How to make homemade wine

  • How to make homemade wine

  • How to make homemade wine

In the DEAR MOTHER section of MOTHER EARTH NEWS No. 3, Gary Dunford asked if it’s possible to make wine at home without buying $40 worth of equipment. The answer is yes.

I started making wine with stuff I could scrounge while living in a one room apartment in the city. Following are my own Super Simple directions. They’re guaranteed to drive dedicated winemakers up a wall but they do produce results. Anyway, they’re a beginning and beginnings are the most important part.

You can make wine out of almost any fruit. In fact, you can make it from just about anything that grows. I have used grapes, pears, peaches, plums, blackberries, strawberries, cherries and—my favorite—honey. Honey wine is called Mead. The so-called wine of the gods. It’s cheap, easy and good. Here’s how:

Homemade Wine Recipe

Get a gallon jug, preferably glass but plastic will do. Clean it out good. Smell it. Someone may have kept gasoline in it. Wash the jug with soap (NOT detergent), rinse with baking soda in water and—finally—rinse with clear water.

Put a pint and a half to two pints of honey in the jug (the more honey, the stronger the wine), fill with warm water and shake.

Add a pack or cake of yeast—the same stuff you use for bread—and leave the jug uncapped and sitting in a sink overnight. It will foam at the mouth and the whole thing gets pretty sticky at this point.

After the mess quiets down a bit, you’re ready to put a top on it. NOT, I say NOT, a solid top. That would make you a bomb maker instead of a wine maker.

What you have to do is come up with a device that will allow gas to escape from the jug without letting air get in. Air getting in is what turns wine mixtures into vinegar.

One way to do the job is to run a plastic or rubber hose from the otherwise-sealed mouth of the jug, thread the free end through a hole in a cork and let the hose hang in a glass or bowl of water. Or you can make a loop in the hose, pour in a little water and trap the water in the loop to act as a seal.

Now put your jug of brew away about two weeks until it’s finished doing its thing. It’s ready to bottle when the bubbles stop coming to the top.

Old wine bottles are best. You must use corks (not too tight!) to seal the wine as they will allow small amounts of gas to escape. The wine is ready to drink just about any time.

You can use the same process with fruits or whatever, except that you’ll have to extract the juice and, maybe, add some sugar. You’ll also find that most natural fruit will start to ferment without the yeast and will be better that way.

Once you’ve made and enjoyed your first glass of wine, no matter how crude, you’ll be hooked.

Muscadine wine is probably one of the healthiest foods you’ve never heard of. Muscadine grapes from the native of Southeastern United States are abundant in polyphenols, resveratrol, and ellagic acid. Muscadine grapes have more fiber than oats and contain a wealth of other essential nutrients as well. But don’t eat them raw just yet, because Muscadine grape is also one grape that is uniquely suited for winemaking. Muscadine wine is one of the few wine grape varieties that is all-American, and during the harvest season, these wine grape/plump berries can be found on supermarkets shelves across the native United States.

Making wine out of Muscadine grapes, though a lengthy process, takes only minimal effort and gives you a sweet, medium-bodied drink with a versatile set of notes depending on the wine grape variety. In this article, we’ll discuss exactly how you can make your own muscadine wine batch at home with just a few ingredients and tools. We’ll also explore all its health benefits, why Muscadine wine is still relatively unknown, and much more.

Why You’ve Probably Never Heard of Muscadine

Muscadine wine is an outlier in several ways. Most wine grapes come from the Vitis vinifera family, but the Muscadine grape belongs to the Vitis rotundifolia group. The former is native to the Mediterranean region, and many of the most popular wines today, such as Pinot Noir wine, Cabernet wine, etc., are of this variant. However, as mentioned earlier, Muscadine wine is native to the Southeastern United States. The difference in species is significant for the sweetness and alcohol by volume (ABV) content of these Muscadine wines post-fermentation, and both of them are lower than the Vitis vinifera grapes. However, by being in the Vitis rotundifolia group, Muscadine wine is resistant to a variety of environmental hazards and pests. Phylloxera, an insect that has long ruined grape yields, is unable to destroy Muscadine crops due to their evolutionary adaptation.

This brings us to the second reason why Muscadine wine is relatively unknown. The weather conditions found in the southern states (Florida, Georgia, North Carolina, etc.) are uniquely suited for the growth of Muscadines. Warm temperatures and humid climate are usually anathemas for Vitis vinifera grapes, but Muscadines thrive under these conditions.

A third reason why Muscadinewine isn’t as popular as its competitors are that they are simply not as profitable for farmers. Muscadine wines grapes are not as resilient as others and need fairly specific weather conditions to grow. Other problems have also plagued farmers of Muscadine, such as inconsistent yields, berry sizes, and flavor. Lastly, Muscadine grapes only sell for around $350 a ton, which is only about a fifth of the value of other wine grape varieties, giving farmers less incentive to grow them.

Why You Should Have Heard of Muscadine

One key reason why Muscadines wines should be more commonly consumed is that they are a genuine superfood in terms of the health benefits they provide. Muscadine wines three main compounds responsible for this: polyphenols, resveratrol, and ellagic acid. Tannin, a chemical that lends the wine its dryness and body, is a type of polyphenol, and its density is partly why sugar levels in Muscadine wines are low. However, besides Tannin, Muscadine wines contain many polyphenols that aren’t found in other wine grapes, and their antioxidant properties are highly beneficial for general health.

There is considerable debate around the exact amount of resveratrol found in Muscadine wines, and whether it grants the benefits it has come to be associated with it. These include cancer prevention, increasing life spans, improving insulin sensitivity, and others. The jury is still out on this one, but if true, it would make Muscadine a rare and unique fruit. Ellagic acid, too, has been linked with cancer prevention, with other reports finding that it can help consumers control their weight, and relieve some complications of obesity.

The second reason, as will be extensively discussed in the next section, is the fact that Muscadines grapes produce some great wine with an interesting and diverse set of notes. Muscadine grapes can be used to make both, red and white wine. The low sugar level of these fruits means that the sweetener needs to be added during fermentation to obtain an ABV of 10%. These grapes are available in several colors, such as bronze, dark purple, black, and green. The bronze and lighter colored grapes are generally used to make white wine, while the deeper ones are utilized for red wine.

Traditionally, Muscadine wines carry a medium body, a medium to bright acidity, and a distinct aroma of bananas. Depending on whether muscadine wines is red or white, the drink can carry notes of vanilla, cranberries, oak, dried fruits, melons, and many others.

Making Wine From Muscadines at Home

Muscadines frequently grow in the wild across the Southeastern US and are commonly found on riverbeds in coastal areas. They are harvested starting in August, till the start of October. During this season, you might be able to find farmers offering schemes that allow you to pick as many as you’d like in return for produce, but they’ll also be abundantly stocked in supermarkets throughout the country.

Introduction: Homemade Plum Wine

How to make homemade wine

This Instructible will show you how to make a simple plum wine.

My Wife & I moved into a house with a good sized plum tree in the backyard about 3 years ago. The 1st year we didn’t know what kind of tree it was until just before the fruit ripened. We ate a few dozen, but most fell to the ground and were wasted. Determined not to have a repeat the next year, I decided to try my hand at wine making. I browsed through the depths of the internet, talked to the guys at the local brewing shop, and hammered out a recipe. The 1st round was a single 5 gallon batch to try out the recipe & test the waters. It turned out amazing!! I couldn’t be happier with the result! This year I did 15 gallons and tweaked the recipe very little.

If you have brewed beer before, you should have most of the equipment on hand. If you are new to wine making/brewing, a trip to the local homebrew shop is highly recommended. You can get all of the supplies off the internet, but you can’t get the years of experience that your local shop owner has.

Step 1: Gather Supplies

Required supplies & ingredients: (per 5 gallon batch)

-Fermenting bucket with lid & spigot

-1 glass/plastic carboy

-3 piece airlock & bung

-Stainless steel stirring spoon

-5 gallon bucket (new or very clean)

-Sanitizing solution (I like Star San)

-English breakfast tea (or liquid tannin)

-10 lbs regular sugar

-20 lbs ripe sweet plums

-2 packs Lalvin 71B-1122 dry yeast

-3′ 3/8 vinyl tubing

Advanced Supplies: (not required but recommended)

-Triple scale hydrometer

-1000ml erlenmeyer flask

-Wine thief (for easy sampling during final fermentation)

Step 2: Get Your Hands Dirty!

Take the straining bag and put it in a bucket. Using your hands, smash the plums & remove the pit/stones. The goal is to keep everything but the pits & stems. It took me about an hour to process 20 lbs. Keep the juice, skins, & pulp for the next step.

Step 3: Makin’ Must

Put the spigot on your fermentation bucket and test for leaks. Use water, you don’t want to find out with sticky plum juice!! Put the bag full of processed plums in the bucket and pour in the juice. I zip tied the bag closed because knotting it is a pain later on. On the stove, melt the sugar in about a gallon of water. Heat the water up to expedite the process, but don’t let it boil. Next, brew a cup of English breakfast tea with 3 tea bags, juice the 2 lemons, add the pectic enzyme (follow the instructions on the bottle for the amount to add) & crush 6 campden tablets. Add everything to the fermenting bucket & stir it up. Put the lid on the bucket with the airlock in the hole in the lid. Leave everything alone for 24 hours to let the campden tablets & pectic enzyme work their magic.

The campden tablets kill off any wild yeast & bacteria that would otherwise spoil the wine.

The pectic enzyme breaks down the pectin in the fruit to allow maximum fermentation of the plums.

The tea adds tannins to the finished wine

The lemons boost the acid level in the must. (unfermented wine)

Step 4: Make a Yeast Starter (optional)

Making a yeast starter, while not required, is a good idea. A yeast starter gives the yeast a chance to wake up and hit the ground running. The faster fermentation starts, the less chance bacteria, wild yeast, and other undesirables have at getting into the must. I used a 50% must/water mix as a starter because I already had 5 gallons ready to go. You can use sugar water as a starter, but it isn’t as good as the what the yeast will be eating in the fermenter. You can do a simple starter in a bottle with foil over the top. I used a stir plate I have for my homebrewing. For more info on yeast starters, just Google it. Their is tons of info on how/why out there.

Add your must/water or sugar water solution to the Erlenmeyer flask with a stir bar. Rehydrate the yeast according to the instructions on the package & add it to the starter. Put it on the stir plate on low for 24 hours.

Step 5: Let’s Get This Party Started!

Until this point sanitation hasn’t really been a factor. Everything that touches the must from now on MUST BE SANITIZED! I can’t stress this enough. Spoons, your hands, tubing, EVERYTHING!

If you have a hydrometer, take a gravity reading. It should be no higher than 1.10, if it is, add some water to drop the gravity. (gravity is a measurement of how much sugar the must has. More sugar = more alcohol, but too much will kill the yeast)

If you didn’t make a starter, re-hydrate your yeast according to the package and pour it in the must. Stir everything up and put the lid back on. Over the next 7-10 days, take the lid off and stir the must twice a day, but don’t slosh it around too much. The goal is to stir it but not add oxygen. Oxygen is needed for fermentation, but too much can oxodize the finished wine. I keep my stirring spoon in a bucket of sanitizer next to the fermenter ready to go. After a day or two the airlock will start bubbling & your house will smell like wine.

Step 6: Transfer to a Secondary Fermenter

Once the gravity reaches 1.030 (7-10 days or when the airlock slows down) transfer the must into a sanatized carboy and put the airlock on top. If you don’t have enough must to fill the carboy to 5 gallons, top it off with some spring water. (don’t use tap water. The campden tablets removed any chloroine from the tap water used earlier, but it could cause off flavors at this point.) Keep it in a cool dark place for the next 3-4 weeks while the fermentation finishes and the yeast drop out of suspension. A basement, closet, bedroom corner, pretty much anywhere the temperature is stable & it won’t be disturbed. Wrap a towel or blanket around it if the room isn’t dark. Direct sunlight can cause off flavors in the finished wine.

Step 7: And Wait.

After about a month, transfer the wine into a clean carboy. If you only have one, transfer it back into the fermenting bucket, clean the carboy, and transfer it back. Use a racking cane to siphon the wine from the carboy leaving the yeast & whatnot behind. Now the hard part. time. Lots & lots of time. My first batch was in the secondary for about 8 months before I bottled it. During this time It clarified and all the flavors mellowed to create the complexity in the finished wine.

Step 8: Bottling

When the wine is finally ready, it’s time to bottle. I used swing top beer bottles because I had a bunch of them lying around. Alternately, you can use regular beer bottles, wine bottles, or Mason jars. 24 hours before you bottle, crush up 6 more campden tablets and add them to the wine to stabilize it in the bottle. I also added wine conditioner from Global to sweeten it up a bit. Before you bottle it, taste it. You can adjust the final taste to your liking. Ask the guys at the local homebrew shop what you can add to sweeten it up, add more body, etc. (just bring them a sample!)

To bottle transfer the wine into your sanitized fermenting bucket, hook up the hose to the spigot, put the bottling wand on the hose and press it down on the bottom of the bottle. It is spring loaded and stops when you release the pressure on the tip.

I don’t have pictures of the last few steps yet because I just transfered to secondary today. I will be adding pictures as the process progresses. I didn’t want to make you wait until their were no more decent plums to be had before I wrote the instructable! Cheers!!

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Banana wine might sound odd, believe me, I was unsure of how this wine recipe would taste too but it is definitely worth trying.

Bananas are full of sugars and are one of the sweetest fruits available to most people. This sweetness is perfect for wine making and with just a few additions to balance the acidity you will have a very memorable, full-bodied banana wine that will make you wonder why you even questioned this in the first place.

It turns out that bananas are great for winemaking. You will often see recipes for other fruit wine and especially floral wines that call for the addition of bananas because the provide sweetness, body and a subtle flavour boost to wines that would otherwise be a little insipid.

How to make homemade wine

The great thing about making a banana wine is that you can do it at any time of year.

You can buy bunches of bananas from almost any supermarket across the globe at almost any point of the year. You aren’t constrained to a seasonal harvest like you would be with other fruit.

The other thing is that in many places bananas are one of the cheapest fruits by weight so it makes this banana wine recipe very inexpensive to make.

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Banana Wine Recipe With Endless Possibilities

Banana wine is also a great wine to blend with other fruit wines. If you find a fruit wine you have made is too tart to your liking, for example, blending it with a finished banana wine made with this wine recipe is a great way to bring it back into balance. Banana pairs so well with other fruits and spices the possibilities are endless with this recipe.

A good thing to experiment with is starting this banana wine recipe as laid out below and then adding additional fruits to the wine to create your own blends, banana and raspberry work well together and I have made this wine a few time. Spices work well too if you like a sweeter tasting wine banana and vanilla wine when back-sweetened makes a great dessert wine.

As you can tell there is plenty of scope to come up with your own signature wine using a simple banana wine recipe.

You can also be sure that not many people with have tried a banana wine before as there is virtually no industrial production of banana wine only small home scale production.

This is why you are going to have to make this banana wine recipe for yourself.

Picking and Prepping Your Bananas For Making Banana Wine

This recipe requires you to use the sliced bananas, peel and all so when you are picking bananas you will probably want to go with something that is organic. This way you will know there are no pesticides or other sprays on the banana peel that will get into your wine.

The next thing you will want to do is to keep the bananas around for a while to ripen. The riper the better without going completely black.

How to make homemade wine

We want the skins to have large brown spots and the bananas to be as sweet as possible so buy the bananas ahead of time and allow them to get over-ripe.

Lastly, it should be noted that this is a recipe for banana wine and will not work for plantains.

Equipment What You Will Need For This Banana Wine Recipe – Makes 1 gallon / 4.5 litres

  • Large Stock Pot
  • Small Fermenting Bucket
  • Demijohn
  • Syphon
  • Fine Straining Bag
  • Airlock & Bung

Banana Wine Ingredients

  • 4.5 litres Water
  • 1.4 kg / 3lb Bananas
  • 900g / 2lb Sugar
  • 1/4 tsp Tannin
  • 3 tsp Acid Blend
  • 1/2 tsp Pectic Enzyme
  • 1 tsp Yeast Nutrient
  • 1 Campden Tablet
  • 1 Sachet Yeast (Lallemand EC-1118 is a good choice but experiment with others)

Banana Wine Recipe Method

1. Bring half of the water to a boil in the large stockpot. Whilst the water is heating up slice the bananas including the skins and secure in the straining bag. Submerge the straining bag in the boiling water and simmer gently for 30 minutes.

2. After simmering for 30 minutes remove the pot from the heat. Lift out the straining bag with the bananas and set to one side for a moment. Pour the liquid from the pot into a sanitised fermenting bucket and then add the straining bag with the bananas as well.

3. Take the remaining half of the water and add to the stockpot with the sugar. Heat to a boil and stir to dissolve the sugar and prevent from burning. Simmer for a few minutes, remove from the heat and then add this to the fermenter. Along with this add the acid blend, tannin and yeast nutrient. Allow to cool to room temperature.

4. Once cooled add the crushed Campden tablet and mix thoroughly, allow to stand for at least 12 hours.

5. After at least 12 hours add the pectic enzyme and mix thoroughly. 24 hours after adding the pectic enzyme add the yeast by sprinkling onto the surface of the must, fit a lid and airlock. Fermentation will begin a few days after this.

How to make homemade wine

6. Allow fermentation to progress for a week stirring daily, after this remove the straining bag and the remains of the banana. Leave for a further 3 days and the fermentation should have died down completely. At this point you can syphon the banana wine into a demijohn or carboy, fit with a bung and airlock.

7. Allow the wine to condition in the demijohn for 3 – 4 months racking to a sanitised carboy once or twice after sediment builds up.

8. After conditioning, for at least 4 months or up to 6 you are ready to bottle the wine. You may want to sample the banana wine and back sweeten it if you prefer a less dry or sweeter wine. Once bottled I like to set aside a few bottles for a number of months and you will notice the banana wine will keep improving with age up to a couple of years.

Published by INVINIC on 05/10/2017

Making fruit wine at home is a popular pursuit, and making plum wine may be the most popular of them all. Plums are a delicious and versatile fruit for eating and cooking, though for us the best use of plums is in winemaking. The internet has a whole host of recipes and techniques for making plum wine and what to do with it. In this handy guide we’ll outline the easiest way to make plum wine, some recipes for cooking with plum wine and some alternatives to plum wine!

How to make homemade wine

Did you know that you can make plum wine?

How to make plum wine

This recipe for making plum wine is simple and straightforward. The ingredients are simple, though you may need to invest a little in the equipment. If you are serious about making wine at home, it’s a very worthwhile investment: This is the sort of equipment that can also be used for home brewing, making elderberry wine and other fruit wines.

Ingredients you’ll need to make plum wine

  • 2.25kg plums
  • 1.35kg sugar
  • 1 gallon of water
  • 1 tsp lemon juice
  • Wine yeast

The equipment you’ll need to make plum wine

  • A 5 gallon plastic fermentation barrel with lid
  • Plastic tubing
  • Funnel
  • A 1 gallon demijohn
  • Rubber bung and airlock
  • Bottles and stoppers (it should fill about 6 bottles)

Step-by-step guide to make plum wine

  1. Wash the plums, cut each in half and add them to the fermentation barrel. Note that you have two choices here: Either leave the stones in for an almond-like flavour, or remove them altogether to get a purer expression of the fruit flavour.
  2. Add boiling water, pour over the plums. Seal the barrel with the lid and leave for four days, stirring once each day.
  3. Add lemon juice and sugar. Stir well, then sprinkle the yeast over the miwture. Seal the barrel once again and leave somewhere warm for another four days. Stir once a day during this time.
  4. Using the siphon hose and funnel, move the mixture to the demijohn. Avoid placing the hose at the very bottom of the barrel, or else you’ll suck up excessive sediment. Seal the demijohn with an airlock.
  5. Store the wine somewhere cool and dry to age. The wine will clear over time, at which point it is ready to be bottled.
  6. Your homemade plum wine is best enjoyed at around 12 months of age, though you can also drink it younger. Enjoy!

2 great recipes for cooking with plum wine

So, let’s say you’ve succesfully made your own plum wine. Congratulations! Maybe you’ll drink it all, give some of it away as gifts, sell it at a market or something else entirely. Our favourite use for plum wine – other than drinking, of course – is cooking with it! There are some really interesting plum wine food recipes out there, and we’ve picked out two of the best!

How to make homemade wine

Cooking with plum wine is a lot of fun!

1. Plum wine cake

Cake made with plum wine is rich and delicious. Season of Sweets has this recipe, which calls for:

  • Flour
  • Baking powder
  • Salt
  • Plum wine
  • Sour cream
  • Sugar
  • Butter
  • Canola oil
  • Eggs

Check out the full recipe above, or this alternative recipe from Duncan Hines. Happy baking!

2. Poached plums in plum wine sauce

This recipe from Lauren Groveman’s Kitchen goes all-in on plums. The recipe provides specific information regarding seasonality and technique, but for a start you’ll need:

  • Sugar
  • Water
  • Star anise
  • Ginger
  • Cinnamon stick
  • Orange peel
  • Plum wine
  • Plums
  • Yoghurt or ice cream

Get the full recipe above and make the most of your homemade plum wine.

And if you don’t want to make plum wine at all…

Sounds simple, right? However, we don’t all have the time or the energy. Perhaps you don’t want to invest in the winemaking equipment. Or perhaps you just want to drink plum wine now! Luckily, there are lots of wines out there which have beautiful plummy flavours.

Plum wine alternatives

  • A young Tempranillo has the juicy, fleshy, and slightly tart style reminiscent of biting into a ripe plum. In Rioja, you’ll often find Tempranillo grapes blended with the likes of Mazuelo or Garnacha, combining ripe plums, with prunes and a little hint of leather, a bit of vanilla and some spice.
  • For easy drinking, Merlot generally has less tannin and you’ll find plums mixed with herbal and black cherry flavours. Merlot and Tempranillo can make a nice blend, with the Merlot providing smoothness to Tempranillo’s forest fruits.
  • A lovely complex option would be a Garnacha, which is aged longer than many Tempranillos and has a bolder style, marrying plum with blackberry, liquorice and raspberry.

Whether you decide to make your own, or you look out for a wine with plummy flavours, the ripe, comforting taste of plum can’t be beaten as summer turns to autumn. Nothing beats curling up in front of the fire after an autumnal walk, with a nice plum wine!

Have you ever made plum wine at home? Tell us about your experience!

Dried fruits are great for making wine, especially when the winter comes around and fresh fruit isn’t in season. This Raisin wine recipe makes a wine that is nice and warming, similar to sherry and a great wine to make from a store cupboard ingredient.

How to make homemade wine

Raisins are great for making wine. You will have probably seen that many wine recipes make use of them. This is because a small amount imparts a lot of flavour and body which a lot of more subtle fresh fruit wines can lack. You will be pleased to know that raisins can be used as the sole fruit in a fruit wine and there a more varieties of raisins than you might expect so there is some room for experimentation too.

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Flavour Packed Raisins

Drying fruit changes the flavour this is why raisins, whilst tasting fruity don’t taste like grapes. Drying any food tends to intensify the flavours and this is a big benefit for winemaking as these intense flavours really shine through in the finished wine.

Raisins are also packed full of sugar another boon for the winemaker as we rely on sugars to make alcohol, the more sugar that comes from the fruit the better as adding plain sugar whilst boosting the alcohol content does not introduce any flavour.

Varieties Of Raisin

When shopping for ingredients for your raisin wine you may be surprised at just how many types of raisin there are available. The raisins you might find are:

Golden Raisins, Muscat Raisins, Black Flame Raisins, Red Raisins and Green Raisins

All will produce a wine of slightly different colour and flavour. Each variety is worth experimenting with as you will often find they are produced from different grape varieties that will produce a unique wine.

Beware Of Oil & Preservatives

Where possible you will want to check the label on any raisins you buy to see what the ingredients are. You may find some dried fruits are coated in oil during production which we want to avoid as the oil will tend to slick on top of the wine and will likely cause undesirable flavours.

Sultanas are usually dipped in oil as part of the drying process so you will want to steer clear of using these.

Some dried fruit is treated with sulphur, fruit like apricots often are to preserve their colour. These are usually fine for winemaking and won’t make a noticeable difference. If there are other preservatives listed, however, you will likely want to pass on using these to make wine unless you know they won’t interfere with either the flavour or the yeast health.

Preparing Raisins For Making Wine

To get the most out of the raisins you use you will need to chop them to prepare them for winemaking. You tend to find when whole raisins are soaked in a liquid they tend to swell plump up and absorb the liquid. Our objective, being to extract the flavours, sugars and colour from the raisins means they need to be chopped or minced to extract maximum flavour.

A decent food processor can make light work of this and should only take a moment. The raisins don’t need to be fine particles but just chopped/minced roughly.

What You’ll Need To Make Raisin Wine – Makes 1 gallon / 4.5 litres

  • Small Fermenting Bucket
  • Demijohn
  • Large Pan
  • Syphon
  • Fine Straining Bag
  • Airlock & Bung

Raisin Wine Ingredients

1kg Raisin (chopped into small pieces)
4.5 litres Water
900g Sugar
1/2 tsp Acid Blend
1 tsp Yeast Nutrient
1/2 tsp Pectic Enzyme
1/4 tsp Wine Tannin
1 Campden Tablet
1 sachet of Yeast (Montrachet is a good choice)

Process

1. Begin by heating the sugar and the water together in a pan. Stir to dissolve the sugar and ensure it does not scorch and gradually bring to a boil.

2. As the sugar solution is heating take the chopped raisins and place them in the straining bag. Secure and drop the bag into a sanitised fermenting bucket. After the sugar has boiled for a few moment take off the heat and pour straight over the raisins in the fermenting bucket. Give everything a good stir to break up the raisins that may have clumped together.

3. Allow the must to cool, once tepid add the acid blend, wine tannin, yeast nutrient and the crushed campden tablet. Mix through the must and cover with a lid and airlock.

4. At least 12 hours after adding the Campden tablet and other additives add the pectic enzyme and mix through the must. Re-cover and leave for a further 12 hours.

5. After another 12 hours sprinkle the yeast on top of the must and allow fermentation to begin. After a day or 12 you will begin to notice activity through the airlock.

6. Allow fermentation to progress for 7 days giving the must a stir every day. After 7 days lift out the bag of spent raisins and allow to drain thoroughly. Leave the raisin wine to settle for a couple of days and then rack to a demijohn.

7. Leave the raisin wine in the demijohn to condition. Rack every 30 days or after sediment has built up. Leave for roughly 3 – 4 months until the wine has cleared before bottling. You may wish to back sweeten the wine if you prefer a sweeter finish. Follow this guide for advice on how to go about back sweetening your wine.

Raisin wine is best aged for a while before drinking, in fact it will get better after a year or more and does really well being kept upwards of 2 – 3 years. However long you want to leave it in bottle you can be sure it will produce a delicious wine.

Banana wine might sound odd, believe me, I was unsure of how this wine recipe would taste too but it is definitely worth trying.

Bananas are full of sugars and are one of the sweetest fruits available to most people. This sweetness is perfect for wine making and with just a few additions to balance the acidity you will have a very memorable, full-bodied banana wine that will make you wonder why you even questioned this in the first place.

It turns out that bananas are great for winemaking. You will often see recipes for other fruit wine and especially floral wines that call for the addition of bananas because the provide sweetness, body and a subtle flavour boost to wines that would otherwise be a little insipid.

How to make homemade wine

The great thing about making a banana wine is that you can do it at any time of year.

You can buy bunches of bananas from almost any supermarket across the globe at almost any point of the year. You aren’t constrained to a seasonal harvest like you would be with other fruit.

The other thing is that in many places bananas are one of the cheapest fruits by weight so it makes this banana wine recipe very inexpensive to make.

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Banana Wine Recipe With Endless Possibilities

Banana wine is also a great wine to blend with other fruit wines. If you find a fruit wine you have made is too tart to your liking, for example, blending it with a finished banana wine made with this wine recipe is a great way to bring it back into balance. Banana pairs so well with other fruits and spices the possibilities are endless with this recipe.

A good thing to experiment with is starting this banana wine recipe as laid out below and then adding additional fruits to the wine to create your own blends, banana and raspberry work well together and I have made this wine a few time. Spices work well too if you like a sweeter tasting wine banana and vanilla wine when back-sweetened makes a great dessert wine.

As you can tell there is plenty of scope to come up with your own signature wine using a simple banana wine recipe.

You can also be sure that not many people with have tried a banana wine before as there is virtually no industrial production of banana wine only small home scale production.

This is why you are going to have to make this banana wine recipe for yourself.

Picking and Prepping Your Bananas For Making Banana Wine

This recipe requires you to use the sliced bananas, peel and all so when you are picking bananas you will probably want to go with something that is organic. This way you will know there are no pesticides or other sprays on the banana peel that will get into your wine.

The next thing you will want to do is to keep the bananas around for a while to ripen. The riper the better without going completely black.

How to make homemade wine

We want the skins to have large brown spots and the bananas to be as sweet as possible so buy the bananas ahead of time and allow them to get over-ripe.

Lastly, it should be noted that this is a recipe for banana wine and will not work for plantains.

Equipment What You Will Need For This Banana Wine Recipe – Makes 1 gallon / 4.5 litres

  • Large Stock Pot
  • Small Fermenting Bucket
  • Demijohn
  • Syphon
  • Fine Straining Bag
  • Airlock & Bung

Banana Wine Ingredients

  • 4.5 litres Water
  • 1.4 kg / 3lb Bananas
  • 900g / 2lb Sugar
  • 1/4 tsp Tannin
  • 3 tsp Acid Blend
  • 1/2 tsp Pectic Enzyme
  • 1 tsp Yeast Nutrient
  • 1 Campden Tablet
  • 1 Sachet Yeast (Lallemand EC-1118 is a good choice but experiment with others)

Banana Wine Recipe Method

1. Bring half of the water to a boil in the large stockpot. Whilst the water is heating up slice the bananas including the skins and secure in the straining bag. Submerge the straining bag in the boiling water and simmer gently for 30 minutes.

2. After simmering for 30 minutes remove the pot from the heat. Lift out the straining bag with the bananas and set to one side for a moment. Pour the liquid from the pot into a sanitised fermenting bucket and then add the straining bag with the bananas as well.

3. Take the remaining half of the water and add to the stockpot with the sugar. Heat to a boil and stir to dissolve the sugar and prevent from burning. Simmer for a few minutes, remove from the heat and then add this to the fermenter. Along with this add the acid blend, tannin and yeast nutrient. Allow to cool to room temperature.

4. Once cooled add the crushed Campden tablet and mix thoroughly, allow to stand for at least 12 hours.

5. After at least 12 hours add the pectic enzyme and mix thoroughly. 24 hours after adding the pectic enzyme add the yeast by sprinkling onto the surface of the must, fit a lid and airlock. Fermentation will begin a few days after this.

How to make homemade wine

6. Allow fermentation to progress for a week stirring daily, after this remove the straining bag and the remains of the banana. Leave for a further 3 days and the fermentation should have died down completely. At this point you can syphon the banana wine into a demijohn or carboy, fit with a bung and airlock.

7. Allow the wine to condition in the demijohn for 3 – 4 months racking to a sanitised carboy once or twice after sediment builds up.

8. After conditioning, for at least 4 months or up to 6 you are ready to bottle the wine. You may want to sample the banana wine and back sweeten it if you prefer a less dry or sweeter wine. Once bottled I like to set aside a few bottles for a number of months and you will notice the banana wine will keep improving with age up to a couple of years.

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