How to make eggs benedict

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Hot buttered English muffins, Canadian-style bacon, and poached eggs are topped with a heavenly drizzle of hollandaise sauce. Wonderful for Easter, Mother’s Day, or anytime you want to treat yourself to the best brunch in the world! Serve with roasted potatoes for mopping up the extra egg yolk and hollandaise. If you prefer, you can substitute ham for the Canadian bacon in this recipe.

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Recipe Summary

Ingredients

To Make Hollandaise: Fill the bottom of a double boiler part-way with water. Make sure that water does not touch the top pan. Bring water to a gentle simmer. In the top of the double boiler, whisk together egg yolks, lemon juice, white pepper, Worcestershire sauce, and 1 tablespoon water.

Add the melted butter to egg yolk mixture 1 or 2 tablespoons at a time while whisking yolks constantly. If hollandaise begins to get too thick, add a teaspoon or two of hot water. Continue whisking until all butter is incorporated. Whisk in salt, then remove from heat. Place a lid on pan to keep sauce warm.

Preheat oven on broiler setting. To Poach Eggs: Fill a large saucepan with 3 inches of water. Bring water to a gentle simmer, then add vinegar. Carefully break eggs into simmering water, and allow to cook for 2 1/2 to 3 minutes. Yolks should still be soft in center. Remove eggs from water with a slotted spoon and set on a warm plate

While eggs are poaching, brown the bacon in a medium skillet over medium-high heat and toast the English muffins on a baking sheet under the broiler.

Spread toasted muffins with softened butter, and top each one with a slice of bacon, followed by one poached egg. Place 2 muffins on each plate and drizzle with hollandaise sauce. Sprinkle with chopped chives and serve immediately.

267
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155
3 star values:

67
2 star values:

32
1 star values:

  • Read Reviews
  • Add Review
  • 561 Ratings
  • 413 Reviews
  • 124 Photos

Hot buttered English muffins, Canadian-style bacon, and poached eggs are topped with a heavenly drizzle of hollandaise sauce. Wonderful for Easter, Mother’s Day, or anytime you want to treat yourself to the best brunch in the world! Serve with roasted potatoes for mopping up the extra egg yolk and hollandaise. If you prefer, you can substitute ham for the Canadian bacon in this recipe.

Gallery

Recipe Summary

Ingredients

To Make Hollandaise: Fill the bottom of a double boiler part-way with water. Make sure that water does not touch the top pan. Bring water to a gentle simmer. In the top of the double boiler, whisk together egg yolks, lemon juice, white pepper, Worcestershire sauce, and 1 tablespoon water.

Add the melted butter to egg yolk mixture 1 or 2 tablespoons at a time while whisking yolks constantly. If hollandaise begins to get too thick, add a teaspoon or two of hot water. Continue whisking until all butter is incorporated. Whisk in salt, then remove from heat. Place a lid on pan to keep sauce warm.

Preheat oven on broiler setting. To Poach Eggs: Fill a large saucepan with 3 inches of water. Bring water to a gentle simmer, then add vinegar. Carefully break eggs into simmering water, and allow to cook for 2 1/2 to 3 minutes. Yolks should still be soft in center. Remove eggs from water with a slotted spoon and set on a warm plate

While eggs are poaching, brown the bacon in a medium skillet over medium-high heat and toast the English muffins on a baking sheet under the broiler.

Spread toasted muffins with softened butter, and top each one with a slice of bacon, followed by one poached egg. Place 2 muffins on each plate and drizzle with hollandaise sauce. Sprinkle with chopped chives and serve immediately.

Making Eggs Benedict is easier than you think—especially if you make the hollandaise sauce in a blender! This recipe is perfect for any special occasion. Just be sure to plan ahead!

Elise founded Simply Recipes in 2003 and led the site until 2019. She has an MA in Food Research from Stanford University.

How to make eggs benedict

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How to make eggs benedict

Making eggs Benedict requires careful orchestration.

You have to have warm, crispy bacon, hot buttered toasted English muffins, eggs poached perfectly to your desire, and a warm, creamy, unbroken hollandaise sauce, all at about the same time.

No wonder I rarely eat Eggs Benedict unless I’m eating out, my brain is scrambled enough as it is in the morning without having to juggle in the kitchen.

Video! How to Make Eggs Benedict

Eggs Benedict

How to Make Eggs Benedict

That said, if you know how to toast an English muffin, know how to cook bacon, and know how to poach eggs, then the only element that is not your standard fare is the hollandaise sauce, which is actually quite easy if you have a blender.

How to make eggs benedict

When to Serve Eggs Benedict

There may be an occasion, such as Mother’s Day for example, for which you might want to make a special someone, such as your mother, something special for breakfast or brunch. Eggs Benedict is as special as they come. Believe me, if you make these for me, I will worship the ground you walk on.

What is Eggs Benedict and Where Does it Come From?

Eggs Benedict is a traditional American breakfast and brunch recipe that originated in New York City. It consists of an English muffin, cut in half, toasted, and topped with Canadian bacon, poached eggs, and classic French hollandaise sauce. It’s decadent, rich, and satisfying.

How to Make Perfect Poached Eggs

Not everyone poaches eggs right on the first try. Or the second. If you’ve never made poached eggs before, they can take some practice. For a better chance of getting it right, try these tips.

  • Start with the freshest eggs you can get. The older the eggs are, the more likely they are to fall apart in the simmering water.
  • Make sure the water is barely simmering when just a few bubbles appear every now and then. If the water is boiling, and there are a lot of bubbles, the chances of the egg separating when it hits the water are greater.
  • Don’t forget to add the vinegar to the water.
  • Crack the egg into a small bowl before adding it to the water. Then gently slide the egg from the bowl into the simmering water. Experienced egg poachers may be able to crack the egg on the side of the pot and add it directly to the water. Unless you’re highly skilled at poaching eggs, use the small bowl.
  • Or, crack the egg into a fine mesh sieve and allow some of the thinner egg white to fall out. Then gently add the egg from the sieve into the simmering water.
  • Time the poaching egg carefully. Four minutes should be just about right.

If you simply can’t get it right, and you really want to make eggs Benedict before you master the skill, try this Microwave Poached Eggs recipe.

Substitutions for Canadian Bacon

While Canadian bacon is the traditional meat used in the eggs Benedict, it’s okay to buck tradition with these alternatives.

  • Crab cakes
  • Lobster
  • Bacon
  • Ham
  • Salmon
  • Taylor ham, or pork roll
  • Asparagus
  • Spinach

Troubleshooting Tips for Hollandaise Sauce

Blender Hollandaise Sauce is one of the easiest methods for getting the sauce to emulsify. If the sauce breaks, or separates, it is usually because of overcooked egg yolks or adding too much butter in quickly. This recipe calls for blended raw egg yolks. The blender will heat them, but not so much that it will cause the sauce to separate.

Follow these tips.

  • Blend the egg yolks a full 30 seconds so they get warm but not hot.
  • Don’t bring the melted butter to a high temperature. Melt it until just hot.
  • Add the butter very slowly to the blender on its lowest setting.
  • If the sauce ends up emulsified, but thin, add it to a saucepan and heat, stirring constantly until it thickens.

Make Ahead Tips

There are a lot of moving parts to eggs Benedict. If you’d like to make some of the dish ahead of time, you can poach the eggs up to five days early. Here’s how.

  • When you’re done poaching the eggs, plunge them in a bowl of cold water to stop them from cooking and cool them off.
  • Remove the eggs from the water with a slotted spoon and place them in a single layer in an airtight container. Refrigerate.
  • Right before you’re ready to assemble the eggs Benedict, reheat the pre-poached eggs in a bowl of hot, but not boiling, water for 2 to 3 minutes. Remove and immediately place on top of the bacon.

Cook the bacon or Canadian bacon ahead of time, too, up to 3 days early. Store in an airtight container. Reheat in the microwave until just warmed through.

Do not make the hollandaise sauce or toast the English muffins ahead of time.

What is eggs Benedict?

Eggs Benedict is a traditional breakfast dish composed of an English muffin topped with Canadian ham, poached eggs, and hollandaise sauce. It’s the latter that gives Eggs Benny its reputation for being difficult. Hollandaise is an emulsion of egg yolks, melted butter, and lemon juice. (The yolks have a tendency to scramble.)

What’s the difference between eggs Benedict and eggs Florentine?

They’re almost the same thing, but eggs Florentine is somewhat healthier because it has sautéed spinach instead of bacon.

Are eggs Benedict supposed to be runny?

Yes. It’s not a law, but it’s the traditional—and in our opinion, the best—way to enjoy the classic breakfast. The combination of runny yolk + creamy sauce = perfection.

Why do people add vinegar when poaching eggs?

It’ll help your egg whites solidify more quickly. You know those weird egg-white tails that form when poaching eggs? It also helps combat that. Don’t worry if you don’t have vinegar or forget to use it. It’s not necessary. We didn’t use it when we made the video above, and our eggs came out lovely.

How do you poach eggs?

The easiest method for poaching eggs is using a strainer to get rid of excess egg white, bringing the pot to a bare simmer, and using vinegar. Check out our easy guide for more help.

Hosting a big crowd?

Made this yet? Let us know how it went in the comments below!

A blog dedicated to eating in the slow lane. Food history, recipes and food in culture

The History of Eggs Benedict

In 1827, at the beginning of New York City’s evolution as the financial center of the world, the genesis of what would become a world renowned culinary institution, Delmonico’s Restaurant, was set. A small shop selling classically prepared pastries, fine coffee and chocolate, bonbons, wines, and liquors as well as Havana cigars was operated by the Delmonico brothers. Its success led them to purchase a triangular plot of land at the intersection of Beaver, William, and South William Streets where, in 1837, they opened the first fine dining restaurant in the country.

Delmonico’s offered the unheard of luxury of the availability of private dining rooms (located on the third floor) where discriminate entertaining was the order of the day. The basement held the restaurateur’s treasure, the largest private wine cellar in the city, holding an impressive 16,000 bottles of the world’s finest wines. It was during these early years that Chef Alessandro Felippini began to develop the restaurant’s culinary identity with the house special, Delmonico Steak.

In 1862, Charles Ranhofer was named Chef de Cuisine inventing many original dishes during his time at Delmonico’s. He is most noted for his innovative creations, Eggs Benedict, Baked Alaska, and Lobster Newburg. These dishes remain on the Delmonico’s menu today.How to make eggs benedict

A regular patron of the restaurant, Mrs. LeGrand Benedict, finding nothing to her liking and wanting something new to eat for lunch, discussed this with Delmonico’s Chef Charles Ranhofer (1836-1899), Ranhofer indulged her with Eggs Benedict. He has a recipe called Eggs a’ la Benedick (Eufa a’ la Benedick) in his cookbook called The Epicurean published in 1894.:

Eggs à la Benedick – Cut some muffins in halves crosswise, toast them without allowing to brown, then place a round of cooked ham an eighth of an inch thick and of the same diameter as the muffins one each half. Heat in a moderate oven and put a poached egg on each toast. Cover the whole with Hollandaise sauce.

Before Delmonico’s , diners ate at cafes or boarding houses, where food was offered prix fixe. Diners had no choice of dishes but ate the food that was served. Delmonico’s changed all that and claims the following firsts:

* The first dining establishment called by the French name restaurant
* The first restaurant where guests sat at their own tables instead of communal tables
* The first printed menu
* The first tablecloths
* The first debutante ball outside a private home
* The first restaurant to offer a leisurely lunch and dinner
* Oysters Rockefeller
* Lobster Newberg, first called Lobster Wenberg
* Baked Alaska in honor of the acquisition of the Alaskan territories
* Eggs Benedict
* Delmonico potatoes
* Delmonico steak
* Hamburger (known then as the Hamburg Steak)
*First use of the expression that something is “86’d”

(since the Delmonico Steak was item 86 on the menu and, when sold out, it was “86’d”)

A good idea can be had in more than one place and more than one time. The following story appeared in the December 19,1942 issue of the weekly New Yorker Magazine “Talk of the Town” column and is based on an interview with Lemuel Benedict the year before he died:

In 1894, Lemuel Benedict, a Wall Street broker, who was suffering from a hangover, ordered “some buttered toast, crisp bacon, two poached eggs, and a hooker of hollandaise sauce” at the Waldorf Hotel in New York. The Waldorf’s legendary chef, Oscar Tschirky, was so impressed that he put the dish on his breakfast and luncheon menus after substituting Canadian bacon for crisp bacon and a toasted English muffin for toasted bread.

I wondered what, exactly , is a “hooker” of hollandaise? It’s not what one might think. it’s a boat, a boat of hollandaise. The boats are often noted for their strong sharp bow and sides that curve outward like ‘the breast-bone of a water fowl’
How to make eggs benedict
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In another account, Craig Claiborne, a writer for The New York Times Magazine and famous cook book author, wrote in a September 1967 column about a letter received from Edward P. Montgomery, an American living in France at the time. In the letter, Montgomery detailed a dish that was created by Commodore E.C. Benedict. Commodore Benedict was a banker and yachtsman who died in 1920 at the age of 86. The dish created by Commodore Benedict was Eggs Benedict. The commodore claims that the recipe had been given to him by his mother who had received it from the commodore’s uncle.

In November of the same year, Mabel C. Butler of Vineyard Haven, Massachusetts responded to Mr. Montgomery’s letter to The Times requesting a correction to the story. Her story was the “true story” of how Eggs Benedict came to be, a retelling of the Delmonico’s stpry above. In Ms. Butler’s story, the creation of Eggs Benedict was well known to the relatives of Mrs. Le Grand Benedict, of whom she was one. Her version included a truffle on top.

A fourth origin of the dish is in food historian, Elizabeth David’s French Provincial Cooking, where she writes about a traditional French dish named œufs bénédictine, consisting of brandade (a puree of refreshed salt cod and potatoes), spread on triangles of fried bread. A poached egg is then set on top and napped with hollandaise. This story would also explain the continental syntax, where the adjective follows, rather than precedes, the noun.

Mrs. Isabella Beeton’s Household Management had recipes in the first edition (1861) for “Dutch sauce, for benedict” and its variant on the following page, “Green sauce, or Hollandaise verte”, so Eggs Benedict undoubtedly precedes the New World stories above. In 1859–1861, she wrote a monthly supplement to The Englishwoman’s Domestic Magazine In October 1861, the supplements were published as a single volume, The Book of Household Management Comprising information for the Mistress, Housekeeper,Cook, Kitchen-maid, Butler, Footman,Coachman,Valet,Upper and Under House-Maids,Lady’s Maid, Maid-of-all-Work,Laundry, Nurse and Nursery maid, Monthly, Wet Nurse, and Sick Nurses, etc. etc.—also Sanitary, Medical,; Legal Memoranda: with a History of the Origin, Properties, and Uses of all Things Connected with Home Life and Comfort.

While all of these stories are entertaining, it is most likely that the dish is a Lenten or meatless dish evolved from Renaissance times.

Now presenting How To Make Truffled Eggs Benedict.

Eggs Benedict, a showy restaurant favorite, is also a luscious brunch entree to make at home. We’ll show you how to make the classic version and a few shortcuts, too.

What Is Eggs Benedict?

The standard recipe calls for English muffins topped with Canadian bacon or sliced ham, poached eggs, and hollandaise sauce, which is a rich sauce made from eggs, butter, and lemon juice. Legend has it that it originated in Delmonico’s Restaurant in New York City. Apparently Mr. and Mrs. LeGrand Benedict complained that there was nothing new on the lunch menu, so the maitre d’ and Mrs. Benedict collaborated and came up with what is now known as Eggs Benedict.

How to Make Eggs Benedict

Here is what you will need for 4 servings of the classic version:

1 recipe Hollandaise Sauce or Mock Hollandaise Sauce (see below)

2 English muffins, split (half of a muffin per serving)

4 slices Canadian-style bacon

1. Prepare Poached Eggs

Poach the eggs in a pan of water. Click here for step-by-step instructions on cooking poached eggs. Or use an electric egg poacher, following manufacturer’s instructions.

Step 2. Make the Hollandaise Sauce

The classic sauce for Eggs Benedict is Hollandaise Sauce. You will need a double boiler to keep the eggs from curdling during preparation. For a foolproof sauce that is a bit simpler but still tasty, try Mock Hollandaise Sauce.

3. Broil the Muffins & Canadian Bacon

  • Preheat the broiler.
  • Place muffin halves, cut sides up, on a baking sheet. Broil 3 to 4 inches from the heat about 2 minutes or until toasted. Top each muffin half with a slice of Canadian-style bacon; broil about 1 minute more or until meat is heated through.

4. Assemble the Eggs Benedict.

To serve, place each bacon-topped muffin half on a plate and top with a poached egg. Spoon Hollandaise Sauce over each egg. If desired, sprinkle with paprika to add a little color.

Make-Ahead Tip: Prepare the eggs and toast the English muffins as above. Place muffin halves in a greased 8x8x2-inch baking pan. Top each muffin half with a slice of Canadian-style bacon and 1 cooked egg. Cover and chill for up to 24 hours. To serve, prepare Hollandaise Sauce; spoon hot sauce over eggs. Bake, covered, in a 350 degrees F oven about 30 minutes or until heated through.

Salmon Benedict Variation: Prepare as above, except spread 1 tablespoon softened tub-style cream cheese with herbs on each toasted English muffin half and substitute 4 ounces thinly sliced smoked salmon (lox-style) for the Canadian-style bacon. If desired, stir 1 tablespoon drained capers and 1/2 teaspoon dried dill weed into the Hollandaise Sauce. Do not use the paprika.

Mushrooms Benedict Variation: This is a meatless option. Select 4 portobello mushrooms with 3-1/2- to 4-inch caps and remove stems. Prepare Eggs Benedict as above, except before cooking eggs, cook the mushroom caps in 1 tablespoon hot olive oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat until mushrooms are tender, about 6 minutes, turning once. Remove from pan and pat mushrooms with a paper towel to soak up excess liquid. Slice mushrooms. Sprinkle lightly with salt and ground black pepper; cover with foil to keep warm. Continue as directed, using the mushroom slices instead of the Canadian-style bacon. Sprinkle each with finely chopped seeded tomato instead of the paprika.

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Find out everything you need to know to make Eggs Benedict for a group here and start hosting the best Sunday brunches ever!

How to make eggs benedict

Even the most seasoned cook can get a migraine when thinking about making Eggs Benedict for her Sunday brunch pals.

Don’t be that cook.

Let’s put together all the components and multiply by five (or however many you’re entertaining) and make Eggs Benedict for your guests. It can be done simply and quickly with one set of hands.

Let’s get started.

Step 1: Poach the eggs the day ahead

As the eggs are ready, use a slotted spoon to transfer them to a big bowl of ice water. Continue to poach eggs and add them to the ice water until you have the number required. Store them in the cold water in the refrigerator for up to 24 hours.

Fast forward to the next morning. Fill a large bowl with hot tap water. Use a slotted spoon to transfer the eggs from the cold water to the hot water. The eggs will heat up there and be nice and warm by the time you need to assemble the dish.

Step 2: Prepare the English muffins and the Canadian bacon

Preheat the oven to 200ºF.

Toast and butter the English muffins. You can use store-bought ones or our homemade ones here. Place in a single layer on a baking sheet and keep warm in the oven for 10-15 minutes.

Fry the Canadian bacon in a frying pan over medium heat. The meat needs to be in a single layer for it to cook properly. Flip occasionally, until lightly browned on both sides.

Place the Canadian bacon, in a single layer, on another baking sheet. Keep it warm in the oven alongside the English muffins.

Step 3: Make the Hollandaise Sauce

Add egg yolks, lemon juice, and cayenne powder to a blender. Pulse. Microwave some butter until melted and very warm. With the blender running, drizzle in the butter. Let it run for an extra 30 seconds. Here’s the Blender Hollandaise recipe for exact measurements and instructions.

Step 4: Prepare the plates

Set up an assembly line.

  1. Line up your plates.
  2. Place two toasted English muffin halves on each plate.
  3. Top each with a slice of Canadian bacon.
  4. Use a slotted spoon to scoop up a poached egg. Blot the bottom of the spoon on paper towel to prevent the egg from being too watery. Pop it on top of the Canadian bacon.
  5. Spoon still-warm hollandaise sauce over top of each egg.
  6. Grab your Bloody Mary’s and head to the table for a feast.
This post originally appeared in April 2016 and was revised and republished in April 2020.

Amy Bowen

Amy had no clue how to cook until she became the food reporter for a daily newspaper in Minnesota. At 25, she even struggled with boxed mac and cheese. These days, Amy is a much better cook, thanks to interviewing cooks and chefs for more than 10 years. She even makes four cheese macaroni and cheese with bacon, no boxed mac in sight. Amy is also on the editorial team at The Cookful.

Eggs Benedict is truly a popular breakfast or brunch item. And what’s not to love? It’s got all the makings of the satisfying meal to get you started for the day: eggs, bacon, bagels, and of course, a rich hollandaise sauce. While it is indeed an impressive dish, it’s actually not that difficult to make. The only trick is getting the poached eggs, and hollandaise sauce right. The sauce is served over a runny egg, with crispy bacon and a toasted bagel (which also provides extra crunch). If you’re looking for an impressive, yet super-satisfying breakfast or brunch, then don’t miss this Best Eggs Benedict recipe.

What is Eggs Benedict?

As with iconic foods, it’s sometimes difficult to determine what the exact origin is. There are a few stories of where this delicious breakfast comes from. The one says that the Eggs Benedict was popularized in New York in the late 19th century (1894, to be exact). The story goes that a Wall Street broker called Lemeul Benedict would frequently visit the Waldorf Hotel, and request his favorite breakfast consisting of toast with poached eggs, bacon, and a rich hollandaise sauce. The other version says no, it was invented at the Delmonico’s Restaurant in the 1860s. Inspired by Mrs. LeGrand Benedict who wanted something new, chef Charles Ranhofer created this recipe which then became the Eggs Benedict. It was subsequently published in his cookbook in 1984.

No matter what the origin, the Eggs Benedict remains a favorite among many. Today, the classic Eggs Benedict consists of toasted English muffins, poached eggs (which are still runny), Canadian bacon, and of course, a rich hollandaise sauce.

How to make eggs benedict

How to make Eggs Benedict

There are a few key components that make up the Eggs Benedict. First, the bacon needs to be cooked. In this recipe, we cook the bacon in the oven, which means you are free to focus on the other components. The eggs are poached until cooked, but just runny.

To make the hollandaise sauce, you will need to work over a low heat (use a bain marie to be precise). The hollandaise sauce, together with the runny eggs, is what makes the Eggs Benedict so rich and decadent.

Once all the components are cooked, they’re ready for assembly. The bagels are halved and toasted, and then the magic happens! The components are piled on top of the bagel slices and covered with the sauce. Now all that’s left, is to devour it!

How To Poach An Egg?

Poaching an egg shouldn’t be an intimidating process. Simply put, you need a pot of boiling water and simply drop in the eggs. But there’s more than that to get it right. There are two things you need to two. First, crack the eggs into a ramekin. This will ensure that you crack it properly (without breaking the yolk), you will also have no shell. It also makes it easier to add the eggs to the water. Another trick is to swirl the water, creating a vortex. This will cause the eggs to cook in a nice rounded shape!

How to make eggs benedict

How To Make Hollandaise Sauce?

In a bain marie over medium heat, the egg yolks are whisked until cooked. Butter is slowly added until the mixture becomes smooth and thick. Finally, lemon juice is added, and the sauce is taken off the heat.

– The Eggs Benedicts are so easy to change up to your liking and taste preferences. Don’t have Canadian bacon? Use smoked salmon or ham. Want to make it more nutritious? Add wilted spinach.

– Get creative and make a Vegetarian Eggs Benedict. Serve the toasted buns with avocado, tomato, eggs, and hollandaise sauce.

– To make an Eggs Benedict Casserole, add Canadian Bacon (cooked) to a large oven-safe dish, together with torn pieces of English muffin. Pour in 1 cup milk mixed with 4 whisked eggs. Season with salt and pepper, and bake until the eggs are cooked. Serve with hollandaise sauce.

Can I store Eggs Benedict?

You can store Eggs Benedict and the Hollandaise Sauce in the fridge for up to 2 days. When reheating the sauce, make sure to do it over low heat to prevent the eggs from curdling.

Instructions

How to make eggs benedict

Place the bacon on a baking tray, cover with another tray. Bake in a pre-heated oven for 20 minutes (160°C/320°F).

How to make eggs benedict

Place 3 egg yolks in a bain-marie.

How to make eggs benedict

Whisk over medium heat until it lightens in color and becomes fluffy thicker.

How to make eggs benedict

Remove from the heat and whisk in the melted butter a little at a time, the sauce will thicken and become more voluminous.

How to make eggs benedict

Whisk in the lemon juice and set aside.

How to make eggs benedict

Cut the bagels in half and toast lightly.

How to make eggs benedict

Add a slice of cheese to each half and then flash under the broiler until it starts to melt.

How to make eggs benedict

Now poach your eggs. Bring a pan of water to a boil then reduce to a gentle simmer. Swirl the water and then drop an egg into the center of each swirl and cook until the whites are set.

How to make eggs benedict

Add some bacon to the top of each cheese-topped bagel.

How to make eggs benedict

Add a poached egg.

How to make eggs benedict

Finally, drizzle over the sauce.

Notes

The key to making a perfect Eggs Benedict is using a bain-marie. If the heat is too high, then the eggs will curdle. To create a bain-marie, simply place a bowl over a pan of slowly boiling water.