How to make a pioneer wagon

If you’re wondering why you should build a pioneer wagon for glamping, here are three things a PlainsCraft covered wagon will do for your business.

1. Create an unforgettable attraction

How many wagons do you currently have at your location? If the answer is none, then it will stand out to your customers and appeal to their sense of adventure. These wagons attract a greater number of customers thanks to the unique historical experience they offer. Place multiple wagons in a circle with a fire pit in the center to create a true old west feel. Your customers might just feel like pioneers themselves once their stay is over!

2. Enhance your customers’ experience

Glamping in an 1800s style wagon creates intrigue and makes your customers’ stay unforgettable. And while they offer an old time feel, they provide all of the modern conveniences they need to make their stay truly comfortable.

3. Grow your profitability

Recent statistics show glamping structures rent quickly, making it a sensible investment that virtually pays for itself within its first year in operation. Plus, our wagons are classified as equipment, which means it qualifies for an immediate tax write off when you build a pioneer wagon as a glamping investment. Curious to see how the wagons will pay off? Let’s chat about how easy it is for your investment to start paying off.

Ready to see all you can do with a PlainsCraft covered wagon?

Get creative as you think about how to build a pioneer wagon. Our sample floor plans will show you just how luxurious or down-and-dirty you can get with our wagons.

How to make a pioneer wagon

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How to make a pioneer wagon

Covered wagons are an enduring symbol of America’s westward expansion in the 19th century. The most common kind was the Conestoga wagon. Usually pulled by teams of mules or oxen, these wagons transported pioneers and their families and goods across the plains and mountains as the western regions of North America were settled.

Items you will need

Step 1

Begin with the wagon box. The box of a Conestoga wagon is also called a Yankee bed. The Yankee bed consists of an open-topped arrangement of wooden planks or boards. Set up a large board for the bottom, about 10 to 12 feet in length and around 4 feet wide. A true Conestoga would be about twice this size. The smaller version is known as a prairie schooner. Bolt another two 10- to 12-foot planks to the long sides of the bottom plank. These sideboards should be about 2 or 3 feet high. Fill any gaps in the boards with tar or caulking.

Step 2

Select a narrow beam about the same length as your Yankee bed. This will be the support for the wheels. It must also be strong enough to support the weight of the Yankee box and cover as well as all your passengers and freight. Select two 4-foot beams and bolt them to the underside of each end of the long main beam. They should be perpendicular to the main beam. Attach a brace to the underside of each end of these 4-foot beams. Your brace can be iron, or it can be a triangle made of wooden beams. It must be the right size for an axle. The axle must fit through it and be able to move freely. If you make a wooden triangle, make sure it points downward.

Step 3

Thrust an axle through each pair of braces. Attach a wagon wheel to the end of each axle. A traditional wagon wheel has wooden spokes and a wooden rim. The wooden rim is enclosed by an iron tire. Wagon wheels are complicated to build; your best option is to buy them. Next, attach two more short beams to the top of the long main beam that is your wheel base. These two beams can about the same dimensions as the beams supporting the axles. Attach them a little in from the axle beams. Bolt them up on their long sides so you get some height above the wheel base. Next, attach the Yankee bed to these beams and bolt it into place.

Step 4

Use some thin beams to make your bows. The bows are the arched pieces of wood that go on top of the Yankee bed to support the canvas cover. Make the bows by soaking or steaming the thin beams and slowly bending them to the right shape. Attach these bows to the sides of the Yankee bed. You’ll will need four or five bows. Space them evenly along the Yankee bed. Finally, get a large piece of canvas and stretch it over the bows. This is your bonnet, or cover.

Step 5

Build the tongue for the covered wagon. The tongue is a long, wooden pole that attaches to the front of the wheel base. Traditional wagons use an arrangement of wooden singletree and doubletree to hold the tongue in place and permit it to move up and down. About as long as the axles, the singletree sits below the tongue. The doubletree is about the length of the crosspieces above the wheels. It sits on top of the tongue. To make the yoke, attach a short pole perpendicular to the top front end of the long tongue. The harness is attached to this yoke.

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How to make a pioneer wagon

American pioneers used three types of covered wagons: the early basic farm wagon, the Conestoga and the Prairie Schooner. Although they differed in height, length and weight, the covered wagons that crossed the plains were constructed with basically the same materials.

Cloth

The bonnet or covering of the wagon was made of 10-oz. canvas, which is a heavy cotton duck material. In the 21st century, covered wagon makers use tight weave painters drop cloth. The canvas was covered with linseed oil to make it waterproof. Cotton draw strings sewn into the hems of the canvas at the front and back openings of the bonnet allowed the bonnet to be closed at night or for protection from the elements during the day.

Wood for Bows

Bows, the u-shaped wooden slats that supported the bonnet, were usually made from hickory, white oak or ash. The wagon worker cut five to eight strips of wood, depending on the type of covered wagon he was making, that measured 2-1/4 inch wide by 3/8 inch thick by 12 feet long and then soaked them in water for 24 hours. The slats were placed under a wagon wheel and the ends were slowly brought upward until they were about 30 inches apart. Then they were tied securely and allowed to dry for a couple of days before being used in the wagon.

Wood for Wagon

The Yankee bed, the basic bed of the wagon, and the sideboards above the bed were made of maple, hickory or oak. This part of the covered wagon consisted of long planks for the bottom and sideboards slightly longer than the bottom boards, which were bolted to the long side of the bottom boards. The seams were filled with pitch or tar to make them waterproof.

Other Uses for Wood

Hubs, spokes, and felly rims of wheels were made of oak. The front wheels of the covered wagon are smaller than the back ones, which make the wagon easier to manage.

The tongue, or falling tree, was an oak pole that extended out in front of the wagon that attached the horses, mules or oxen to the wagon. The length of the tongue depended on the number of animals needed to pull the load.

Oak doubletrees and singletrees were used for horses or mules only. Oak neck yokes were used for oxen.

Metal

Metal grommets were sewn into the canvas of the bonnet every 16 to 20 inches along the sides of the bonnet to tie it to the wagon. A light rope strung through the grommets was secured by metal hooks in the sideboards, which anchored the bonnet in place.

Hand-forged iron was used for many parts of the wagon, such as clouts, lynch pins and thimble skein axles. Iron also was used to strengthen wood in stress areas such as for braces to support the Yankee bed at the corners and in the hubs of the wheels. Iron tires were fitted around the wooden rim of the wheels to support the wood and to take wear and tear.

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How to make a pioneer wagon

As pioneers and early settlers crossed harsh terrain to settle the West, they usually came with nothing more than a team of oxen or horses and a covered wagon that held all of their worldly possessions. The covered wagon was also their refuge in inclement weather. Unfortunately, the road West was one littered with rivers and creeks, meaning that the pioneers would need to get their animals, possessions and wagon across the river. They would work hard in preparing wagons for river crossings to keep everything and everyone safe.

Bolting Down

When the early settlers viewed a river ahead, they sent out scouts to look for the best place to cross. They would not want to cross somewhere where the water was too deep or especially fast-moving. At times, rivers had areas of undertow called “chutes” that could drown animals, so it was important to look for slow moving water. If you were a pioneer, while the scouts looked for the best place, you’d begin securing your belongings with ropes and rubbing wax all over the open portions of the wagon to help waterproof it against the rushing river. All of the people, even children, were removed from the wagons to get ready to cross on foot or by raft.

Shallow Water

If the water in the river was fairly shallow, the pioneers could drive straight across it with their teams of oxen. In this case, what was too heavy would be removed from the wagons to make it easier for the oxen to pull the heavy wagons across the often rocky riverbeds. As a pioneer, you’d have to go to work in helping your neighbors carry items across the river on foot, and children were usually carried across as well. If the water was shallow, but the wagons too heavy and the water fast, you would ask a neighbor to double-up teams of oxen for each wagon and slowly get everyone’s wagons across one at a time.

Deep Water

If the pioneers came across water that was moving too fast or was too deep, and a more shallow place to cross was not found, then they would quickly create rafts that were known as “scows.” These lightweight rafts had beams to tie the wagons onto and float them across to the other side. If you were a pioneer, you’d need to remove almost all that you could from your wagon to make it light enough to float with a makeshift raft. One would need to lash fallen trees and rods together with rope to create a scow, and drive posts in it for keeping the wagons in place. Often, when American Indians were present, they would secure leather boats in which to get their belongings across the river.

Pioneers Unit
Includes the lessons: Making A Wagon, Wagon Trail And Tribulations, Map to Fort Laramie, Poems Along The Trail, Pioneer Checkers Game, and Culmination: Time Capsule Reflection.

Westward Expansion Unit
Focus: Students will investigate the pioneer movement: modes of transportation, reasons for moving, people involved, and the life in general.

Pioneer Covered Wagon
Use a milk carton to make this miniature version of a covered wagon driven by pioneers many years ago.

A Pioneer’s Journey to the Frontier
This page was designed by 4th and 5th graders for other elementary students. It includes information about early American Pioneers who traveled to the frontiers, recipes, pioneer music, projects, quizzes, and more.

Pioneer Life in America
Two 4th grade students put this site together to share facts and resources about pioneer life.

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  • How to make a pioneer wagon

    The most familiar covered wagon crossing the plains and mountains to the promised land of the west was a smaller, lighter cousin on the Conestoga wagon of the east. This “prairie schooner” was superbly designed for its job of transporting pioneer families and their goods on the five month long, 2000 mile journey west. The cloth top protected people and possessions from sun and rain, hail and wind, and it could be closed off entirely by drawstrings on each end. The big wheels rolled easily over the bumps and hole of the rough trails, and wide rims kept the wagons from sinking into the soft ground. The wagon’s 10 – by 3 1/2 foot- body could take a load of a ton and a half, but experts advised keeping it below this limit. The lighter the wagon, the less likely it was to bog down in muddy stream-banks or prairie sloughs. There was not much room inside the wagon, and in decent weather most people cooked, ate, and slept outside.

    When you consider the amount of goods that the average pioneer family would have carried with them it is no small wonder that broken axels, wheels and running gear were a common problem on the trail. Stops were scheduled along the way at groves of hard wood to collect the lumber needed to manufacture replacement parts for the wagons.

    The pioneer wagon carried a huge assortment of goods the families needed to survive the trip and to homestead once they reached the end of their journey. If you were to take a peak in a pioneer wagon you would most likely see:

    Bedding And Tent Supplies

    Blankets, feather beds, ground cloths, pillows, tent, poles, stakes, ropes.

    Rifle, pistol, knife, hatchet, gunpowder, lead, bullet mold, powder horn, bullet pouch, holster.

    Flour, bacon, coffee, baking soda, corn meal, hardtack, dried beans, dried beef, dried fruit, molasses, vinegar, pepper, eggs, salt, sugar, rice, tea.

    Cooking Utensils

    Dutch oven, kettle, skillet, reflector oven, coffee grinder, coffee pot, teapot, butcher knife, ladle, tin tableware, water keg, matches

    Miscellaneous Items

    Surgical instruments, liniments, bandages, campstool, chamber pot, washbowl, lanterns, candle molds, tallow, spyglasses, scissors, needles, pins, thread.

    How to make a pioneer wagon
    Herbal Medicine Kit

    Wool sack coats, rubber coats, cotton dresses, wool pantaloons, buckskin pants, duck trousers, cotton shirts, flannel shirts, cotton socks, brogans, boots, felt hats, Palm-leaf sun hats, green goggles, sunbonnets.

    Tools And Extra Equipment

    Set of augers, gimlet, ax, hammer, hoe, plow, shovel, spade, whetstone, oxbows, axels, kingbolts, linchpins, ox shoes, spokes, wagon tongue, heavy ropes, chains.

    Canned foods, plant cuttings, schoolbooks, musical instruments, dolls, family albums, jewelry, china, silverware, fine linens, iron stoves, furniture.

    How to make a pioneer wagon

    Many of the “Western” movies we have seen show a family riding in the wagon on there way to their new home. This is an inaccurate portrayal to say the least. When you consider the fact that a wagon box is roughly a 10′ by 3 1/2′ container with 30 inch sides there was simply not any room for people in the wagons unless they were injured or extremely ill. The fact of the matter is – most of the pioneers walked around 2000 miles to their new home.

    Many times the travelers found that they were trying to take too many of there belongings with them and the draft animals could not handle such a heavy load. The trails to the western territories were strewn with the pioneers personal possessions that were left behind in an attempt to lighten the load. There are even written accounts of pianos and parlor organs seen left behind on the trail. How hard it must have been to leave behind such a vestige of civilization.

    Oxen, Horses, and Mules

    How to make a pioneer wagon

    Most of the overlanders chose to use oxen for their draft animals. Although oxen were slower than mules, they fared much better in muddy conditions and could survive on little food. most of the pioneers used the oxen from their farms back east and were experienced at handling them. Oxen were relatively cheap. They cost only $55 to $65 per yolk while mules might be as much as $100 each. Horses were not used until the later years of western emigration because they could not work well with such poor feed.

    People ask me, “Did you build your wagon?” I point at the yellow wagon body and say, “yes, I built the body.” Then I say, “but Pioneer Equipment built the running gear.” Today I’d like to welcome Pioneer Equipment aboard as the latest Lost Sea Expedition supporter. Here’s more about how Pioneer fits in to the Lost Sea Expedition.

    How to make a pioneer wagon My mule Polly and the Lost Sea Expedition wagon straddle the North Dakota/Montana state line. This is the yellow wagon Polly pulled across America.

    The Lost Sea Expedition

    The Lost Sea Expedition is a 4-part series about my 14 month wagon voyage across America. For the series, I built a small wagon and filmed my way from Canada to Mexico. The series premiers on Rocky Mountain PBS late 2017.

    How to make a pioneer wagon Route of the Lost Sea Expedition

    The wagon behind the TV Series

    I’m lucky. As I’ve written elsewhere, I’m the kind of guy that can just set off with a bit of gear knowing full-well that things are going to turn out well. The key is to set off with a bit of gear. Not too much. Not too big. Don’t make too many plans.

    So early in the planning stages of the Lost Sea Expedition, I knew what I wanted in a wagon. The wagon had to be small and light enough to be pulled by one mule. I also wanted to build it quickly. I didn’t want to spend years building the perfect wagon. Better to put the energy in to the voyage, not getting ready to take the voyage.

    That’s why, early in the planning process, I decided to buy the wagon’s running gear.

    How to make a pioneer wagon For illustration only. Here’s a Pioneer running gear I used to build a flat bed wagon. I used that wagon for hay rides and plain ‘ol messing about. A great rig. I later removed the wood bed and added a large body.

    Running Gear

    The running gear is all the stuff that makes a wagon run: front and rear axles, brakes, wheels and the coupling pole that connects the front and rear axles.

    At the time I lived in Southern Pines, North Carolina. I’d been around wagons just enough to understand that it would be faster, instead of building my own running gear, to just go ahead and buy that part of the wagon.

    It happened quickly. One day I was thinking of building a wagon chassis out of a junked Ford Pinto. The next day, I was the proud owner of a Pioneer running gear.

    How to make a pioneer wagon Here I’m building the large wagon body on the chassis pictured above. The primer-colored box is the steel frame work that, with the addition of walls and a roof, will become the wagon body. This is the wagon I gave my buddy Bob Skelding after his wagon was destroyed by a tractor trailer. He ended up putting 10,000 miles on that rig.

    Building the Wagon Body

    Now that I had the running gear, I just needed to build the wagon body. I got busy in my buddy Mel’s garage and, in short order, welded up a simple frame. To that, I added sides and a roof.

    How to make a pioneer wagon Here’s how the wagon body looked after I added sides and roof beams. How to make a pioneer wagon A cozy interior.

    And the rest is history

    Flash forward. I’ve built my wagon. I’m heading from Canada to Mexico. I meet all sorts of folks and encounter the best – and worst – the Great Plains can throw at at a man.

    How to make a pioneer wagon A Saskatchewan farming family tops up Polly’s oat supply (outside Lake Alma, SK)

    How to make a pioneer wagon The Pioneer gear in action. Pioneer’s equipment is often red. I repainted their running gear to match my wagon’s yellow and green paint job. How to make a pioneer wagon Brrrrr. Mule Polly and I make our way through a snow patch of South Dakota weather. This was one of those times I could have used another bit of gear Pioneer Equipment sells – sled runners that attach to the wheels.

    But wait a minute? Where are the photos of the wagon crashing and the frame bending and the wheels falling off the hubs? Well, sure, we had those crashes.

    How to make a pioneer wagon Polly jumped a fence….while attached to the wagon. The fence bent. The Pioneer running gear didn’t. (Outside Alzada, MT)

    But there aren’t any photos of broken axles or coupling poles because, well, nothing like that ever broke on my wagon. That Pioneer gear was just that stout.

    About Pioneer Equipment

    Pioneer Equipment is Amish owned. They sell their equipment through distributors. In keeping with their beliefs, they don’t maintain an online presence or website.

    Still, you can call or write them for info, spare parts and their catalogue.

    How to make a pioneer wagon

    Contact:
    Pioneer Equipment

    16875 Jericho Road

    Dalton, Ohio 44618

    Ph: 330 857 6340

    Thanks Pioneer Equipment for your support .

    BYU professor and student make replica of remarkable invention

    How to make a pioneer wagon

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    How to make a pioneer wagon

    BYU student Joseph Jacobsen, left, and professor Larry Howell show their replica of the odometer.

    Jaren Wilkey, BYU

    PROVO — A legend about the man who kept records in the first Mormon pioneer company says William Clayton was such a stickler for detail that he tied a red bandanna to a wagon wheel and painstakingly counted how many times it went around to measure the trek’s progress.

    William Clayton clearly was a fussbudget about pioneer mileage in 1847, but a guide with his measurements of the Mormon Trail was published in St. Louis in 1848 and became invaluable to pioneers and to the 49ers of the California Gold Rush.

    There’s no evidence Clayton ever used a red bandanna, but he was the one who persuaded Brigham Young to form the team that engineered an ingenious wagon-wheel odometer. The original pioneer odometer has been lost to history, but Brigham Young University mechanical engineering professor Larry Howell has created the first working replica of the remarkable device.

    “Other people have built replicas,” Howell said, “but none have been to the actual dimensions. One of the myths about the odometer was that the dimensions were unknown.”

    Howell dug through the journals of Clayton and Orson Pratt and said that with those first-hand descriptions of the wooden gadget and his own knowledge of gear design — he teaches a gear design class at BYU — he realized an exact replica was possible.

    Howell usually pushes the envelope of modern mechanical engineering, working on things such as microprocessors and fitting working mechanical devices on microchips. But he was intrigued when he learned about the odometer.

    He’d seen an old odometer at the Museum of Church History and Art of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Salt Lake City that was proclaimed in church history books to be the one built by Clayton, Pratt and a craftsman named Appleton Harmon. At first, Howell thought he’d try to add to a book called “Landmarks in Mechanical Engineering.”

    Then he learned that former BYU professor Norm Wright had proved the museum piece wasn’t the Young-Clayton-Pratt odometer — and that no replica with the right dimensions existed.

    “I’ve been a nerd for a long time,” Howell said, “but the novelty of these guys conducting a research-and-development project in the wilderness really intrigued me.”

    The red bandana story could be true. As the pioneers moved across Iowa after the Mormons were ejected from Nauvoo, Ill., Clayton became frustrated that his estimates of daily pioneer progress were regularly lower than those posited by others.

    “He doesn’t say it like this,” Howell said, “but it’s clear he’s getting some grief for his lower estimates.”

    So one day Clayton counted the revolutions of a wagon wheel and did the calculations based on the diameter of the wheel. He found 360 revolutions equaled one mile. He counted all day. At the end of the day, he gathered everyone’s estimates and, Howell said, “sure enough, he’d been the one who was right.”

    Clayton pestered Young for a machine that would take accurate measurements, and Young turned to Pratt, who designed the odometer based on Clayton’s needs. The group resembled a modern engineering team, with Young as manager, Pratt as engineer, Clayton as customer and Harmon as craftsman.

    “You quickly realize this was an absolutely brilliant man,” Howell said of Pratt, “that people don’t realize what a genius he was.”

    A wagon wheel was outfitted with a piece that, at the end of each revolution of the wheel, turned a tooth on the odometer attached to the wagon. Every six turns equaled one mile. With 60 teeth on the gear, the device was extremely accurate

    A second gear counted every 10 miles, but Clayton and Harmon didn’t follow Pratt’s specifications for that part and rain caused it to swell and break.

    Still, Clayton’s job became a lot easier. Since he kept track of the exact distance and time on the trek, the odometer acted as a crude speedometer, too. The pioneers made roughly two miles per hour, which means Clayton had to check the odometer only every 30 minutes or so.

    “That’s better than a red bandanna,” said Joey Jacobsen, the BYU student Howell enlisted to manufacture the replica of the odometer.

    Jacobsen made no attempt to use old tools to make the replica, which is 18 inches long, 15 inches high, 3 inches thick and is made up of four gears turning on three shafts.

    “No way,” Jacobsen said, “we used any modern tool we could find.”

    The exercise still gave him a new appreciation for the inventiveness of the pioneers.

    “I’m impressed they made it, especially on the trail,” Jacobsen said. “It’s one thing if they had a shop in Nauvoo, but to make it nights and mornings out of the back of a wagon?”

    Clayton returned the 1,032 miles he’d measured from Salt Lake City to Winter Quarters, Iowa, in 1848. Young sent him to St. Louis to publish “The Latter-day Saints’ Emigrants’ Guide.” The booklet was so popular there was at least one unauthorized version. Three other guides either relied on Clayton, borrowed heavily or plagiarized.

    The odometer, Clayton and his guide provided incredible detail to pioneers who used the trail over the next several years and led much of the Gold Rush right through Salt Lake City on its way to California, a financial boon to the fledgling LDS community.

    “The pioneers were cash-strapped and now you have these 49ers with cash coming through who need repairs and supplies,” Howell said. “

    Howell will present his research at a “History of Mechanisms Symposium” in Philadelphia in September. His work has been peer-reviewed and will be published in the proceedings of the symposium by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers.

    How to make a pioneer wagon

    The Conestoga wagon was a symbol of America’s Wild West era, back in the 19 th century. These wagons were covered and pulled by horses, mules or oxen, and played an instrumental role in the transportation of families and goods across the continent. While these wagons are not in use anymore, you can still make one quite easily for Halloween. Keep reading this article to learn how.

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    Instructions

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    You first need to begin with the wagon box which is also known as a Yankee bed. This bed consists of wooden planks or boards. You need to set up a large board which will be used as the bottom. It should be somewhere around 10 to 12 feet in length and 4 feet in width. Now on the bottom planks you need to bolt two more planks which need to be 10 to 12 feet in length. You can use tar and caulking to fill the gaps in the boards.

    You now need to select a beam of the same length as the Yankee bed, which will enable you to provide support to the wheels. The important thing is that it should be big enough to cover all your passengers and strong enough to support the weight. You now require four foot long beams and bolt them to the end of the main beam. Bolt them in such a way that they are perpendicular to the beam. The four foot beams should also have a brace on the underside.

    An axle needs to be passed through the braces. Get a wagon wheel and attach it to the end of the axle. A wagon wheel has wooden rims, wooden spokes and the rim has to be enclosed with an iron tire. It is recommended that instead of trying to build your own wagon wheel, you buy one.

    You now need to make the bows with the thin beams. These bows go at the top of the Yankee bed. You can make the beams by steaming and then slowly bending them. Remember do not bend them quickly, as they might break. These bows now need to be attached on the sides of the Yankee bed. Space these four to five bows evenly. For the cover, just stretch a large canvas over the bows.

    Seguin Canvas & Awning, LLC.

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    How to make a pioneer wagon

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      Wagons have been used for decades and are apart of our heritage. Seguin Canvas and Awning, llc is committed to restoration by recovering wagons. We also have additional features that we can add that might make your trail ride a little more comfortable. Call us for a free consultation Make your next trail ride, ranch tour, parade, or pioneer tradition come to life!

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      How to make a pioneer wagon

      Canopy Material

      Some of the largest fabric manufactures that we use are SunbrellaВ®, Serge Ferrari GroupВ®, and HerculiteВ®. Wagons can be done in different colors, fabric types, vinyl styles, and have custom options such as mesh screen. Velcro, zippers, and ties are available as custom options for wagon covers.

      Most fabrics comes with a manufacture warranty. Contact our representative today to find out more about fabrics and specific warranties that are available.

      If you do not see a style you like here, call us for a consultation.

      We do repairs, covers, and speciality items as well.

      How to make a pioneer wagonThe thread used to manufacture your awning is of the highest quality and doesn’t contain any polyester. We only use Gore В® Tenera В® Sewing Thread.

      Our thread is only the best. The thread is made up of 100 percent expanded polytetrafluoroethylene.

      Why Choose Seguin Canvas & Awning?

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      • สิ่งที่คุณต้องการ

      ส่วนอื่น ๆ

      ผู้บุกเบิกเดินทางไปทั่วอเมริกาด้วยเกวียนที่มีหลังคาคลุม เกวียนสามารถจดจำได้ทันทีสำหรับโครงไม้และผ้าใบปู คุณไม่จำเป็นต้องเป็นผู้แสวงบุญที่อาศัยอยู่ในอเมริกาเพื่อสร้างเกวียนที่มีหลังคาคลุม ด้วยสิ่งของบางอย่างจากรอบ ๆ บ้านและความคิดสร้างสรรค์มากมายคุณสามารถสร้างเกวียนขนาดเล็กของคุณเองที่มีลักษณะคล้ายกับที่ผู้แสวงบุญใช้!

      ขั้นตอน

      ส่วนที่ 1 จาก 3: การสร้างฐานเกวียน

      หากล่องสี่เหลี่ยมเพื่อใช้เป็นฐานรถบรรทุกของคุณ กล่องของคุณอาจมีขนาดใดก็ได้ที่คุณต้องการ แต่กล่องรองเท้าทำงานได้ดีเป็นพิเศษสำหรับโครงการนี้ กล่องของคุณควรสั้นกว่าความกว้างเล็กน้อย หากกล่องของคุณสูงเกินไปให้ตัดให้เล็กลง

      • คุณตัดลงจากด้านบนของกล่องมากแค่ไหนขึ้นอยู่กับว่าจะเริ่มด้วยกล่องใหญ่แค่ไหน ใช้วิจารณญาณที่ดีที่สุด
      • คุณสามารถใช้กล่องนม ตัดแผงด้านข้างออกจากนั้นตัดผนังลงไม่ให้สูงมาก

      ตัดเดือยบาง ๆ เป็น 2 ชิ้นที่เหมือนกัน ชิ้นส่วนจะต้องเป็น ⁄2 ยาวกว่าส่วนท้ายแคบของเกวียนถึง 1 นิ้ว (1.3 ถึง 2.5 ซม.) คุณสามารถตัดเดือยด้วยกรรไกรหรือใบมีดงานฝีมือ คุณยังสามารถหักครึ่งแล้วขัดปลายหยัก

      • หากคุณไม่มีเดือยบาง ๆ ให้ใช้ฟางหรือไม้เสียบแทน หากเกวียนของคุณมีขนาดเล็กมากคุณสามารถใช้ไม้อมยิ้มได้!

      เลื่อนเดือยผ่านรูเพื่อสร้างแกน ตรวจสอบให้แน่ใจว่าเดือยมีพื้นที่เพียงพอที่จะหมุนไปรอบ ๆ ในรูที่คุณเพิ่งทำ หากจำเป็นให้ใช้กรรไกรเพื่อทำให้รูใหญ่ขึ้น เว้นไว้ประมาณ ⁄4 ถึง ⁄2 นิ้ว (0.64 ถึง 1.27 ซม.) ของเดือยที่ยื่นออกมาจากแต่ละรู

      ส่วนที่ 2 จาก 3: การเพิ่มล้อ

      ตัดวงกลมที่เหมือนกัน 4 วงออกจากกระดาษแข็ง ติดตามวงกลมโดยใช้เข็มทิศฝาเล็ก ๆ หรือแก้วน้ำดื่ม ทำให้วงกลมมีความสูงเท่ากับเกวียนของคุณ เมื่อคุณพอใจกับขนาดแล้วให้ตัดวงกลมออก การใช้มีดคราฟต์จะง่ายกว่า แต่คุณไม่มีมันอยู่ในมือคุณสามารถใช้กรรไกรแทนได้

      ทาสีวงกลมสีน้ำตาลหากต้องการ หากกระดาษแข็งเป็นสีน้ำตาลอยู่แล้วให้ข้ามขั้นตอนนี้ไป หากกระดาษแข็งไม่ใช่สีน้ำตาลให้ใช้เวลาสักครู่ในการวาดวงกลมด้วยสีอะคริลิกหัตถกรรมสีน้ำตาลและพู่กัน ปล่อยให้สีแห้งก่อนดำเนินการต่อ

      • ทาสีด้านหลังของวงกลมเพื่อให้ได้สีที่ดีขึ้น

      วาดซี่สีดำลงบนล้อ ลากเส้น 3 เส้นไขว้กันตรงกลางของแต่ละวงล้อสร้างรูปดอกจันขนาดใหญ่ คุณสามารถทำได้โดยใช้มาร์กเกอร์สีดำหนา ๆ หรือจะทาสีทับแทนโดยใช้พู่กันบาง ๆ และสีอะครีลิกสีดำ หากคุณอยากดูมีฝีมือมากขึ้นให้ทากาวเส้นด้ายสีดำทับเส้นที่คุณวาด

      • กาวร้อนหรือกาวที่ไม่มีรสนิยมจะใช้ได้ดีในการติดเส้นด้ายเข้ากับวงกลม หากคุณใช้กาวร้อนให้ทำงานทีละ 1 บรรทัดไม่เช่นนั้นจะติดกาวเร็วเกินไป

      ตัดช่องว่างระหว่างซี่ออกถ้าคุณต้องการล้อที่เหมือนจริง ขั้นตอนนี้อาจเป็นเรื่องยุ่งยากดังนั้นจึงควรให้ผู้ใหญ่ช่วยเหลือคุณ ตรวจสอบให้แน่ใจว่าคุณตัดเฉพาะสามเหลี่ยมระหว่างซี่เท่านั้น ระวังอย่าตัดเข้าไปตรงกลางหรือด้านนอกของล้อ

      ติดล้อเข้ากับเดือย หากเดือยบางเกินไปและล้อหลุดอยู่เรื่อย ๆ ให้เจาะรูตรงกลางล้อแต่ละล้อจากนั้นเลื่อนล้อไปที่เดือย ยึดล้อเข้ากับเดือยด้วยกาวหยดเพื่อไม่ให้หลุดออก

      • ตรวจสอบให้แน่ใจว่าซี่อยู่ด้านนอก
      • ล้อต้องอยู่กึ่งกลาง หากจำเป็นให้วาด X ที่ด้านหลังของแต่ละล้อเพื่อหาจุดศูนย์กลาง
    • ส่วนที่ 3 ของ 3: การคลุมเกวียน

      ตัด 2 ถึง 3 แถบออกจากกระดาษแข็งหรือกระดาษแข็งบาง ๆ เพื่อทำเป็นส่วนโค้ง แถบต้องยาวพอที่จะสร้างส่วนโค้งเมื่อคุณจับปลายกับด้านข้างของเกวียน ซุ้มประตูควรสูงประมาณ 3 เท่าของความสูงของเกวียนของคุณ สีของกระดาษแข็งหรือกระดาษแข็งไม่สำคัญเพราะจะอยู่ด้านใน

      • กล่องเล็ก ๆ จะต้องใช้ 2 แถบ กล่องขนาดใหญ่จะต้องใช้แถบ 3 ถึง 4 แถบเพื่อการรองรับที่มากขึ้น
      • คุณสามารถใช้น้ำยาทำความสะอาดท่อแทนการ์ดสต๊อกหรือแถบกระดาษแข็ง ตัดน้ำยาล้างท่อถ้ายาวเกินไป เชื่อมต่อน้ำยาล้างท่อหลาย ๆ ตัวถ้ากล่องของคุณใหญ่มาก

      กาวแถบเพื่อสร้างส่วนโค้งที่ด้านหน้าและด้านหลังของเกวียน ใช้แถบแรกของคุณแล้วงอเป็นรูปตัวยูเพื่อสร้างส่วนโค้งแรกของคุณ จัดตำแหน่งส่วนโค้งที่ส่วนหน้าของเกวียนของคุณ ลดปลายโค้งลงในเกวียนประมาณ ⁄2 ถึง 1 นิ้ว (1.3 ถึง 2.5 ซม.) ยึดส่วนโค้งเข้ากับผนังด้านในของเกวียนด้วยกาวร้อน ทำซ้ำขั้นตอนนี้สำหรับส่วนโค้งที่สองที่ด้านหลังของเกวียน

      • คุณสามารถใช้กาวที่ไม่มีรสนิยมสำหรับขั้นตอนนี้ได้ แต่คุณจะต้องยึดแถบด้วยผ้าหนีบผ้าจนกว่ากาวจะแห้ง
      • หากเกวียนของคุณมีขนาดใหญ่มากให้เพิ่มซุ้มประตูที่สามตรงกลางเกวียน

      ตัดสี่เหลี่ยมผืนผ้าออกจากผ้าให้ใหญ่พอที่จะคลุมกรอบ วัดความยาวของเกวียนของคุณก่อนจากนั้นวัดตาม 1 ของส่วนโค้งจากปลายจรดปลาย ตัดสี่เหลี่ยมผืนผ้าออกจากผ้าสีขาวหรือสีขาวตามขนาดของคุณ ผ้าฝ้ายสีขาวหรือสีขาวนวลจะเหมาะกับสิ่งนี้ที่สุด แคนวาสอาจมีความแม่นยำมากกว่า แต่อาจทับส่วนโค้งได้

      • คุณยังสามารถใช้กระดาษพิมพ์สีขาวหรือกระดาษก่อสร้างเพื่อทำปก

      ใช้ผ้าพันทับบนโครงและยึดด้วยกาว ใช้พู่กันทากาวที่ไม่มีรสนิยมที่ส่วนโค้ง พาดผ้าไว้เหนือส่วนโค้งและขจัดรอยยับให้เรียบ หากคุณกำลังใช้กระดาษคุณอาจต้องยึดขอบกระดาษกับด้านข้างของเกวียนด้วยเทปจนกว่ากาวจะแห้ง

      • หากคุณยึดขอบของผ้าใบกับเกวียนด้วยเทปให้ลอกเทปออกทันทีที่กาวแห้ง
      • หากคุณใช้น้ำยาทำความสะอาดท่อคุณสามารถใช้กาวโดยตรงจากขวด คุณสามารถลองใช้กาวร้อนได้เช่นกัน แต่ทำงานได้อย่างรวดเร็วจึงไม่แข็งตัว

      ปล่อยให้กาวแห้งจากนั้นตัดผ้าส่วนเกินออกหากจำเป็น รอสองสามชั่วโมงเพื่อให้กาวแห้ง หากมีผ้าห้อยลงมาที่ด้านข้างของเกวียนให้ใช้กรรไกรตัดแต่งจนกว่าจะถึงขอบด้านบนของผนังด้านข้างของเกวียน หากมีผ้าแขวนอยู่เหนือด้านหน้าและด้านหลังของเกวียนให้ตัดแต่งด้วย

      เพิ่มสายรัดสำหรับม้าหรือวัวหากต้องการ ตัดเชือกที่มีความยาวประมาณเกวียนของคุณแล้วพับครึ่ง กาวปลายเชือกแต่ละด้านเข้าที่ด้านในของผนังด้านหน้าของเกวียนของคุณ กาวร้อนจะทำงานได้ดีที่สุดสำหรับสิ่งนี้ แต่คุณสามารถใช้กาวที่ไม่มีรสนิยมได้เช่นกัน ตรวจสอบให้แน่ใจว่าคุณติดกาวที่ด้านล่างเพื่อไม่ให้แสดง

      เสร็จแล้ว.

      คำถามและคำตอบของชุมชน

      ฉันจะทำให้มันสามารถควบคุมได้อย่างไร?

      สับช่องว่างที่ใหญ่กว่าสำหรับเพลาล้อและเชื่อมต่อกับแกนล้อในแนวตั้ง เพิ่มพวงมาลัย / จอยสติ๊กหากคุณต้องการ

      If you’re looking for Pioneer Day Activities, then look no more! Mariah has created a roundup of things to do, including crafts and snacks.

      This month in Utah, we celebrate Pioneer Day on July 24th. Pioneer Day is an important day here in Utah and is a lot of fun! What is Pioneer Day exactly? Well, it’s a state holiday where we celebrate when Brigham Young and the first group of Mormon pioneers came into the Salt Lake Valley in 1847. The pioneers are a BIG part of Utah’s history and they stand as amazing examples of strength, dedication, faith, family, and courage. If you’re looking for some fun ways to teach your kids about the pioneers this Pioneer Day, look no further! Here are 17 activities and crafts that will help them learn about who the pioneers were and give them a taste of what their lives were like. Enjoy Pioneer Day!

      How to make a pioneer wagon

      17 Pioneer Day Activities & Crafts for Kids (she: Mariah)

      How to make a pioneer wagon

      Blue Skies Ahead

      How to make a pioneer wagon

      Heaps of Laundry

      How to make a pioneer wagon

      How to make a pioneer wagon

      Jamie Cooks It Up

      How to make a pioneer wagon

      How to make a pioneer wagon

      How to make a pioneer wagon

      How to make a pioneer wagon

      The Crafty Classroom

      How to make a pioneer wagon

      How to make a pioneer wagon

      How to make a pioneer wagon

      How to make a pioneer wagon

      How to make a pioneer wagon

      How to make a pioneer wagon

      Adventure in a Box

      How to make a pioneer wagon

      Living in Lilliput

      How to make a pioneer wagon

      Little House on the Prairie

      How to make a pioneer wagon

      Here’s another great Pioneer Day post on the blog:

      How to make a pioneer wagon

      And for more fun activities to do with the kids, check out these posts on OSSS:

      Monday, March 2, 2015

      Plans to Making Covered Wagon Plans PDF Download

      How to make a pioneer wagon
      How to make a pioneer wagon
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      How to make a pioneer wagon
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      Interpretive panel at the Sand Hill Ruts near Sutherland, Nebraska.

      The Sand Hill Ruts near Sutherland, Nebraska.

      One of the ruts near Sand Hill, Sutherland, Nebraska.

      Interpretive panel at the Sand Hill Ruts near Sutherland, Nebraska.

      The Sand Hill Ruts near Sutherland, Nebraska.

      North Platte River near the Sand Hill Ruts, Sutherland, Nebraska.

      Sutherland Bridge over the North Platte River near the Sand Hill Ruts, Sutherland, Nebraska.

      As pioneers of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and others trekked across what is now the state of Nebraska, the route was initially flat and firm, minimizing the difficulty of the journey. But as they continued west beyond the city of North Platte, things changed.

      North Platte River near the Sand Hill Ruts, Sutherland, Nebraska.

      Just north of Sutherland, Lincoln County, Nebraska, they came to a series of sand hills that slope down to the North Platte River. The deep sand and steep hills on the trail in that area made it very difficult for the animal teams to pull the heavy wagons.

      An interpretive panel at the site, now known as Sand Hill Ruts, reads: “These great sand bluffs plunge to the river’s edge creating a formidable barrier for pioneer wagon trains. On May 13, 1847, Brigham Young and Heber C. Kimball scouted a valley route through these hills for the Mormon pioneer company. Loose, deep sand created a hard pull for the wagon teams. The travelers decided to rest their animals overnight, and then to double team them to be able to make the ascent.”

      The panel further interprets the site as one where “the many ruts and swales mark the passage of hundreds of overland wagons.”

      The slow nature of the travel near the sand hills necessitated that the travelers find places to camp near the hills. These sites were often less than hospitable. One account of an 1851 traveler records: “Had very heavy days traveling we had to cross a great many sand hills, saw thousands of lizards, snakes and grasshoppers” (see Jean Rio Baker in “Sacred Places, Vol. 5: Iowa and Nebraska” edited by LaMar C. Berrett, pages 305-306).

      How to make a pioneer wagon

      The John Wayne Pioneer Wagons and Riders Association is a non-profit organization dedicated to preserving and promoting the John Wayne Pioneer Trail in Washington State.

      Palouse to Cascades Trail is in Washington State. The trail is over 200 miles long and provides a unique opportunity for recreation.

      The Palouse to Cascades Trail

      From the densely forested Cascades to the scablands carved by the Ice Age floods, Palouse to Cascades State Park Trail gives hikers, cyclists and equestrians a taste of Washington’s diversity. This linear park runs from west of North Bend to the Columbia River near Vantage – and continues from the town of Lind to the Idaho border.

      Heading east on this historic rail trail (part of the Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul, and Pacific Railroad from 1909 to 1980), travelers pass lush, vast Olallie State Park, with its waterfalls and seasonal colors. Explorers continue through the mountain pass into dark tunnels and over high trestles, until the landscape gives way to the amber-hued farmlands of eastern Washington. And, railroad buffs, don’t miss the historic train depots at South Cle Elum and Kittitas along the way.

      You can take this trail in one-day sections or as a long-distance hiking, biking, or riding trip through diverse environments. Trailheads and access points are located every few miles along the trail. Camping can be found at Lake Easton State Park, just off the trail near Easton, and Wanapum Recreation Area, a few miles south of Vantage. Primitive campsites are available west of Thorp along the trail.

      History of JWPWR
      The Milwaukee railroad built the Chicago to Seattle line between 1906 and 1909. In 1915 it was electrified. The last train ran in 1972 and the route was abandoned in 1980. There was immediate controversy on how to use the right of way. Chic Hollenbeck, founder of the original JWPWR group, spearheaded the effort to convert the right of way to a trail for equestrians. Imagine how happy he would be with the progress of the trail today.

      Use

      The trail is open to all non-motorized uses. Its gentle gravel surface is popular with cyclists, hikers, birders, horseback riders, teamsters and cross country skiers. The western segment, which is closer to Seattle and more accessible, is more heavily used than the eastern segment.

      Plan ahead – Long distance trips require planning and extra gear and provisions, particularly water. Some detours are needed around rail lines, missing bridges and private property. Be sure to check conditions before you go. The state-managed corridor is typically 50 feet on either side of the center of the trail, but this varies. Please respect private property along the trail.

      How to make a pioneer wagon

      The John Wayne Pioneer Wagons and Riders Association is a non-profit organization dedicated to preserving and promoting the John Wayne Pioneer Trail in Washington State.

      FORMS FORMS FORMS…Click on the buttons below for forms and info

      John Wayne Pioneer Wagons and Riders Association

      The John Wayne Wagons and Riders Association is a non-profit organization dedicated to preserving and promoting the Palouse to Cascades Trail in Washington State. The trail is over 200 miles long and provides a unique opportunity for recreation.

      The Palouse to Cascades trail has now become connected to the “Great American Rails To Trails” that will eventually cross the entire United States in one continuous trail. The trail is flat as it follows the paths of the former rail way lines with very slight grade. Picture yourself … riding across the entire country on a safe, seamless and scenic pathway—or walking a local trail that connects along historic routes. Imagine the incomparable experience of exploring America’s heritage by trail—its potential, its beauty and bounty, its people and places. Consider the economic opportunities and the benefits for communities along the route of a multi use trail that stretches more than 3,700 miles between Washington and Washington.

      Our club is made up primarily of horseback riders and teamsters, but we welcome walkers and cyclists. We sponsor a two week trip across Washington each spring. Followed up by a Fall Ride in September.

      Learn how to make a wagon wheel wreath to welcome summer! Easy summer decorations using a wagon wheel, florals and greenery.

      We’re excited to share an easy to make wreath for the summer! You know our love of wreaths, we’ve made dozens over the years! Today’s wagon wheel wreath is perfect for any home decor style. The classic wagon wheel can fit in with modern, rustic or farmhouse and florals match any look as they’re colorful and cheery!

      How to make a pioneer wagon

      Read on for the step by step to create your own floral wagon wheel wreath then check out several more summer decor ideas from our talented blog friends by scrolling down.

      DIY WAGON WHEEL WREATH

      How to make a pioneer wagon

      Visit more easy to make wreaths:

      • Modern Floral Wreath
      • Floral Heart Wreath
      • Wood Bead Summer Wreath
      • Fall Wheel Wreath

      Supplies to Make a Wagon Wheel Wreath

      How to make a pioneer wagon

      • Wagon Wheel
      • Florals
      • Stems
      • Floral Wire and Cutters
      • Hot Glue (optional)
      • NailScrew to Hang

      HOW TO MAKE A WAGON WHEEL WREATH

      Making a summer wagon wheel wreath is so easy, your only talent is wrapping floral wire around the wheel then twisting it to secure the ends. (You can use hot glue as well but since my wagon wheel is huge and heavy, my florals were also over-sized so wire seemed more secure and used less materials.)

      How to make a pioneer wagon

      I started with the biggest flower stems first and laid them on the wagon wheel. I placed the biggest stems at each end and met in the middle, only covering half of the wheel.

      How to make a pioneer wagon

      After the flowers were laid down, I tucked in greenery into the empty spots until it was full looking. I love these hanging seeded eucalyptus leaves, they really complete the look and add length at the same time. Super easy, get creative!

      How to make a pioneer wagon

      How to Hang a Wagon Wheel Wreath

      I used a thick nail to hang the wreath and simply placed it on my wall. If you’re concerned about damaging the wall, use a Command Hook but make sure it can handle the weight. You can also use a screw or tap in an eye hook into the wheel then hang with a screw or nail.

      How to make a pioneer wagon

      Sneak peek: Here she is as the cherry on top of Kristi’s new summer porch furniture, aka the perfect summer decor!

      How to make a pioneer wagon

      How to make a pioneer wagon

      Start your summer right with cheery decorations on your welcoming patio… here is it on my own coastal farmhouse porch, too. SO VERSATILE. Love. 😍

      How to make a pioneer wagon

      Visit more Summer DIY Wreath Ideas as part of the Seasonal Simplicity Summer Series, please hop around and pin your favorites!

      How to make a pioneer wagon

      Today I’m joined by a fabulous group of blogging friends who are also sharing their Summer DIY Wreath Ideas as part of the Seasonal Simplicity Summer Series. Click on the links below their wreath design to see exactly how they made it…

      How to make a pioneer wagon

      How to make a pioneer wagon

      How to make a pioneer wagon

      How to make a pioneer wagon

      How to make a pioneer wagon

      PLEASE PIN

      so your friends can grab some amazing summer wreath decor ideas, too! xo

      How to make a pioneer wagon

      About Lolly Jane

      Meet Kelli & Kristi, twin sisters and authors of Lolly Jane. We are two busy wives + mommas who are makers of all things pretty. From signs to home decor and holiday crafts or redoing furniture in between soccer practices, we do it all all while armed with an ice cold Diet Coke. Join us in our DIY adventures! XOXO

      “Things You Wouldn’t Know If We Didn’t Blog Intermittently.”

      28 October 2011

      How covered wagons traversed the Rockies

      How to make a pioneer wagon

      In old western movies, the settlers’ covered wagons are typically shown traversing the plains and deserts. Getting them over the mountains was less scenic.

      The illustration above comes from an outstanding book – Hard Road West, by Keith Heyer Meldahl – that I’ll review in more detail later. It shows the technique used at a location eventually dubbed “Roller Pass.”

      At Roller Pass, the final 400 feet from a 30-degree slope of jagged boulders, “as steep as the roof of a house”. Oxen could not pull wagons directly up such a grade. Instead, the animals were unhitched from the wagons and driven to the top, where they could heave along the flatter ground at the pass. Some emigrants placed log rollers at the top of the slope. They yoked the oxen to hundreds of feet of chain, and then passed the chain over the rollers and down the slope to a waiting wagon. Then, under shouts and cracking whips, as many as 12 yoke of oxen hove to on each wagon. “

      How to make a pioneer wagon

      The drawing doesn’t seem to be to scale re the wagon, but the point is clear. At other sites, the terrain was even more impassable, and the wagons had to be unloaded and disassembled, and the wagon parts hoisted up the mountain with winches, then reassembled at the higher altitude (right image).

      Credit for the lower image to Charly Price, the graphic artist for Tahoe National Forest; he prepared this drawing for the Overland Emigrant Trail Map, which he designed. Via.

      Your discussion concerns crossing the Rockies. Roller Pass is one of two passes used in the Donner Pass area just west of Truckee CA, part of the Sierra Nevada Range. Since the Sierra is granitic, rather than basaltic, as much of the Rockies are, the topography is structurally quite different.

      How to make a pioneer wagon

      Pioneer Woman Mode
      Pioneer Woman mode embodies the sacrifice that Mormon Utah Pioneer women made. These women were thrust from their homes, often with their children and little or no provisions.

      They were forced to walk, sometimes barefoot, pulling handcarts with their belongings, responsible for providing for their needs and those of their children.

      Pioneer Woman Mode refers to assessing the situation, and creating a safety plan for oneself, including planning and creating financial resources, preparing emotionally/mentally, obtaining education, preparing for provisions and lodging should need arise, or if a husband is no longer able or willing to support his wife and children.

      This may also include going back to school, getting life insurance, creating savings, and even packing bags with a plan in place, should it ever be necessary for an individual to move forward without her spouse.

      How to make a pioneer wagon

      Packing Your Wagon This term references the preparations an individual makes in case they may be forced out of their home. It refers to preparing one’s self for a hard journey ahead, on one’s own, without the help or support of a husband.

      To be wise and prepared, one recognizes that there is a possibility that this may happen, and so both figurative and literal preparations are made.

      A suitcase (wagon) is prepared with everything that may be needed for her to survive and succeed in the future on her own, and it is available for her at any time of the day, at a moment’s notice.

      Mental and emotional preparations are made as well, as she prepares to move forward on her own if needed.

      For more information on this ask about it in your WORTH group.

      Written by Maurice W. Harker, CMHC, Director of Life Changing Services, Director of Sons of Helaman and creator of Men of Moroni, Facilitator of the WORTH group, Consultant for the Daughters of Light program

      Below is an excellent selection of horse drawn wagons and accessories for sale. Some of them are for actual use, while others are for display purposes.

      A wagon is a horse-drawn vehicle with four wheels made for hauling goods of various kinds, and/or for carrying people. A wagon can be contrasted to a cart, which has two wheels and is designed to carry people; or a carriage which has four wheels like a wagon but is primarily designed for carrying people instead of hauling goods.

      The phrase “horse drawn,” when used for defining a wagon, can be a bit misleading: “Horse drawn” when used in this manner is a generic phrase that also means the wagon can be pulled by other types of animals such as mules or oxen. For good things to know before buying a wagon, please scroll down beneath the items for sale.

      Below: A team of six horses pulling a horse drawn wagon.

      How to make a pioneer wagon

      Below: A red horse drawn wagon being shown in six horse hitch competition.

      How to make a pioneer wagon

      Horse Drawn Wagons – Good Things To Know Before You Buy

      Below are a few good things to know before buying a horse drawn wagon on the Web or anywhere else.

      • Is it really a wagon? Some people call any horse drawn conveyance a wagon when it’s actually something else like a cart, carriage, hearse, or sleigh.
      • Is the wagon suitable for use as a wagon (that is, hitched to horses or other animals and carrying a load), or is it for sale with the intended purpose of being used for display only?
      • Is it new or used?
      • If the wagon is used, what condition is it in? Is it ready to use or will it need repairs?
      • If the wagon has been restored, what parts of it are new/restored, and what parts of it are original?
      • How old is it?
      • Are there enough clear photos of the wagon, inside and out, that you can get a good look at everything you want to see? If not, you may need to ask the seller for additional photos.
      • What does, and does not, come with the wagon? Don’t assume anything comes with it, even if additional items are shown in the photos. Read the description carefully to know what you will, and will not, be getting.
      • How big is it? What does it weigh?
      • Where is the wagon located? Will the seller ship it or deliver it, or will you have to pick it up? If the wagon is for pick up only, how long will the seller hold it while waiting for you to come and get it?
      • If the seller will ship the it, what will shipping charges be? Is insurance included in the shipping charges or will it be extra?
      • Will there be any taxes or other additional fees due?
      • What methods of payment will the seller accepted?
      • How soon after you make your purchase do you have to pay for the wagon? Some sellers are now requiring their items be paid for within a certain time frame or the sale is off. Read the item’s description for acceptable payment times and terms.
      • Will the entire payment be due when you make your purchase, or will you put down a deposit then pay the balance at a later time? Note: It is not uncommon for balances due to be accepted in cash or cashier’s check only.
      • Can the wagon be returned? If so, what are the conditions for the return?
      • Every eBay item for sale has a “Seller info” area. Be sure to check this area to view the feedback rating that previous buyers have left for that particular seller.
      • eBay offers a free buyer protection plan for many items. Be sure to read the details and eligibility under “eBay Buyer Protection.”
      • If you have any questions about a wagon you might be interested in be sure to ask the seller before you buy. Look for the “Ask a question” link in the “Questions and answers about this item” area to ask your questions.

      About Wagons

      As we mentioned at the top of this page a wagon is a four-wheeled vehicle pulled by work animals (commonly horses, mules, or oxen) made for hauling goods and/or cargo. While wagons are typically considered a conveyance to transport items, not people, it is not uncommon for them to transport people as well.

      Below is a wagon whose design was originally intended to haul goods. This one though, has been modified to add extra seating in the back. It is used to carry people on wagon rides.

      How to make a pioneer wagon

      This wagon is similar to the one above. Instead of being used as horse drawn wagon, however, it has been retired from actual use and is now for display.

      How to make a pioneer wagon

      Wagons are commonly used for display purposes only. This one makes a beautiful planter.

      How to make a pioneer wagon

      This beautiful horse drawn wagon is in excellent condition and is used competitively to show in six horse hitch competitions.

      COVERED WAGON, the means of transcontinental transportation used for two centuries of American history. The covered wagon was fundamentally a wagon box with a framework of hoop-shaped slats over which a canvas tent was stretched to make a “covered” wagon. Each wagon was drawn by several teams of horses, mules, or oxen. Many were boat shaped with oarlocks so they might be floated over streams, the animals swimming across.

      Although derived from the Conestoga wagons built in Lancaster, Pa., in the early eighteenth century, the covered wagon used by emigrants on the Oregon and California trails differed in size, design, and purpose. Conestoga wagons were primarily designed to haul heavy goods for trade along the eastern coast, while smaller covered wagons were the vehicle of choice for emigrant groups headed to western destinations.

      Emigrants using covered wagons assembled at such points west of the Missouri River as Independence, Mo., and Council Grove, Kans., and organized into caravans—called wagon trains—for companionship and protection. Emigrants usually took between four and six months to make the two-thousand-mile trek that lay between the Missouri and the Pacific Ocean. Although the threat of Indian attack was small, emigrants would often draw their wagons into a circle to serve as a corral for their animals and post sentinels to guard against livestock raids. Covered wagons remain in museums, including the Conestoga wagon original at Pittsburgh, Pa., and Ezra Meeker’s prairie schooner at Tacoma, Wash.

      BIBLIOGRAPHY

      Dunbar, Seymour. History of Travel in America. Indianapolis, Ind.: Bobbs-Merrill, 1915.

      Winther, Oscar Osborn. The Transportation Frontier: Trans-Mississippi West, 1865–1890. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1964.

      Weaver People Hauler Wagons

      Weaver people hauler wagons are designed to move large groups of people in a safe, efficient, and comfortable manner. These wagons are used in animal parks, fall festivals, hay rides, etc. The wagons can be custom built to ensure you have just the right wagon for your application.

      These wagons are available in both tractor and horse models and come standard with full-length seats on the side and a double center bench, rear steps for easy loading and unloading as well as a roof cover for protection from the weather.

      How to make a pioneer wagon

      Tractor drawn people hauler wagon (model 7200) on 6-ton Pioneer gear – 8′ X 16′ Bed – 25 to 30 Passengers – Prices start at $7,835.00

      How to make a pioneer wagon

      Tractor drawn people hauler wagon (model 7300) on 6-ton Pioneer gear – 90″ X 16′ Bed – 25 to 30 Passengers – Prices start at $12,215.00

      People Hauler Options

      7500 – Torsion axles suspension
      7502 – Hydraulic brakes on 2 or 4 wheels
      7503 – Wheel chair ramps
      7504 – Cushions on benches

      How to make a pioneer wagon

      Horse drawn people hauler wagon (model 7400) on 6-ton Pioneer gear with torsion axle & hyd. brakes – 90″ X 16′ bed – 25 to 30 passengers – Prices start at $16,676.00

      by Lauren Novak

      How to make a pioneer wagon

      You probably don’t really want to go back to the pioneer days filled with disease, famine and long travel. However, if you love the covered wagons they used to ride around in and want a new camping experience, now you can sleep in a covered wagon for fun.

      Near Yosemite National Park, you can rent a covered wagon sleeping cabin at Yosemite Pines RV Resort and Family Lodging. It looks very similar to “glamping” or glam camping… basically many amenities of home, but still the fun of being in the wilderness.

      If you or your children ever used to play the game Oregon Trail, you might remember these covered wagons in the game. They look just like ox-pulled covered carts on wheels. The inside is completely different though and you don’t have to worry about your oxen dying or getting yellow fever like in the game.

      There are six wagons available to rent and each one can sleep between four and six people. There is a king-sized bed, bunk beds, and a small dining area. They all have heat, air conditioning, a microwave, a refrigerator, and even a Keurig coffee maker for your coffee fix.

      All of these wagons have an outdoor area with a picnic table and a grill, much like many campsites these days. It would be a great place to take kids because not only are you right by Yosemite, but there is a swimming pool, volleyball courts, a petting farm, and other fun activities nearby in the campground.

      If you want to rent one, they cost between $139 and $279 per night, depending on what season. Obviously, summer months tend to run higher in price. If you are interested in booking, click here. They also offer cool campers and Airstreams to rent as well. It is an RV park so you can also bring your own camper or RV or just pitch up a tent for the night.

      If you are ready to start your pioneer fantasy vacation, check it out! Bonus points if you decide to dress and eat like pioneers while you are vacationing in these wagons. But, we don’t blame you if you don’t!

      Would you want to stay in a covered wagon for the night? Do you think it would be fun to take kids along and teach them about the pioneer days? Or would you never want to do this?

      If you enjoyed this article, please SHARE with your friends who love to go camping or used to love playing the Oregon Trail game!

      Etsy предоставляет возможность прямой связи покупателей и продавцов со всего мира. Когда вы используете сервисы Etsy (мы будем называть etsy.com, Pattern by Etsy, наши мобильные приложения и другие сервисы нашими «Сервисами»), вы несете ответственность за соблюдение этой политики, независимо от вашего местоположения.

      Эта политика является частью наших Условий использования. Используя любые наши Сервисы, вы соглашаетесь с этой политикой и нашими Условиями использования.

      Как транснациональная компания из США, ведущая деятельность в других странах, Etsy должна соблюдать экономические санкции и торговые ограничения, включая введенные Управлением по контролю за иностранными активами (OFAC) Министерства финансов США. Это означает, что Etsy или кто-либо, пользующийся нашими Сервисами, не может участвовать в транзакциях, в которые вовлечены определенные люди, места или изделия из этих мест, указанные государственными органами, такими как OFAC, в дополнение к торговым санкциям, предусмотренным соответствующими законами и нормами.

      Эта политика действует в отношении всех, кто использует наши Сервисы, независимо от их местоположения. Решение об ознакомлении с такими ограничениями остается за вами.

      Например, эти ограничения в целом запрещают, кроме прочего, транзакции, в которых участвуют следующие стороны:

      1. определенные географические регионы, такие как Иран, Крым, Куба, Северная Корея, Сирия, Россия, Беларусь, Донецкая Народная Республика («ДНР»), Луганская Народная Республика («ЛНР»), а также любые физические или юридические лица, ведущие деятельность или находящиеся на этих территориях;
      2. физические или юридические лица, состоящие в санкционных списках, таких как Список лиц особых категорий и запрещенных лиц (SDN) или Список иностранных лиц, уклоняющихся от санкций (FSE) организации OFAC;
      3. граждане Кубы независимо от их местоположения, не имеющие гражданства или вида на жительство за пределами Кубы; и
      4. изделия, из Ирана, Крыма, Кубы и Северной Кореи, за исключением информационных материалов, таких как публикации, фильмы, постеры, грампластинки, фотографии, кассеты, компакт-диски и определенные произведения искусства.
      5. Любые товары, услуги и технологические решения из ЛНР и ДНР за исключением информационных материалов и сельскохозяйственной продукции, в том числе продуктов питания для людей, семян сельскохозяйственных культур или удобрений.
      6. Импорт в США следующей продукции российского происхождения: рыба, морепродукты, алмазы непромышленного назначения и любая другая продукция, согласно периодическим указаниям министра торговли США.
      7. Экспорт из США либо гражданами США предметов роскоши и любых других товаров, согласно указаниям министра торговли США, любому лицу, находящемуся в России или Беларуси. Список и определение «предметов роскоши» приведены в «Дополнение № 5 к Разделу 746», опубликованном Федеральным реестром США.
      8. Изделия, изготовленные за пределами США и попадающие под действие Закона о тарифах США и связанных с ним законов о запрещении принудительного труда.

      Для защиты нашего сообщества и торговой площадки Etsy предпринимает меры для соблюдения режимов санкций. Например, Etsy запрещает участникам пользоваться своими аккаунтами в определенных географических регионах. Если у нас есть основания полагать, что вы управляете своей аккаунтом из места, находящегося под санкциями, например, любого из перечисленных выше санкционных мест, или иным образом нарушаете какие-либо экономические санкции или торговые ограничения, мы можем приостановить или прекратить использование вами наших Сервисов. Как правило, участникам не разрешается выставлять на продажу, покупать или продавать изделия из регионов, находящихся под санкциями. Сюда входят изделия, появившиеся ранее санкций, поскольку у нас нет возможности проверить, были ли они вывезены из запрещенного места. Etsy оставляет за собой право обращаться к продавцам с запросом предоставить дополнительную информацию, раскрыть страну происхождения изделия на странице товара или предпринять другие шаги для соблюдения обязательств. Мы можем отключить товары или отменить транзакции, представляющие опасность нарушения этой политики.

      Кроме соблюдения требований OFAC и применимых местных законов, участникам Etsy следует иметь в виду, что другие страны могут вводить собственные торговые ограничения и что определенные изделия могут не допускаться к экспорту или импорту согласно международным законам. Когда в транзакции участвуют лица из разных стран, вам следует изучить законы любых соответствующих стран.

      Наконец, участникам Etsy следует иметь в виду, что сторонние платежные системы, например PayPal, могут самостоятельно отслеживать транзакции на предмет соблюдения санкционных требований и могут блокировать транзакции в рамках собственных программ, обеспечивающих соблюдение требований. Etsy не имеет власти или контроля над процедурами независимого принятия решения в таких системах.

      Экономические санкции и торговые ограничения могут применяться к порядку использования вами Сервисов и могут изменяться, поэтому участникам следует регулярно проверять источники информации о санкциях. За юридической консультацией обращайтесь к квалифицированному специалисту.

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      THE MOST FUN YOU’LL HAVE EXPERIENCING HISTORY

      We put you in the action!

      You become part of a pioneer wagon company headed West so get ready to take a 2,000 mile journey along the Oregon/California Trail – in just one hour!

        1. Experience a simulated pioneer trek along the Oregon Trail
        2. Buy provisions at a gun shop and merchantile store
        3. Be guided by our wagon master and live pioneer actors in period costume
        4. Ride in a computer-simulated covered wagon
        5. Sit around a campfire within a pioneer wagon encampment
        6. Learn about Oregon Trail pioneer folkways
        7. Do all this in the comfort of our spacious Trail Center.

      Our Wagon Master and Pioneer Actors will greet you as you embark on your Imaginary Journey into the Pioneer Era of 1842-1869.

      “Do you all have the necessary provisions before we get started?”, the wagon master asks. Instead of modern day cameras and walking shoes, he’ll want his pioneers to think with historical focus. For this journey will require a strong wagon, four to six oxen, two sets of clothes, a milk cow and chickens, shotgun or rifle, axle grease, candles, a butter churn. As emigrants traveling the trail you’ll need such food supplies as flour, bacon, beans, coffee, hardtack, vinegar, and yeast powder. To survive you must take six months’ worth of supplies.

      Before your trek, you’ll stop at a gun shop and merchantile store to learn what supplies you need to stock your wagon. From this unique experience you will learn and feel what it must have been like to be a pioneer emigrant traveling the long and dusty trail to Oregon or California. You’ll make life and death decisions regarding your survivability on the trail.

      You’ll purchase your supplies for your trek west here in our merchantile store re-enactment area.

      Etsy предоставляет возможность прямой связи покупателей и продавцов со всего мира. Когда вы используете сервисы Etsy (мы будем называть etsy.com, Pattern by Etsy, наши мобильные приложения и другие сервисы нашими «Сервисами»), вы несете ответственность за соблюдение этой политики, независимо от вашего местоположения.

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      2. физические или юридические лица, состоящие в санкционных списках, таких как Список лиц особых категорий и запрещенных лиц (SDN) или Список иностранных лиц, уклоняющихся от санкций (FSE) организации OFAC;
      3. граждане Кубы независимо от их местоположения, не имеющие гражданства или вида на жительство за пределами Кубы; и
      4. изделия, из Ирана, Крыма, Кубы и Северной Кореи, за исключением информационных материалов, таких как публикации, фильмы, постеры, грампластинки, фотографии, кассеты, компакт-диски и определенные произведения искусства.
      5. Любые товары, услуги и технологические решения из ЛНР и ДНР за исключением информационных материалов и сельскохозяйственной продукции, в том числе продуктов питания для людей, семян сельскохозяйственных культур или удобрений.
      6. Импорт в США следующей продукции российского происхождения: рыба, морепродукты, алмазы непромышленного назначения и любая другая продукция, согласно периодическим указаниям министра торговли США.
      7. Экспорт из США либо гражданами США предметов роскоши и любых других товаров, согласно указаниям министра торговли США, любому лицу, находящемуся в России или Беларуси. Список и определение «предметов роскоши» приведены в «Дополнение № 5 к Разделу 746», опубликованном Федеральным реестром США.
      8. Изделия, изготовленные за пределами США и попадающие под действие Закона о тарифах США и связанных с ним законов о запрещении принудительного труда.

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      How to make a pioneer wagon

      As a new country, the United States boasted freedom and opportunity, particularly in the West, where there were vast expanses of land and, later, rumors of gold. Many pioneers moved west hoping to own land and start fresh. Read a pioneer history below and check out our Westward expansion timeline.

      Westward Expansion

      How to make a pioneer wagon

      Early pioneers extended American settlements to the Mississippi Valley. Later pioneers settled the Great Plains and the West Coast. The Oregon Trail was one of the most traveled trails heading west. What was the Oregon Trail? It started in Independence, Missouri, and passed through present-day Kansas, Nebraska, Wyoming, Idaho, and Oregon. Approximately 500,000 people made the journey on foot, in covered wagon trains, or on horseback on the Oregon Trail and two other famous trails: the California Trail and the Mormon Trail.

      Along their way west, American pioneers passed famous landmarks and forts, including Chimney Rock, Fort Laramie, Independence Rock, and Fort Bridger. Traces of the paths they took can still be seen today, with wheel tracks and names carved into stone.

      How to make a pioneer wagon

      Westward Expansion Timeline

      Major political and social events inspired many people to make the move west. Rumors of rich farming lands in Oregon, gold in California, and refuge across the country convinced many to take the risks of pioneer travel and pursue a better life. However, rumors weren’t the only force at work. Some major events helped accelerate the movement.

      The Louisiana Purchase in 1803 was one of the first events that encouraged people to move west. In this purchase, the United States acquired the Louisiana Territory and opened 828,000 square miles of land for settlers. It cost the government over $15 million (the equivalent of over $570 billion 1 in today’s market).

      Later, the discovery of gold in California in 1848 inspired hundreds of thousands to move west and mine the lands, despite the efforts of discoverers James Wilson Marshall and John Sutter to keep it quiet. By the end of the California Gold Rush, miners extracted a total of 750,000 pounds of gold, worth roughly $2 billion. 2

      Other events, such as the Homestead Act of 1862—which offered settlers the opportunity to homestead 160 acres of free land, the migration of Mormon pioneers seeking refuge, and the decision of the Mexican government to allow United States citizens to settle the Texas territory were all forces behind the expansion of the American West.

      Were your ancestors among the farmers seeking land, miners hunting for gold, or religious people seeking refuge?

      Q. My great-grandparents Thomas and Elizabeth Teter came west on a wagon train after 1892. They lived in Memphis, Scotland County, Mo. Is there any way to verify their names on a roster or find out which wagon train they were on?

      A. No comprehensive list exists of wagon trains and who was on them, and not all trains were documented, so you’ll have to search a variety of sources. It’ll help to know when and where your great-grandparents departed and arrived, and which wagon trail they followed. Re-examine your research for clues, look for your grandparents in US and territorial censuses, check their obituaries and search for land claims in the destination state (use the General Land Office records site).

      Run a Web search search on your ancestors’ trail traveled using a search engine such as Google. For example, a search on oregon trail turns up an Oregon GenWeb. Try search terms such as wagon train genealogy and add the arrival and departure states and towns. That’s how we found a page with excerpts from an Akin family 1852 pioneer diary (now offline). Other interesting online sources include 1843 Wagon Train Pioneers, Gold Rush Journey and Cyndi’s List: Migrations.

      Genealogical, historical and pioneer societies (such as the California Pioneer Society) in western states usually collect research materials and maintain registries of people who’ve proven their ancestors arrived before statehood. A distant cousin may have listed your family members or your family’s fellow wagon train passengers. Some groups focus on particular trails, such as the Oregon-California Trails Association.

      Search state archives’ Web sites and online catalogs, too. Look for pioneer manuscript collections, trail diaries (even if it’s not your ancestor’s—another journaler may have mentioned your relatives) and published indexes of train members, such as California Wagon Train Lists, compiled by Louis J. Rasmussen (San Francisco Historic Records) in the California State Library. Pioneer museums might help, too—the End of the Oregon Trail Interpretive Center in Oregon City details trail history and names Pioneer Families of the Month on its Web site.

      Local newspapers sometimes covered wagon train arrivals and departures, and also reported on trail happenings such as American Indian attacks. Be sure to check online newspaper resources as well.

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      How to make a pioneer wagon

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      The Covered Wagon

      c ompiled by Stephenie Flora
      copyright пїЅ 2007 How to make a pioneer wagon

      How to make a pioneer wagon

      T he covered wagon used to cross the plains to the west was a smaller, lighter version of the big Conestoga wagon used in the east. The cloth top that protected people and possessions from extreme weather conditions also was the prime reason that the wagon was sometimes referred to as the “prairie schooner”. (The view of a wagon train with its billowing tops resembled a fleet of ships sailing over the plains.) A frame of hickory bows held the wagon top. The top could be rolled back for ventilation. Waterproofed with paint or linseed oil, the top was of heavy duty canvas, often made from hemp.

      Big wheels helped the wagon roll easily over bumps and dips in the trail, and wide rims helped keep the wagon from sinking into soft ground. The rear wheels were about five or six feet in diameter, the front ones four feet or a bit less. The front wheels had to be smaller to permit sharp turns–a big wheel would jam agains the wagon body.

      The wagon’s 10 X 3.5 foot body could take a load of a ton and a half, but most advised to keep the weight below this limit. The lighter the wagon, the less likely it was to bog down in muddy streambanks or prairie sloughs–or to tire the long-suffering teams pulling it. Massive axles supported the weight of the wagon body and load. On the plains a broken axle was a disaster–and prudent wagoners usually took along a spare.

      A toolbox is on the wagon’s one side, the brake lever and water bucket on the other. Hanging from the rear axle was the grease bucket, filled with a mixture of animal fat and tar. It was used to keep the hubs of the wheels greased.

      In addition, each ox wagon should be provided with two extra bows, six S’s, and six open links for repairing chains. Every set of six wagons should have a tongue, coupling pole, king-bolt and a pair of extra hounds. Every set of six mule wagons should be furnished with five pairs of hames, two double trees, four whipple-trees, and two extra pairs of lead bars.

      Two lariats will be needed for every horse and mule, as one generally wears out before reaching the end of a long journey. They will be found useful in crossing deep streams, and in letting wagons down steep hills and mountains; also in repairing broken wagons. Lariats made of hemp are the best.

      One of the most indespendable articles to the outfit of the prairie traveler was rawhide and an awl. The rawhide was used for repairing harness, saddles, bridles, and numerous other daily necessities.

      How to make a pioneer wagon
      Illus: Story of the Great American West. The Reader’s Digest Association, Inc, 1977

      The wagon box was packed to keep the center of gravity low and to avoid puncturing the cover. Heavy supplies–a plow, bedstead, chest of drawers, stove, spinning wheel and bags of seed–go on the bottom, carefully wrapped to avoid jostling in the springless vehicle. Then come lighter goods–kitchen utensils and clothes–wrapped and strapped down. On top are stored necessaries for the trip: flour and salt, a water keg, cooking pot, rifle, ax, blankets, even folding campstools.

      By the time the necessities were packed and the prized possessions were loaded there was little room remaining. In decent weather most people cooked, ate, and slept outside. In bad weather the family slept in tents, under the wagon or inside, on the load. As the trip got harder and the teams started to tire, many items would be abandoned alongside the trail.

      My name is Stephenie Flora. Thanks for stopping by . Return to [ Home Page ] All [ Comments and Inquiries ] are welcome.

      How to make a pioneer wagon

      The famous Conestoga wagon was used, not by emigrants, but to haul freight.

      Minivan of the Emigrant Trails

      How to make a pioneer wagon

      The Murphy Wagon at Scotts Bluff National Monument was constructed by the Dewitts Buggy Works in 1979.

      Murphy Wagon

      Joseph Murphy began producing wagons for the traders headed west from Missouri to Santa Fe and later for the overland emigration. His wagons became the best known on the western trails.

      Murphy’s wagons consisted of wheels, running gear, a box, and a cover. They were usually nine feet high with a twelve foot long bed. The bed of a Murphy wagon had a straight box, unlike its more famous counterpart, the Conestoga, which had a curved box. A Murphy could comfortably haul between 1,800 to 2,200 pounds. Straying too far above these load weights could risk serious problems.

      Oxen were most often used for pulling this type of wagon. It required two yoke (pairs) of oxen. A spare yoke often trailed behind so that the livestock could be rotated and rested.

      For those who preferred mules, an equivalent number of harnessed mules could have been used in place of oxen. Horses were used rarely, if ever. They lacked the strength and endurance needed to pull a wagon 2,000 miles. They also required costly supplemental feed.

      How to make a pioneer wagon

      The Studebaker wagon at Scotts Bluff National Monument.

      Studebaker Wagon

      The Studebaker brothers began their enterprise in South Bend, Indiana. The Studebaker name was as recognizable on the trail as Murphy. As blacksmiths, the Studebakers provided the hardware for many of the early wagon manufacturers. Nearly every wagon making the journey westward had Studebaker components and spare parts. They would later expand into manufacturing wagons for emigrants and freighting companies.

      The influence of the Studebaker family and their adaptive skills would extend into the modern era with the design and production of the Studebaker automobile.

      How to make a pioneer wagon

      The famous Conestoga wagon.

      Conestoga Wagon

      The Conestoga wagon is probably the most familiar pioneer wagon to us of the modern era, as it is often used in films and other media. This vehicle was the primary choice for freighting companies shipping goods to the western frontier. Sleek and angular, with graceful curves, it was attractive to the eye. Sometimes a medium sized variation of the Conestoga would be used by families traveling the Oregon Trail.

      The name Conestoga comes from the Conestoga River Valley in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. A Conestoga’s size was 17 feet long and 11 feet high, reflecting the freighter’s need for space in hauling. In addition to a longer bed, it had a curved box much like that on a boat. This curved bed kept freight from moving and shifting, thus keeping the cargo in the center during transit.

      This wagon required a double cover. The cover was usually made of canvas, cotton sailcloth, or homespun hemp. It cantilevered out slightly more than that of a typical emigrant wagon to help protect the cargo from the weather.

      The front and rear gates angled up higher to help prevent freight from sliding out of the back on steep inclines. A Conestoga could likely haul a load of up to three tons. A load this size may have required as many as eight yoke of oxen.

      Historic artist and photographer, William Henry Jackson, first traveled west in 1866. He found employment as a bullwhacker, hauling freight. Jackson painted many images depicting the westward migration, often with Conestoga wagons in the foreground.

      How to make a pioneer wagon

      Mormon Handcarts were used primarily by European converts.

      Mormon Handcart

      If you couldn’t afford a wagon, there was the option of a handcart. As the name implies, it was not powered by an animal, but pushed or pulled by a person. The handcart was most likely based on carts used by street sweepers, or luggage trolleys used by railroad porters. It was often seen as an economical means of bringing impoverished Mormon converts west to Salt Lake City.

      A typical handcart was three feet wide by four feet long. It had a shallow box that was about nine inches high. Wheels were four feet tall and the carts could carry several hundred pounds. Most Mormon converts were limited to what they could carry because of weight restrictions set by the Mormon Church.

      Across the front of the cart was a cross bar that allowed the cart to be either pushed or pulled. Some carts also sported a canvas top, making them resemble miniature covered wagons. Since carts were often made entirely of wood, they were often noisy and subject to frequent breakdowns. During a four year period from 1856 until 1860, over ten handcart companies aided approximately 3,000 Mormons to Salt Lake City.

      Part of a series of articles titled The Emigrant Experience .

      Whether you’re preparing for a pioneer trek reenactment or researching the Mormon pioneer experience, these fascinating insights into the realities of life in wagon and handcart companies may surprise you.

      Mormon emigration stories have been shared over and over through the decades. Today, many youth and leaders in the Church repeat these stories as they pull handcarts and reenact experiences of the early pioneers. The reenactments provide just a glimpse into the emigration experience. To better understand this era in Church history, it’s important to know a few key facts:

      Companies were organized according to the “Word and Will of the Lord,” as received by Brigham Young (now found in Doctrine and Covenants 136). This was the same model used by Joseph Smith during Zion’s Camp in 1834. Brigham Young appointed captains of hundreds, fifties, and tens. One Church historian noted, “The revelation helped transform the westward migration from an unfortunate necessity into an important shared spiritual experience.”1

      Each company had rules for the journey. The following rules were established for the Willard Richards company in 1848 and were followed by other companies in subsequent years. One company member described them as “rules adopted for the benefit of the Camp of Israel in travelling from Winter Quarters to the Salt Lake city.”2 A member of a later company recorded:

      “[Captain Gideon] proceeded to read the rules and regulations adopted by the Emigrating Saints in 1848 which were unanimously adopted, And are as follows:

      1st That each ten Shall travel ahead alternately according to their numbers.

      2nd That all lost property when found Shall be brought to the captains of fiftys quarters.

      3rd That all dogs shall be tied up at dark to prevent the annoyance of the Guard.

      4th That no man be allowed to leave the Camp by himself or without the consent of the Captain.

      5th That it shall be the duty of the Captains of ten to instruct their men to attend to their family prayers at the Sounding of the horn.

      6th That it Shall be the duty of the Captains of Fiftys to see that the Guard shall be placed around the Camp at 1/2 past eight o.c. [o’clock] of each night to relieve the Captains of the herd whose duty it Shall be at the Sounding of the horn in the morning with his men & boys exempt from guard duty to take charge of the herd until the night guard is posted.

      7th That the sounding of the horn in the morning shall be the Signal for the camp to arise and attend to the duties of the morning.

      8th That the Camp Shall be ready to Start each morning at 1/2 past seven o’Clock.

      9th That implicit obedience to the officers be required of every man in the Camp.

      10th That every man owning horses or Mules be required to bring them into the Camp at Sun down and make them fast.

      11th That it shall be the duty of each teamster when the herd is brought in to see that his team is on hand or in the herd without fail.

      12th That every member of the camp be at their quarters at nine o’clock, and that the Guard Cry the correct time each 1/2 hour without making any unnecessary noise. Captain Hyde made some remarks. Showed the great importance of vigilence on the part of the herds, men, And night guard. And set forth the character of the Indians, etc etc.”3

      Press Release: For immediate release
      Press contact: Jason Olson, [email protected] or 307-277-0525 (contact only – not for publication)
      Headline: Travel Across the USA and Stay in a Modern Conestoga® Wagon in 26 States.

      (BLOOMINGTON, IDAHO) With the network of Resorts offering stays in the comfort of a modern Conestoga® Wagon, built by Conestoga Wagon Company®, it is possible for vacationers to create their own pioneer trail across the United States.

      Travelers have the option of embarking from the east as the original pioneer travelers did, from Resorts in Maine, North Carolina or Florida and then choose to take a northern, mid-country or southern route as Resorts in 26 states now offer the wagons as an accommodation. The choice of route, embarking from any direction can be seen in the company’s client map here.

      Conestoga Wagon Company® has sold over 375 wagons to the Resorts since its start-up in 2015. The company offers its RV Park and Glamping clients flexible sleeping arrangements for up to six with the choice of king-size bed, bunk beds or single-twin bed configurations.

      And it is possible to work while vacationing at a Resort as the 180-square-foot Conestoga® Wagons have built-in USB ports and optional tables plus space for a mini-fridge, microwave, and coffee maker. The well-insulated wagons can be heated or cooled with the addition of an AC/heating unit installed over the wooden door.

      As travelers continue their self-created trail, they have the opportunity to enjoy family reunions or group stays recreating a “Circle the wagons around the campfire” spirit. The wagons can easily be moved with a pick-up truck by Resort management.

      The significant wagon sales led to the need for upscale Shower Houses to be added to the manufacturing capabilities of Conestoga Wagon Company®. After completing applicable research and development, the company decided that for privacy and comfort the shower houses would be a separate building offering two units that can be used exclusively by wagon guests or offered to all guests at a Resort.

      Two of Conestoga Wagon Company®’s partners are also owners of a luxury home construction company, so the design and execution of all products meet the most stringent standards of the construction industry. The Shower Houses are delivered turnkey to the Resort and placed in the designated area with the use of the forklift slots built into the steel frame.

      As an innovative company, the latest product combines all the comforts of the wagons with the luxury of the bathroom in their Luxe Tent. The same sleeping configurations as the wagons are offered and the turnkey bathroom attached to the tent also includes a claw-foot tub and full wooden vanity.

      The wagons are frequently the topic of world-wide publicity as journalists, influencers and guests have discovered that the Wagons offer more than a place to sleep. Instead, Resorts offer experiences such as campfire sing-alongs, pioneer dances, and meals reminiscent of early cross-country travel.