How to make fish stock

How to make fish stock

The Spruce / Victoria Heydt

Nutrition Facts (per serving)
353 Calories
9g Fat
4g Carbs
60g Protein

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Nutrition Facts
Servings: 8
Amount per serving
Calories 353
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 9g 12%
Saturated Fat 4g 20%
Cholesterol 137mg 46%
Sodium 160mg 7%
Total Carbohydrate 4g 1%
Dietary Fiber 1g 3%
Total Sugars 1g
Protein 60g
Vitamin C 4mg 22%
Calcium 65mg 5%
Iron 2mg 11%
Potassium 968mg 21%
*The % Daily Value (DV) tells you how much a nutrient in a food serving contributes to a daily diet. 2,000 calories a day is used for general nutrition advice.

Fish stock, also called fumét in French, is a magnificent base for making soups, chowders, seafood risotto, and any number of sauces. But you may shy away from making your own stock because it is disproportionately labor- or time-intensive. You are not wrong when it comes to beef, veal, or poultry stock, but fish stock happens to be the exception. Unlike chicken stock or beef stock, fish stock is quick and easy to make; rather than simmering away for hours, requiring continuous skimming and fussing, fish stock takes just 45 minutes on the stovetop.

Although certain recipes will use chicken broth instead of fish stock, such as a simple clam chowder, using the fish stock will really enrich the seafood dish and bring a complex level of flavor. Based in French cuisine, fumét is an important ingredient in several French sauces, such as Normandy sauce. It will also contribute a wonderful flavor when poaching fish and is the basis for Spanish Basque seafood stew.

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How to make fish stock

Fish stock is liquid made from seasoning, water, and fresh fish parts. Similar to broth, it often serves as part of the liquid base in seafood soups, stews, and chowders. Stock is frequently preferred to water for soups and stews because it adds an extra seafood flavor. Unlike chicken or beef stock, which is made using a similar process, fish stock does not need to be cooked for hours. Although fish stock can be found commercially, it is more often homemade.

White fish, such as flounder, cod, or red snapper, is normally used to make fish stock. Since white fish is leaner than oily fish, it is more desirable for the stock. Only the bones, heads, and, sometimes, fins are used. The gills are removed from the head before it is included in the stock.

In addition to the fish parts, onions, carrots, and celery are normally added. Black peppercorns and salt are popular additions for seasonings. Dry white wine or white wine vinegar combined with water usually serves as the liquid element. Either olive oil or butter is included for sauteing as well.

Many versions of fish stock add a bundle of spices, termed a herb bouquet or sachet d’épices. The spice bag usually consists of fresh or whole herbs, such as bay leaves, thyme springs, and garlic cloves, wrapped and tied in cheesecloth. Parsley stems and whole cloves are also sometimes included. Wrapping the herbs in cheesecloth allows the flavors to combine with the stock without stray herbs floating in the liquid.

To make fish stock, the vegetables are usually sauteed in olive oil, and sometimes the fish bones are sauteed with them. Afterward, the rest of the ingredients are added. When all the elements have been included, the stock is first brought to a boil and then simmered for about half an hour. During simmering, any foam that forms on the surface of the liquid can be skimmed off.

Once complete, the stock is sieved, usually through layers of cheesecloth. Any solids are disposed of and only liquid should be kept. The fish stock can immediately be used for a soup, stew, sauce, or chowder, or it can be covered and refrigerated for up to two days. It also may be frozen for about two months. When chilled, any excess fat that forms on the surface should be skimmed off before the stock is used in a recipe.

How to make fish stock

How to make fish stock

See how to cook fish

Fish stock (or fumet as it’s known when concentrated) is one of the quickest, freshest, most fragrant stocks out there, and it is of course very resourceful, sustainable and satisfying to get use out of every part of the animal you’re eating.

As with all stocks, it’s a good idea to make a big batch and freeze down portions, so you always have some to hand. The recipe below is for a big batch but you can of course scale down the amounts if you want to make a small batch to use straight away.

Bones

If you are not using surplus bones from fish you have filleted yourself, ask your fishmonger for a kilo of bones – they’ll be very cheap (or maybe even free). You must only use the bones of white fish; bass, cod and flat fish are good to use. Bones of oily fish such as salmon, mackerel or tuna are too fatty and will make your stock greasy and unpleasant. The fish bones must be cleaned of any blood and gills as these will impart a nasty, bitter taste and cloud up your stock. Fish heads add a lot of flavour and contain a lot of gelatine which will give body to your stock, but make sure they are thoroughly cleaned (and always remove the gills). A good way of cleaning the bones is to run them under a cold tap and leave them to soak in the water to allow impurities to float the surface (which you can then skim and discard).

Vegetables and aromatics

Traditionally the vegetables used to make fish stock are fennel and celery, along with aniseed herbs like tarragon and dill. Carrots tend to be avoided, as they discolour the stock. To get the most out of your vegetables chop them nice and finely, as this gives them a larger surface area when frying them off, releasing more of their flavour. For extra umami and a natural taste of the sea, throw in a sheet of kombu seaweed.

Seasoning

Be careful when seasoning fish stock – if you intend on reducing it down for a sauce do not add any salt until right at the end, as the saltiness will intensify and may become overpowering. If you’re using the stock straight away without reducing, however, season as normal.

The recipe below makes around 1lt of stock.

Ingredients

  • 1kg fish bones, chopped down into 5cm pieces and cleaned
  • 1 leek, white parts only, chopped
  • 1/2 fennel, chopped
  • 1 stick of celery, chopped
  • 1 small onion, chopped
  • 1/2 garlic bulb
  • 500ml of white wine
  • 6 white peppercorns, (you can also use pink peppercorns for a more floral flavour)
  • 1 tsp fennel seeds
  • 1 sheet of kombu, (optional)
  • 2 bay leaves
  • parsley stalks
  • 1 handful of dill
  • 1 handful of tarragon
  • 2 slices of lemon

How to use fish stock in cooking

A top-quality fish stock is essential to many of the great seafood dishes out there – from the famous French king of soups bouillabaisse to creamy smoked haddock chowder, seafood paellas or a nicely spiced kedgeree. It is also used as a base for sauces; whisk stock into a bubbling roux of flour and butter to make a velvety fish velouté which will take your fish pie to the next level. As one of the five French ‘mother sauces’, fish velouté is a base for various ‘daughter sauces’ such as sauce Bercy which is flavoured with white wine, lemon and fresh parsley. Another is sauce Normande, which sees fish velouté enriched with egg yolks, butter and cream and is a popular accompaniment to mussels.

How to make fish stock

How to make fish stock

Restaurants often make whole vats of stock to reduce down into sauces. A stock reduced by half is known as demi-glace (demi meaning half in French), and a stock reduced by 80–90% is called a glace. Reducing the stock intensifies flavour and naturally thickens it (without having to use any kind of thickening agent). Turning fish stock into a glace is also a good way of storing your stock; once it’s reduced right down it should solidify as it cools. You can then portion the glace into ice cube trays to keep in the freezer. By doing this you’re essentially creating your own high-quality stock cube; simply dissolve the glace in water to turn it back into fish stock.

A fish glace is a great base to a simple pan sauce to accompany a piece of fish; whisk in some chilled butter, season with lemon juice and finish with fresh herbs or even some brown shrimp or clams. The intense flavour means a little goes a long way, and the resulting taste is far better than anything you can buy in the shops.

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This can be a base for many soups and stews, and when making our Caribbean Bouillabaisse.

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Recipe Summary

Ingredients

Remove the gills and any traces of blood from fish heads; thoroughly wash bones, and cut them to fit into a 12-quart stockpot. Place heads and bones in a large bowl, and set aside.

Quarter leek lengthwise; cut into 1/4-inch-thick slices. Transfer to a bowl of cold water; let stand 5 minutes to rid leek of sand. Lift out of water; drain in a colander; set aside.

Make a bouquet garni by placing bay leaves, parsley, thyme, cloves, fennel seeds, fennel branches, and peppercorns in a 12-inch-square piece of cheesecloth. Form a bundle, and tie with kitchen twine; set aside.

Melt butter in a 12-quart stockpot over medium heat; add cut leek, onion, celery, and fennel bulb; cook until vegetables are tender, 8 to 10 minutes. Increase heat to medium high, and add fish heads and bones. Cook, stirring, 5 minutes. Add wine, bouquet garni, and 2 1/2 quarts water, covering the bones. Bring liquid to a boil. Reduce heat to low, and simmer 25 minutes, skimming any scum that rises to the surface. Turn off the heat, and let sit 10 minutes.

Prepare an ice bath. Strain the stock through a fine sieve set over a large bowl. Set the bowl in the ice bath. Use stock within 1 day, or freeze for up to 3 months.

Cook’s Notes

Resist the temptation to cook this stock longer than instructed, as it will become bitter. The vegetables are cut small so they can add the maximum amount of flavor in the shortest time.

How to make fish stock

How to Make Homemade Fish (Fume) Stock

Of all the stocks home-cooks need to prepare for their favorite recipes, I’m guessing seafood stock is not at the top of the list. It has always been easy find both chicken and beef stock in your local market but hard to find seafood or fish stock.

That’s changing now and commercial seafood stock is now showing up on my supermarket shelves. But what if I want to make my own home-made fish stock?

Is Seafood Stock the Same as Fish Stock?

I think of fish stock as being made from the bones and body parts of fish only where seafood stock can be made with both fish and shellfish shells.

When I make risotto that calls for fish stock, I often use shrimp shells to make my own simple stock by adding them to a pot of water and cooking the liquid down by half. This is more of a shrimp or shellfish stock but it’s better than nothing.

Why Use Fish Stock?

Another great question. A well made fish stock can greatly enhance the flavor of all seafood recipes like risottos and pasta recipes dishes but it really reinforces the flavor of seafood sauces like Seafood Sauce for Pan Seared Fish Recipe.

A good fish stock also works wonders as a base for fish and seafood soups like New England or Manhattan Clam Chowder.

Fish Stock Ingredients

To me, a good fish stock needs lots of fish bones, maybe even a fish head or two. I know you are thinking, “where am I going to buy fish heads or even fish bones?”

If you are only purchasing boneless fish fillets like tuna, swordfish, halibut, or flounder, you are not going to have any bones or fish heads to make your stock. So what can you do?

1. Buy a whole fish like trout, flounder, branzino and fillet the fish yourself. Save the head and bones to make a tasty stock.

2. If you absolutely can’t stand filleting your own fish or cutting off the heads, make friends with your local fishmonger. Buy a whole fish and ask him or her to clean and fillet the fish but save the fish bones and head for your stock. They will be happy to do this for you.

3. If you are tight with your local fishmonger, ask them to save some bones or fish heads for you and they most likely will give them to you or sell them to you at a very low price.

Although you can use any fish available to make your good homemade fish stock, I would recommend you stay away from really oily fish like salmon or mackerel. These fish are very pungent and may give your stock an overpowering flavor.

It’s also important to clean the bones by washing them under water to remove any residual blood. If using fish heads, be sure to remove the gills to reduce any off tasting flavors and aromas.

Other Ingredients

You’ll be adding what professional chefs call aromatics to the stock to add additional layers of flavors. Aromatics may include onions, garlic, carrots, celery and leeks plus herbs like parsley, tarragon, cilantro and bay leaves.

It’s important to chop the vegetables into small dices or thin slices so there is more surface exposed to the water allowing for quicker extraction of flavors from them.

The goal when preparing a classic fish stock is to end up with fresh, clean, delicate flavor that is not over fishy in both taste and aroma. From my research, a higher ratio of clean bones to water offers the best results.

Cooking Times

Making a fish stock at home is much faster than making a beef or chicken stock. In fact, you don’t want the fish stock to keep cooking down or it will become way too strong tasting and there’s the risk of giving it an overly fishy smell.

How long you cook your fish stock depends on how much you are making but it will typically take half the time it takes to make a chicken or beef stock.

Fish stock, when done right, is rich in vitamins and minerals. This simple and quick-to-make elixir is liquid gold to your health.

How to make fish stock

This post contains affiliate links. The cost is the same for you.

If you’ve never prepared traditional fish stock, roll up your sleeves and let’s get to it. It’s very similar to regular beef or chicken bone broth, only we’re using whole fish to make it. Also, roasting the bones isn’t necessary when making fish stock neither is including Apple Cider Vinegar. This is a simple technique I learned from my mom and I’ve been using this method for over a decade. There really is no right or wrong in this, more of a personal preference.

How to make fish stock

Why make fish stock?

Well, because according to South American Proverb “fish broth will cure anything.” In prior times, the butcher and fishmonger have always sold the meat and fish on the bone. It wasn’t until recently, Americans began preferring their meat and fish de-boned and filleted.

Convenient? Yes. Nutritious? Not so much.

You see, when you cook the entire fish, you are producing collagen from the cartilage that can only be found in bones and heads. Collagen is a protein made up of amino acids responsible for healthy hair, skin and nails and it’s also used to restore elasticity to the joints making it a perfect supplement for those suffering from arthritis. (source) There are more benefits to collagen beyond the scope of this post but suffice it to say, it has tremendous capabilities to heal and nurture your body.

How to make fish stock

Making stock with fish heads also gives you a very iodine-rich broth that is healing to the thyroid. The thyroid gland of the fish is in the head but it disintegrates so much during cooking that you won’t even taste it but instead, produces a very iodine-dense broth. And since most people are deficient in this mineral that’s responsible for metabolism and hormone health, it would behoove you to make this on a regular basis. (source)

Why else would I make Fish Stock?

Simply put, fish stock is surprisingly cheap to make. Most fish markets will sell their unused fish heads and carcass for super cheap (and sometimes free!). And yet the benefits that fish stock gives is tremendous. It’s very similar to the concept of bone broth, where you use unwanted animal parts at incredibly low prices to make something so rich in nutrition. You really can’t beat the powerhouse of nutrition that you get from fish stock (or bone broth for that matter) for pennies on the dollar. It’s cheap. It’s healthy. It’s a win in my book.

How to make fish stock

What is the best fish for fish stock?

Fish stock is made from the carcass of non-oily fish like snapper, sole, and cod and is ideally cooked for no longer than one hour. For a nutrient-dense stock, it’s imperative that you include bones and heads as they are rich in iodine and fat-soluble vitamins. Some classic cookbooks advise against using oily fish such as salmon for fish stock because the unsaturated oils become rancid during the long cooking process, that’s why I personally love fish stocks. You don’t really cook them for long periods of time. Forty-five minutes to an hour is all you need for a healthy, nutritious fish stock.

Fish heads are relatively cheap at the fish market because most people go for the fleshy part of the fish. Some fishmongers will even give it away free of charge. And as always, source wild fish since farmed fish are fed grain pellets and antibiotics and spend their lives in horrible environments.

How to make fish stock

We purchased this 18-pound white sturgeon and my husband filleted it and I processed the meat and flesh of the fish. I prepared fish steaks for baking or grilling and fish cubes for this Cilantro and Chili Ceviche. All that’s remaining was this beautiful white sturgeon carcass. Pardon our lack of professionalism in taking apart this fish (yes, that is a towel under the two glass cutting boards). We had neither the tools nor the know-how to do it properly.

Before the World Conservation Society comes knocking at my door, let me just say, I am aware sturgeon fish are considered at risk. Sturgeons are valued for their highly-prized caviar and while I admit, we used to relish those black pearls years ago, sturgeon roe hasn’t touched our lips in a very long time. In fact, last I heard, it was illegal to fish female sturgeon; they have to be released back into the water. Also, white sturgeon is one of the very few species of sturgeon that is NOT endangered. I feel comfortable knowing this and thus, enjoy my fish stock. ?

How to Make Nutritious Fish Stock – a Tutorial

Thoroughly wash all the bones and the fish heads and place them into a large stockpot. You can add celery, carrots, onions, leeks, bay leaves or peppercorns to the pot but I prefer the very basic version of just bay leaves, seasoned with salt and pepper.

Tip: I prefer to flavor my fish stock separately when I’m making specific soups. Add salt after cooking and straining since you will lose some of the liquid during the cooking.

Add filtered water and place over medium-high heat to bring it to a boil. Reduce heat to low, and simmer for 45-60 minutes, continually skimming any scum that rises to the surface.

How to make fish stock

Strain fish stock using a fine mesh sieve.

How to make fish stock

Now would be a good time to clean out your fish and fish out for some flesh (pun totally intended). Yep, that in my hand is a real fish eye. This would be for the chickens.

How to make fish stock

And this would be for us. Delicious, tender white sturgeon flakes.

How to make fish stock

Use stock within a day or freeze in quart-size jars or half-gallon jars (be sure to allow room for expansion) for up to 3 months.

Tip: Remaining fish carcass is a great fertilizer for your garden. You can grind it up and compost it.

I like to enjoy fish stock with chopped green onions, fresh dill and a squeeze of lemon juice for a nice side addition to breakfast. There are also a myriad of different soups and chowders that would call for fish stock and since we are officially in Fall mode, there will be lots of yummy recipes to come. This Easy Nourishing Fish Soup also calls for fish stock.

Make your own shellfish stock with the shells from crabs, shrimp, and lobster. Homemade shellfish stock recipe with photos and step-by-step instructions.

Elise founded Simply Recipes in 2003 and led the site until 2019. She has an MA in Food Research from Stanford University.

How to make fish stock

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How to make fish stock

Years ago, on a little island off the coast of Marblehead, Massachusetts, a friend’s aunt showed me how to eat a lobster, including the fine art of sucking the tender meat and juice out of the spindly legs.

It was July, when lobsters are in season, and we had a huge pot of them for our gang. Aunt Judy then explained that one makes lobster bisque from the leftover shells.

I still recall my astonishment. How could something so delicious come from boiled shells?

While New England has its summer lobster season, we in Northern California have our winter Dungeness crab season. In anticipation of making stock for seafood bisques and stews, I have been collecting our leftover shells from each crab feast and freezing them.

How to make fish stock

Making seafood stock is similar to making chicken stock; it takes time and attention, and the final result makes it worth the effort. Best to do on a weekend afternoon. Make a big batch and freeze what you don’t need!

How to Make Shellfish Stock

Ingredients

  • 4-6 cups shellfish shells, from shrimp, lobster, and/or crab
  • 1/2 cup dry white wine
  • 1 large yellow onion, sliced or chopped
  • 1 carrot, roughly sliced or chopped
  • 1 celery stalk, roughly sliced or chopped
  • 2 Tbsp tomato paste
  • 2 sprigs of thyme
  • Several sprigs parsley
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 10-15 whole peppercorns
  • 2 teaspoons salt

Method

Break thick shells (lobster or crab) into smaller pieces by putting in a sealed, thick plastic bag and either rolling with a rolling pin or hitting with a meat hammer to crush.

Cut up thinner shrimp shells with a chef’s knife. Don’t crush or cut too small. You can even skip this step if you want, if you are already dealing with broken up shell pieces (like cracked crab).

Place in a large roasting pan and roast at 400°F for 10 minutes (this step you can skip, but it greatly enhances the flavor).

How to make fish stock

Put the shells in a large stock pot and add enough water to cover the shells with an inch of water. Heat the water on high. As soon as you see that little bubbles are starting to come up to the surface, reduce the heat to medium.

How to make fish stock

Do not let the water boil! You want to maintain the temperature at just at the edge of a simmer (around 180°F), where the bubbles just occasionally come up to the surface.

Do not stir the shells! Stirring will muddy up the stock.

Skim the foam. As the bubbles come up to the surface a film of foam will develop on the surface. Use a large metal spoon to skim away this foam. Let the shells cook like this for about an hour; skim the foam every few minutes. The foam comes from shells releasing impurities as their temperature increases.

Once the stock has stopped releasing foam, add the wine, onions, carrots, celery, tomato paste, thyme, parsley, bay leaf, and peppercorns.

How to make fish stock

How to make fish stock

Bring to a low simmer and reduce heat so that the stock continues to barely simmer, but not boil, for 30 minutes. If more foam comes to the surface, skim it off. Add salt and remove from heat.

How to make fish stock

Use tongs, a large slotted spoon, or a spider strainer to lift out and remove most of the solids from the stock. (Later put in a plastic bag and put outside in the trash! Shellfish shells have a way of stinking up a kitchen.)

How to make fish stock

Dampen a few layers of cheesecloth and place over a large, fine mesh strainer, over a large pot or bowl.

How to make fish stock

How to make fish stock

Pour the stock into the strainer. Either use the stock right away, or cool for future use.

If you aren’t going to use in a couple of days, freeze (remember to leave some headroom at the top of your freezer container for the liquid to expand as it freezes.)

Links:

Williams-Sonoma Mastering Soups and Stews – great book for cooking techniques. I got the basic method for this shellfish stock from this book.

Fish stock, when done right, is rich in vitamins and minerals. This simple and quick-to-make elixir is liquid gold to your health.

How to make fish stock

This post contains affiliate links. The cost is the same for you.

If you’ve never prepared traditional fish stock, roll up your sleeves and let’s get to it. It’s very similar to regular beef or chicken bone broth, only we’re using whole fish to make it. Also, roasting the bones isn’t necessary when making fish stock neither is including Apple Cider Vinegar. This is a simple technique I learned from my mom and I’ve been using this method for over a decade. There really is no right or wrong in this, more of a personal preference.

How to make fish stock

Why make fish stock?

Well, because according to South American Proverb “fish broth will cure anything.” In prior times, the butcher and fishmonger have always sold the meat and fish on the bone. It wasn’t until recently, Americans began preferring their meat and fish de-boned and filleted.

Convenient? Yes. Nutritious? Not so much.

You see, when you cook the entire fish, you are producing collagen from the cartilage that can only be found in bones and heads. Collagen is a protein made up of amino acids responsible for healthy hair, skin and nails and it’s also used to restore elasticity to the joints making it a perfect supplement for those suffering from arthritis. (source) There are more benefits to collagen beyond the scope of this post but suffice it to say, it has tremendous capabilities to heal and nurture your body.

How to make fish stock

Making stock with fish heads also gives you a very iodine-rich broth that is healing to the thyroid. The thyroid gland of the fish is in the head but it disintegrates so much during cooking that you won’t even taste it but instead, produces a very iodine-dense broth. And since most people are deficient in this mineral that’s responsible for metabolism and hormone health, it would behoove you to make this on a regular basis. (source)

Why else would I make Fish Stock?

Simply put, fish stock is surprisingly cheap to make. Most fish markets will sell their unused fish heads and carcass for super cheap (and sometimes free!). And yet the benefits that fish stock gives is tremendous. It’s very similar to the concept of bone broth, where you use unwanted animal parts at incredibly low prices to make something so rich in nutrition. You really can’t beat the powerhouse of nutrition that you get from fish stock (or bone broth for that matter) for pennies on the dollar. It’s cheap. It’s healthy. It’s a win in my book.

How to make fish stock

What is the best fish for fish stock?

Fish stock is made from the carcass of non-oily fish like snapper, sole, and cod and is ideally cooked for no longer than one hour. For a nutrient-dense stock, it’s imperative that you include bones and heads as they are rich in iodine and fat-soluble vitamins. Some classic cookbooks advise against using oily fish such as salmon for fish stock because the unsaturated oils become rancid during the long cooking process, that’s why I personally love fish stocks. You don’t really cook them for long periods of time. Forty-five minutes to an hour is all you need for a healthy, nutritious fish stock.

Fish heads are relatively cheap at the fish market because most people go for the fleshy part of the fish. Some fishmongers will even give it away free of charge. And as always, source wild fish since farmed fish are fed grain pellets and antibiotics and spend their lives in horrible environments.

How to make fish stock

We purchased this 18-pound white sturgeon and my husband filleted it and I processed the meat and flesh of the fish. I prepared fish steaks for baking or grilling and fish cubes for this Cilantro and Chili Ceviche. All that’s remaining was this beautiful white sturgeon carcass. Pardon our lack of professionalism in taking apart this fish (yes, that is a towel under the two glass cutting boards). We had neither the tools nor the know-how to do it properly.

Before the World Conservation Society comes knocking at my door, let me just say, I am aware sturgeon fish are considered at risk. Sturgeons are valued for their highly-prized caviar and while I admit, we used to relish those black pearls years ago, sturgeon roe hasn’t touched our lips in a very long time. In fact, last I heard, it was illegal to fish female sturgeon; they have to be released back into the water. Also, white sturgeon is one of the very few species of sturgeon that is NOT endangered. I feel comfortable knowing this and thus, enjoy my fish stock. ?

How to Make Nutritious Fish Stock – a Tutorial

Thoroughly wash all the bones and the fish heads and place them into a large stockpot. You can add celery, carrots, onions, leeks, bay leaves or peppercorns to the pot but I prefer the very basic version of just bay leaves, seasoned with salt and pepper.

Tip: I prefer to flavor my fish stock separately when I’m making specific soups. Add salt after cooking and straining since you will lose some of the liquid during the cooking.

Add filtered water and place over medium-high heat to bring it to a boil. Reduce heat to low, and simmer for 45-60 minutes, continually skimming any scum that rises to the surface.

How to make fish stock

Strain fish stock using a fine mesh sieve.

How to make fish stock

Now would be a good time to clean out your fish and fish out for some flesh (pun totally intended). Yep, that in my hand is a real fish eye. This would be for the chickens.

How to make fish stock

And this would be for us. Delicious, tender white sturgeon flakes.

How to make fish stock

Use stock within a day or freeze in quart-size jars or half-gallon jars (be sure to allow room for expansion) for up to 3 months.

Tip: Remaining fish carcass is a great fertilizer for your garden. You can grind it up and compost it.

I like to enjoy fish stock with chopped green onions, fresh dill and a squeeze of lemon juice for a nice side addition to breakfast. There are also a myriad of different soups and chowders that would call for fish stock and since we are officially in Fall mode, there will be lots of yummy recipes to come. This Easy Nourishing Fish Soup also calls for fish stock.