Note: Cats don’t sweat like humans do. The steamy hot water you might prefer for a shower or bath can overheat your pet. Instead, aim for a few degrees above lukewarm.В

    5. Try a Pour-Over Method: Your cat probably won’t willingly go under water. Instead, use a handheld sprayer, a pitcher, or a plastic cup to gently pour water over their body until they’re thoroughly wet.В

    6. Use a Cat Shampoo: Don’t use human shampoo on your cat. They’re  not safe if your cat licks it, and they may hurt your cat’s delicate skin. Instead, use a shampoo that’s designed for cats. Start at your cat’s neck and gently massage the shampoo toward the tail. Avoid their face, eyes, and ears.

    7. Rinse Well: Once you’ve fully lathered up your cat, you can begin rinsing them off with clean, lukewarm water. Take the time to make sure all of the soap is gone; anything that’s left will be ingested by your cat when they clean themselves again later. It can also irritate their skin and attract dirt.

    8. Clean the Face: If your pet’s face also needs cleaning, don’t pour water over it or use shampoo. Instead, use a warm, damp washcloth to carefully wipe it off. Be extra cautious around your cat’s eyes and ears, which are sensitive and can be easily damaged. If you do need to use something more than plain water, you can use just a drop or two of cat shampoo on the washcloth to remove anything sticky or dangerous.В

    9. Dry Thoroughly:

    The most important part of bathing your cat is drying them off afterward. Dry them off as quickly as possibly with a large towel, and keep them in a warm room until they’ve completely dried. If your cat lets you, you can also use a hairdryer on its lowest warmth setting to speed up the process. If your cat has long fur, take the time to comb it out with a wide-toothed comb to avoid mats later.В

    10. Treat Time: Once bath time is over, make sure to reward your cat for behaving. Treats, praise, and playtime afterward may help your cat come around on the idea of bath time so it’s not as much of a struggle next time.

    Show Sources

    Central California SPCA: “Is Bathing a Cat Really Necessary (or Just a Myth in Caring for Pets)?”

    Danbury Animal Welfare Society: “Help Keep Kitty Clean.”

    Humane Society: “Declawing Cats: Far Worse than a Manicure.”

    Michelson Found Animals: “Cat Grooming 101,” “How to Give a Stress-Free Cat Bath.”

    Some cats are very finicky about their water. You leave fresh water out for them all day but the minute you turn on the tap they come rushing for a drink. So what is the attraction with cats and running water?

    Maybe your cat will drink from a bowl but insist on splashing the water with her paw. Maybe she keeps tipping her bowl on the ground so she can drink from the floor. Your cat may balance precariously on the toilet seat so she can drink from the bowl. And if you have an outdoor cat, she may even favor dirty rain water rather than the fresh supply you put out for it.

    Why the odd behavior?

    No-one is really sure exactly why cats can be so finicky about their water but there are a couple of theories. There may be an instinctual aversion to still water. In the wild, a cat will usually only drink moving water which helps to help prevent her from becoming sick. Alternatively, it could be that your cat has learned that water tends to be cooler when it’s from a tap or rain water.

    It’s also possible that the water is just a toy for your cat. To your cat, flipping over its water bowl or trying to catch the falling drips from a tap might make a great game, as well as having the added benefit of quenching its thirst.

    Cats don’t need much water to drink, especially if they eat canned food or food in pouches which contains a lot of water in it. However, it is still important to make sure your cat has fresh water at all times.

    Drinking from a bowl

    There are a few things you can do to encourage your cat to drink from her bowl.

    Try moving her water dish to somewhere that isn’t alongside her food. Your cat may be picky about having food and water right next to each other.

    If you think your cat doesn’t like the temperature of its water, try adding a few ice cubes to the bowl.

    You may want to try changing the bowl entirely. Different types of bowl will give different tastes to the water. If your cat has a plastic bowl, try a metal, ceramic, or even glass one. If your cat is a bowl tipper, try looking for a wider bowl with a rubber base. This will foil even the most dedicated of cats.

    There are also cat drinking fountains that either constantly run water in a loop, or are activated by your cat approaching. These require electricity to run so you’ll need to find a place for it close to a socket outlet.

    You can occasionally leave the tap dripping for your cat to have a drink. Your cat will drink from any source if she is thirsty enough but you may choose to occasionally offer her water from the tap as a treat.

    We’ve all grown up believing that cats hate water. It’s about time we debunked this myth! Cats love water, except when they have no control over it, such as when they’re being washed. Washing cats is not exactly “mission: impossible”, but you’ll definitely need to be patient and follow a few handy tips.

    Cats are very clean animals by nature, and they spend hours and hours licking and grooming their coat. Nevertheless, they do need to be washed every now and then, especially if they’re free to leave the house. Every cat owner has found himself with a dirty cat in his hands, and if you don’t want to take your cat to a pet shop for professional grooming, the only alternative is doing it yourself.

    Your cat may not be very happy about it, but you can help her get over her fear of water and get her used to being washed. This should be a gradual training process, and it’s easier if you start when she’s still a kitten. Here’s how:

    • start with a mini-bath. Fill a basin with a few centimetres of warm water and place your cat inside, watching her initial reaction. Caress and pamper your cat, then take her out and dry her well;
    • do this again for a couple of days in a row, to get your cat used to the sensation of being wet a little at a time. Gradually increase the amount of water in the basin;
    • once your cat has stopped panicking, you can think of adding an element of disturbance, such as a little toy that moves in the water, makes waves and perhaps a little noise;
    • if everything is going smoothly, you can start with the bath itself. Begin by wetting your cat, starting with the neck and then moving on to her body and paws, her belly and tail. Soap her up and then rinse the soap off, as gently as possible, avoiding jerky movements that may scare her;
    • a good piece of advice is to talk to your cat throughout the bath, to make her feel safer. Once the bath is over, dry her up with a warm towel, then gently brush her with a suitable brush. To pamper her even more, use a massaging glove, also great to make her coat look soft and glossy. These gloves are very easy to use: just slip your hand inside and caress your cat’s fur. With its soft rubber teeth, it helps get rid of dead fur and is very pleasant for your cat.

    Keep in mind that it may take weeks for the bath to be successful, but if you’re patient and calm enough you can make your cat’s baths fun even for the most fearful cat in the world!

    Have you noticed that cats like to drink from strange places? You might give them a bowl of fresh clean water every day, but they still like to drink from the shower or the base of a pot plant. Why is this? And how do you ensure that a cat drinks enough water?

    Cats don’t drink a lot of water by nature. They are descendants of desert-dwelling felines that would have been able to withstand drought quite well. As such, cats should be able to get their moisture from their food. It is vital for cats not to become dehydrated in order to prevent bladder and kidney problems. Bladder grit and urinary tract problems are painful and potentially fatal for a cat. Drinking water is therefore essential for your cat to remain happy and healthy.

    Note that if you are a cat sitter and suspect a cat might be having difficulty urinating during a cat sitting booking, always contact the vet.

    Water from cat food

    Just as wild cats get a lot of moisture from their prey, cats that eat wet food are less likely to run the risk of becoming dehydrated. You will also notice that cats that eat wet food might drink water less often. Cats that only get dried food have to drink a lot more to ingest a sufficient amount of fluid during the day. However, there may be a good reason to give your cat dried food (for example, for healthy teeth). Wet food is also of varying quality, so make sure to purchase wet food that contains high-quality ingredients.

    Another behavioural remnant of the domestic cat’s wild past is that they generally don’t like to drink water located near their food or toilet – their instinct says that this water is polluted. This is part of the reason why cats like to drink in strange places, such as outside from a puddle. Help your cat out by keeping their water bowl away from their food bowl or litter tray.

    How to make a kitten like water

    A cat that drinks enough is usually cheerful and active, has slightly moist gums and pees about three times a day. A healthy cat’s skin is also soft and clear and their coat is shiny.

    If you suspect your cat doesn’t drink enough, there are some tricks to get your cat to drink more water.

    Tips for getting your cat to drink more:

    • Gradually add wet food or fresh meat to your cat’s diet
    • Add a little water to your cat’s wet food
    • Keep their water bowl away from the litter box and food bowl
    • Keep several water bowls around the house in different places
    • Clean your cat’s water bowls regularly
    • Use a shallow water bowl to prevent ‘whisker stress’
    • Fresh water is always best: change it every day
    • Cats love running water, so purchase a water fountain.

    Talk to your cat sitter

    Do you ever book a cat sitter on Pawshake? Ask your cat sitter to refresh your cat’s water every day and pay attention during the booking in case your cat’s habits change. Request that the cat sitter not only cleans and tops up all of your cat’s bowls (if you have a few around the house – which is an excellent idea). Some cats don’t mind exploring running/dripping water from a tap or watering can, so suggest this as a fun activity to your cat sitter.

    Suddenly drinking more?

    Does your cat suddenly drink much more water, more frequently? Drinking and peeing too much is not good either. If you or your cat sitter suddenly sees a change in behaviour, always consult your veterinarian.

    How to make a kitten like water

    This article contains affiliate links. Found Animals receives a portion of the proceeds from every purchase made after clicking on the links. These profits go toward saving more homeless animals!

    If you look like you just got off the set of a horror film after every cat bath, you’re doing it wrong.

    Cats and water rarely go together with ease. And trying to submerge them into a tub without researching beforehand can result in trauma for both you and your pet. You’ll likely end up with water on the floor, bites and scratches all over your body and a scared kitty who’s fled the scene, nowhere to be found. Besides, what’s the point? One of the many qualities we love about cats is how incredibly and obsessively clean they are. After a satisfying meal, cats will clean themselves meticulously with their little sandpaper tongues from the tip of their tails to the top of their heads.

    Though bathing your cat is not something that is typically needed, there may be times when they need some extra cleaning. Whether they’re older or they’ve found themselves in sticky situations, you may indeed find yourself faced with the tedious task.

    Here are some helpful tips to to make cat baths less stressful for you and your pet:

    • Enlist another person to help you, preferably someone your cat knows and likes . The other person can help hold the cat while you bathe them.
    • Trim your cat’s nails with clippers or a grinder before you attempt to bathe your cat. Most cats will attempt to get away from you, so keeping those nails trimmed will help reduce the amount of scratches you receive during the process.
    • Brush out their fur with a brush to get out the tangles before you start the bath. If there are any mats or knots, getting them wet will only make them tighter so it’s wise to eliminate them before you put the cat into the water.
    • Use a towel on the bottom of the bathtub as a bathmat, so your kitty can get a good grip on the surface.
    • Only use a few inches of water, and keep the temperature very mild. Fill the tub and some extra buckets of water before bringing your cat into the bathroom so the running water won’t frighten them.
    • Use a shampoo that is made specifically for bathing cats. Anything else could be harmful or even toxic to your cat.
    • Be very careful with your cat’s head, and avoid getting water into your cat’s eyes, ears or nose.
    • Use a soft cloth to soap down your kitty, then rinse them well with warm water until all the soap is out of their fur. Use the extra buckets of water to rinse the soap out.
    • Speak to your cat in calm soothing tones as you bathe them. This will help to keep them calm.
    • Blot them dry with a towel and let them air dry in a warm draft-free room. If your cat has longer fur, you may have to comb it out while it’s drying to eliminate tangling.

    If your cat is absolutely intolerable of water, have no fear. Waterless cat baths are also an option! Look for cat-safe dry shampoo or wipes at your local pet supply store.

    Of course, kittens are much easier to bathe, but they are also more fragile. Be careful not to get their heads wet, and dry them with a hairdryer immediately after the bath to maintain body temperature.

    For more information, check out this video of one of our staffers bathing her foster kitten.

    1 in 3 cats will experience kidney problems in their lifetimes. Many cat lovers have already had to deal with this issue at one time or another, and may already be aware that dehydration worsens kidney disease. With that in mind, here are 7 great ways to encourage your cat to drink more water.

    1. Place water bowls EVERYWHERE

    Location, location, location—it really matters! You’d be amazed to learn how sensitive most cats are to the positioning of a water bowl. Even a little unexpected foot-traffic can be enough to keep your cat from having that next drink. Keep fresh water bowls in multiple spots to maximize your feline’s comfort.

    How to make a kitten like water

    2. Consider feeding your cat wet food

    You should talk over any diet change with your veterinarian, but wet food can be a great way to introduce more liquid to your cat. It is always more important that a cat eats, than eats what we want, and it is surprising that not every cat likes wet food, especially as their only diet. So, keep your cat’s preferences in mind and make sure he eats enough of his new diet to maintain his energy level and weight.

    How to make a kitten like water

    3. Add water or flavor to your cat’s food

    Consider adding water or a low sodium chicken broth to canned food or get creative and discuss other flavor options with your veterinarian. You want to find something that’s healthy and appealing to your cat. Remember, each cat is an individual, and even the texture of food can make a difference.

    How to make a kitten like water

    4. Add flavor to your cat’s water

    Consider adding low sodium tuna or clam juice ice cubes to your cat’s water (you may want to use a different tray than you use for your own cubes). The ice will not only keep the water cold longer, but can add a tasty flavor. Alternatively, you can give the cubes to your cat to play with.

    How to make a kitten like water

    5. Use drinking fountains

    Drinking fountains are not only a fun way to encourage your cat to drink; they can make very appealing additions to your home. Check out this photo gallery for some of our favorite, feline fountains >>

    How to make a kitten like water

    6. Test different bowls

    Keep in mind that your cat probably doesn’t want to share the dog’s giant bowl. In fact, the only way you’ll know your cat’s preferences is to swap out different bowls at different times. Better yet, keep several bowls out at all times and see which one drains the fastest. Lastly, consider broadening your definition of “bowl.” Dr. Jane Robertson’s cat, for example, only likes to drink from a clear drinking glass.

    How to make a kitten like water

    7. Encourage your cat’s drinking quirks

    Many cats will embrace less conventional methods of getting water. Many cats, for example, would rather drink from a leaky faucet than an open bowl. If you notice this behavior, by all means, let your cat have a few drips before turning off the faucet.

    How to make a kitten like water

    If you have any questions or concerns, you should always visit or call your veterinarian — they are your best resource to ensure the health and well-being of your pets.

    Chronic Kidney Disease: What Does Kidney Failure in Cats Really Mean?

    How to make a kitten like water

    This article contains affiliate links. Found Animals receives a portion of the proceeds from every purchase made after clicking on the links. These profits go toward saving more homeless animals!

    If you look like you just got off the set of a horror film after every cat bath, you’re doing it wrong.

    Cats and water rarely go together with ease. And trying to submerge them into a tub without researching beforehand can result in trauma for both you and your pet. You’ll likely end up with water on the floor, bites and scratches all over your body and a scared kitty who’s fled the scene, nowhere to be found. Besides, what’s the point? One of the many qualities we love about cats is how incredibly and obsessively clean they are. After a satisfying meal, cats will clean themselves meticulously with their little sandpaper tongues from the tip of their tails to the top of their heads.

    Though bathing your cat is not something that is typically needed, there may be times when they need some extra cleaning. Whether they’re older or they’ve found themselves in sticky situations, you may indeed find yourself faced with the tedious task.

    Here are some helpful tips to to make cat baths less stressful for you and your pet:

    • Enlist another person to help you, preferably someone your cat knows and likes . The other person can help hold the cat while you bathe them.
    • Trim your cat’s nails with clippers or a grinder before you attempt to bathe your cat. Most cats will attempt to get away from you, so keeping those nails trimmed will help reduce the amount of scratches you receive during the process.
    • Brush out their fur with a brush to get out the tangles before you start the bath. If there are any mats or knots, getting them wet will only make them tighter so it’s wise to eliminate them before you put the cat into the water.
    • Use a towel on the bottom of the bathtub as a bathmat, so your kitty can get a good grip on the surface.
    • Only use a few inches of water, and keep the temperature very mild. Fill the tub and some extra buckets of water before bringing your cat into the bathroom so the running water won’t frighten them.
    • Use a shampoo that is made specifically for bathing cats. Anything else could be harmful or even toxic to your cat.
    • Be very careful with your cat’s head, and avoid getting water into your cat’s eyes, ears or nose.
    • Use a soft cloth to soap down your kitty, then rinse them well with warm water until all the soap is out of their fur. Use the extra buckets of water to rinse the soap out.
    • Speak to your cat in calm soothing tones as you bathe them. This will help to keep them calm.
    • Blot them dry with a towel and let them air dry in a warm draft-free room. If your cat has longer fur, you may have to comb it out while it’s drying to eliminate tangling.

    If your cat is absolutely intolerable of water, have no fear. Waterless cat baths are also an option! Look for cat-safe dry shampoo or wipes at your local pet supply store.

    Of course, kittens are much easier to bathe, but they are also more fragile. Be careful not to get their heads wet, and dry them with a hairdryer immediately after the bath to maintain body temperature.

    For more information, check out this video of one of our staffers bathing her foster kitten.

    1 in 3 cats will experience kidney problems in their lifetimes. Many cat lovers have already had to deal with this issue at one time or another, and may already be aware that dehydration worsens kidney disease. With that in mind, here are 7 great ways to encourage your cat to drink more water.

    1. Place water bowls EVERYWHERE

    Location, location, location—it really matters! You’d be amazed to learn how sensitive most cats are to the positioning of a water bowl. Even a little unexpected foot-traffic can be enough to keep your cat from having that next drink. Keep fresh water bowls in multiple spots to maximize your feline’s comfort.

    How to make a kitten like water

    2. Consider feeding your cat wet food

    You should talk over any diet change with your veterinarian, but wet food can be a great way to introduce more liquid to your cat. It is always more important that a cat eats, than eats what we want, and it is surprising that not every cat likes wet food, especially as their only diet. So, keep your cat’s preferences in mind and make sure he eats enough of his new diet to maintain his energy level and weight.

    How to make a kitten like water

    3. Add water or flavor to your cat’s food

    Consider adding water or a low sodium chicken broth to canned food or get creative and discuss other flavor options with your veterinarian. You want to find something that’s healthy and appealing to your cat. Remember, each cat is an individual, and even the texture of food can make a difference.

    How to make a kitten like water

    4. Add flavor to your cat’s water

    Consider adding low sodium tuna or clam juice ice cubes to your cat’s water (you may want to use a different tray than you use for your own cubes). The ice will not only keep the water cold longer, but can add a tasty flavor. Alternatively, you can give the cubes to your cat to play with.

    How to make a kitten like water

    5. Use drinking fountains

    Drinking fountains are not only a fun way to encourage your cat to drink; they can make very appealing additions to your home. Check out this photo gallery for some of our favorite, feline fountains >>

    How to make a kitten like water

    6. Test different bowls

    Keep in mind that your cat probably doesn’t want to share the dog’s giant bowl. In fact, the only way you’ll know your cat’s preferences is to swap out different bowls at different times. Better yet, keep several bowls out at all times and see which one drains the fastest. Lastly, consider broadening your definition of “bowl.” Dr. Jane Robertson’s cat, for example, only likes to drink from a clear drinking glass.

    How to make a kitten like water

    7. Encourage your cat’s drinking quirks

    Many cats will embrace less conventional methods of getting water. Many cats, for example, would rather drink from a leaky faucet than an open bowl. If you notice this behavior, by all means, let your cat have a few drips before turning off the faucet.

    How to make a kitten like water

    If you have any questions or concerns, you should always visit or call your veterinarian — they are your best resource to ensure the health and well-being of your pets.

    Chronic Kidney Disease: What Does Kidney Failure in Cats Really Mean?

    How to make a kitten like water

    Behavior Changes in Older Cats
    How your older cat’s behavior change may actually be a sign of disease

    As cats get older, their behavior may start to change. While some behavioral changes are due to environmental stress or Cognitive Dysfunction Syndrome (commonly known as senility), there is often a medical reason underlying the behavioral change. Investigating these changes proactively may allow us to catch an underlying disease process sooner and to more effectively treat it.

    CHANGES IN LITTER BOX HABITS:
    Litter box habits are dependent on a cat’s state of general health.
    Having to change the litter more frequently goes hand in hand with increases in urination. Increased volume of urine is often a sign of kidney disease, diabetes, or hyperthyroidism.

    If your cat has started urinating or defecating outside the litter box, this could be a sign of arthritis. Maybe your cat is having trouble getting in and out of the box, gets sore when trying to squat, or there is a barrier like a staircase making things difficult.

    While some UTIs are simple, in older cats they can be secondary to diseases like diabetes, kidney disease, hyperthyroidism, bladder stones, or cancer.

    APPETITE AND FOOD:
    A decreased appetite can often be a sign of illness, but there are some less obvious changes in eating habits that could mean something else is going on.
    Increases in your cat’s appetite, an increase in begging behavior, or starting to steal food from other cats can be a sign of hyperthyroidism, diabetes, or inflammatory bowel disease.

    Is your cat suddenly having a preference for certain food textures, dropping food, drooling, picking food up with her paws, audibly grinding her teeth, or exhibiting some other new eating behavior? These could all be signs of dental disease or nausea.

    DRINKING HABITS:
    Just like increases in urination can mean kidney disease, hyperthyroidism, or diabetes, the same is true of increases in drinking.

    Increased thirst might not just mean that you are filling the water bowl more often. Some cats start spending more time sleeping near the water bowl, seeking out other water sources (like drinking from the toilet or dishes in the sink), or suddenly show interest in drinking from the faucet.

    Cats may start to play with water (batting at the water bowl, knocking over glasses, etc) when they have increased thirst.

    Dropping food in the water bowl can be a sign of dental disease.

    AGGRESSIVE BEHAVIOR:
    While aggression can often be a sign of stress or fear, in an older cat that has not previously shown signs of aggression, it could be an indicator of a medical condition. If your cat has become increasingly cranky or irritable, consider further investigation into an underlying cause.

    Arthritis is a painful condition. If your cat seems less enthusiastic about you petting her, it could be because her joints are bothering her.

    Vision and hearing loss can cause your cat to easily startle, making her suddenly appear aggressive.

    Hyperthyroidism can cause irritability, so new grumpiness should warrant thyroid hormone testing.

    ENERGY LEVEL:
    It can be easy to attribute energy changes to an older cat just “slowing down,” but sometimes these changes are because there is something else going on.
    Arthritis can cause an otherwise good-feeling cat to slow down, hide more, or stop sleeping in bed.

    If your cat has started to stay awake at night, maybe even meowing all night, this could be a sign of high blood pressure or hyperthyroidism.

    Kidney disease can cause accumulation of toxic metabolic by-products in the bloodstream, which make your cat feel sick and less like herself.

    Though it may seem welcome if your older kitty is hyperactive and full of energy, an increase in activity from baseline can be a sign of hyperthyroidism.

    Getting tired after light exercise can be a sign of heart disease.

    Though adult and geriatric cats may be less active than they were as kittens, never assume that changes in your older cat’s behavior are just due to aging. Cats are very good at hiding the fact that they are sick, and often subtle behavioral changes are due to medical conditions that we can treat and get your cat feeling back to her old self again. If you have any concerns, contact your vet right away!

    References
    Blackwell’s Five-Minute Veterinary Consult: Canine and Feline. Fifth Edition. Wiley Blackwell. 2011.

    Cornell Feline Health Center. The special needs of the senior cat. http://www.vet.cornell.edu/FHC/health_resources/SeniorCats.cfm

    Landsberg, Gary, and Joseph A. Araujo. “Behavior problems in geriatric pets.” Veterinary Clinics of North America: Small Animal Practice 35.3 (2005): 675-698.

    Vogt, Amy Hoyumpa, et al. “AAFP-AAHA feline life stage guidelines.” Journal of feline medicine and surgery 12.1 (2010): 43-54.

    Have you ever wondered how much water your cat should be drinking? If you have recently got a new kitten you may be particularly unsure as to what’s normal and what’s not! Let’s explore a bit further about what you can expect.

    Table of contents

    • What is normal for kittens?
      • 4-week-old kittens
      • 8-week-old kittens
      • 12-week-old kittens
    • How can I encourage my kitten to drink?
    • What if my kitten is poorly?
    • Summary

    What is normal for kittens?

    It’s first of all worth bearing in mind that each animal is individual. Factors like age and diet can play a part in how much fluid they need to take on board. One other thing to note is that cats are descended from desert animals and are therefore not known to be big drinkers generally.

    The average amount of water an adult cat requires per 24 hours is 50 – 60 ml of water per kilogram of bodyweight. So a 4kg cat would need approximately 200 – 240 ml of water per day. You may find your cat drinks less than this if they are on a predominantly wet food diet, which has a high water/moisture content. Equally, you might find they drink a bit more than this if they are on dry food.

    The amount of water a kitten drinks depends on their age. Very young kittens will get most of their fluid from their mother’s milk and won’t need anything else. Weaned kittens will need fresh water to drink.

    4-week-old kittens

    At around 4 weeks of age, kittens start exploring with food. Up until this point, they will be getting all of their nutrition from their mother’s milk. Kittens may start to lap at water (or play with it!) but will still be getting most of their fluid from milk.

    8-week-old kittens

    At around 8 weeks most kittens will wean themselves off of their mother. Many kittens go to their new home from around this time. It’s not uncommon for some kittens to continue suckling for a little longer though in some cases, all the while their mother is tolerating them. However, biologically, most kittens should be fine with just food and water by this point.

    12-week-old kittens

    Kittens are completely weaned at this age and will be getting all of their nutrition from a complete kitten diet and fresh water.

    It is not necessary to give kitten milk to kittens that are fully weaned from their mother. These products, which can be bought from many pet shops and supermarkets, should just be used as an occasional treat. You definitely shouldn’t give kitten milk in place of fresh water.

    How can I encourage my kitten to drink?

    Most kittens and adult cats will be able to self regulate how much fluid they need, so all you need to do is to ensure there is a constant supply of clean water. Cat’s should be allowed to drink whenever they want to and have access to water at all times.

    Some cats will prefer drinking out of one type of bowl over another. So if you are worried that your cat isn’t drinking much consider trying a different type of bowls. You could perhaps try porcelain instead of metal or plastic, or vice versa.

    Generally, a wide flat dish with plenty of space for their whiskers is best. Some cats will drink more from a source of moving/running water, for many cats, this is as simple as a dripping tap. You can get water fountains specifically for cats if you prefer, with a constant flow of water for them to lap up.

    As your kitten gets older and ventures outside, you may not be able to monitor how much they are drinking at all. Many cats will start to drink from puddles, ponds and other sources of water in preference to tap water indoors. Cats seem to enjoy the taste of rainwater!

    What if my kitten is poorly?

    Most of the time you shouldn’t have to worry too much about your cat’s fluid intake unless they are showing signs of ill-health. If your kitten or adult cat becomes unwell they may stop drinking and might be losing fluids through diarrhoea and vomiting. If this occurs you should speak to your veterinarian as dehydration could occur, particularly in very young animals.

    Signs of severe dehydration include lethargy, sunken eyes, loss of skin elasticity (skin doesn’t spring back when lightly pinched), decreased urination and inappetence. Cats can also on occasion go the other way and drink to excess if there are underlying health conditions. Particularly those affecting the kidneys and blood sugar levels.

    Summary

    You shouldn’t need to overly worry about how much your kitten is drinking as long as they are bright and well. Just make sure you are providing them with free access to clean, fresh water. However, if your cat is showing any signs of ill health or you notice a change in its behaviour, then call your vet for some advice.

    Yes, they do. Although movies and other media often show cats drinking a bowl of milk, it’s not good for most felines.

    Water, however, is as vital to a cat’s survival as it is to that of humans. 60-70% of their body weight is water. Despite being good for them, many cats don’t like drinking water, especially if it’s still or standing water. This dislike for water can lead to a dehydrated cat, so it’s important to monitor your cat’s water intake.

    Why is Proper Hydration Important for Cats?

    Hydration is the physiological state of balanced electrolytes, specific minerals and fluids within the body, and maintaining this balance is important. Water is vital because it affects everything from organ function and nutrient transportation to circulation and digestion.

    It also helps decrease the likelihood of urinary stones and helps the kidneys flush out toxins.

    All cats are different and have their own preferences, though. As a result, you may need to try a few different methods of providing water to find something your kitty likes.

    What Causes Dehydration in Cats?

    Cats can become dehydrated for a number of reasons. One of the primary reasons is it’s in their genes. Felines evolved from desert dwellers, and therefore have a low thirst drive and can survive on less water than their canine counterparts.

    Cats have near-sightedness issues, so it may be hard for cats to visualize the edge of the water in a bowl. Additionally, when cats lap water from a bowl, they curve their tongue into a J-shape and bite off a column of water, which is incredibly inefficient. Cats only end up with 3/100 of a teaspoon per lap!*

    Plus, cats are sensitive to the taste and presentation of water. Most cats instinctively gravitate toward fresh, moving water.

    Conditions that make cats more prone to dehydration include chronic kidney disease and other conditions, such as diarrhea or diabetes.

    Signs of Dehydration in Cats

    If your cat neglects her water bowl, she may become dehydrated. Signs of a dehydrated cat include:

    • Dry gums
    • Lethargy or depression
    • Loss of appetite
    • Decrease in skin elasticity
    • Elevated heart rate

    You may have a dehydrated cat on your hands if you gently pinch the skin over her shoulders and the skin stays gathered when you release it. This is known as “skin tenting” and is a sign of dehydration.

    If you notice any of the above signs, call your veterinarian. They can give your cat fluids, rule out any potential illnesses and offer guidance on preventing dehydration in the future.

    How Much Water Should a Cat Drink?

    Cats need varying amounts of water based on their weight and the type of food they eat (dry kibble or canned wet food).

    It’s difficult for even the healthiest of cats to drink the right amount of water because of the unique shape of their tongues. A single lap of water only provides a cat with 3/100 of a teaspoon.*

    Although many cats struggle to stay hydrated, some cats can drink too much water. If your cat drinks more water than usual, it may be a sign of feline hyperthyroidism or diabetes.

    How to Get a Cat to Drink Water

    Getting your cat to drink more water can be tricky. You may have to experiment until you find something she likes. Start with one or more of the following suggestions to see how your cat reacts.

    Choose the Right Water Bowl: If your cat’s current water bowl is deep and narrow, it may touch her whiskers, which is uncomfortable. Try switching your cat’s water bowl to a wider, shallower dish with a smaller lip to see if she drinks more.

    Place it in the Right Location: Although it’s tempting to stick your cat’s food and water bowls in an out-of-the-way area, cats don’t like being boxed into a corner. They prefer locations where they can see their surroundings with a quick glance and don’t have to worry about anyone sneaking up behind them. See if moving her water bowl to a new location helps.

    Keep it Fresh: The longer water sits, the more particles it collects. Dust, dirt, hair and more can all collect in your cat’s water bowl, making her less inclined to drink from it. Put fresh water in her bowl one to two times a day.

    Try a Cat Water Fountain: Cats love running water and there are many theories why. It may also appeal to more of their senses, as they can see it move, hear the sound it makes and even taste a difference. A cat water fountain can make drinking water more exciting and pleasurable for your kitty.

    Add Wet Cat Food to Her Diet: Water isn’t the only way to keep your cat hydrated. If you’ve tried all the above and she’s still not drinking enough, try hydrating with wet cat food or broths. Although it can’t replace water altogether, supplementing with wet food can help increase her overall water intake to help prevent dehydration.

    For some cats, even the fanciest water bowls and cat fountains and the most delicious wet foods aren’t enough. If your cat still isn’t drinking enough water, talk to your veterinarian. They may recommend a cat hydration supplement or give you more tips to help increase your cat’s water intake.

    Not only do cats drink water, but it’s vital for their survival. Keeping your cat hydrated will help keep her happy and healthy. Explore all the wet cat food options we offer to help increase your cat’s total water consumption. Always check with your veterinarian before adding new food to your cat’s diet.

    Click here to learn more about:

    *Reis et al. How cats lap water: water uptake by Felis catus. Science 330. 1231-1234 (2010).

    An aversion to water is one of the most well-known characteristics of household cats. However, this isn’t true of all felines. Some large cats, such as tigers, commonly take a dip to cool off or hunt prey, and even some domesticated breeds are known to enjoy a swim when the opportunity arises.

    In general, however, domestic cats will go to great lengths to avoid getting wet, and behaviorists have developed a number of theories to explain why. One suggests that because the species evolved in dry climates and had little exposure to rivers or lakes, water (except for drinking) is an element they are unfamiliar with and thus avoid.

    More likely, however, cats don’t like getting wet because of what water does to their fur. Cats are fastidious animals that spend a great deal of their day grooming themselves. Wet fur is extremely uncomfortable for a cat and often takes a long time to dry. Wet fur is also heavier than dry and thus makes a cat less nimble and easier for predators to catch.

    There is also the shock factor. Accidentally falling into a full bathtub, for example, can be a frightening experience for a cat and can make it fearful of water for the rest of its life.

    Nonetheless, many cats seem to enjoy playing with running or dripping water, such as out of a faucet. Behaviorists believe cats are drawn by the movements of the water and the sounds it makes, all of which can stimulate a cat’s instinctual drive to catch prey. Such play is also acceptable to even an otherwise water-averse cat because only the cat’s paws get wet.

    Certain breeds of domesticated cats, such as the Maine Coon, Bengal, and Turkish Van, are less fearful of water and actually enjoy the occasional swim. What makes these breeds unique is the texture of their fur, which makes them more water-resistant than other breeds.

    There are certainly dozens of other chores you’d rather tackle than giving your cat a bath—and without a doubt, your kitty doesn’t welcome the idea either! But when you need to provide the best care for your adorable fuzzball, we have helpful tips to make bath time easier.

    Do Cats Really Need to Be Bathed?

    The good news is, most cast breeds don’t require regular bathing says Tarina L. Anthony, DVM, a longtime practitioner of feline-exclusive medicine, and owner and medical director of Aurora Cat Hospital and Hotel in Aurora, Colorado. “Many people ask me when they get a new cat how often they should be bathing them,” she says. By nature, cats are fastidious creatures and able to keep themselves clean.”

    A cat’s rough tongue is covered with tiny curved barbs called papillae that transfer saliva across her fur. This is like a mini spa treatment, as each lap spreads healthy natural oils across her coat and skin. Those little spines work as natural detanglers, too, which is why you’ll often see your kitty licking and biting at fur clumps until she smooths everything out.

    Although a cat spends about 30 percent of her time on daily self-carebetween naps, of course!—Anthony says it’s more important to keep your cat groomed than to worry about bathing them, as regular brushing and combing helps reveal health problems more quickly. “Many times, skin conditions are signs of underlying metabolic or gastrointestinal disease, so if your cat’s hair coat has changed, talk to your vet,” she says.

    Routine salon time with your kitty also helps reduce loose hair and prevent hairballs. WebMD recommends using a metal comb to gently loosen matted areas, especially under her belly and along her legs. Follow with a rubber or bristle brush to remove dirt and loose hair all over her body. Groom short-haired cats about once a week, and long-haired beauties every day.

    So How Often Should You Bathe a Cat?

    Certain circumstances require you to give a cat or kitten a bath. Anthony advises bathing a cat if she’s gotten into something she shouldn’t ingest, such as motor oil, antifreeze, gasoline, or paint. Basically, anything that gets on her fur that could be harmful needs to be washed off immediately.

    Anthony also notes some felines develop skin conditions that are soothed with bathing, such as seborrhea, a disorder that causes flakey, red, and itchy skin. Your veterinarian might also recommend medicated baths for treating other health conditions, such as severe flea allergies or ringworm.

    Older cats with arthritis or who are obese might need you to bathe them more frequently, as they’re not always able to groom well and often have trouble reaching certain spots and preventing odors. As much as cats hate water, they dislike being unkempt even more.

    Many long-haired breeds, such as Maine coons, Persians, and Himalayans, benefit from a bath every couple of months or so to minimize fur matting. Some short-haired cats with dense coats might also need an occasional bath.

    Hairless breeds, like the Sphynx, probably need more frequent bathing than furred felines, as they have an oily residue that gets on fabrics when they’re particularly grimy. If you don’t want to bathe your hairless cat weekly, Anthony suggests cat-specific grooming or baby wipes for regular upkeep.

    Consult your veterinarian about your pet’s particular needs to establish the best routine.

    02nd December 2019

    How to make a kitten like water

    There are times when it might be helpful to encourage your cat to drink more fluids.

    Examples of this include but are not limited to:

    • Cats with kidney disease
      These cats are more vulnerable to becoming dehydrated and this can worsen their kidney disease.
    • Cats with feline idiopathic cystitis (FIC)
      Producing larger volumes of more dilute urine helps to prevent relapses of this condition.

    Type of water bowl

    Choose a bowl from which your cat will want to drink from.

    • Experiment with the types of bowl that you offer your cat
    • In general, cats prefer glass, metal and ceramic dishes to plastic ones
    • Most cats prefer a wide shallow bowl so that they do not need to put their head inside the container to drink from it. Cats do not usually like their whiskers to touch the side of their water (or food) bowl
    • Some cats like drinking from tumblers (choose a non-breakable one if placing on a high up surface
    • Fill the water bowl to the brim – cats like to drink from a full container

    Number of water bowls

    Have several water bowls so that your cat does not need to go far to find one.

    • For example, one on each level of the home so the cat does not need to go up or downstairs to find their water
    • If you have more than one cat, you need to provide enough resources for each ‘social’ group of cats – at least one bowl of water for each social group of cats in the home

    Location of water bowls

    Choose a good location for your water bowls.

    • Away from the food bowl: cats prefer not to drink near their food
    • Avoid double bowls (one side for water and the other for food). Your cat will drink more if food and water are offered in separate locations
    • In a quiet location – away from doors that are heavily used or especially busy places

    Other water supplies

    Consider running water sources as some cats like to drink from moving water.

    • Water foundations
    • Other options include:
      • A dripping tap
      • A shower tray or bath with a small amount of water in it
      • Placing a ping pong ball inside a large diameter bowl full of water – some cats will enjoy playing with this and it can stimulate drinking as well as helping to create some movement of the water which many cats like

    Different types of water

    Consider experimenting with different types of water – see if your cat has a preference. Many cats do not like heavily fluorinated water.

    Try:

    • Tap (‘faucet’) water (as long as safe for human consumption)
    • Collected rainwater – for example from containers placed in your garden
    • Many cats prefer to drink from puddles and water sources in the garden if given a choice
    • Mineral water

    Other liquids to try

    • Water left over when a piece of chicken or fish has been cooked by poaching
    • Liquid from a can of tuna in spring water
    • Prawns, fish or meat liquidised in water to create a soup or broth

    Liquid to avoid:

    • Salty liquids such as brine
    • Milk
      • If your cat has kidney disease this is not ideal as it contains high amounts of phosphate which is not good
      • Cow’s milk cannot be fully digested by cats so it may cause diarrhoea
    • Anything containing onions or onion powder eg. stock. Onions are poisonous to cats

    Other tips

    • Offer water and other liquids at room temperature where possible (the flavour is reduced in cold liquids)
    • Feed a wet diet (cans or pouches) rather than a dry diet
      • Check with your vet before changing your cat’s diet
      • Adding extra water to wet food can also help increase water intake. Some cats will happily eat food that resembles soup! (add water at room temperature rather than cold water).
    • If your cat will only eat dry food, try adding water to their food
    • Be persistent
    • Be gradual in making changes – cats do not like sudden changes to their food or water

    Thank you for visiting our website, we hope you have found our information useful.

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    How to make a kitten like water

    Cats are notoriously picky drinkers

    Some only drink from their human’s glass of water, others refuse to drink from any vessel and meow until you turn on the tap. Have you ever thought about getting your cat a Catit drinking fountain? This is why you should:

    1. Most cats don’t drink enough

    Did you know that cats don’t have the instinct to drink much? Wild cats get most of the moisture they need from the prey they catch. Since indoor cats can’t catch any mice, birds, or other prey, they should drink a lot of water. Entice your cats to drink more by providing them with a drinking fountain. The Catit Flower Fountain, Catit LED Flower Fountain and Catit Mini Flower Fountain have 3 water flow settings to please even the pickiest drinkers.

    How to make a kitten like water

    2. Water is vital for your cat’s health

    Staying hydrated is key to prevent kidney and urinary tract diseases. When cats don’t drink enough, the minerals in their urine start to crystallize and form stones, which can have dire consequences. Running water is much more appealing to cats and can prevent health problems as well as a steep vet bill.

    3. Cats have trouble seeing the water level in a bowl

    Many cat owners use ordinary drinking bowls. They are great, but did you notice how hard it is to spot the water level inside them? Cats have great eyesight but they possess an even keener sense of hearing. This means that the sound of running tap water or water streaming down the petals of the fountain will sure draw your curious cat’s attention!

    How to make a kitten like water

    4. Cats consider standing water to be unsafe

    In nature, standing water is an excellent breeding ground for nasty bacteria that could make a cat violently ill. Running water, on the other hand, is much safer which is why many domestic cats still prefer running water.
    The Catit Flower Fountain and Catit LED Flower Fountain have a Triple Action water-softening filter that removes bacteria. Moreover, there’s no open reservoir in which dirt can accumulate, so your cat can enjoy crisp water at all times.

    How to make a kitten like water

    5. Cats don’t like their whiskers to be touched

    A cat’s whiskers are incredibly sensitive and provide your feline with information about the space around her. Some cats become stressed when their whiskers are being touched without a good reason, for example when drinking or eating from a bowl that’s too deep. This condition is known as whisker stress or whisker fatigue. Our Catit drinking fountains are designed to keep your cat’s whiskers untouched for a comfortable, stress-free drinking experience.

    16th August 2018

    To avoid kidney problems, it’s important to ensure your cat stays hydrated, particularly during hot weather. Take a look at these top tips to encourage your cat to drink more.

    Water bowl placement

    Many cat owners place their cat’s water directly next to their food bowl. Cats might be put off drinking near their food due to the smell or because they perceive the water to be contaminated because it is close to the food. In the wild, cats eat their prey away from water sources to avoid contamination and this is true of domestic cats.

    Try different bowls

    Cats are sometimes particular about the size and material of bowl. Try a few different bowls until you find one that your cat is happy with, such as stainless steel or glass bowls, shallow or wide bowls.

    Fresh water

    Replace your cat’s water daily to ensure they always have access to fresh, clean water.

    Cool water

    Cats sometimes prefer drinking water that is cold, because they might perceive cold water to be fresher. Keep your cat’s water cold by replenishing it regularly. You could even pop a few ice cubes in the bowl if the weather is particularly warm. Ice cubes in their food can also work as while they’re eating, they can stay extra hydrated too.

    Running water

    In the wild, cats instinctively look for running water to quench their thirst, steering clear of still water that may have become stagnant. Running water from a tap at home might therefore be more appealing to your cat. Leave a tap dripping or invest in a pet water fountain for your cat to drink from.

    Multiple resources

    Don’t just provide one water source for your cat – make sure you have plenty of water stations, both inside and outside of the house. This is particularly important if you have more than one cat because cats generally do not like to share resources. In multi-cat homes, water stations should not be placed next to one another as a timid cat might not want to visit a water bowl when a more dominant cat is drinking. Place water bowls in areas of the house that each of your cat’s likes to visit so that each cat can drink in peace.

    We all know that most cats like water as much as we like receiving a letter from the IRS! While they may spend hours grooming themselves to perfection, there are some circumstances that may mean that it is necessary to perform a thorough cleaning of your feline friend.

    Cats can find being bathed extremely stressful which makes them far more likely to become defensive or even aggressive, hissing, raising their fur and even lashing out at you. However, with some preparation and patience you can bath your cat and survive scratch-free and the secret involves not so much a bath, but a shower instead!

    Get Organized
    Just like bathing a baby; bathing a cat requires everything that you need to be within arm’s reach. You should have:

    • A shower or bath with a handheld shower head.
    • Several towels to clean her off and help her dry.
    • Special cat shampoo and conditioner. These are available from most pet stores and your veterinarian will be able to advise if there is a particular brand that would be good for your feline friend. You should never use human shampoo or conditioner as is has a different PH level to the sort suitable for cats and could damage your pet’s hair or skin.

    Pre-bathing Prep
    Before you start you should brush your cat to remove any knots or tangles, particularly if she is a long-furred breed.

    Set the water temperature to warm and have it running through the shower head at a medium level spray.

    The Bathing Process
    While talking to your cat and offering lots of reassurance and praise, gently place her into the shower tray or bath. Using a showerhead from above is significantly less stressful for your pet as she is far more likely to be used to being rained on than she is being lowered into 4 inches of tepid water!

    Hold your cat in place by her scruff, or use a harness if you think she is going to be tricky to control. Begin washing her gently using soft confident strokes. Cats are very intuitive at picking up stress, so if you seem stressed she will be on edge too, and far more likely to lash out or try to make a run for it!

    Apply small amounts of shampoo – she’s probably not as dirty as you think she is! Make sure you rinse clean and then repeat with the conditioner. Take care to avoid her eyes and nose.

    Getting Dry
    Once she is clean you should towel-dry your cat as much as possible. Some cats are petrified of hair dryers. If your feline friend isn’t then you could consider trying to dry her using a low heat and speed. You may need to confine her to a carrier in order to do this. Alternatively you could leave your cat in the warm bathroom until her coat is totally dry. The important thing is to ensure that she is thoroughly dried before going into other parts of the house. Damp cats can easily become chilled which can make them unwell, or in the case of kittens, particularly low body temperatures can be life-threatening.

    That’s it! The secret to bathing your car and surviving scratch-free really lies in the fact that a well-prepared shower is the very best way to get your feline companion clean.

    How to make a kitten like water

    Does it seem like your cat never drinks from its water bowl? That could be a big problem – UTIs, kidney problems, and dehydration is more common in cats than you might expect. The ancestors of today’s housecats got most of their water from the prey they ate, and cats that eat dry kibble instead may not have as much of an instinct to drink water from a bowl.

    What health problems could your cat have if they don’t drink enough water? How much water should your cat be drinking? How can you get your cat to drink more water? Read on for these answers and more.

    How Much Water Should Cats Drink?

    Cats need between 3.5-4.5 ounces of water per 5 pounds of body weight per day. For a 10-pound cat, that’s 7-9 ounces a day.

    Your cat doesn’t need to drink all that water from a bowl, though. If you feed your kitty wet food, they could get between 3.85-4.4 ounces of water from a 5.5-oz can of food. On the other hand, cats who only eat dry kibble won’t get much moisture from their food and should drink plenty of water to make up for it.

    How Do I Know if My Cat Is Drinking Enough Water?

    It’s difficult to monitor how much water your cat is drinking, especially if they eat canned food. The best thing you can do is to fill your cat’s water bowls to the same level every day and take note of how much water is left before you dump it out and refill it.

    While you may not get a precise amount of how much water your cat is drinking, you should notice trends. If there is suddenly more or less water than usual left in your cat’s bowl, you’ll have a sign that something could be wrong with your cat.

    What Happens if My Cat Won’t Drink Water?

    Cats that don’t drink enough water are more prone to dehydration, urinary tract infections (UTIs), crystals, and other health problems.

    Cat Dehydration Symptoms

    Just like people, cats can suffer from dehydration if they don’t drink enough water. Signs of dehydration in cats include:

    • Sunken eyes
    • Loss of energy
    • Loose skin that doesn’t “snap” back into place if you pinch it
    • Panting
    • Refusal to eat
    • Tacky or dry gums
    • Urinating less than usual
    • Elevated heart rate

    Dehydration can be fatal. If your cat is experiencing any symptoms of dehydration, seek emergency veterinary care.

    Cat UTI Symptoms

    Since cats tend not to drink enough water, they are more prone to urinary tract infections (UTIs), bladder stones, or blockages than dogs. If you’ve ever had a UTI, you know how painful it can be. However, cats tend to hide their symptoms if they don’t feel well.

    Be on the lookout for cat UTI symptoms like:

    • Urinating outside the litter box
    • Frequent urination, but only passing a small amount of urine each time
    • Straining to urinate
    • Blood in the urine
    • Increased licking of the urinary opening
    • Crying in pain while urinating

    How to Get Your Cat to Drink More Water

    If you’re worried about how much water your cat is drinking, here are some ways to get them to drink more water.

    Consider Switching to Wet Food

    Since cats were designed to get the water they need from the food they eat, it makes sense to feed them wet food. In fact, wet cat food is about 70-80% water. Even if you can’t switch your cat to an entirely canned diet, adding canned cat food to their dry kibble can still help your kitty get more moisture.

    Get a Drinking Fountain

    In the wild, flat water is more likely to harbor parasites, so cats may be more likely to drink flowing water than flat water. Cat drinking fountains have the added benefit of making it easier for your cat to hear and see the water than if it’s in a bowl.

    Alternatively, you could leave a faucet dripping if your cat likes drinking water that way.

    Try Different Bowls

    Cats are picky – we know this as cat lovers! Your cat may not like the taste of water in a plastic bowl, or they may experience whisker fatigue if they drink from a bowl that’s too small and high-sided. Try bowls of different sizes and materials to find out what your kitty likes best.

    Place More Water Bowls Around Your Home

    Does your cat only have one water bowl in the whole house? Make it easier for them to drink by putting more water bowls around your home. Also, make sure that food and water dishes are a good distance away from the litter box – you probably don’t enjoy eating near the bathroom, either, right?

    Add Flavor to the Water

    Ice cubes, clam juice, or low-sodium chicken broth could all make water more appealing to your cat. Just remember – a little bit goes a long way.

    Add Water to Dry Food

    Since dry food is so low in moisture, adding a little water to it can help your cat get more moisture. Experiment with different ratios of water to food to see what your kitty likes best.

    How to make a kitten like water

    Wash Your Cats Bowl More Frequently

    Cats can be hypersensitive to smell and taste, meaning even the slightest difference can turn them off from drinking out of their water bowl.

    Get a Cat Sitter in Los Angeles, Las Vegas, Sacramento, or San Francisco to Help

    If you’re worried about your cat drinking enough water, you should definitely employ a cat sitter any time you have to leave town. A professional cat sitter can make sure your cat’s water bowls or fountains are clean and full and pay attention to how much water your cat is drinking.

    Don’t risk coming home from a trip to discover your cat knocked over their water bowl while you were gone. Trust The Comforted Kitty if you need a cat sitter in Sacramento, San Francisco, Las Vegas, or Las Angeles.

    For FAQs, services, rates, or to schedule an appointment for cat sitting, click here now.

    Article provided by Catster

    In the wild, there are many big cats that actually enjoy being in the water. Tigers, leopards and lions all like to soak, most likely because their usual habitat is in a hot environment and it helps cool them off. Domestic cats may have evolved to dislike water because most breeds have coats that absorb rather than deflect moisture. It’s harder for them to get dry after they’re soaked.

    So, Why Would a Cat Need a Bath?

    How to make a kitten like water

    In many cases, cats don’t need to be washed with water. They groom themselves naturally, so regular brushing is usually enough to keep your pet looking clean and comfortable. However there are occasions when a real bath is necessary. Kitty may have soiled himself in the litter box, for instance. Cats have been known to try to climb up the inside of a chimney.

    Preparing Your Cat’s Bath
    The best solution is to make sure that you have all the necessary supplies handy, so you can make your cat’s bath very quick:

    • Rubber gloves
    • Cat shampoo
    • A large pitcher for rinsing or (even better) a gentle spray nozzle
    • A large towel
    • Cotton balls to clean the ears
    • A small cloth to clean the face

    It’s much easier to wash your cat in a kitchen or bathroom sink than bending over a tub. Following is a step-by-step procedure for the quick and painless cat bath:

    • Fill the sink with about 2 or 3 inches of warm (but not hot!) water
    • Wet the cat from the shoulders to the tail and apply shampoo.
    • Just like your own hair, lather and rinse thoroughly
    • Since most cats hate having water splashed on their faces, use a damp washcloth to gently clean your cat’s head.
    • Use a cotton ball to clean inside the cat’s ears. Never put any kind of object (not even a Q-Tip) in your cat’s ear.
    • After a thorough rinsing, lift your cat onto a large towel and fold it around him.
    • Rub as much water from their fur as possible
    • Long-haired cats may require the use of a blow dryer, but only if the noise does not terrify them. Set it on low and see if the cat will tolerate it.

    It’s best if you have the time to purchase a shampoo specifically formulated for cats. If you don’t have any cat shampoo, a mild baby shampoo may be used. You don’t want to use any other kinds of human cleaning products, as it may sting your cat’s eyes or irritate their skin.

    November 17, 2015

    The toilet bowl, bathtub, kitchen tap, condensation on windows. Some cats will drink water from anywhere but their own perfectly good water bowls.

    How to make a kitten like water

    As baffling as it may be for humans, cats have their own perfectly good reasons for doing so:

    Fresh water

    Your cat may be looking for fresh, clean, aerated water. And yes, as far as it’s concerned, even toilet water fits that bill. By comparison, the water in your cat’s bowl may have been sitting around for longer than your cat would like, becoming stale and accumulating a film of hair, dust and other particles.

    Water temperature

    Your cat may seek out other water sources because it doesn’t like room temperature water. A cat that joins you in the shower or drinks leftover bathwater might prefer its water warm, whereas one that licks condensation off the windows or drinks straight from the tap might like it cool.

    Bowl shape and size

    Your cat may be avoiding their water bowl because it finds drinking from it uncomfortable. Some cats won’t drink from deep or narrow bowls because they don’t like their sensitive whiskers rubbing up against the sides.

    Taste

    The water in your cat’s bowl may taste different depending on the material it’s made from. Just like many humans have a preference for drinking from a glass or aluminium can, your pet may prefer ceramic or stainless steel. If it’s flavour your cat is looking for, you might find their head in the ceramic toilet bowl or bathtub.

    Ask any cat owner and they’ll tell you the same: Most cats don’t like getting wet. But what to do if you feel your feline friend is dirty and due for a good old-fashioned soak in the suds? “Domestic felines do not need to be bathed,” says Vanessa Spano, associate veterinarian at Behavior Vets of NYC. “Cats, unlike dogs, groom themselves daily—this is a normal species behavior. The majority of cats also may not like being exposed to water, and an unnecessary bath can be very stressful and uncomfortable for those felines unaccustomed to water.”

    Of course, there are some instances where a bath is necessary, but you should always check with your veterinarian first. Felines’ agile bodies and sandpaper-like tongues make them excellent self-groomers, says Hannah Shaw, a Royal Canin cat expert and founder of Kitten Lady, so you can skip the dip unless yours develops a skin condition, like ringworm (consult your vet about using a medicated soap), or gets especially dirty.

    Fortunately, there are steps you can take to reduce the likelihood of your cat needing an actual bath, as well as effective ways to clean them at home, too. We reached out to Serena Juma, a cat behaviorist at Purina, for advice; here’s what she to say.

    Brush Your Cat Regularly

    The best way to keep your cat clean outside of bath time? Juma says to brush them regularly. “In general, a healthy adult cat doesn’t require bathing unless he or she has gotten into something that has coated the fur and can’t be easily removed with brushing,” she says. “Cats groom themselves naturally, however their owners should help keep them clean by brushing or combing them regularly.”

    Only Clean as Necessary

    If your cat happens to get dirty enough that you can’t just brush them clean, Juma suggests only washing the areas that are soiled. “If a cat does require a bath, I recommend only bathing the area that needs attention,” she says. “Some cats enjoy being in and around water, while many don’t like the feeling of being submerged as it causes their coats to become heavier. By only washing areas that need attention, you can help reduce the discomfort that a cat may feel if submerged.”

    Use the Right Shampoo

    “It is critical to buy a shampoo made specifically for cats,” says Juma. “Shampoos made for humans or dogs, especially flea shampoos, can be toxic to felines. Most pet stores will have a cat-safe option that clearly states on the packaging that it is feline-friendly. A veterinarian may also recommend a specific shampoo or cleaning method if there is an ongoing health issue that requires the owner to bathe a cat regularly.” Or forgo the bath entirely and opt for something like Vet’s Best Waterless Cat Bath Dry Shampoo ($7.49, amazon.com).

    Wash Carefully

    If a partial bath is in order, Juma says to follow these steps to ensure a successful (and less stressful) cat cleaning. First, before you draw the bath, trim their nails (if needed) to avoid accidentally being scratched. “Recruit a family member to help,” she suggests. “This will allow one person to focus attention on interacting with the cat while the other cleans the cat.” Prepare everything that’s needed for the bath ahead of time; this includes a cat-safe shampoo like Pro Pet Works All-Natural Organic Shampoo ($14.29, amazon.com), a washcloth, a measuring cup for pouring water, and a clean, dry towel. “Brush the cat thoroughly to remove any tangled or matted fur,” she says. “Just like for humans, a cat’s hair will become more tangled or matted when wet.”

    “Fill a sink or bathtub with a few inches of tepid or lukewarm water,” she says. “Get the area that needs to be cleaned wet by either dipping the cat into the water, pouring water onto her with the measuring cup or using a washcloth to dampen her fur. Avoid getting water in the cat’s eyes, nose and ears. Use a wash cloth when cleaning the face area. Use a wash cloth or soft brush to apply cat-safe shampoo.”

    Wrap her in a towel, and dry vigorously. “You can also back-comb her fur to help it aerate more quickly,” adds Shaw.

    Why, oh why, is spraying cats with water still a thing? In looking around online and talking with people, I find that – over and over again – people are drawn to using a squirt bottle to either discipline or punish cats for unwanted behavior. Even shelters and those who should know better are still recommending the use of spray bottles or squirt guns. With everything we now know about cats, learning, and behavior, we need to update this antiquated mode of trying to teach cats to stop one behavior and do something different!

    Well, folks who encourage the use of the spray bottle do have one thing right – using a spray bottle may indeed change your cat’s behavior, although not in the way you want it to. You know all of those stories where a fairy or genie or leprechaun grants three wishes, but the way those wishes are granted usually means something awful happens to the wisher? You can get similar results when you use a squirt bottle with your cat. Your cat might stop scratching the couch…only to start scratching on another piece of furniture when you’re not around. Or, your cat might stop chewing the plants…until you’re not around. Or, your cat might stop hopping up on the kitchen counters…until you’re not around. See what I’m getting at? Your cat won’t necessarily make the connection between his behavior and the squirt bottle, other than he gets squirted when he does those things AND you’re around. But when you’re not around, there’s no consequence. So the behavior continues…when you’re not around.

    And frankly, squirt or spray bottles may not even be that effective. I’ll be honest with you. Many years ago, before I knew what I know now, I used a squirt bottle on a cat I had who was constantly jumping up on our kitchen counters. It worked the first few times I squirted her – she got down immediately and ran away. But the behavior continued, and pretty soon, she simply stared me down while I was squirting her and her tiny little face was just like “BRING IT” (she was a tortie and had tortitude, so this was totally in line with her purrsonality). The spray bottle was completely useless at that point, and all I was doing was 1) showing her that I was mean, and 2) soaking her. I didn’t have the intention of being mean, of course – my intention was simply to keep her from getting on the counter! But she didn’t know that, she was just getting squirted down by a big old meanie. Ahhh, I’m so sorry, Zoe.

    I’ve also talked with many people who have had similar experiences, where the squirt bottle didn’t do anything to correct the behavior. And, I’ve even talked with a couple of people who said their cats thought the squirted bottle was a GAME, so they would do things just to get sprayed! (So much for the myth that cats hate water, eh?)

    To correct (or change) a cat’s behavior, either punishment (like using a spray bottle) or reinforcement (to reward good behavior) needs to happen consistently – that’s when cats start to put two and two together, linking their behavior with the consequence. With positive reinforcement, this is fun for everyone – kitty does something good, and you get to be the hero by providing a reward (e.g., a treat) in hopes of encouraging the kitty to repeat that behavior. The more often you are able to reinforce a desirable behavior, the more likely the cat will repeat it (think consistency). However, the same is NOT true of using punishment such as a spray bottle. You will not always be around to punish your cat for doing something undesirable, thus, the punishment will not be consistent. And the more consistent you are with punishment, the more frequently your cat is receiving bad juju from you. So, if you are able to be consistent enough with punishment, it comes with a price – fear and distrust. If you are constantly doling out punishment in the form of spray bottles or even yelling (and I certainly hope not hitting or making physical contact), your cat is more likely to start fearing you. The end result is more stress for everyone, and when cats get too stressed, that results in…yup, you guessed it…more behavior issues (which can even include aggression towards you).

    So what happens when you use a spray bottle, or other method of punishment that comes from you?

    • Your cat starts to associate the unpleasant experience with you, and not necessarily his actions with the punishment (as you intended).
    • Your cat will begin to do the undesired “thing” when you’re not around.
    • Your cat will begin to fear and distrust you.
    • Your cat’s stress levels may increase, which can result in more of the behavior you are trying to correct, or result in a new undesirable behavior.

    Ok, so now that we’ve got that cleared up, what CAN you do to correct your cat’s behavior? Please understand that most cats do things because to meet a biological need. Cats need to scratch, so you must provide them with an adequate scratcher – if they don’t like the one they’ve been given, they will find something more suitable (i.e., your couch). Your cat jumps up on the kitchen counter because he’s hungry or has been rewarded by finding food up there before. Your cat tries to get out the door when you open it because he’s maybe not getting enough enrichment inside and is bored with his environment. Or, perhaps your cat sprays your bedding because he’s feeling insecure about his place in the household and needs to put his scent down as a self-soothing measure. Maybe you have even been unknowingly rewarding or reinforcing an undesirable behavior, or just not have given your cat an appropriate outlet for what he is biologically driven to do. So, when it comes to correcting any undesirable behavior, please consider:

    • What is the need your cat is trying to meet? (Scratching, viewing his territory, getting exercise, eliminating in a place where he feels safe?)
    • How can you meet your cat’s need in a way that would be acceptable to you? (Can you purchase a scratcher he would like, or try a different location for the litterbox?)
    • Can you reinforce a better, alternative way to express the behavior? (Does your cat like treats for using his scratcher, or praise for using the litterbox?)
    • In conjunction with providing an acceptable outlet for the behavior , is there a humane way to discourage the old behavior even when you’re not around ? (Can you put Sticky Paws on the couch where he was previously scratching, or put a food bowl in a spot where your cat had previously urinated to change the purpose of the area?)

    Spraying cats with water from a squirt bottle is not a reinforcement; it’s a punishment. Giving your cat a choice of ways to express his behavioral needs and then rewarding his use of the choice you prefer is the best way to encourage your cat’s “good” behavior. The inappropriate behavior will fade away, the bond between you will be strengthened because you’re giving rewards based on something your cat does (i.e., operant conditioning), and your cat won’t fear or distrust you. In my book, that’s called a win-win!

    If you would like to learn more about positive and negative reinforcement or punishment, check out my article “How to Use Positive Reinforcement for Good Cat Behavior“.