How to make roses out of fondant

November 1, 2013 by Roxy

How to make roses out of fondant

I’ve been spending some time making fondant roses lately so I decided to make this quick tutorial and share with you what I learned. Really, they are not that hard to make and they are a beautiful decoration for cupcakes, cakes etc. – check out my Heart-Shaped Cake covered in roses if you don’t believe me!

Depending on your experience working with fondant, the tools you have available (using a pasta machine to roll out the fondant will save you a ton of time!) and other distractions (such as crying babies) it will take you about 5-10 min per rose :).

Other than fondant, you will need:

  • rolling pin or pasta machine
  • rose cutter
  • some cornstarch
  • fondant shaping foam set
  • ball tool
  • gel food colouring if you want to make your roses in a different colour

Firstly, make the rose center. Roll a 1/2 inch ball of fondant and form it into a teardrop shape.

Sprinkle some cornstarch on your work surface so the fondant won’t stick and roll the fondant until it’s quite thin. I used my pasta machine and went down to the #3 setting but you could roll it even thinner.

Using the rose cutter cut out 3 blossom shapes per rose. I have the two Ateco Rose Cutters and used the smaller one this time. You can find them on Amazon or if you are in GTA, at Golda’s Kitchen… just google it and I’m sure you’ll find other places where you can buy them.

How to make roses out of fondant How to make roses out of fondant How to make roses out of fondant How to make roses out of fondant

Then place the petals on the fondant shaping foam and using the ball tool smooth out the edges of the petal.

How to make roses out of fondant How to make roses out of fondant

Now if you don’t have a rose cutter it’s not the end of the world! Just cut off small, evenly-sized pieces of fondant and roll them into tiny balls. These will be your rose petals. Take a plastic foiling pocket, cut the edges off, open it up and place the tiny balls of fondant inside the plastic pocket. Using your thumb, smooth out the little pieces of fondant. Keep them a little thinner around the edges (for 3/4 of the petal) but leaving the bottom (

¼ of the petal) somewhat thicker.

Brush the rose center with some water and wrap one petal around; the thicker edge should be towards the bottom and then thinner one at the top. Attach another petal around and place the third one half away inside the second one. Again glue them together using some water if necessary and gently press against the base to attach. Attach all the remaining petals in a similar way. Lastly, pinch the edges of the petals a little to make them look more natural. You can cut off any excess fondant you might have at the bottom.

How to make roses out of fondant How to make roses out of fondant How to make roses out of fondant How to make roses out of fondant How to make roses out of fondant How to make roses out of fondant

I left the fondant roses dry out in an egg carton for several hours.

A quick way to make realistic roses out of fondant.

In this Yeners Cake Tip, I show you my way of making realistic roses out of fondant in little to no time! If you’ve watched my tutorials, you have probably already seen this but for anyone who is new to Yeners Way, you may find this tip helpful.

9 comments

I Made these roses but found the fondant petals did not stay as firm as yours so when I was putting it together either thetop of the petals were sticking together or flopping downwards, should I have left the petals to sit for awhile to firm up or did I make the petals to thin (although mine did look a bit thicker than your)

just add some icing sugar to fondant to make it a little bit firmer. That will solve your problem.

They are adorable you are such a talented man . My Dad was a baker also. Thank you so much for this tutorial

I think these are so beautiful I hope I can achieve something similar god bless and thank you.

Muchas grasias por enseñar a ser las rosas de una manera fácil quedan herm
osas

Thank you soo much for teaching me how to
make the most beautiful roses in no time. They
came out beautiful *

Hi. I just wonder if it’s possible to provide me with some material that l needs. I am in USA please continue with me.

It was an excellent learning experience. Tell me how many hours before can I pre make the flowers

The flowers can be used after an hour on the cake. Fondant flowers also can be prepared weeks before and kept in a dark box. Light may affect the colours.

Leave a Reply Cancel reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Member’s Projects

Here’s what some of our members have created after watching this tutorial.

I’ve gotten a few requests on how to make a fondant rose, there are so many ways you can make them, in this blog I am going to show you three different techniques on how to make a fondant rose. These techniques are quick and easy and will provide you with a realistic rose in the end.

The first method does not require any tools, which is great when you want to add a beautiful topper for a cake or cupcake.

The second method is more cumbersome in which it is an all in one technique.

The last method is a little more time consuming but still efficient in providing a beautiful realistic rose.

First Method: No Tools

Make a bud by first pinching off a drop of fondant, you want to roll it into a ball with a cone shape top, it should resemble a Hershey kiss or a teardrop.

From the large piece of fondant tier off nine small bite size pieces. These pieces should be smaller than the Hershey kiss/ teardrop shaped piece. Roll all nine pieces separately into tiny balls.

Take one tiny ball at a time and flatten it with your fingers. Move along side the edges so that it becomes thin and smooth. Move around the entire ball until it creates a circle with thin edges.

If you are noticing your fingers are sticking lightly dust it with a little cornstarch and confectioner sugar.

Place your first piece around the cone making the base of the circle align with the mid-section of the cone shaped fondant it should end up being higher than then the actual cone when you wrap it around. The result should look like a rose bud.

The heat from your hands should make the fondant pliable and no water should be needed to complete the rose.

For the first row of petals you will need three flatten thinned out circular fondant pieces. You will be repeating the steps you use to make the bud.

Wrap the first petal around the bud, this should overlap the first fondant petal, when applying the second and third petal you want to tuck it under the first petal and so forth, so it looks like a budding rose.

For the next row of petals, you will have five tiny remaining fondant pieces left. You want to flatten each piece and thin out the edges as you previously did with the first set of petals.

When adding petals, pull back the last petal and tucking the other petal inside so they all overlap.

When all fondant pieces are on, to make the fondant flower look more realistic you may want to open and adjust the petals a little with your hand and roll the edges to make the flower look open and real.

You can also thin out more tiny pieces of fondant into circular petals to make a larger rose.

At this time, you may notice the bottom end of your rose getting bulky twist off the excess piece or cut it off with a scissors.

Set the flower aside to dry before adding to your cake or cupcake.

Second Method: Easier Rose Cutter Ever

For this method you will need the following:

  • Easiest Rose Ever Sugar Flower Cutter
  • Plastic rolling pin
  • Fondant (your choice of color)
  • Ball tool
  • Spoons
  • Foam mat
  • Water
  • Fine-tipped paintbrush
  • Pizza cutter or Small knife

Roll fondant to less than an 1/8″ thick and cut using the Easiest Rose Ever Cutter. Place the cut shape onto a foam mat and lightly thin the edges of each of the scalloped sides using a ball tool. If you do not have a ball tool, the end of your small rolling pins works as well.

To make sure all the scallop edges curl in the same direction, flip the fondant piece over and thin the other side using the ball tool.

Before folding flip the fondant back to its original side add a little water and fold the shape in half, being sure to press firmly creating a crease.

Roll the petal tightly into a coil allowing each petal to be wrapped into itself. Adjust the petals by using the ends of the paint brush or your hands opening the petals to create a blooming flower look.

You can dry your rose in a spoon or egg carton prior to adding it to your cake.

How to make roses out of fondant

Third Method: Wilton’s Rose Cutters

This method is the first method I ever learned, although it’s the most time consuming it does make the flowers look the most realistic. For this method you will need the following:

  • Wilton’s Rose Cutter
  • Plastic rolling pin
  • Fondant (your choice of color)
  • Toothpick
  • Ball tool
  • Foam mat
  • Thick foam mat
  • Water
  • Fine-tipped paintbrush
  • Pizza cutter or Small knife

Make the rose center. Roll a small ball of fondant and form into a teardrop shape. Coat the end of a toothpick with vegetable shortening or piping gel and insert it into the bottom of the tear drop.

Using the largest rose cutter first, roll out fondant about 1/16 in, cut the three blossom shapes. Cover the remaining two pieces with plastic and set aside.

Place on thin foam and use ball tool to soften and smooth out the edges. Move blossom piece to thick foam mat and press in the middle with ball tool to create a cup shape.

Brush the middle of blossom with a little water. Insert the toothpick holding the rose bud and center it into the middle of the 5-point petal. Wrap the petals around the buds, using a little water, each petal should overlap the next.

Take the next bloom from the plastic and transfer it to the thin foam. Repeat steps of thinning and softening the edges using the ball tool. Transfer to thick foam and use ball tool to cup the petal.

Brush with water and thread onto toothpick . Brush the 2 sides of the petals with water and attach, centering over the seams of the previous 2 petals. Brush remaining petals with water and attach.

Be light with the water to preventsaturation . pinch off excess if needed and repeat this step for last bloom.

If possible, turn rose over and let petals fall natural into place or you can use a toothpick to open the petals. Let dry and remove toothpick.

How to make roses out of fondant

We hope you found this blog helpful, we love hearing from you, send us pics of your fondant roses or drop a comment.

Adorn your decorative cake with hand crafted fondant icing roses with help from this cake decorating tutorial. To make one of these adorable roses, follow these steps:

1. It’s important to have a decent sized work area, so make sure you have enough room, and place powdered sugar all over your work area. This is so the fondant won’t get too sticky.

2.Next, get your fondant/gumpaste. Nead the icing so that it isn’t hard and is easy to use.

3. Roll out a ball of the icing. Pinch the top so it becomes pointy (more like a nub) on one side. Set your nub to the side for later use.

4. Make another ball of icing. Mold it into a snake by rubbing the icing between your hands.

5. Flatten the ‘snake’. Take one side and make it flatter than the other side.

6. Now take your snake, making sure the flatter side is on the top. Take the numb and roll the flattened snake so it is one circle above the nub. Keep spiraling it down the rest of the flower. This is suppose to be your bud.

7. Put that to the side, and make another ball. Flatten out the ball and make it very flat one one side. Wrap it around the bud.

8. Keep doing that (those are your petals). Keep wrapping them around until your satisfied with the look.

9. The left over fondant at the bottom can easily be cut off with a knife, or pinched off.

Want to master Microsoft Excel and take your work-from-home job prospects to the next level? Jump-start your career with our Premium A-to-Z Microsoft Excel Training Bundle from the new Gadget Hacks Shop and get lifetime access to more than 40 hours of Basic to Advanced instruction on functions, formula, tools, and more.

An Expression of Art

Monday, March 3, 2008

Roses: How to Make Fondant Roses

Fondant roses are beautiful. These roses harden up and are less fragile than royal icing flowers. If you are able to roll the fondant “dough” very thin, the roses can look very realistic. They do take a little bit longer than icing roses, but the end result is wonderful. Not to mention that they last longer.

Please note that the instructions below may seem a little intimidating. To make a full rose takes about 5 minutes. The first time may take longer. Once you get a hold of it, you will be making these roses a bunch at a time. They are worth it.

Before you start make sure you have the following:

Fondant (and the color of choice: I use Wilton Gel Food Colors )

A plastic mat (this will be for rolling the fondant). I use the Wilton Cake Dividing Wheel (it works wonders for me and it has many uses).

A tiny bit of shortening (to rub the mat so the fondant won’t stick)

Flower fondant cutters (I use the Wilton Rose Bouquet Cutter Set )

Ball tool (I prefer the one that has the ball tool on one side and the veining tool on the other- very practical)

Icing flavoring (this will be used to glue the fondant)

Thin and Thick Foam pads

  • And last but not least: Before you start, read the “Working with Fondant” that I have previously posted.
  • Step 1:
    Have the amount of rose centers you need ready (toothpick with cone fondant centers). Instructions on how to make this: “Fondant Rose Centers”.

    Step 2:
    Prepare your mat by applying a very thin layer of shortening. This will avoid the fondant from sticking to it. Make sure the amount of shortening you place is very minimal. Too much and it will make the fondant sticky.

    Step 3:
    Knead a portion of your colored fondant until it is a little bit softer (this shouldn’t take long). Roll it into a ball and place on top of the mat.

    Step 4:
    Roll the fondant from center to the edge to stretch into a very thin layer. I know it is thin enough when I cannot roll it any thinner and I can read the mat printed font through it (see picture below).

    How to make roses out of fondant

    Step 5:
    Use your medium sized flower cutter and cut as many flowers as you can (remember we are only rolling a portion of the fondant as this will dry very fast). You need three flower cutouts to make one full bloom flower.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    Step 6:
    Take one cut out (tip: wrap the rest with plastic wrap to prevent drying) and place on top of your thin foam. Make short straight incisions in between each petal as shown on the picture below. This will allow the petals to be more flexible and not rip when bended.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    Step 7:
    In order to create a more realistic effect, we have to thin the edges of each petal with the ball tool. Place the one side of the ball tool at its middle (i.e., half of the ball is touching the fondant and the second half the thin mat). Roll your ball at the edge on each petal by pressing a little hard. You will see the petals “rippling”. DO NOT go back and use the ball tool again on a thinned petal. This will rip the petal. This is a one chance only. I will refer to this step as “balling”.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    Step 8:
    Place your thinned or “balled” flower cut out on top of the thick foam pad. Note that I covered the foam with some corn starch to prevent sticking. With the ball, press its center (as shown on the picture below) slightly hard. This will create a “cupped” center.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    Step 9:
    Apply a little icing flavoring with an art brush at the cupped center. We use icing flavoring instead of water because the flavoring has alcohol and this evaporates faster thus the flower will dry faster. Insert the rose center toothpick through it. This first petal will be the center petals of your rose.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    Before we continue to setp 10, visualize the picture below. Each cutout has 5 petals. Imagine that this looks like a gingerbread man, with petal 0 beign the head; petal 1 and 2 the arms; and petals 3 and 4 the legs.

    How to make roses out of fondant
    Step 10:
    Apply flavoring to petal 0 (the head). Glue the petal to the center fondant cone as shown on the picture below.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    Step 11: Apply flavoring to one arm petal, in this case petal 1 and ‘glue’ it with flavoring to the cone center.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    Step 12:
    I assume that by this time you know the process, so a picture is not necessary. Apply flavoring to opposite leg, in this case petal 4 and ‘glue’ it to the cone center.

    Step 13:
    Apply flavoring to the remaining arm (petal 2) and ‘glue’ it to the cone center.

    Step 14:
    Apply flavoring to the remaining leg (petal 3) and ‘glue’ it to the cone center. The center petals of the rose are complete. Stop here if you want a rose button.

    Step 15:
    Take another flower cutout and make the incisions between the petals. Place on the thin foam pad and ball all the petal edges. Transfer the balled flower cutout and place on top of a thick foam pad. INSTRUCTIONS ARE DIFFERENT HERE.

    Step 16:
    Place the ball tool on middle of one of the arm petals (petal 1) and cup the petal. Do the same to the second arm (petal 2) and then to the center. Turn the petal to the other side and cup the head (petal 0) the two legs (petal 3 and 4).

    How to make roses out of fondant

    Turn the petal to the other side and insert the toothpick with cone center and first layer of petals. Glue one arm petal (petal 1) to the one layer rose (exactly where two petals meet) do the same for the second arm (petal 2). Glue the head (petal 0) next, then the opposite leg (petal 4) then remaining leg (petal 3). You have completed the second layer of petals of the rose. Stop here if you want a medium size rose.

    Step 16:
    Take another flower cutout and make the incisions between the petals. Place on the thin foam pad and ball all the petal edges. Transfer the balled flower cutout and place on top of a thick foam pad. INSTRUCTIONS ARE DIFFERENT HERE.

    Cup the center of the flower cut out with your ball tool and then cup all the petals one by one.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    Turn the flower cutout to the other side and insert the toothpick on cupped center (petals should be curved on the outside) and glue the petals one by one to the 2 layer rose (where two petals meet).

    An easier way is to turn the rose upside down and glue all the petas one by one to the 2 layer rose.

    Your full rose bloom is done. CONGRATULATIONS.

    Test Kitchen Manager and Chef at Kitchen Stories

    “Fondant dries up very quickly when it makes contact with air, so be sure to keep your dough covered in plastic wrap.”

    Difficulty

    Preparation

    Baking

    Resting

    Ingredients

    Utensils

    plastic wrap, rolling pin, pastry cutter, 4 rose cutter, ball tool, pastry brush, plate, toothpick

    How-To Videos

    How to pipe buttercream flowers

    How to coat a cake in sprinkles

    How to sugarcoat rose petals

    How to apply fondant

    Step 1 / 5

  • fondant
  • pink food coloring
  • starch

  • plastic wrap
  • Prepare the fondant in 3 shades, then wrap them individually in plastic wrap to keep them from drying up. Dust the work surface with starch.

    Step 2 / 5

  • water
  • starch

  • rolling pin
  • pastry cutter
  • rose cutter
  • ball tool
  • pastry brush
  • plate
  • To make fondant roses, cut a small portion of fondant and use a rolling pin to roll it into a thin layer, then use an easy rose cutter to cut out two pieces. Dip the ball tool in starch and press it lightly on the petal part to thin out the edges. Repeat this process until all petals are thinned out. Use a small wet brush to draw a line across the center of one fondant piece. Fold it in half along the line, then brush some more water across folded fondant along the same line. Roll the fondant from right to left to form the shape of a rosebud. To keep the petals split, fix with some starch so they won’t move. Fold the other piece of fondant the same way, brush some water along the bottom line again and wrap it around the rosebud. Apply a little pressure while wrapping to make the two pieces stick together. Stand the finished rose up on a plate.

    Step 3 / 5

  • fondant
  • starch
  • water

  • toothpick
  • To make fondant carnations, roll out fondant and use a rose cutter to cut out the shapes. Dip a toothpick in starch, then use it to press and thin out the petal edges, and make them a bit ruffled up. Repeat the process until all edges are done. Brush a line of water through the middle of one fondant piece, fold it in half, then roll it into the shape of a flower bud. Repeat the process with another piece, and wrap it around the bud. Press to stick the two parts together. Keep the petals split with some starch, tear off a few petals if needed.

    Step 4 / 5

  • fondant
  • starch
  • water

  • 3 rose cutter
  • To make fondant English rose, roll out a slightly darker dough. Use a small rose cutter to cut out 4 pieces. Next, roll out a lighter dough. Cut out three pieces with a medium-size rose cutter and cut them in half lengthwise. Use a ball tool to press out all petal edges. Brush the small pieces with some water and stick them together. Brush water on 4 halves of the medium-size pieces, stick them together. Cut out layered fondant pieces. Pair one small petal with one medium petal to form a unit, then stick all 4 parts together to form a bud, brush the remaining halves with water and wrap then around it. Roll out another dough of lighter shade, cut out 2 pieces with a large rose cutter. thin out the edges with a ball tool, and cut in half lengthwise, brush with some water. Layer two halves together, then wrap one after another on the outer layer. Cut off the bottom if needed.

    Step 5 / 5

    Use your fondant flowers to decorate cakes. Enjoy!

    If you feel bad each time you toss a dried blossom, learn how to make potpourri from roses, and you’ll never have to throw away your favorite flowers!

    A home filled with a luscious, but the gentle aroma from potpourri is comforting and inviting. We’re spoiled with all kinds of store-bought scented candles, perfumes, and synthetic room fragrances that we forget the best natural deodorizer.

    Take on this short and easy project and come home to an ambrosial smell each day. Bonus: you get to cherish your dead flowers and the memories they come with as long as you want!

    Table of Contents

    What’s Potpourri?

    To view this video please enable JavaScript, and consider upgrading to a web browser that supports HTML5 video

    Potpourri combines dried flower petals and buds, spices, herbs, and other decoration items like wood chips. You can keep it in a ceramic or glass bowl, usually uncovered.

    You can combine different types of flowers, as long as the scents can play along. While there are hundreds of recipes, the base is the same. Dried flowers, combined with suitable spice or essential oil and something to add texture.

    Potpourri might be old-fashioned, but it’s a sustainable and eco-friendly way to diffuse fragrance into your home. The pungent smell of synthetic air fresheners can cause headaches. Potpourri’s aroma is more delicate and not as overwhelming.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    History And Use of Potpourri From Roses

    The name comes from the French word pot-pourri, which means a pot of something rotting. Since synthetic fragrances are a perk of the newer ages, people used potpourri as an air freshener in ancient times.

    Some claims date the potpourri back to the 12th century. The servants would fill bowls with potpourri as soon as they finished cooking to disperse a pleasant aroma around the castle. Closets, baths, and large rooms were filled with bowls of potpourri. Sometimes they would scatter the mix on bedroom floors.

    How To Make Rose Potpourri

    Make use of the rose bouquet you received recently of the prevailing roses in your garden. You can even ask your neighbors for a few buds – but make sure to share the recipe with them too! Let’s get down to the details.

    Ingredients

    • One dozen of scented roses
    • 5-10 rosebuds
    • A handful of cinnamon bark
    • A handful of lavender stalks or a teaspoon of dried buds
    • Teaspoon of cloves
    • Orange or lemon peel
    • Rose essential oil (optional)

    Equipment

    • Wooden spoon
    • Paper or cardboard
    • 2 Large trays
    • Glass or ceramic bowl (cover optional)
    • Small mesh bag (optional)

    How to make roses out of fondant

    Instructions – Making The Potpourri From Roses

    Step 1

    Start by pulling the petals from the roses, but keep the buds intact. We’re using them to add texture and get a more aesthetically pleasing end product.

    Take the large trays and cover them with regular paper or cardboard. Don’t use waxed parchment paper or aluminum foil as they won’t absorb the moisture from the drying flowers.

    Click here to Learn bout:

    Step 2

    Place the rose petals on one tray and the buds and fruit peel on the other tray. If you’re using fresh lavender, put the lavender on the second tray. Make sure you distribute all the ingredients in a single layer.

    Store the trays in a dry and dark place, preferably warm, for at least 2 to 3 days. Once you notice the edges of the petals have become brittle, it’s time to remove them.

    Step 3

    Transfer the rose petals, buds, orange peel, cinnamon, lavender, and cloves to a deep bowl. Stir with a wooden spoon to combine. Optionally, add a few drops of rose essential oil. Cinnamon, cloves, and lavender act as natural fixatives. With their help, your potpourri will stay fragrant longer.

    Fill your bowls of choice with the potpourri. If you want to keep your wardrobe smelling delightful, fill up a small mesh bag. Attach the bag to the inside of your wardrobe door.

    How To Dry Rose Petals For Potpourri

    There are a few ways to dry your rose petals: natural air drying, baking, microwaving, and book pressing. Since we mentioned air drying above, we’ll focus on the other three methods.

    Baking is the fastest way to dry your rose petals. Start by heating your oven to 175°F. Next, line a baking tray with parchment paper and place the petals in a single layer without touching each other. Dry for 10 to 20 minutes until the edges are crispy.

    Microwaving kills off the rose’s smell, making it unsuitable for potpourri. Bookpressing takes a lot of time, but it’s a convenient solution for leftover petals. Choose heavy books with mate pages. Put each petal flat on a page, close, and forget it for at least 2 weeks.

    The Lifespan Of Potpourri From Roses

    Potpourri can last for a few weeks up to a few years. The lifespan and fragrance intensity depends on the mixture and storage. Covered potpourri will stay aromatic longer. A good homemade potpourri keeps up to 4 months. After that, the smell diminishes, but you can still use it as a decoration.

    You can refresh the mixture by spraying it with vodka or rubbing alcohol. Adding a few drops of essential oil or fixative can recover the original scent of the potpourri.

    How To Make Potpourri From Dead Roses

    Don’t throw away your roses after you’ve deadheaded them. You can use the same recipe as we did with fresh roses. Plus, they’re already dried, cutting the preparation time.

    Remove the petals and combine them with spices and herbs of choice. Go for a more potent smell like vanilla. Add a few drops of essential oil, as dead roses tend to be less fragrant.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    Optionally you can add Orris root as a fixative. It has an intensive smell of pepper, raspberry, and chocolate. This is actually the dried root of the Iris flower!

    Bottom Line: How To Make Potpourri From Roses At Home?

    Potpourri is an excellent way to give your roses life after the end of the season. Maybe you want to preserve your bridal bouquet or ditch the artificial room deodorizers.

    Dry your petals and combine them with spices, herbs, and a fixative to preserve the smell.

    In ancient times people placed potpourri all over their homes, from bathrooms to closets. A mesh bag filled with potpourri in your wardrobe can even help you get rid of clothes moths!

    How to make roses out of fondant How to make roses out of fondant

    About

    Some uses for that marshmallow fondant
    I am not going into how to make the fondant, you can find that how to here, and it is very good detail.

    I add flavoring to it, just because I can.

    Be warned, it is a sticky mess and you will wonder if you are sane.

    • How to make roses out of fondantmarlene j. added Fondant Roses to dessert 12 Jan 22:40
    • How to make roses out of fondantjankea favorited Fondant Roses 27 Dec 13:06
    • How to make roses out of fondantderyn S. favorited Fondant Roses 02 Aug 12:14

    You Will Need

    How to make roses out of fondant

    Make a small cone. You can either tint your fondant or leave it white. Set aside.

    I used leftover fonadant from the Lightning Mcqueen cake I made. (My first attempt at sculpting cake and fondant- never worked with it before)

    This will show you how to make a rose bud, but I will explain how to do a full rose too.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    Make another cone, and flatten it.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    Keep flattening it, you want a thinner outside top edge, almost ruffle like.

    I use my fingers, if it gets too sticky, put a dab of cornstarch on your fingers

    How to make roses out of fondant

    Place the petal you just made on the cone. The petal should be just slightly higher than the cone itself.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    Now wrap the petal around the cone.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    Make another petal, place on your cone with the first petal’s seam on the inside. Wrap.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    Keep alternating sides, hiding the seam and adding petals until you like the shape of your rose bud.

    Keep making the petals slightly larger, not overly large, and keep them thin.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    I think the rose bud looke about right for my idea of a rose bud.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    Tint some fondant green. Get out a very small leaf cookie cutter or a very sharp blade. (don’t cut yourself, we aren’t making a blood rose)

    How to make roses out of fondant

    Cut your leaves. These are for the bottom of your bud, not the steam.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    Attach to the bottom of the bud.

    When attaching, I use a paint brush dipped in warm water and a touch syrup.

    Put your bud on a bamboo skewer to dry.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    To make a full rose, do step one and two.

    Then you will be working in odd number petals.

    the first petal is one
    the second row of petals number three, when you put them on, overlap the petals.

    Put your first one one, then the second petal will go on any where from the middle to out.

    Your third row will be five petals, put on the same way.

    Your fourth and final row (unless you want a really big open roase) is seven petals.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    So for a rose bud, you work with one petal on placing the seam on the petal that is around the cone in the middle of the new petal.

    With a full rose, you work in increasing odd numbers.

    Comments

    How to make roses out of fondant

    How to make roses out of fondant

    Pepperette – I use it to cover the cakes, but I make my fondant from scratch. I won’t use the pre package stuff, although satin ice does taste ok, it is too expensive.

    I add flavoring depending on the cake it is covering. The Lightening McQueen was raspberry.

    I don’t like fondant, but everyone who has tasted the fondant I make like it. They say to them it tastes just like frosting, or candy.

    Sweet – Fondant is a pliable type of icing you can roll out and cover a cake, or use it to mold different items. But to use it like clay it can’t be too soft.

    Covering a cake, you get a perfectly smooth (as long as you take care covering it) canvas to work on.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    How to make roses out of fondant

    How to make roses out of fondant

    yes, and adding your favorite flavor helps too. you just have to remember not to add a flavor that will clash with your cake.

    this was left over fondant from lightning mcqueen, it smelled just like raspberries.

    and the mom told me that her son who doesn’t eat frosting was going to everyone and pulling the fondant off their piece and eating it.

    By Laura Davis | Submitted On April 23, 2008

    How to make roses out of fondant How to make roses out of fondant How to make roses out of fondant

    How to make roses out of fondant How to make roses out of fondant How to make roses out of fondant How to make roses out of fondant How to make roses out of fondant

    *If you are not accustomed to working with fondant icing or have not made roses before then make sure you buy enough fondant for several attempts- practice makes perfect.*

    These instructions once perfected will give you perfect roses commonly used on wedding cakes; this method is tricky and it is recommended you practice making the roses before the day of preparation.

    Break off a small piece of the fondant and roll it until you roughly have a 1″ diameter ball. Shape the ball into a cone by pinching one side of it; ideally you want the cone to be 1.5″ tall.

    To make a petal roll a ball of fondant roughly a quarter of the size of the previous, do not worry too much about size, if in a later stage you are finding that the sizes of the petals are too small then start again.

    Once you have your ball we want to flatten it to form a petal; use your thumb and press down on the ball. You want to create a circle that is 2″ in diameter, it is important that the petal is about ¼” thick on the bottom and thin on the top.

    *For a more realistic look ensure that the petal tips are paper thin.

    Having created the first petal, apply to the base of the cone, carefully wrapping it around finishing with a furl at the top to create a bud.

    It is best to start by applying the thick side of the petal to the base of the cone then carefully wrap the thin ‘petal’ around- slightly bending it over itself to create a bloom effect.

    Do the same with the three remaining petals; applying them from the bottom bud and delicately shaping the thin top to replicate a rose’s petal as it unfurls from the bud.

    Make five more petals, this time slightly larger than the originals but ensure you still keep the tips as thin as possible. Apply these final petals lower down on the base than the previous petals, spread the petals evenly round the base layering them up and curling the edges back a slight bit more to create more bloom.

    Continue layering the petals on until you are satisfied with the fullness of the rose.

    Here is an even simplified method for creating a less detailed rose, although in my opinion it is a more modern look. This method will give you a rose that if kept pure white with perhaps a small silver sugar ball placed on top of the bud will be suitable for wedding cakes; however, if used with bright coloring they will be perfect for birthday cakes. This method is easy to change and I recommend experimenting to create variations on the basic rose.

    The method is as follows.

    Roll out your colored fondant icing till it is 1.5cm in thickness, 15cm in width and 20cm in length. Arrange the rolled out icing in front of you so that the 20cm length is the side closest to you.

    Take the top of the fondant rectangle, pull it towards you and fold it on top of itself to create a smaller layered piece of fondant that is 3cm thick and 7.5cm wide. Do not flatten or squeeze the two layers together at all, try to leave a small cavity of air/space in the fold to create volume in your petals.

    Cut off 1cm of length from each end of the rectangle.

    Take one of the short ends of your rectangle and begin to roll it up like a swiss roll; however you do not want the rose to look like a log so to create a bud pinch the base end as you continue to roll the fondant length around itself. This should create a basic rose shape.

    After cutting off any excess icing carefully push back and separate the layers to give the flower more shape. To finish cut little leave shapes out of green icing and stick to the underside of the rose.

    If you want to create the side of your iced cake make several of these flowers and link them by the green leaves creating a rose chain around your cake.

    To completely change the finished look of the rose cut the folded over icing and pinch to create a two layers of thin petals; once rolled splay the thin layers out to create a carnation style flower.

    Here is a third method for creating flowers, this time small buds, that when made in quantity can be used to create a bouquet effect or simply used to decorate cupcakes by themselves.

    Take a small ball of fondant around 2cm in size and roll it into a 0.5cm thick sausage shape using a small rolling pin roll out the icing until it is of a really thin consistency.

    Using your fingers apply pressure and pull the icing at one side so that this side becomes thinner than the other, further thin it out by using a cocktail stick as a rolling pin.

    Carefully roll up the length of the icing like a Swiss roll. Take the little icing roll which should be around 1-2cm diameter and smooth the edge in the outer layer with the aid of the cocktail stick.
    Pinch the roll 3-4cm from the ‘bloom’ to get rid off the unused icing and to encourage the outer layers of the roll to splay out.

    Very gently with your index finger separate and furl back the layers of the roll to create the effect of petals. It may be useful to use your cocktail stick or a tissue covered cocktail stick (to protect the shape of the icing) to slightly separate the layers of the roll and shape them backwards to create the effect of a bloom.

    Take catering scissors (ordinary sharp scissor will also do) and cut the roll so that it is only 1.5-2cm of the bloom is left.

    This leaves a small flower that when produced in bright colors look brilliant on top of iced cupcakes and birthday cakes; turning a celebration cake into something special!

    How to make roses out of fondant

    How to make roses out of fondant

    Nutrition Facts (per serving)
    4 Calories
    0g Fat
    1g Carbs
    0g Protein

    ×

    Nutrition Facts
    Servings: 24
    Amount per serving
    Calories 4
    % Daily Value*
    Total Fat 0g 0%
    Saturated Fat 0g 0%
    Cholesterol 0mg 0%
    Sodium 0mg 0%
    Total Carbohydrate 1g 0%
    Dietary Fiber 0g 0%
    Total Sugars 1g
    Protein 0g
    Vitamin C 0mg 0%
    Calcium 0mg 0%
    Iron 0mg 0%
    Potassium 0mg 0%
    *The % Daily Value (DV) tells you how much a nutrient in a food serving contributes to a daily diet. 2,000 calories a day is used for general nutrition advice.

    Fondant Petals are beautiful, lifelike, edible rose petals made out of fondant! They can be made large and used to decorate cakes, cupcakes, and other pastries, or made miniature and used to decorate candies, as in these Raspberry Rose Truffles. If you want to make your own fondant to make these petals, I recommend making Marshmallow Fondant–it’s the easiest way to make fondant, and it tastes great too!

    Ingredients

    1 batch store-bought or homemade fondant , or enough for desired number of petals

    1 bottle food coloring

    Steps to Make It

    Gather the ingredients.

    Begin by mixing your food coloring with a little water to thin it out and dilute the color.

    Dust your work surface with powdered sugar or corn starch, and roll the fondant out until it is very thin, less than 1/8-inch thick. For lifelike petals the fondant need to be very thin, so the thinner you can get it during this stage, the better.

    Use a small circular cutter to cut circles out of the fondant. If you’re making a large amount of petals, don’t cut them all at once, or the fondant will be too dry to work with by the time you get to the end. Instead, work with a portion of the fondant at one time and keep the rest covered with cling wrap until you’re ready to use it.

    Take a fondant circle and press it between your fingers, thinning out the edges. Rose petals are thin and delicate along the edges, so want to replicate this effect by thinning the edges of your fondant.

    Take your diluted food coloring and paint your fondant petal. You can paint the whole thing, or just the edges, or just the interior—whatever looks right to you! Real rose petals have variations in color and intensity, so you can play around with coloring your petals and see what you like.

    If you have petal dust, luster dust, or shimmer dust, you can play around with adding these in addition to or instead of the coloring. Be aware that many luster dusts don’t mix well with water and should either be applied dry, or mixed with alcohol to make a liquid. Check your specific product for usage guidelines.

    To dry the petals, crumple up some foil, waxed paper, or parchment paper, and spread the petals across the surface, draping them unevenly over the crumpled material so they do not lie flat. This will give them interesting, lifelike shapes when they’re dry. Allow them to sit out overnight to dry completely.

    Your fondant petals are now finished! They can be used to decorate the tops of cakes, cupcakes, or candies, as in the case of these Raspberry Rose Truffles. They can be stored indefinitely in an airtight container at room temperature. Fondant does tend to absorb moisture, so don’t refrigerate them or place them on a moist dessert until you are ready to serve it.

    Wednesday 26th March 2014

    How to make roses out of fondant

    Developing your sugar craft skill is always a joy, and progressing from cutters and moulds to hand formed models is the true marker of having mastered fondant icing. Sugar paste flowers form a key part of any keen cake decorators arsenal, and having taken you through all you need to know about creating flowers from cutters and beautiful blooms out of moulds, we’ve detailed below all the steps shared in our live hand modelled flower Q&A which took place Thursday 27 March on Twitter.

    Such a delicate creation may appear intimidating at first glance, but they’re really not that tricky to turn out. With a few hints and tips from our very own Nic Hemming, you’ll soon be turning out immaculate hand-modelled flowers in no time.

    All you need is your chosen colour of ready to roll icing, some flower and modelling paste, a sugar craft rolling pin and a ball tool, and you’re good to go!

    Hand Modelled Flowers

    1. Knead the Ready to Roll Icing or Flower & Modelling Paste until soft and pliable on a clean dry work surface lightly dusted with icing sugar.

    Mix your icing with flower and modelling paste or add gum tragacanth or CMC before rolling to help the icing set firm once rolled out, cut and shaped.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    How to make roses out of fondant

    2. Roll a piece of icing into a ball about approximately 2cm in diameter, then roll the ball of icing between the palms of your hands, adding extra pressure on one side of the ball to make a cone shape which will form the centre of your rose.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    How to make roses out of fondant

    How to make roses out of fondant

    3. To make the petals, roll a large ball of icing out into a sausage shape approximately 1cm in diameter, and cut a 1cm wide chunk of icing from the end.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    How to make roses out of fondant

    How to make roses out of fondant

    How to make roses out of fondant

    4. Roll the piece of icing into a ball and then flatten with your thumb or finger, thinning one side with a ball tool and leaving the other side thicker. You will need to make sixteen petals in total.

    Use a plastic wallet to thin your petals between, to avoid finger print marks on your finished flowers.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    How to make roses out of fondant

    How to make roses out of fondant

    How to make roses out of fondant

    How to make roses out of fondant

    5. Wrap the first petal around the cone to cover the top of the cone and to form the start of the bud, sticking to the cone shape with cooled boiled water.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    How to make roses out of fondant

    How to make roses out of fondant

    6. Press three more petals around the base of the bud. Gently curl the edges of the petals, and position each one overlapping the other round the first petal, sticking to the other petals with cooled boiled water.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    How to make roses out of fondant

    How to make roses out of fondant

    How to make roses out of fondant

    How to make roses out of fondant

    How to make roses out of fondant

    7. Take five more petals. Using a little water stick petals under first row of petals, again curling the edges and positioning lower than the previous row of petals.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    How to make roses out of fondant

    How to make roses out of fondant

    8. Continue the process with a further seven petals for a large open flower.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    9. Trim off excess cone at the bottom of the flower and leave to set for a few hours.

    Use coloured powders, lustre dusts or edible glitter to decorate, applying to the modelled flowers with a dry brush and leave to dry.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    10. Place on your cake or cupcake, sticking down with a little cooled boiled water if required.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    Feeling inspired to try your first flower cake? How about something simple like this beautiful in blooms flower cake, or being a little more adventurous with our vintage flower cake?

    Learn how to make fondant roses (ribbon roses) without tools, with this step by step tutorial. Quick, easy, homemade with simple ingredients. Great for decorating cakes and cupcakes. No fondant rose cutter needed!

    One of my favorite ways to decorate cakes is to use what I already have on hand. I am not a fan of fancy cutters or tools and like simplified steps. That’s exactly how I made this beautiful Fondant Flower Cake and these Fondant Daisies. If you enjoyed those, then you are sure to love today’s tutorial too.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    How to make easy fondant roses? (Ribbon roses)

    1. Roll fondant- Using a rolling pin.
    2. Cut thin strips- Using a pizza cutter.
    3. Roll- Fold one corner and start rolling to the end.
    4. Final touches- Cut the end of your rose with scissors and smooth out the bottom with your fingers.
    5. Enjoy- Let these dry overnight or until they harden.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    Variations

    Decorate cupcakes- I decorated a cake but you can make make smaller flowers and use them as cupcake toppers. You can also use them on individual sized mini cakes or petit fours or even cookies.

    Make different sizes of flowers- Follow the same technique to make various sizes.

    Try other colors- I chose a pink, yellow and green but you can use any colors you like.

    Try other cake flavors- Such as Easy Key Lime Cake or this Pineapple Cake (With Cake Mix).

    Try other frosting flavors– Such as Marshmallow Frosting or Mint Frosting.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    Tips and Techniques for Fondant Rose Cake

    For faster drying- Use a 50/50 mixture. Just knead together half fondant and half gum paste and use that instead of just fondant.

    Homemade fondant vs. Store-bought fondant- Either can be used. My homemade version tastes incredible!

    Can you use marzipan instead of fondant? Yes, you can use that but it tastes different than fondant.

    Use pre-colored fondant- If you are short on time, use fondant that’s already colored.

    Use gel colors- If you are planning on coloring fondant, be sure to use gel colors because they are concentrated and more vibrant than liquid colors. Also, it prevents the fondant from becoming sticky.

    How long does it take for fondant flowers to dry? Typically, it takes 24 hours. However, the drying time may vary. This depends on the thickness that you rolled out the fondant. The thinner it is, the faster it dries. The thicker it is, the slower it dries. Drying time is also quicker when you live in dry climates where there is little to no humidity.

    Don’t decorate a warm cake- This is very important because if the cake is warm, the decorations will get sticky and messy.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    Storage

    Room temperature- Once they are dry, store in a cardboard box away from sunlight and moisture for up to 1 month. They can last even longer. I have some that are 3 months old and still good.

    Freeze- Fondant decorations cannot be frozen because when they thaw, the flowers will become sticky due to condensation.

    Refrigerate- They cannot be refrigerated because they can become sticky from the moisture in the fridge.

    simple cake recipes

    Wednesday, December 28, 2011

    How To Make Fondant Icing Roses For Cakes

    ; this method is tricky and it is recommended you practice making the roses before the day of preparation.

    Break off a small piece of the fondant and roll it until you roughly have a 1″ diameter ball. Shape the ball into a cone by pinching one side of it; ideally you want the cone to be 1.5″ tall.

    To make a petal roll a ball of fondant roughly a quarter of the size of the previous, do not worry too much about size, if in a later stage you are finding that the sizes of the petals are too small then start again.

    Once you have your ball we want to flatten it to form a petal; use your thumb and press down on the ball. You want to create a circle that is 2″ in diameter, it is important that the petal is about ¼” thick on the bottom and thin on the top.

    *For a more realistic look ensure that the petal tips are paper thin.

    Having created the first petal, apply to the base of the cone, carefully wrapping it around finishing with a furl at the top to create a bud.

    It is best to start by applying the thick side of the petal to the base of the cone then carefully wrap the thin ‘petal’ around- slightly bending it over itself to create a bloom effect.

    Do the same with the three remaining petals; applying them from the bottom bud and delicately shaping the thin top to replicate a rose’s petal as it unfurls from the bud.

    Make five more petals, this time slightly larger than the originals but ensure you still keep the tips as thin as possible. Apply these final petals lower down on the base than the previous petals, spread the petals evenly round the base layering them up and curling the edges back a slight bit more to create more bloom.

    Continue layering the petals on until you are satisfied with the fullness of the rose.

    Here is an even simplified method for creating a less detailed rose, although in my opinion it is a more modern look. This method will give you a rose that if kept pure white with perhaps a small silver sugar ball placed on top of the bud will be suitable for wedding cakes; however, if used with bright coloring they will be perfect for birthday cakes. This method is easy to change and I recommend experimenting to create variations on the basic rose.

    The method is as follows.

    Roll out your colored fondant icing till it is 1.5cm in thickness, 15cm in width and 20cm in length. Arrange the rolled out icing in front of you so that the 20cm length is the side closest to you.

    Take the top of the fondant rectangle, pull it towards you and fold it on top of itself to create a smaller layered piece of fondant that is 3cm thick and 7.5cm wide. Do not flatten or squeeze the two layers together at all, try to leave a small cavity of air/space in the fold to create volume in your petals.

    Cut off 1cm of length from each end of the rectangle.

    Take one of the short ends of your rectangle and begin to roll it up like a swiss roll; however you do not want the rose to look like a log so to create a bud pinch the base end as you continue to roll the fondant length around itself. This should create a basic rose shape.

    After cutting off any excess icing carefully push back and separate the layers to give the flower more shape. To finish cut little leave shapes out of green icing and stick to the underside of the rose.

    If you want to create the side of your iced cake make several of these flowers and link them by the green leaves creating a rose chain around your cake.

    To completely change the finished look of the rose cut the folded over icing and pinch to create a two layers of thin petals; once rolled splay the thin layers out to create a carnation style flower.

    Here is a third method for creating flowers, this time small buds, that when made in quantity can be used to create a bouquet effect or simply used to decorate cupcakes by themselves.

    Take a small ball of fondant around 2cm in size and roll it into a 0.5cm thick sausage shape using a small rolling pin roll out the icing until it is of a really thin consistency.

    Using your fingers apply pressure and pull the icing at one side so that this side becomes thinner than the other, further thin it out by using a cocktail stick as a rolling pin.

    Carefully roll up the length of the icing like a Swiss roll. Take the little icing roll which should be around 1-2cm diameter and smooth the edge in the outer layer with the aid of the cocktail stick.
    Pinch the roll 3-4cm from the ‘bloom’ to get rid off the unused icing and to encourage the outer layers of the roll to splay out.

    Very gently with your index finger separate and furl back the layers of the roll to create the effect of petals. It may be useful to use your cocktail stick or a tissue covered cocktail stick (to protect the shape of the icing) to slightly separate the layers of the roll and shape them backwards to create the effect of a bloom.

    Take catering scissors (ordinary sharp scissor will also do) and cut the roll so that it is only 1.5-2cm of the bloom is left.

    This leaves a small flower that when produced in bright colors look brilliant on top of iced cupcakes and birthday cakes; turning a celebration cake into something special!

    Gum Paste Roses

    How to make roses out of fondant

    With the right tools and a little patience, anyone can shape elegant, intricate gum paste roses. This illustrated guide will help you make a variety of roses, from tight buds to extravagant blooms.

    What You’ll Need

    • Flower paste/gum paste
    • Toothpicks
    • Styrofoam block
    • Nonstick board or marble slab
    • Cornstarch
    • Rolling pin
    • Gum paste cutters or cookie cutters in various sizes
    • Gum paste flower tool (optional)
    • Small brushes
    • Gel paste colors/edible petal dust

    Make Base

    How to make roses out of fondant

    Roll some gum paste into a small ball, about 1/2 inch in diameter. Pinch the top of the ball to shape it into a teardrop.

    Insert Toothpick and Let Dry

    How to make roses out of fondant

    Insert a toothpick into the base and set it aside in a Styrofoam block. Make these bases a few days in advance, as they need to be completely dry before you can proceed.

    Roll Out Gum Paste

    How to make roses out of fondant

    On a smooth surface dusted with cornstarch, use a rolling pin to roll out your gum paste to a thickness of about 1/16 of an inch.

    Cut Out Rose Petals

    How to make roses out of fondant

    Use an assortment of gum paste cutters to make your rose petals. In order to create a more natural effect, use smaller cutters for the inner petals and large cutters for the outer petals.

    Thin Out Petal Edges

    How to make roses out of fondant

    If you have a gum paste flower tool, use it to thin each petal’s edges and create a delicate, frilled effect. If you don’t have a flower tool, simply pinch the petal’s edges to thin them.

    Wet Finished Petal

    How to make roses out of fondant

    Wet the finished petal with a little water or gum paste adhesive.

    Wrap Petal Around Base

    How to make roses out of fondant

    Wrap the petal around the base and furl the outside edge slightly to create a closed rosebud. If you’re making a gum paste bouquet, keep some flowers at the rosebud stage.

    Make Another Petal

    How to make roses out of fondant

    Prepare another petal of similar size and repeat steps five through seven.

    Wrap Second Petal

    How to make roses out of fondant

    Wrap the second petal around the rosebud, then roll back the petal’s outer edge.

    Attach Third Petal

    How to make roses out of fondant

    Repeat this process with a third petal of similar size. Again, roll back the petal’s outer edge to open your gum paste blossom. If you are making a gum paste bouquet, keep some roses at this stage.

    To shape larger roses, cut out a set of larger petals and repeat steps five through 10. Always ensure that your roses are dry before moving on to the final step.

    Add Color to the Finished Dried Roses

    How to make roses out of fondant

    Paint your flowers with a small brush and an assortment of gel food coloring or petal dust shades. Apply a darker tint to each flower’s core for a natural effect.

    Note: If you are aiming for a deep red hue, use colored gum paste—it is nearly impossible to produce a rich, vivid color with just petal dust or gel food coloring.

    So far in our cake decorating series we have made a cake and covered it with butter cream frosting and fondant. These are very important skills to learn, but not nearly as fun as making creative decorations! In this part of the cake decorating series, we are going to get creative and make some beautiful fondant roses to put on top of our cake.

    If you are new to the cake decorating series, take a look at some of the past recipes and tutorials:

    Directions:

    1. For the best results, watch the instructional video below.
    2. To color your fondant, dip a toothpick into your food coloring and then place that small amount of coloring onto your fondant. Knead the fondant to mix in the coloring. Keep your counter dusted with icing sugar to avoid having the fondant stick.
    3. Continue adding coloring one toothpick at a time as needed. It is better to add small amounts of coloring because you can always add more. But if you add too much, you can’t take it away.
    4. For our decorations, we made a small amount of green fondant to make leaves, a small amount of pink fondant for roses and left a small amount of fondant uncolored (white) for roses as well.
    5. To make the leaves, roll the green fondant flat. In the video below I use a leaf cutter, which is a small plastic cutter in the shape of a leaf, but it isn’t necessary. You can also use a sharp knife to cut the leaves by hand.
    6. Once you have the leaves cut out, add a little bit of detail by making small marks with a knife.
    7. To make the roses, start with a small piece of colored fondant, about the size of a pea. Cover your fingers with icing sugar to prevent your fingers from sticking when you are working with the fondant. Shape the fondant to look like a teardrop.
    8. Pinch one side of your tear shape thin, to make a shape that resembles an ear. Wrap the thin side that you have pinched out around the un-pinched side to make a rosebud.
    9. Next, take another pea sized piece of fondant. This time, you will want to flatten the entire piece of fondant to make a rose petal. Wrap this rose petal around the bud that you made in the previous step.
    10. If you wanted, you could stop here. These make great rosebud decorations and when mixed on a cake with full roses, they make for a great display.
    11. To continue making the full rose decoration, pinch out more rose petals from the fondant. Continue adding the petals to the flower until you are pleased with the size. Let the tops of the petals hang over a little for added effect.

    That’s it! After a little practice you will be making beautiful bouquets of fondant roses! Coming up next week we will create some more fondant decorations. Enjoy!

    Ingredients:

    • Small Ball of Rolled Fondant (recipe here)
    • Small Amount of Concentrated Food Coloring, your choice of colors
    • 1/2 cup of Icing Sugar

    Posted by Candra on Monday, March 28th, 2011 at 12:37 pm and is filed under Cake Decorating, how-to, Video. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

    Making fondant roses, part 1

    A while ago, I wrote a blog post on how to pipe roses out of buttercream (have a quick look here). I thought I’d continue with the theme of making roses by showing you how to create simple roses from sugarpaste/fondant, much like the pink roses is the picture above.

    It’s a simple technique – all you’ll need is some sugarpaste in a colour you want to make your roses, some clingfilm and a rolling pin.

    Step one: Roll out 3 balls of a similar size, making sure one of these balls is more of a long cylinder-shape. The size of these balls will be indicative of the size of your rose.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    Step two: Place a ball between two sheets of clingfilm and using the end of a rolling pin, carefully press down and shape into a flat disc. Do this for all 3 balls – make sure the longer shaped ball is shaped into an oval rather than a perfect circle.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    Step three: Taking the oval piece, roll it onto itself. Have a look at both ends, one will undoubtedly look neater and more ‘rose’ like than other – this is the end you’ll want to focus on.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    Step four: Taking the piece you’ve just rolled up, place it in the centre of one of the circular discs. Make sure the neater end fits just below the top edge of the disc.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    Step five: Fold the circular disc onto the rolled up piece, securing it by pinching together. You’ll start to see the rose take shape.

    Step six: Repeat steps four and five for the final disc, again, making sure the rolled up piece sits just below the top edge of the disc.

    Step seven: At this point, you’ll have quite a long rolled-up rose, using your finger, carefully spread the ‘petals’ of the neat end to fan out the rose. Depending on how tall you want the rose, pinch and tear the part you do not wish to keep and reshape the bottom to make it neater.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    Leave aside to harden and that’s all there is to it – simple! You can always add further layers by using more discs, but if your rose is relatively small, I would stick with 5 layers max, otherwise it will start looking bulky. You’ve also got the option of using florist paste (it dried rock solid, unlike fondant) and is often used for making flowers. Be warned though – although it’s edible, I’d highly recommend NOT eating it!

    In part 2, I’ll demonstrate how to make larger fondant roses that can used on larger cakes, rather than just cupcakes.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    Experience the world of cake decorating like never before with Cake Central Magazine!

    When you purchase a digital subscription to Cake Central Magazine, you will get an instant and automatic download of the most recent issue.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    Fondant Roses??

    How to make roses out of fondant

    Good morning. Does anyone else make roses out of fondant only, rather than half gp and half fondant? Any opinions on this? Which is better? I DO want thin petals. I think they look more like real roses. But I thought I could do this by rolling the fondant thinner and by using the ball tool to thin the edges of the petals. Thanks for your input. I am actually making a “Harley Davidson” wedding cake. (Oh Lord. give me the strength to turn this bride’s idea into an elegant wedding cake )

    How to make roses out of fondant

    I make all my flowers out of flowerpaste , fondant or half half just doesn’t give the effect of “real” enough for me

    How to make roses out of fondant

    What is that? Do you make it yourself?

    How to make roses out of fondant

    I use the royal icing tylose paste. It is really easy to make yourself and the results are worth it. I make a lot of roses and wouldn’t make them out of anything else.

    If you would like some more info on how to make it please PM me I am happy to answer any questions.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    Flower paste is called gumpaste in the United states. I use nicholas lodges- its the one where you make royal icing and add tylose powder. You can get the paste very thin and it is very pliable. Its really nice to work with. You can find the recipe all over the internet and CC

    How to make roses out of fondant

    I make roses all three ways: fondant only, fondant and gum paste, and gum paste only. For roses that people can actually eat and enjoy I make fondant only and I actually have a lot of people request these.

    For fondant only roses I roll well kneaded pliable fondant out to about 1/16″ and use a circle cutter for the petals. I create a cone base out of a large ball of fondant leaving the cone at the top of the ball with enough fondant at the bottom to create a standing base so I can work with both hands to apply the petals. I pick up a circle, press it thinner and wider, lightly brush it with water and wrap the entire cone and ending up overlapping and lightly furling the outside edge.
    Then I thin three circles on one side only until you can no longer easily feel the edge of the fondant. Next, take one at a time and lightly brush water in a V shape at the bottom half of the petal and add to the wrapped cone leaving the left side unattached. Add the next two petals in the same manner overlapping them and finally tucking the third one in under the first. Furl and curl the petals slightly. The next row will be five petals done in the same manner which will give you an open rose bud flower . For a full open flower add a third row of seven petals and furl them a bit more.

    You determine how large your finished rose will be by how large you make your cone and how large the circles are that you cut to make your petals. I have made fondant roses as small as 1/4″ to as large as 3″. Attached is an example of the size I put on cupcakes.

    Saturday, 2 October 2010

    How To Make Fondant Icing Roses For Cakes

    *If you are not accustomed to working with fondant icing or have not made roses before then make sure you buy enough fondant for several attempts- practice makes perfect.*

    These instructions once perfected will give you perfect roses commonly used on wedding cakes; this method is tricky and it is recommended you practice making the roses before the day of preparation.

    Break off a small piece of the fondant and roll it until you roughly have a 1″ diameter ball. Shape the ball into a cone by pinching one side of it; ideally you want the cone to be 1.5″ tall.

    To make a petal roll a ball of fondant roughly a quarter of the size of the previous, do not worry too much about size, if in a later stage you are finding that the sizes of the petals are too small then start again.

    Once you have your ball we want to flatten it to form a petal; use your thumb and press down on the ball. You want to create a circle that is 2″ in diameter, it is important that the petal is about ¼” thick on the bottom and thin on the top.

    *For a more realistic look ensure that the petal tips are paper thin.

    Having created the first petal, apply to the base of the cone, carefully wrapping it around finishing with a furl at the top to create a bud.

    It is best to start by applying the thick side of the petal to the base of the cone then carefully wrap the thin ‘petal’ around- slightly bending it over itself to create a bloom effect.

    Do the same with the three remaining petals; applying them from the bottom bud and delicately shaping the thin top to replicate a rose’s petal as it unfurls from the bud.

    Make five more petals, this time slightly larger than the originals but ensure you still keep the tips as thin as possible. Apply these final petals lower down on the base than the previous petals, spread the petals evenly round the base layering them up and curling the edges back a slight bit more to create more bloom.

    Continue layering the petals on until you are satisfied with the fullness of the rose.

    Here is an even simplified method for creating a less detailed rose, although in my opinion it is a more modern look. This method will give you a rose that if kept pure white with perhaps a small silver sugar ball placed on top of the bud will be suitable for wedding cakes; however, if used with bright coloring they will be perfect for birthday cakes. This method is easy to change and I recommend experimenting to create variations on the basic rose.

    The method is as follows.

    Roll out your colored fondant icing till it is 1.5cm in thickness, 15cm in width and 20cm in length. Arrange the rolled out icing in front of you so that the 20cm length is the side closest to you.

    Take the top of the fondant rectangle, pull it towards you and fold it on top of itself to create a smaller layered piece of fondant that is 3cm thick and 7.5cm wide. Do not flatten or squeeze the two layers together at all, try to leave a small cavity of air/space in the fold to create volume in your petals.

    Cut off 1cm of length from each end of the rectangle.

    Take one of the short ends of your rectangle and begin to roll it up like a swiss roll; however you do not want the rose to look like a log so to create a bud pinch the base end as you continue to roll the fondant length around itself. This should create a basic rose shape.

    After cutting off any excess icing carefully push back and separate the layers to give the flower more shape. To finish cut little leave shapes out of green icing and stick to the underside of the rose.

    If you want to create the side of your iced cake make several of these flowers and link them by the green leaves creating a rose chain around your cake.

    To completely change the finished look of the rose cut the folded over icing and pinch to create a two layers of thin petals; once rolled splay the thin layers out to create a carnation style flower.

    Here is a third method for creating flowers, this time small buds, that when made in quantity can be used to create a bouquet effect or simply used to decorate cupcakes by themselves.

    Take a small ball of fondant around 2cm in size and roll it into a 0.5cm thick sausage shape using a small rolling pin roll out the icing until it is of a really thin consistency.

    Using your fingers apply pressure and pull the icing at one side so that this side becomes thinner than the other, further thin it out by using a cocktail stick as a rolling pin.

    Carefully roll up the length of the icing like a Swiss roll. Take the little icing roll which should be around 1-2cm diameter and smooth the edge in the outer layer with the aid of the cocktail stick.
    Pinch the roll 3-4cm from the ‘bloom’ to get rid off the unused icing and to encourage the outer layers of the roll to splay out.

    Very gently with your index finger separate and furl back the layers of the roll to create the effect of petals. It may be useful to use your cocktail stick or a tissue covered cocktail stick (to protect the shape of the icing) to slightly separate the layers of the roll and shape them backwards to create the effect of a bloom.

    Take catering scissors (ordinary sharp scissor will also do) and cut the roll so that it is only 1.5-2cm of the bloom is left.

    This leaves a small flower that when produced in bright colors look brilliant on top of iced cupcakes and birthday cakes; turning a celebration cake into something special!

    For inspirational ideas for decorating your cakes check out Special Day Cakes, award winning designers of celebration cakes in Lanarkshire

    วันพฤหัสบดีที่ 26 พฤศจิกายน พ.ศ. 2552

    How To Make Fondant Icing Roses For Cakes

    * If you are not on working with fondant icing roses or not made before then sure you buy enough fondant for several attempts practices used, makes perfect .*

    These instructions once perfected will be perfect roses commonly used on wedding cakes, this method is sensitive, and it is recommended that you practice making the roses before the day of preparation.

    Break off a small piece of rolled fondant and until you have about a 1 “diameterball. The ball in the form of a cone by pinching one side, you ideally want the taper to 1.5 “tall.

    On a petal roll a ball of fondant around one quarter the size of the former, do not worry too much about the size, if at a later stage, you find that the size of the leaves are too small, then start again.

    Once you have your ball, we want it flat on a petal shape, use your thumb and press the ball. You want a circle 2 “in diameter to create, it isimportant that the petal is about ¼ “thick on the bottom and thin at the top.

    * For a realistic view that the petal tips are thin as paper.

    After the first petal created for the base of the cone, carefully wrapped to make ends with a furl at the top of a bud.

    The best way is by applying the thick side of the petal at the base of the cone then carefully the thin ‘petal wrap “around start-bend about themselves to create a flowerEffect.

    Do the same with the three remaining petals, the application of the bottom bud and delicately shaping the thin top to replicate a rose’s petal as it unfolds from the bud.

    Make five more petals, this time slightly larger than the originals, but to ensure that you still consider the tips as thin as possible. Apply these final petals down on the ground than the previous petals, the petals spread evenly coated around the foot and curling the edges back a slight bit moreCreate more bloom.

    Continue layering the petals on until you are satisfied with the fullness of the rose.

    Here is a simplified procedure for creating a less detailed rose, although it is my opinion, a modern look. This method gives you a rose to be held, if pure white with perhaps put a little silver sugar on top seeds are suitable for wedding cakes, but when used with bright color, they are perfect for birthday cake. ThisMethod is easy to change, and I recommend experimenting to create variations increased the base.

    The procedure is as follows.

    Roll out your colored fondant icing until it is 1.5 cm thick, 15cm wide and 20cm long. Arrange the rolled out icing in front of him, so that is 20cm long side closest to them.

    Take the top of the fondant rectangle you draw on it and fold it on itself to a smaller piece of fondant layers that create 3cm thick and 7.5 cmwide. What is flat or squeezing the two layers together at all, try to leave a small cavity of air / space in the fold to create volume in your petals.

    Cut off 1 cm length from each end of the rectangle.

    Take one of the short sides of the rectangle and you can roll up like a Swiss roll, but you do not want to increase as a piece of wood so as to create a bud pinch the bottom end as if the next roll fondant length. This should be a basic roseShape.

    Cut it back after the excess ice and gently separate the layers to give the flower more shape. To stop little left to cut shapes from green frosting and stick to the underside of the rose.

    If you do create, on the side of your cake to combine several of these flowers and want to create it with the green leaves, a rose chain around the cake.

    To completely change the finished look of the rose cut the folded over ice and a dash of two layers, the production of thinPetals, once rolled splay of the thin layers to a carnation style flower.

    Here is a third method for creating flowers, this time small buds, which, when used in amounts to be able to create a bouquet effect or simply used to decorate cupcakes themselves.

    Take a small ball of fondant around 2cm in size and roll it into a 0.5 cm thick roll shape with a small rolling pin, roll out the icing until it is a really thin consistency.

    Using yourFingers exert pressure, and drag the icing on the one side so that side is thinner than the other, then thin it with a cocktail stick as a rolling pin.

    Carefully roll the length of the ice like a Swiss roll. Take the small role that ice should be about 1-2cm in diameter and smooth edge in the outer layer with the help of toothpicks.
    Press get rid of the roll 3-4cm from the “flower” to the unused icing and the outer layers of the role to promotesplay out.

    Very gently separate with your index finger and roll back the layers of the roll to create the impact of the petals. It may make sense to protect your cocktail stick or toothpick covered with a tissue (to the shape of the icing), the layers easily separate the role and shape them backwards to create the effect of flowers.

    Take advantage of the catering scissors (ordinary sharp scissors will do) and cut the roll so that it is only 1.5-2cm of the bloom is left.

    There is a remainingsmall flower, which, when produced in bright colors are brilliant on the frozen muffins and pies, cakes turning a celebration into something special!

    Learn how to make easy fondant flowers with this step-by-step tutorial and simple ingredients. Great for decorating cakes and cupcakes. No fancy tools or cutters needed. Easy enough for beginners!

    These edible flowers are fantasy-based but still so pretty. Use them to decorate cakes, cupcakes, cookies, brownies or any other dessert you like. Make them in different sizes and colors to suit any occasion and theme. Fore more inspiration, be sure to check out all of these other simple tutorials, starting with this post on How to Make Easy Fondant Roses (Ribbon Roses) and this tutorial on How to Make Royal Icing Flowers (Sugar Flowers) plus this guide on How to Make Buttercream Flowers (Russian Piping Tips). If you are still not satisfied, check out these Fondant Daisies and these Easy Wafer Paper Flowers.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    How to make Easy Fondant Flowers?

    1. Bake cakes– The bottom tier was chocolate and the top tier was vanilla.
    2. Let them cool- Until room temperature.
    3. Make icing- American buttercream frosting was the best choice.
    4. Assemble bottom tier– Cut cake in half. Place one chocolate cake on cake board, ice it, place other cake on top, ice entire cake smoothly. Cover it in purple fondant.
    5. Assemble top tier- Cut cake in half. Place one vanilla cake on cake board, ice it, place other cake on top, ice entire cake smoothly. Cover it in green fondant.
    6. Final assembly- Place this prepared top tier on top of the bottom tier with dowel support.
    7. Make flowers– And let them dry overnight.
    8. Final decoration– Stick abstract purple and green fondant cut-outs on both tiers. Then, stick the dry flowers on cake.

    Can you make fondant flowers ahead of time? Are they edible?

    Yes, this is actually recommended because it can take up to 24 hours for flowers to dry and harden. Yes, they are completely edible.

    Is it better to use gum paste or fondant?

    Both can be used. The only difference is that gum paste dries hard and also dries quicker than fondant.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    Variations for sugar paste flowers

    Try other color combinations– I chose purple and green but the possibilities are endless.

    Use other cutters– I used the heart shape but you can use oval or circle to make a different flower design. The same instructions will apply.

    Try other cake flavors- Such as German Chocolate Cake or Cherry Cake.

    Fill cake- With jams and preserves, Homemade Caramel Sauce or Dulce De Leche or nut butters. You can also add fresh berries or chopped up nuts or candy bars.

    Flavor fondant- Use extracts. Make sure the flavor you choose compliments the cake and frosting flavors too.

    Consider a different cake shape– I made square cakes but you can bake classic circle cakes.

    How to fix fondant bubbles, bumps and tears? Try this little trick: Cut out some weird and irregular shapes of fondant. Start sticking them on to your cake randomly to cover all the flaws.

    Tips and Techniques

    Homemade marshmallow fondant vs. Store-bought fondant- Either can be used. Homemade version definitely tastes better but store-bought version is convenient since it can be bought pre-colored.

    Don’t decorate warm cakes- Because the heat will cause the icing and fondant to melt and become sticky.

    Don’t roll fondant too thick– Because that will make the blossoms too heavy and they will fall off the cake or damage the cake.

    Add support– Since this is a tiered cake, dowels or bubble tea straws should be used for support to prevent the cakes from collapsing onto each other.

    Use gel colors for coloring fondant- This works much better than liquid colors because gel colors are thicker and more concentrated and will not make the fondant wet and sticky.

    Drying time for flowers may vary- Too much moisture and humidity in air = Slower drying time. Speed up the drying time by placing a table fan pointed directly on the flowers.

    Don’t use a lot of water- Water is being used as a glue to stick fondant pieces together. Adding too much will create puddles and make fondant very sticky to work with. It will also increase the drying time considerably.

    Flowers must be completely dry before being glued onto the cake– This is very important because if they are not dry, they will lose their shape and bend over and look odd.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    Storage

    Room temperature- Decorated cake can be left at room temperature for up to 24 hours as long as there is no fruit filling that requires refrigeration.

    Refrigerate- Leftovers can be stored in a sealed container in the fridge for up to 3 days. However the fondant decorations will become slightly sticky and tacky from the moisture in the fridge.

    Freeze- Unfrosted cakes and frostings can be stored separately in a sealed containers for up to 1 month. When you are ready to enjoy this dessert, let them thaw in the fridge overnight and then, decorate as per instructions below.

    Make ahead instructions- This cake can be baked and decorated 1 day in advance and stored at room temperature until you are ready to serve.

    Fondant ribbon roses add a touch of whimsy to any cake that you make. They are so easy to make that you can probably make it with your eyes closed. I use them a lot on cakes for kids, babies, and even for wedding cakes.

    Here is a illustrated guide on how to make fondant ribbon roses. The tools that I used were a ruler and pizza cutter. I used a ruler as a guide when cutting the fondant with the pizza cutter. You can use a knife or metal spatula in place of the pizza cutter.

    METHOD

    Color the fondant to desired shade. Roll it to about 1/8″ thick or thinner.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    Using a pizza cutter and a ruler, cut a rectangular shape of approximately 3″ by 7″. You can cut them smaller or bigger depending on what size you will need. Once you cut the rectangle, fold it over lengthwise.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    Then take one end and start rolling it to the other end. You can pinch the bottom part, like making some pleats, as you roll along. This helps open up the rose a bit.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    How to make roses out of fondant

    How to make roses out of fondant

    Once it’s rolled all the way to the end, cut the excess part off.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    Next for the leaves, cut the fondant into squares. What I do is roll out the fondant and cut a big square, then I cut smaller squares. This helps the production faster.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    Then take two opposite corners of the square and pinch them together in the middle.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    Cut the pinched part in the middle.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    And voila, you get two leaves at once!

    How to make roses out of fondant

    You can make them roses and leaves ahead of time and leave them to dry or you can place them on the cake right away.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    Now that was easy!

    You might also like:

    How to make roses out of fondant

    How to make roses out of fondant

    How to make roses out of fondant

    How to make roses out of fondant

    Disclosure: Please note some of the links in this post may be affiliate links, I will earn a commission if you decide to make a purchase. This doesn’t cost you anything additional and I truly appreciate this support, thank you!

    How to make roses out of fondant

    Experience the world of cake decorating like never before with Cake Central Magazine!

    When you purchase a digital subscription to Cake Central Magazine, you will get an instant and automatic download of the most recent issue.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    Big Fondant Roses

    How to make roses out of fondant

    Can anyone point me in the right direction toward learning how to make the big beautiful fondant/gumpaste roses I have seen on here? I can make the smaller wilton method ones, but I would like to learn the method for the big, more realistic ones! Thanks.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    Yes, I second this! Any tips would be great, i.e. what type of cutters and gumpaste, etc.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    Check out Edna’s videos on Youtube (she is on this site as toneda and on youtube as tonedna1) here is the link to part 1 on youtube.

    She is so awesome. her work is flawless.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    I use the jem 5 petal cutters to make my roses and they are fantastic! they come in different petal sizes so that you can make small miniature roses up to large beautiful ones.

    I got them from:
    www.countrykitchensweetart.com

    When i called the lady there suggested to use three different petal sizes to get a grand rose, i’ve only one them in the same petal size and they still come out beautiful.

    if you have any questions don’t hesitate to ask!

    How to make roses out of fondant

    Here you go!! How to make roses out of fondant How to make roses out of fondant

    How to make roses out of fondant

    I’m in the process of doing them now. I am using the five petal cutters, which work fantastic. I learned a trick with my wires that works really well. I make my cones for the center, let them dry, then I take the wire, heat the tip with a lighter until it is red hot, stick it in the rose cone. The sugar will melt around the wire, and when cooled it will stay adhered.

    I keep a pad of Styrofoam and stick all the wires with the cones attached in that. My husband bought me one of the long nosed lighters that you use for starting grills, and it works really well.

    Make sure you use lot’s of corn starch on your table when cutting out the petals, and then keep the gumpaste under plastic wrap so it doesn’t dry out. After my roses are dry. I hold them over a pot of boiling water, and it brings the color out, plus the cornstarch will melt away. Then I dust them with luster dust.

    I did hundreds of roses for my fair cake this year. It should be in my photos.

    February 18, 2014 by Roxy

    How to make roses out of fondant

    When it comes to ruffle flowers there are endless designs and variations. You can’t really go wrong with making one of these because there is no right way of making it! You can use any type of cutters you have available, in the same size or different sizes – round, fluted round, lace cutters etc.. Although I’m using fondant here you can make them out of gum paste or modeling chocolate as well. Lately I’ve seen many cakes decorated with ruffle flowers so I really wanted to try making some as well. For my first try I think they turned out pretty, what do you think : )?

    So let’s get started and learn how to make fondant ruffle flowers!

    Materials & Tools:

    Other than fondant in the colour of your choice, you will need:

    • 5 round cutters in different sizes – the size is your choice depending on how big/small you want to make the flower; I’m using 5 of the Ateco round 11 piece cutter set
    • rolling pin or pasta machine
    • some cornstarch
    • a toothpick or small skewer
    • fondant shaping foam mat (optional)
    • forming cups (optional)
    • Silicone mold for the flower centers (optional); I’m using the First Impression Silicone Mold

    You can find the cutters or tools on Amazon or you can just google the names and I’m sure you’ll find other places where you can buy them.

    Sprinkle some cornstarch on your work surface, so the fondant won’t stick, and roll the fondant until it’s quite thin. I used my pasta machine and went down to the #3 setting but you could roll it even thinner. If you don’t have a pasta machine no worries, you can keep using your rolling pin to roll the fondant until it’s almost paper thin.

    Using the round cutters cut out 5 circles per flower. Note that for the smallest circle I rolled out some yellow-orange marbled fondant to give the flower center a nicer look.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    Once you cut out the circles place all of them, except the largest one, in a ziplock bag or cover them with plastic wrap to prevent them from drying out.

    Place the fondant circle on your fondant shaping foam mat – I didn’t use one and I was able to create the ruffles just as well by placing it straight on the counter top but you have to use the right amount of cornstarch to prevent it from tearing /sticking to your work surface… the mat it’s supposed to make it easier for you to make the ruffles without tearing your petals.

    Take your toothpick, place it about 1 inch (2.5 cm) on the fondant circle and while holding the toothpick with your fingers rock it back and forth all the way around the outer edge. This will create a nice ruffle effect.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    Repeat the steps to create the remaining petals.

    Now you can let your flower dry out on a flat surface or in the forming cups, depending on how you want them to look. I assembled mine in forming cups.

    Place the first circle and brush some water in the centre.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    Layer the second one on top, brush some water…

    How to make roses out of fondant

    the third one, brush some water…

    How to make roses out of fondant

    the fourth one, brush some water…

    How to make roses out of fondant

    and the fifth one.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    You can make the flower out of three or four circles instead of five. I promise you it will look pretty either way :)!

    If you don’t have a silicone mold to make the flower centres just take a small piece of orange fondant and make a small ball. Then brush it with some water and place it in the middle of the flower. If using a silicone mold, take a small piece of fondant, dust it with cornstarch and then press it into the mold.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    Carefully pop the molded fondant out, brush it with some water on the bottom and put it in the centre of the flower.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    When you decorate your cakes if you want to place a flower on the side of the cake you have to make a hole in the middle of the flower and place a skewer in. Take a skewer and push it through the middle of the flower as seen below but not all the way through. Let the flower dry like that and when you’re ready to place it on the cake just place the skewer back in and secure it with royal icing or melted chocolate.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    Let the flowers dry out overnight.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    Some of the items used to make these ruffle flowers:

    How to make roses out of fondant

    Experience the world of cake decorating like never before with Cake Central Magazine!

    When you purchase a digital subscription to Cake Central Magazine, you will get an instant and automatic download of the most recent issue.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    How Far In Advance Can You Make Fondant Figures

    How to make roses out of fondant

    I’m making a cake in about 3 1/2 weeks and I wanted to try some fondant figures on top. I was hoping to do them ahead of time, but I’m not sure what’s the best way to store them and how long will they keep before getting cracked or otherwise yucky. Any thoughts? Thanks!

    How to make roses out of fondant

    I make my fondant figures & CC toppers a month in advance & some make them way before that too. Let them dry very good before you store them to prevent color bleeding & fondant becoming all gewy. Store them in an air tight container.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    I’ve saved fondant figures for years with no problems. I do agree to let them dry well before storing them. Personally I don’t store them in air tight containers, I like to store them in cardboard boxes so they can breathe.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    TexasSugar, Im with you, I made mine last month, And i don`t need them till next month, After they dried I put them in a cardboard box and they are still their waiting.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    Be careful on storing them in a plastic container. When I first started making fondant decorations, I made them in advance and put them in a plastic container. When I opened the container a couple days later the figures I had made were sticky, shiny and had lost some of their shape. I was told then to always store them in a cardboard box so they can breathe.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    If they’re going to crack, they generally do so within the first day or so – so don’t worry about that. But especially larger pieces – as for molded animals and bodies – can take weeks to dry completely. Store in a dark place – because fondant colors fade in light, cushion your pieces with foam or crumpled saran wrap. Be very careful when you handle them. I personally think they become more fragile with age – and make sure they have good airflow around them. Early on I had figures get gummy when I covered a tray full with just one layer of paper towels. I like to put them on a wax paper covered tray in a dark room or cupboard – no covering at all – until I use them.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    Originally Posted by cricket0616

    Be careful on storing them in a plastic container. When I first started making fondant decorations, I made them in advance and put them in a plastic container. When I opened the container a couple days later the figures I had made were sticky, shiny and had lost some of their shape. I was told then to always store them in a cardboard box so they can breathe.

    That happened to me last month too but I didnt let them dry well before storing, now that TS mentioned the cardboard box I would definitely go with that its way safer than a plastis container

    How to make roses out of fondant

    So glad you posted this. I will be trying my first fondant figure needed for the 23rd of this month. was hoping I could start soon. Thanks to all for sharing tips.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    I have dogs on my windowsill from my daughter’s 7th birthday. She’s turning 9 soon. They are discolored from the sun, but otherwise, just the same.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    Would these tips on storing and drying apply to gumpaste flowers as well?
    thanks

    How to make roses out of fondant

    The same goes for gumpaste. although the gumpaste may dry out completely a little faster.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    does that go for fondant mixed with edible cmc aswell

    How to make roses out of fondant

    You can make them months in advance

    1 – Mix your fondant with some gumtex powder or tylose powder. It will be much stronger
    2 – prepare a container that eliminates sunlight to put your figurines in. Plan ahead if you need something to hold your figurine upright
    3 – I do NOT use an airtight container. I want the figurine to dry and do not want it airtight at all. I would leave it out to dry but need to protect it against dust and sunlight. I put some rice or a desiccant pack in the bottom of the container and then raise the figurine above it to dry.

    Note that certain colors – especially green, may fade. After the figurine dries completely you can fix this with a drop of gel food coloring mixed with vodka. It will not look painted on. It simply re-tints the dry fondant.

    How to make roses out of fondant

    The only time I ever had a problem was when I colored some fondant/gumpaste gray by mixing in a little black. Even though I kept them in a dark place, everything that was gray had turned bluish green. Has anyone else had that problem?

    How to make roses out of fondant

    Originally Posted by dawnybird

    The only time I ever had a problem was when I colored some fondant/gumpaste gray by mixing in a little black. Even though I kept them in a dark place, everything that was gray had turned bluish green. Has anyone else had that problem?

    The red fades first in almost every medium, leaving the blue and the yellow+blue=green.