How to make a layer cake

When I first made the Schichttorte (A.K.A. a 20-layered German cake, baumkuchen, bebinca, etc.) and posted it on Reddit, it got 1.3MM views overnight. It was bananas. I literally made the cake at 9PM after a long day and while watching Wet Hot American Summer, so thanks internets! You know how to turnaround an anonymous internet poster’s day. #2blessed.

As it is long overdue, I am posting the American-friendly version of this German recipe by popular demand. The most important factors in the success of this recipe: having a broiler, a scale and a lot of patience. These layers take time! I basically stood at the oven the whole time I made it, but it was worth it for the super cool cross sectional at the end. Plus apparently they did a Schichttorte (german layer cake with jam) challenge on The Great British Bake Off which is the greatest cooking competition show of all time (fun fact: BBC programming requires 100% transparency in reality TV programming–how cool is that?). Make a Schichttorte and dazzle your friends + family! Or not–I can’t force you to do anything in this short life we get prior to the imminent mortal coil.

Learn how to make Schichttorte German Layer Cake recipe inspired by the Great British Bake Off.

Learn how to make Schichttorte German Layer Cake recipe inspired by the Great British Bake Off.

Schichttorte Recipe

Ingredients

  • 10 large eggs, separated
  • 100g unsalted butter
  • 150g caster / icing sugar (Shhh you can grind sugar to get to the consistency needed for this)
  • 1 large lemon’s zest
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 150g all-purpose flour, sifted
  • 65g cornstarch
  • oil
  • 1 jar of apricot jam
  • 150g confectioners’ sugar
  • 4 tablespoons cocoa powder
  • 2 tablespoons milk
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 1 1/2 cups confectioners’ sugar
  • 2 1/2 teaspoons milk
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 teaspoon butter

Instructions

  1. Make layered cake. In a stand mixer, whisk the egg yolks on high speed until pale and thick (5 minutes).
  2. Separately, beat butter and sugar until pale and creamy. Mix in lemon zest and vanilla extract. Add in the whisked egg yolks from the stand mixer and mix well. Then add the flour and cornstarch and mix well to form a batter.
  3. Separately, whisk egg whites until soft peaks form. Stir in one-third of egg whites into batter. Then gently fold the rest of the egg whites into the batter.
  4. Melt apricot jam in a small pan and pass through a sieve to yield a smooth jam. Set aside.
  5. Pre-heat oven to broil setting.
  6. Grease an 8 inch springform pan with oil and cover the bottom with parchment paper.
  7. Evenly spread 1/3 cup of batter onto the base of the pan and give the pan a quick shake to even out. Place in broiler and cook for 2 minutes or until light golden brown.
  8. Take pan out of broiler and evenly spread 1/3 cup of batter onto the first layer and spread evenly with a brush. Place in broiler and cook for 3 minutes or until dark golden brown.
  9. Repeat steps #6 and #7, ensuring that every 5th layer is instead a layer of smooth jam from step #4 cooked for 2-3 minutes. Repeat this process until all batter has been used, or 20 layers have been achieved.
  10. Remove from oven and allow to cool in pan for a few minutes, and then remove from springform pan.
  11. Brush the top and sides of the cooled cake with the rest of the apricot jam.
  12. Make chocolate glaze. Sift together confectioners’ sugar and cocoa powder into a bowl. Stir in milk and vanilla and mix until smooth. If too thick, heat up over small pan. Pour evenly over cake.
  13. Make vanilla glaze. Melt butter and add in confectioners’ sugar, milk, salt and vanilla extract. Mix until smooth. Pour into squeeze bottle and drizzle over cake.
  14. Eat way too much Schichttorte; dazzle your friends and family; #foodstagram.

Made this at home? Tag your photos with #PateSmith or share them in the comments for the chance to be featured onsite!

This is the 4 th part of my series about cake decoration for beginners. The free sessions are about how to make a layer cake with fondant. You can read the other lessons here. In this session you will learn how to stack a cake

How to make a layer cake

Party cakes and wedding cakes with fondant are typically 7,5-8 cm tall (2.75-3.15 inches) and consist of 3 cake layers with mousse in between – this is the way we make layer cakes in Scandinavia – it might be completely different in your country ;-).

HVOR MUCH MOUSSE DO YOU NEED FOR ONE CAKE LAYER?

That’s a really good question, which can be hard to answer completely, however, it will most of the time be written in the recipe. In the chart beneath you can see the general rules for mousse amounts (but it’s better to make too much rather than too little).

The chart is read so that if a recipe has e.g. ½ liter of whipped cream (17 US fl oz), it’s equal to 1 layer in a cake of 25 cm in diameter (10 inches).

The size of the cake in diameter Amount of whipped cream
15-18 cm (6-7 inches) about 250-300 ml per layer (8.45-10.14 fl oz)
20-25 cm (8-10 inches) 0,5 liter per layer (17 fl oz)
28 cm (11 inches) 0,75 liter per layer (25.3 fl oz)
30-35 cm (12-14 inches) 1 liter per layer (33.8 fl oz)

Beware that this is just indications! It also depends on the other ingredients in the recipe. If the recipe contains e.g. yoghurt, this will make it go further.

Which tools should you use?

I use the following tools when I want to stack a cake:

  • Round cake ring (To keep the mousse inside the cake – use a square ring for a square cake)
  • Acetate cake roll (also to keep the mousse inside the cake)
  • Piping bags to pipe the mousse onto the layers.
  • A bag holder so I can place the piping bag on the table, without it making a mess.
  • A cake spatula (with an angle) to smoothe out the mousse so it’s as even as possible.

Cake ring:How to make a layer cake

Acetate cake roll:

How to make a layer cake

Piping bag:
How to make a layer cake

How to stack a cake

Start by placing the first cake layer on your cake dish, and place the cake ring around the cake. The cake ring shouldn’t sit too tight around the cake since there should be space for the acetate cake roll. Place the acetate cake roll between the cake and the cake ring, so that the cake roll is aligned with the cake ring all the way around. Tighten the cake ring, so that it’s tight on the cake layer.

How to make a layer cake

Done:

How to make a layer cake

Now you should fill your first layer of cake mousse in the piping bag. Don’t fill the bag completely, it’ll be way too hard to control it, you can always refill if you run out.

How to make a layer cake

When the bag is full, spin the top closed so you can control the content:

How to make a layer cake

Cut the bag about 2-3 cm from the edge of the bag:

How to make a layer cake

How to stack the cake:

Now you carefully press the mousse onto your cake layer. Start by pressing the mousse into a circle along the edge of the cake. When you’ve finished the first circle, you press the mousse into a new circle inside the first one, until you’ve reached the center of the cake. In this way, the mousse creates a pattern of circles inside each other:

How to make a layer cake

If you’ve missed any spots, you can press out some extra mousse to cover the cracks. Now you may wonder why you can’t just take a spoon and smear the mousse onto the cake? But this is to make sure the cake gets an even layer of mousse with the same thickness all the way around.

Now grab your angled cake spatula and run it over the mousse until the circles can’t be seen and the mousse is in an even layer all over the cake.

How to make a layer cake

When the cake is even, you can take your next layer of cake and carefully place it on top of the mousse. I always start with letting the cake layer follow some of the edge, and then I let it fall in place from the edge I have chosen.

How to make a layer cake

Repeat the same process with your next type of mousse. For this cake, the first layer of mousse was raspberry mousse and the next layer of mousse is chocolate.

How to make a layer cake

Afterwards, you place the next cake layer on top and you can now add another layer of raspberry mousse or even a 3rd kind of mousse if you prefer that. (You can also settle for just two layers of mousse in the cake, which I actually did with this one).

How to make a layer cake

If you add a 3rd layer of mousse it has to follow the top part of the cake ring when you even it out in the end. The mousse shouldn’t go higher than the cake ring.

Let the cake sit in the refrigerator, e.g. overnight. When the mousse is completely hardened, you’ll carefully remove the cake ring and the acetate cake roll.

Use a bigger cake spatula to carefully remove the acetate cake roll
How to make a layer cake

How to make a layer cake

Ready for frosting:

How to make a layer cake

You have now learned how to stack a cake. Feel free to contact me if you have any questions for this. The next step is about how to frost a cake

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· Plus tips on how to make a Boxed Cake Mix taste Homemade ·

I want to share some tricks I’ve learned on how to elevate a boxed cake mix to taste homemade and look beautiful in the form of a layer cake!! I have been baking cakes since I was a child. In fact, one of my most treasured gifts from Santa was an Easy Bake Oven. I graduated from my Easy Bake Oven to using a real oven for baking cakes and cupcakes. Whether from scratch or a boxed mix, it’s a true joy for me to bake cakes or cupcakes for my family, friends, and for my job as a freelance food stylist. Flavor, texture, and density are important factors when it comes to the way cake tastes.

I’ve had the pleasure of working alongside some very talented food stylists and bakers who have shared with me their expertise on how to create beautiful even cake layers and even how to ensure your layers of icing are even. In my experience as a freelance food stylist, I’ve learned that using two cake mixes for one layer cake make each layer bake out thick and even.

In order to make a 9″ round cake with three THICK layers, you’ll need to use two standard boxed cake mixes. To achieve the “from scratch” or “from the bakery” cake taste, you will need to substitute a few simple ingredients. Most boxed cake mixes call for 3 ingredients in addition to the actual cake mix in order to make the batter: water, oil, and eggs.

If the instructions on the box call for water, substitute water with equal parts whole milk.

If the instructions on the box call for oil, substitute oil with equal parts melted butter.

Some articles suggest using extra eggs, which I’ve not yet tried. I’ve found my cakes to be very moist by simply substituting equal parts whole milk for water, melted butter for oil, and using the exact amount of eggs or egg whites the box mix calls for. The sky is the limit when it comes to ingredient substitutions, however, milk and melted butter are on the top of my sub list.

My most recent elevated layer cake was with a new favorite boxed cake mix of mine, Duncan Hines Perfectly Moist French Vanilla. I made this cake for my son to celebrate his first Holy Communion. Each box mix called for 1 cup of water, 1/3 cup of oil, and 3 eggs. I mixed both boxed cake mixes at the same time with 2 cups of whole milk, 2/3 cup or 10 tbsp of melted butter, and 6 eggs.

Layer cakes are at the top of a Southern baker’s list of culinary achievements. Avoid these snags so you can create a stunning masterpiece.

If there were a college curriculum in Learning How To Be a Southern Cook, the Senior-level class would be on Baking Stately Layer Cakes. Along with the ability to turn out moist pound cakes, juicy fruit cobblers, and savory chicken casseroles, a Southern baker measures her culinary value on the height and straight sides of her layer cakes. Producing such perfection takes trial and error, many lop-sided cakes, and perhaps even a few tears. But with patience and practice, you can acquire the talent to create such stunning and show-stopping desserts. To get started, choose one of these delicious layer cake recipes, have the proper sized pans and quality ingredients on hand, and start baking. Check out our tips below and you might soon find assembling a layer cake isn’t as daunting as it looks.

1. Don’t stack uneven cake layers.

For various reasons, cake layers often bake with a domed top or uneven sides. It happens to the best of bakers, so don’t worry about it when your layers emerge from the oven looking a little lopsided. If you stack these uneven layers it will create an unbalanced cake with a high risk of falling over.

Do level and trim your layers once they are cooled. Use a long serrated knife to gently shave off the dome or uneven sides, leveling the layer. You may even want to chill the layers a bit before trimming; when the cake is cool and firm, it is less likely to crack or tear.

2. Don’t frost warm layers.

We must admit, we’ve gotten a little anxious and prematurely frosted a cake or two. To avoid a gloppy mess, practice a little patience and wait for the layers to completely cool.

Do give yourself plenty of time. When planning to bake a cake, factor in enough time for the layers to cool completely. Or consider baking the cake layers the day before you plan to frost it.

Yield: Yields one four-layer cake

This is the basic method for assembling and frosting a four-layer cake. For inspiration, see Vanilla Layer Cake with Chocolate Buttercream & Raspberry Jam, or Orange Marmalade Layer Cake with Grand Marnier Buttercream, or choose your own favorite flavor combinations.

Ingredients

  • 1 recipe Vanilla Butter Cake
  • 1 recipe Buttercream (your choice of flavor)
  • 3/4 cup seedless jam or marmalade (optional)
  • 3 Tbs. liqueur, such as brandy or Grand Marnier (optional)

Nutritional Information

  • Nutritional Sample Size based on twelve servings
  • Calories (kcal) : 800
  • Fat Calories (kcal): 460
  • Fat (g): 52
  • Saturated Fat (g): 32
  • Polyunsaturated Fat (g): 2
  • Monounsaturated Fat (g): 14
  • Cholesterol (mg): 205
  • Sodium (mg): 350
  • Carbohydrates (g): 80
  • Fiber (g): 0
  • Protein (g): 7

Preparation

Assemble the layers:

    Level the cakes, if necessary, and slice each cake into two layers making a total of four layers of cake.

Place the bottom layer on a flat serving platter or a cake stand lined with strips of waxed paper to keep it clean while assembling the cake. Top the layer with a scant 1-1/2 cups buttercream, spreading it evenly with a metal cake spatula almost to the cake’s edge. If your’re using jam between the layers, stir together the jam and liquer in a small bowl. Spread a third of the jam on the next cake layer, then lay it, jam-side down, over the buttercream filling. Repeat with the next two layers.

In this world of ready mixes and canned frosting, baking and decorating layer cakes from scratch often seems like a lost art. But there’s hardly a cooking craft more satisfying: not only does it fill your house with that heady aroma, but by the time you finish assembling and decorating the cake, you feel like an architectural genius.

And once you know how to make one layer cake, you know how to make hundreds. All you need is an arsenal of a few reliable components—chocolate and vanilla cake bases, a fluffy whipped-cream filling, and a smooth buttercream (each with multiple flavoring options) and nearly endless options for decorating, from fresh berries to elegant chocolate curls.

Choose your cake style

There are two basic styles here: a stacked, “naked” cake with berries and whipped-cream filling and frosting on, or a cake filled and frosted with homemade buttercream. If you’re running short on time, opt for a whipped-cream-filled cake. Making it is a cinch, and the cake looks spectacular with whipped cream and berries oozing between the layers. But don’t be afraid of buttercream cakes: they won’t bog you down for endless hours—they require just a little more time and focus. If you want to work ahead, consider that buttercream cakes can be assembled the night before and refrigerated, while whipped cream cakes should be assembled shortly before serving.

Bake your cake

Both recipes make two 9-inch round cakes, which will be split into four layers. The Vanilla Butter Cake is tender, not overly sweet, and the perfect neutral backdrop for a variety of filling flavors. The Chocolate Sour Cream Cake is deep, intense, and exceptionally moist. The vanilla cake requires about half as much baking time as the chocolate. No matter which cake you choose, let it cool completely before beginning the assembly process.

Choose a cake flavor

Make your frosting

Whether you chose a whipped-cream frosting or buttercream frosting, you have several options for flavoring it, from basic vanilla to berry purées to citrus zest. See the options below, then refer to the recipes for specifics.

Choose a frosting flavor

Level and split the cakes

If the tops of the cakes have mounded unevenly, level them by removing the top crust with a long serrated knife.

Slice each cake into two layers: start by tracing a line around the middle of the cake with a long serrated knife. Then slowly rotate the cake while following that line with the knife and cut through the cake toward the center. After a few rotations you will have sliced the cake in two.

If you don’t get a straight cut, put a toothpick in each layer, one directly above the other, before separating them, so you can line them up again when assembling the cake. (Watch the video to see how.) This will prevent your finished cake from tilting.

Fill and stack the cakes

If you’ve chosen a whipped cream-frosted cake, adding berries between the layers not only tastes great but helps the delicate whipped cream support the cake. If you’ve chosen a buttercream-frosted cake, you can add an additional layer of flavor by spreading liqueur-thinned jam mixed with 3 Tbs. of liquer on the underside of each cake layer.

Place the bottom layer on a flat serving platter or a cake stand lined with strips of waxed paper to keep it clean while assembling the cake. Top the layer with a scant 1-1/2 cups buttercream or whipped cream frosting, spreading it evenly with a metal cake spatula almost to the cake’s edge for buttercream, or right up to the edge for whipped cream.

For a whipped cream cake, top with 1-1/2 cups berries (see options below), making sure some of the berries are around the edges of the cake so you can see them between the layers. Repeat with the next two layers.

Whipped cream cake: choose one to four berries (6-1/4 cups total)

For a buttercream cake, if you’re using jam between the layers, stir together 3/4 cup of the jam and 3 Tbs. of the liquer (see options below) in a small bowl. Spread a third of the jam on the next cake layer, then lay it, jam-side down, over the buttercream filling. Repeat with the next two layers.

Buttercream cake: Choose a jam filling (optional)

Frost the cake (buttercream only)

First apply a light coat of frosting (called crumb coating) to seal the cake crumbs in: Spoon about 1/2 cup buttercream into a small bowl. Spread it in a very thin layer over the entire cake with a small metal cake spatula. You should be able to see the cake layers through the frosting. Chill the cake for about 20 minutes or until the frosting is firm.

Spread the remaining frosting thickly and evenly over the entire cake with a large metal cake spatula. Don’t worry about getting a smooth, perfect finish; just make sure the cake is completely covered and the frosting is spread uniformly. You shouldn’t be able to see the layers underneath the buttercream.

Finish the sides of the cake (buttercream only)

Chopped or sliced nuts or chocolate shavings easily stick to the sides of a buttercream-frosted cake, which is also a handy way to disguise a less-than-perfect frosting job.

Working over a large plate or tray to catch the fallout, take a small handful of coconut/nuts/chocolate (see options below) and gently pat them around the side of the cake. Repeat until the sides are completely coated.

Choose a finish for the cake sides (optional; buttercream only)

Finish the cake top

Whipped-cream cakes are finished simply, with more whipped-cream frosting and a crown of the same berries between the layers. With buttercream cakes you have many options: citrus slices, toasted nuts, flaked coconut, chocolate curls and much more.

For whipped-cream cakes, spread the remaining 1-1/2 cups of frosting on top of the cake with the spatula. Arrange the remaining berries artfully on top of the cream.

For buttercream cakes, smear the frosting with the back of a teaspoon and pull it upward to form curls and swirls over the entire cake top (and sides, if you didn’t coat it in nuts or chocolate). Arrange any finishing touches (see options below) on top of the cake.

Choose one or two finishes for the cake top (optional; buttercream only)

In this world of ready mixes and canned frosting, baking and decorating layer cakes from scratch often seems like a lost art. But there’s hardly a cooking craft more satisfying: not only does it fill your house with that heady aroma, but by the time you finish assembling and decorating the cake, you feel like an architectural genius.

And once you know how to make one layer cake, you know how to make hundreds. All you need is an arsenal of a few reliable components—chocolate and vanilla cake bases, a fluffy whipped-cream filling, and a smooth buttercream (each with multiple flavoring options) and nearly endless options for decorating, from fresh berries to elegant chocolate curls.

Choose your cake style

There are two basic styles here: a stacked, “naked” cake with berries and whipped-cream filling and frosting on, or a cake filled and frosted with homemade buttercream. If you’re running short on time, opt for a whipped-cream-filled cake. Making it is a cinch, and the cake looks spectacular with whipped cream and berries oozing between the layers. But don’t be afraid of buttercream cakes: they won’t bog you down for endless hours—they require just a little more time and focus. If you want to work ahead, consider that buttercream cakes can be assembled the night before and refrigerated, while whipped cream cakes should be assembled shortly before serving.

Bake your cake

Both recipes make two 9-inch round cakes, which will be split into four layers. The Vanilla Butter Cake is tender, not overly sweet, and the perfect neutral backdrop for a variety of filling flavors. The Chocolate Sour Cream Cake is deep, intense, and exceptionally moist. The vanilla cake requires about half as much baking time as the chocolate. No matter which cake you choose, let it cool completely before beginning the assembly process.

Choose a cake flavor

Make your frosting

Whether you chose a whipped-cream frosting or buttercream frosting, you have several options for flavoring it, from basic vanilla to berry purées to citrus zest. See the options below, then refer to the recipes for specifics.

Choose a frosting flavor

Level and split the cakes

If the tops of the cakes have mounded unevenly, level them by removing the top crust with a long serrated knife.

Slice each cake into two layers: start by tracing a line around the middle of the cake with a long serrated knife. Then slowly rotate the cake while following that line with the knife and cut through the cake toward the center. After a few rotations you will have sliced the cake in two.

If you don’t get a straight cut, put a toothpick in each layer, one directly above the other, before separating them, so you can line them up again when assembling the cake. (Watch the video to see how.) This will prevent your finished cake from tilting.

Fill and stack the cakes

If you’ve chosen a whipped cream-frosted cake, adding berries between the layers not only tastes great but helps the delicate whipped cream support the cake. If you’ve chosen a buttercream-frosted cake, you can add an additional layer of flavor by spreading liqueur-thinned jam mixed with 3 Tbs. of liquer on the underside of each cake layer.

Place the bottom layer on a flat serving platter or a cake stand lined with strips of waxed paper to keep it clean while assembling the cake. Top the layer with a scant 1-1/2 cups buttercream or whipped cream frosting, spreading it evenly with a metal cake spatula almost to the cake’s edge for buttercream, or right up to the edge for whipped cream.

For a whipped cream cake, top with 1-1/2 cups berries (see options below), making sure some of the berries are around the edges of the cake so you can see them between the layers. Repeat with the next two layers.

Whipped cream cake: choose one to four berries (6-1/4 cups total)

For a buttercream cake, if you’re using jam between the layers, stir together 3/4 cup of the jam and 3 Tbs. of the liquer (see options below) in a small bowl. Spread a third of the jam on the next cake layer, then lay it, jam-side down, over the buttercream filling. Repeat with the next two layers.

Buttercream cake: Choose a jam filling (optional)

Frost the cake (buttercream only)

First apply a light coat of frosting (called crumb coating) to seal the cake crumbs in: Spoon about 1/2 cup buttercream into a small bowl. Spread it in a very thin layer over the entire cake with a small metal cake spatula. You should be able to see the cake layers through the frosting. Chill the cake for about 20 minutes or until the frosting is firm.

Spread the remaining frosting thickly and evenly over the entire cake with a large metal cake spatula. Don’t worry about getting a smooth, perfect finish; just make sure the cake is completely covered and the frosting is spread uniformly. You shouldn’t be able to see the layers underneath the buttercream.

Finish the sides of the cake (buttercream only)

Chopped or sliced nuts or chocolate shavings easily stick to the sides of a buttercream-frosted cake, which is also a handy way to disguise a less-than-perfect frosting job.

Working over a large plate or tray to catch the fallout, take a small handful of coconut/nuts/chocolate (see options below) and gently pat them around the side of the cake. Repeat until the sides are completely coated.

Choose a finish for the cake sides (optional; buttercream only)

Finish the cake top

Whipped-cream cakes are finished simply, with more whipped-cream frosting and a crown of the same berries between the layers. With buttercream cakes you have many options: citrus slices, toasted nuts, flaked coconut, chocolate curls and much more.

For whipped-cream cakes, spread the remaining 1-1/2 cups of frosting on top of the cake with the spatula. Arrange the remaining berries artfully on top of the cream.

For buttercream cakes, smear the frosting with the back of a teaspoon and pull it upward to form curls and swirls over the entire cake top (and sides, if you didn’t coat it in nuts or chocolate). Arrange any finishing touches (see options below) on top of the cake.

Choose one or two finishes for the cake top (optional; buttercream only)

Pastry chef Catherine Adams takes us through how to make the high-rise cake, step by step.

  • 1 hr preparation
  • 50 mins cooking plus cooling
  • Serves 14 – 18

Vanilla-rose layer cake

Tip 1: Mix the butter into the flour. Photo: Ben Dearnley

Tip 1: Mix the butter into the flour

Tip 2: Don’t overbake (and don’t peek in the oven too early). Photo: Ben Dearnley

Tip 2: Don’t overbake (and don’t peek in the oven too early)

Tip 3: To make your frosting, make sure you cool the meringue mixture. Photo: Ben Dearnley

Tip 3: To make your frosting, make sure you cool the meringue mixture

Tip 4: Fill your piping bag sans air pockets. Photo: Ben Dearnley

Tip 4: Fill your piping bag sans air pockets

Tip 5: Use a lazy Susan to assemble your cake Photo: Ben Dearnley

Tip 5: Use a lazy Susan to assemble your cake

Tip 6: Pipe the frosting from the base of the cake. Photo: Ben Dearnley

Tip 6: Pipe the frosting from the base of the cake

Vanilla-rose layer cake recipe Photo: Ben Dearnley

Vanilla-rose layer cake recipe

Ingredients

  • 450 gm cake flour (see note)
  • 400 gm caster sugar
  • 50 gm brown sugar
  • 28 gm baking powder
  • 255 gm butter, at room temperature, chopped
  • 360 gm milk, at room temperature
  • 200 gm eggwhites (7-8 eggs), at room temperature
  • 25 gm egg yolk, at room temperature
  • 15 gm (2 tsp) vanilla extract
  • 350 gm rose jam (or jam of your choice)
  • 900 gm caster sugar
  • 450 gm eggwhite (around 18 eggs)
  • 120 gm liquid glucose
  • 1 kg butter, at room temperature
  • ½ tsp vanilla extract, vanilla paste, or rose water, or to taste
  • To whiten: food colouring, or titanium dioxide (optional; see note)

Method

Notes

Note Cake flour is available from select supermarkets; to make it, remove 2 tbsp from each cup of plain flour, and replace with 2 tbsp cornflour. Titanium dioxide is a whitening agent available from cake-decorating suppliers.