How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

The INSIDER Summary:

• The Internet is filled with tutorials on how to scramble eggs inside the shell.
• I tried it in my own kitchen, but never achieved the perfect golden egg.

According to a swath of Youtube tutorial videos, there’s a way that you can scramble an egg inside the shell before you hard cook it, resulting in a uniformly golden hard-boiled egg.

As food hacks go, it’s pretty strange: It doesn’t really solve a problem or simplify a complex cooking process. Actually, it’s pretty useless — but that doesn’t change the fact that these golden eggs look really freaking cool.

One company even invented a kitchen gadget called the Golden Goose Egg Scrambler that was supposed to produce — you guessed it — the perfect golden egg.

And while I didn’t go to the trouble of buying this device, I was determined to make a golden egg of my own. So I went to YouTube and found a video that made the process seem simple. The trick, essentially, is to secure the egg inside a t-shirt sleeve and spin it around so vigorously that the egg’s contents scramble.

A peek into the comments section revealed mixed reviews: Some people said they achieved the golden egg, while many others complained that it didn’t work at all. Still, I forged ahead.

I put the egg in a plastic bag, slid it into one of my long sleeve shirts, tied off the sleeve on either end of the egg, and twirled that thing like my life depended on it. The video suggests twisting and pulling the shirt sleeve at least 15 times. I decided to triple it — 45 twists and pulls — just to be safe.

Then I cooked the egg the same way I always do: Cover with water, bring to a boil, turn off the heat, cover, and let sit 10 minutes.

Finally, it was time for the big reveal. The first peek behind the shell wasn’t promising.

And with the shell fully shed, I found my egg disappointingly unscrambled. All I’d managed to do was jostle the yolk away from the center of the egg. Looks like all that twirling also left a weird hole in the white.

Now all I’ve got are sore arms and a weird egg that looks like a creepy eye from some angles.

So the golden egg “hack” turned out to be an ultimate fail, just as many YouTube commenters noted before me.

In the end, though, the outcome’s not too surprising.

Eggs are actually equipped with thick ropes of protein called chalazae that serve the sole purpose of anchoring the yolk in the center of the egg so it won’t break. (You know those cloudy white globs you see in a freshly cracked egg? Those are the chalazae!) Something tells me spinning an egg really fast inside a t-shirt probably isn’t enough to overcome the egg’s evolutionary design. Just a hunch.

How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

Introduction: How to Scramble Eggs Inside Their Shell – NEW VERSION

How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

In preparation for Easter this year I decided to improve on one of my classic projects: how to scramble an egg inside it’s shell. In a video I made several years ago I demonstrate how scrambling an egg can be done by spinning it quickly inside of a shirt sleeve. This new method requires a much smaller amount of physical effort to achieve the same result, and bonus: It can scramble 3 eggs at once!

The scrambling device I use is an 8″ long section of 2″ diameter PVC pipe. The rope is thin nylon (you want to be sure it’s strong enough not to break on you!) and the handle is a short

4″ section of 1/2″ diameter PVC pipe.

Assembly is simple: Drill two opposing holes on each side of the 8″ length of pipe, then feed a length of rope through to form each loop. Before tying one of the two loops, slide the 4″ length of 1/2″ diameter pipe over one end. That’s it! I find that square knots work well to tie the ropes together to close each loop.

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How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

Hello my dear friends! In today’s video I’d like to try and show you how to make scrambled eggs inside their shell. The idea author is an American, not me, however I was interested in it when I saw this idea on Lizz TV. They tried to make an experiment and check whether it is fake or not.
In this video I’m going to show you an unusual idea of how to make scrambled eggs inside their shell. I saw this idea from on web, made by an American, but later Russian Youtubers cast this idea back, calling it a fake. They didn’t succeed, so they called it a fake. I partially agree with them, as unelastic sleeve has not enough speed to make a good centrifuge to scramble an egg. So I decided to change this experiment, and use women’s stocking instead of a sleeve. You may also use women’s nylon stockings. I’ve cut a piece of it. I think that I’ll manage to do it, because the stockings are elastic, and it will help to get more speed for a good centrifuge. I hope we’ll get the white of the egg mixed with the yolk.

How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

Sp, let’s start. Put an egg into a stocking, and try to rotate it. As you see,the stocking is very elastic, and I hope we’ll be able to reach enough speed to combine the white of the egg and the yolk. Rotate it about 20-30 times, then boil the egg. We are going to remove the shell and check whether it’s mixed up in one. There was a sound of popping in the egg, I think the yolk has popped. We’ve already span the egg. Let’s try to boil it for about 5 minutes, then pill the shell and look at the result.

How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

This is the crucial point, egg is boiled. Let’s try to remove the shell.

How to make scrambled eggs inside the shellHow to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

Well, my dear friends, I’m very glad. We did it very well. Of course, there are some white spots, but it’s because we didn’t spin it enough. I’ve already eaten one slice, it’s quite tasty, as a simple boiled egg. Also, I’d like to suggest you not to leave negative comments for American author of this idea, as it really works. It’s not a cheating, or fake. Kostia and Max could have span the egg not enough, or some problems might occurred while spinning the sleeve. I don’t want to argue with anyone. It does work. Thanks for your attention. By the way, you may scramble the egg inside its shell, paint it and serve on the Ester table. I think it’s an awesome idea. If your guests haven’t seen this video, they would be guessing for a long time where you took such an unusual egg from. Thanks for viewing this video. Bye-bye!

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The macho and easy way to make golden eggs. How to scramble eggs inside their shell useing a drill. AKA Fuwatoro Eggs.

You need a 0.5 liter plastic bottle. Cut it in half and drill some holes in it.

How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

Drill a hole in the cap. You need a bolt, some washers and a nut.

How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

Assemble the parts and tighten the nut. Screw the cap on to the bottle.

How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

Mount it on a drill.

How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

Wrap an egg in toilet paper.

How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

Insert the egg in to the bottle. It should be pointing like this.

How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

Use wire to prevent the egg from falling out of the bottle.

How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

Run the drill alternately forwards and reverse. Repeat between 5-15 times.

Check if it´s ready by holding it to a light in a dark room. A proper scrambled egg glows with red color.

How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

Be careful when boiling the egg. Raise the temperature gradually.
When bubbles start forming on the shell, turn the stove off and let the egg sit in the pot for 15 minutes.
Let the egg cool in a bowl of cold water.

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How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

Attention egg-obsessed people of the world: This new trick is about to shake up your life—literally.

While everyone has their preference, it could be argued that scrambled is the best way to eat your eggs. And until now, the closest thing to taking your scrambled eggs on the go was an Egg McMuffin—though I think we can all agree that’s not the healthiest option. But thanks to this genius, one-minute trick that allows you to scramble an egg inside of its shell, you’ll be taking this sit-down breakfast classic wherever you please. Here’s how to try it out:

Step 1: Grab a long-sleeve T-shirt, two rubber bands, a plastic bag and an egg.

Step 2: Place the egg inside of a plastic bag and seal it (make sure to squeeze the extra air out of the bag).

Step 3: Slip the plastic bag into the sleeve of the shirt. Take one rubber band and slip it over the sleeve of the shirt, above one end of the egg. Wrap the band around a few times until the sleeve is closed off tightly above the egg. Take the second rubber band and do the same below the egg.

Step 4: Pick up the shirt and hold it, one hand at each end of the sleeve.

Step 5: Swing the sleeve in a circular motion in front of you, allowing the weight of the egg to propel the sleeve forward, kind of like a jump rope. Repeat this for 15 seconds, and pull the sleeves tight every so often so the swinging comes to an abrupt halt.

Step 6: Shine a bright light (like the flashlight feature on your cell phone) to test if the egg has been scrambled. A regular egg allows light to shine right through; a scrambled egg will not.

Step 7: Place your eggs in a pot of hot water (below boiling point) and cook for 15 minutes.

When your timer is up, you should have a perfect batch of hot scrambled eggs. Could you be more innovative?

How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

Introduction: Scrambled Eggs – Still in the Shell !

How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

Notice how the egg under that shell is a delicious shade of yellow rather than the typical white? In Japan this is called a Golden egg.

That’s a nice name, but a more descriptive one would be “Scrambled egg still in the shell“. This is a simple egg trick my Sensei told me about; it’s easy and fun and makes a tasty hard-boiled treat.

**UPDATE** I’ve done some research. The actual name in Japanese is�rD�gu � or MD�D�g_

Twhich means Yellow Boiled Egg. Pretty straight forward name. I guess Golden egg is just the poetic version. (Instructables apparently doesn’t support non-roman characters, so the Japanese didn’t show up.)

Step 1: Getting Started

All you need to make a Golden egg is:

  1. a raw egg
  2. one leg cut from a pair of nylons

Slip the egg into the nylons and place it half way between the toe and the opening.

**EDIT** It’s been suggested that what I’m really using here is one leg from a pair of stockings. This could very well be true, as I know literally nothing about nylons or stockings. If so, just replace each instance of “nylons” with “stockings”, and go at it!

**EDIT #2**Apparently the type of stocking / tight / legging / nylon may play a larger role than I knew. The stockings I use have a relatively low level of stretch. If the material is too stretchy then it won’t spin properly. Also, it took me 4 eggs before I finally got a Golden egg (before I figured out the flashlight check in Step 3), so hang in there if it doesn’t work on the first try!

Step 2: Scramble Time

Now we scramble! Grab the ends of the nylons, one end in each hand, with the egg suspended in the middle. Begin to twist the nylon around the egg, about 20-25 twists. When it is fully twisted, pull the ends of the nylon apart quickly. The nylon should untwist itself, spinning the egg rapidly.

Repeat about 10 times.

If you are letting the kids help, you may be concerned about handing them what are essentially flails made of nylon and raw egg. I don’t blame you 🙂 But have no fear! Simply put each egg in a ziploc bag before you put it in the nylon. Now if they smack an egg on a table top (or their sibling’s head), there’ll be no mess to clean up (only hurt feelings).

Step 3: Is It Golden Yet?

To check if your egg is properly scrambled, go to a dark room and shine a flashlight through your egg. An unscrambled egg will appear bright and yellow, and you may even see a shadow inside cast by the (still intact) yolk. A properly scrambled egg will be a much darker red color, since the yolk is now mixed with the albumen.

Step 4: Boil and Bubble

Of course, now that your egg is scrambled in the shell, you can cook it anyway you desire. I like to hard boil them, myself.

Put the eggs in a pot of lukewarm water until they are just covered. Heat. Once the water reaches a rolling boil set a timer for 6 minutes. When the timer rings, turn off the heat and soak in cold water to stop the cooking (and keep your hands safe).

**EDIT #3** People have commented on something I forgot to mention, which is that hard-boiled Golden eggs are harder to peel than regular hard-boiled eggs. For whatever reason, the scrambled egg grabs to the shell a bit stronger than usual and can make for an ugly peeled egg. (My first four eggs were hideous. Tasty, but hideous.) To solve this problem, and produce the not-ugly egg you see in this instructable, I used the back of a spoon to gently break the shell into small pieces, and then peeled it while submerged in a pot of cold water. It helped alot.

How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

Introduction: Gadget to Scramble Eggs Inside Their Shells

How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

In this Instructable, I’ll show you how to make a cool gadget that can scramble an egg inside the shell in less than a minute.

If you ever tried to scramble an egg in a sleeve, you’ll know that it takes time and it’s a forced workout (I guess that’s good?)

You’ll need:

  • Instamorph Moldable plastic
  • Piece of PVC Pipe
  • Nail
  • Wooden Dowel
  • Some glue
  • String
  • A bowl (I used a bamboo bowl)

Step 1:

Take an egg and make a cage around it with Instamorph moldable plastic.

Step 2:

Drill or melt a hole in the centre.

I used a hot needle to do it.

Step 3:

Glue a nail in the centre.

Epoxy glue is a good choice

Step 4:

Drill 2 holes in a PVC pipe

Step 5:

Cut a wooden dowel in half if necessary. Drill a hole in the middle or hammer a nail to make a hole.

Step 6:

Attach the “egg cage” to the pipe and slide the dowel onto the nail, applying the glue first.

Step 7:

Get a string and wrap it around the dowel.

Put the egg in a bowl. It’s best to use a bowl that is like a ” ) ” symbol, so the egg can spin freely.

Put the egg in the cage.

Use room temperature eggs as they can be scrambled much faster than the ones from the fridge.

Egg should be smaller than the cage or in other words – When you lift the cage, egg should stay on the bowl.

Pull the rope and lift the gadget at the same time.

Harder you pull, faster the egg will spin (if you pull too hard, the egg can break)

When the egg has stopped or almost stopped, give it a quick shake.

Boil the egg in a lower temperature than usual as it might crack.

In my tests it was enough with 1 spin and 10 sec shake. I was able to scramble an egg in 40 sec.

This little gadget can spin the egg extremely fast. It looks slower in the video than in reality.

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How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

A cracking idea! Bizarre kitchen appliance can create scrambled eggs INSIDE the shell

  • £10 ($17) gadget was created by Chicago-based designer Geraint Krumpe
  • Pulling cords apart causes the capsule to spin, mixing the egg’s contents
  • It makes eggs taste more creamy as it prevents air getting inside the yo lk

Published: 12:51 BST, 24 April 2014 | Updated: 19:37 BST, 24 April 2014

  • –> –> –>

    A Chicago-based entreprenuer has come up with something worth getting egg-cited about after inventing a gadget that scrambles an egg inside its own shell.

    The £10 ($17) contraption gently spins the egg, blending the yolk and the white without cracking the shell itself.

    The already-scrambled egg can then be soft or hard boiled – and its creator, Geraint Krumpe, claims the ingenious method makes them taste far better than regular eggs.

    Scroll down for video

    How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

    The device, which features a capsule for the egg suspended between two cords, was inspired by a Victorian era child’s toy.

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    Pulling the two cords apart causes the capsule to gently spin, mixing the egg’s contents without damaging the fragile shell.

    Mr Krumpe is currently seeking funding for the product, named Goose, on crowdsourcing website Kickstarter and if successful plans to launch the product later this year.

    How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

    It’s no yolk: A Chicago-based entreprenuer has invented a gadget that scrambles an egg inside its shell

    How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

    Egg-cellent system: Pulling the two cords apart causes the capsule to gently spin, mixing the egg’s contents

    How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

    Cracking invention: Geraint Krumpe, a 37-year-old industrial designer, said the idea for the Goose gadget came about after he found a video online in which a guy claims to make an in-shell scrambled egg with a tea towel

    HOW DOES THE GOOSE WORK?

    The gadget works by alternating the rotation of an egg back and forth.Pulling the two cords apart causes the capsule to gently spin, mixing the egg’s contents without damaging the fragile shell.

    Because the egg is scrambled inside the shell there, air doesn’t get into the egg. ‘The result is a much creamier, custardy tasting egg which is far superior to normal scrambled eggs,’ said Mr Krumpe.

    Mr Krumpe, 37, who is an industrial designer, said: ‘The idea for the Goose all started when I found a video online in which a guy claimed to make an in-shell scrambled egg with a tea towel.

    ‘I didn’t believe it could be done so I decided I had to give it a go. I quickly used up all the eggs in my fridge and not one attempt was successful.

    ‘Something sparked inside me and I became obsessed with trying to find an easy way of scrambling an egg in its shell every time.

    ‘I remembered seeing a Victorian child’s game that involves pulling two cords apart to spin a disc and thought I could apply the same principals in my design.

    How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

    Eggs-traordinary: The gadget works by alternating the rotation of an egg back and forth. Because the egg is scrambled inside the shell there, air doesn’t get into the egg. The result is a much creamier, custardy taste

    How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

    Sunny side up: ‘‘In the culinary world people are always looking to create different flavour profiles using the chemistry of cooking and this is exactly what the Goose does’, said Chicago-based inventor Geraint Krumpe

    How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

    Eggs-tra special: Gadget took a year to create and is raising funds for development on Kickstarter

    ‘I worked on the Goose for one year before I finally got the finished product. The result is a gadget that can fit any egg in and is guaranteed not to break the shell.

    ‘In the culinary world people are always looking to create different flavour profiles using the chemistry of cooking and this is exactly what the Goose does.’

    Because the egg is scrambled inside the shell there, air doesn’t get into the egg.

    ‘The result is a much creamier, custardy tasting egg which is far superior to normal scrambled eggs,’ said Mr Krumpe.

    ‘The Goose is all about injecting a little bit of fun back into the kitchen.’

    How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

    No shell-fishness: ‘The Goose is all about injecting a little bit of fun back into the kitchen,’ said Geraint Krumpe

    • Scrambled Egg Mix
    • Pre-Cooked Scrambled Eggs

    How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

    Scrambled Egg Mix

    We’ve done the work for you.
    We cracked farm fresh eggs, then pasteurized and seasoned them to create the perfect scrambled egg mix. All you need to do is boil in bag and serve for perfect scrambled eggs – every single time.

    Product Details

    How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

    • rich, wholesome taste & fluffy, even texture with no separation
    • certified Kosher
    • made from farm fresh eggs, with milk and light seasonings
    • conserves heat longer than pre-cooked scrambled eggs
    • boil in bag, no handling required

    KITCHEN BENEFITS

    • suitable for all types of food service operations – restaurants, hotels, catering, long term care, sporting facilities, cafeterias
    • no shells, no mess, 100% yield
    • consistent taste, appearance & product performance
    • frees up labour and improves operations efficiency

    Formats

    Order
    Code
    Product
    Description
    Pack Size Shelf Life SCC
    10167 Scrambled Egg Mix 6 x 2.26 kg
    (5 lb)
    1 year 106 65079 10167 5

    Menu Ideas

    You might also like.

    • Pre-Cooked Scrambled Eggs (30710)
    • Plain Skillet Omelet (30168)
    • Zero Cholesterol Plain Skillet Omelet (30165)

    Shelf Life & Storage

    Shelf life = 1 year

    • Store frozen at -18°C (0°F) or colder.
    • Once thawed, do not refreeze.
    • Refrigerate thawed product at 4°C (39°F) or colder and use within 3 days.
    • Once opened, use within 2 -3 days.

    Cooking Instructions

    For best results, prepare from a fully- or semi- thawed state.

    Immerse bags in hot water (75°C (167°F)) in a large stock pot or steam kettle. Simmer for about 35 mins (from thawed) or 50 mins (from frozen), stirring or shaking bags about every 5 minutes for uniform cook. When cooked to desired texture, knead bags to break up eggs and slit to serve.

    Do not overcook. Eggs will continue to cook while being held.

    Nutrition Facts

    Nutrition Facts

    Calories 114.95 % Daily Value
    Fat 6.88 g 9%
    Saturated 2.21 g
    + Trans 0.08 g
    10%
    Carbohydrate 3.45 g
    Fibre 0.19 g
    Sugars 2.07 g
    0%
    2%
    Protein 9.23 g
    Cholesterol 296.94 mg
    Sodium 261.25 mg 12%
    Potassium 150 mg 3%
    Vitamin A 76.94 RE 8%
    Vitamin C 0 mg 0%
    Calcium 70.94 mg 6%
    Iron 0.84 mg 7%
    *5% or less is a little, 15% or more is alot

    Ingredients & Allergens

    INGREDIENTS: Whole eggs, skim milk powder, corn syrup, salt, xanthan gum, citric acid, sodium phosphates, annatto.
    ALLERGENS: Egg, Milk.

    How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

    Innovation: A Gadget That Scrambles The Egg Inside The Shell

    How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

    The Golden Goose will retail for around $24. Courtesy Y Line Product Design hide caption

    The Golden Goose will retail for around $24.

    Courtesy Y Line Product Design

    In our “Weekly Innovation” blog series, we explore an interesting idea, design or product that you may not have heard of yet. Do you have an innovation to share? Submit with this form.

    How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

    The tool scrambles an egg inside its shell in 15 seconds. Courtesy Y Line Product Design hide caption

    If this egg scrambling tool works as promised, your egg can come out of its shell with the yolk and egg already mixed. You could hard or soft boil, fry, scramble or devil them into what creator Geraint Krumpe calls “golden eggs,” named for the eggs’ creamy, soft yellow color when they come out.

    “I was laid off from a company I worked for for 11 years,” Krumpe says, when asked how this all started. “So I had to get creative.”

    Krumpe started a product design company, and last Easter he was surfing YouTube videos and found inspiration. “I found a video with a science guy spinning an egg inside a shirtsleeve. So I said, I have to try this. I stayed up late and broke a bunch of eggs trying to get one to work,” he says.

    Eleven months later, after a lot of development and testing, Krumpe and his company released the kitchen creation he calls the Golden Goose. It works by rotating an egg back and forth at an accelerated rate to mix the yolk and egg together without introducing any outside air. A soft cradle nestles the egg and holds it center, keeping it from breaking during the back-and-forth motion.

    The device scrambles an egg inside the shell in about 15 seconds.

    How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

    A hard-boiled “golden egg,” which was scrambled inside the shell before boiling. Courtesy of Y Line Product Design hide caption

    A hard-boiled “golden egg,” which was scrambled inside the shell before boiling.

    Courtesy of Y Line Product Design

    “You haven’t entered any outside air or other gases into the mix of protein and fats, and it allows for this chemistry to happen that has culinary benefits, because depending on what temperature the egg is at and for what time period, you can achieve a range of different flavor profiles and even different colors,” Krumpe says.

    Imagine all the golden egg creations! Krumpe tells us that a hard-boiled golden egg comes out tasting like savory custard. And if you simply scramble the egg in its shell and crack it into an iron skillet, it creates a tasty scrambled egg dish because you never whisked in any outside air. Plus, there’s a little less dish washing.

    “This way you don’t have to wash a fork and bowl, and it has been suggested that you could spend a lot of time as a prep cook scrambling eggs and putting them in the fridge for breakfast or baking. Here they’re pre-scrambled. It doesn’t take much effort and it’s the best possible way to scramble,” Krumpe says.

    This invention is already funded, reaching more than $60,000 in support from 1,800 backers, way above its original $34,500 fundraising goal.

    Now that it’s funded, the plan is to manufacture the devices for the donors this summer and then take Golden Goose directly to consumers. Krumpe says it will retail for around $24, but probably won’t be for sale until November at the earliest.

    Check out the Kickstarter page for yourself, but a warning, if you’re hungry: It includes many photos of delicious egg dishes.

    Thursday, April 24, 2014

    The Goose gadget can create scrambled eggs INSIDE the shell

    By Ellie Zolfagharifard

    A Chicago-based entreprenuer has come up with something worth getting egg-cited about after inventing a gadget that scrambles an egg inside its own shell.

    The £10 ($17) contraption gently spins the egg, blending the yolk and the white without cracking the shell itself.

    The already-scrambled egg can then be soft or hard boiled – and its creator, Geraint Krumpe, claims the ingenious method makes them taste far better than regular eggs.

    The device, which features a capsule for the egg suspended between two cords, was inspired by a Victorian era child’s toy.

    Pulling the two cords apart causes the capsule to gently spin, mixing the egg’s contents without damaging the fragile shell.

    Mr Geraint is currently seeking funding for the product, named Goose, on crowdsourcing website Kickstarter and if successful plans to launch the product later this year.

    HOW DOES THE GOOSE WORK?

    Mr Geraint, 37, who is an industrial designer, said: ‘The idea for the Goose all started when I found a video online in which a guy claimed to make an in-shell scrambled egg with a tea towel.

    ‘I didn’t believe it could be done so I decided I had to give it a go. I quickly used up all the eggs in my fridge and not one attempt was successful.

    ‘Something sparked inside me and I became obsessed with trying to find an easy way of scrambling an egg in its shell every time.

    ‘I remembered seeing a Victorian child’s game that involves pulling two cords apart to spin a disc and thought I could apply the same principals in my design.

    ‘I worked on the Goose for one year before I finally got the finished product. The result is a gadget that can fit any egg in and is guaranteed not to break the shell.

    ‘In the culinary world people are always looking to create different flavour profiles using the chemistry of cooking and this is exactly what the Goose does.’

    Because the egg is scrambled inside the shell there, air doesn’t get into the egg.

    ‘The result is a much creamier, custardy tasting egg which is far superior to normal scrambled eggs,’ said Mr Geraint.

    ‘The Goose is all about injecting a little bit of fun back into the kitchen.’

    Make Scrambled Eggs in the Shell!

    How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

    Get all of the ingredients and equipment together.

    How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

    Put 1 large egg in the sock. Put the egg in the center of the sock. Then, using the string or rubber bands, tie the sock at each of the ends of the egg.

    To scramble, you will hold each end of the sock and swing it like a jump rope towards you until it can no longer be spun. Then pull both of the ends to un-wind it. It will make a sloshing noise.

    Repeat this process 12 times for each egg.

    How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

    Tip: In order to know if the egg has been scrambled, place it on top of a flashlight (you can use your phone flashlight). If the scrambled looks darker than a normal egg, then you have do it right!

    How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

    Fill up the pot with water approximately 1/2 full. Then turn on the burner. You want to bring your water to a rolling boil.

    How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

    Take out the eggs from the sock. Then, place the eggs in to the boiling water with a slotted spoon very slowly, being careful not to drop the eggs in and break them.

    Set a timer for 12 minutes and cook the 3 large eggs.

    After they are done cooking, turn off the burner and carefully take the pan off. Pot holders may be needed.

    How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

    Place the pot in the sink and let cold water run in it. It’s okay if it overflows. Then carefully place the eggs in cold ice water for 5 minutes. Then take them out. Ready to peel!

    How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

    After you take the eggs out of the ice water, peel off the shells to reveal the delicious scrambled inside. Now you have an awesome treat! Enjoy

    Although relatively simple to make, scrambled eggs can easily go wrong if you don’t use the right technique. Too much heat can result in a rubbery, dry texture, while using a whisk, believe it or not, actually breaks them down too much.

    Luckily, our associate food editor Kelsey Youngman has shared her best way for making perfect scrambled eggs every time, and it’s incredibly simple. All you need is a few eggs, salt, butter, and some milk, if you choose—within a few minutes, you’ll have the breakfast of your dreams. Read on for her step-by-step guide.

    Crack the eggs on a flat surface

    Since she’s cooking for two people, Kelsey grabs six eggs. She cracks them all on a flat surface before adding them to a bowl—this helps avoid shell pieces breaking off into the mixture.

    Don’t be afraid to pre-salt them

    Next, she adds a quarter teaspoon of salt to the eggs (you can adjust according to your preference). This helps keep a little bit of the moisture in while they cook.

    Add a splash of milk

    While totally optional, this also helps add moisture to the eggs. In lieu of milk, you can use cream or stock, too.

    Use a fork, not a whisk

    If you use a whisk to beat the eggs, it will break them down so much that you’ll end up with a creamier texture as opposed to a fluffier texture, which Kelsey prefers. To achieve the latter, go with a fork instead, and use an ellipse motion as you mix the whites and the yolks. You want to beat them until they’re fully incorporated so you avoid stripes of white in the scrambled eggs.

    Cook in a non-stick pan …

    Kelsey recommends using a non-stick pan so that the eggs don’t attach to the surface while you cook. As an added bonus, it also allows you to use less oil or butter, so your eggs aren’t swimming in fat. In this case, Kelsey uses a little bit (two tablespoons) of butter with these eggs to add some flavor.

    … and make sure it’s cold

    For the best scrambled eggs, add them and the butter straight to a cold pan. Adding them to a hot pan, Kelsey explains, would cause the protein in the eggs to cook right away on the outside but stay cold in the middle, resulting in a “skin.” (Which yes, is just as gross as it sounds.) Starting in a cold pan, on the other hand, allows you to control the cooking process, so you gradually build your way up to soft, tender, creamy eggs.

    Keep the heat relatively low

    Once everything is in the pan, turn the burner on to a moderately low-medium heat. You want enough heat to cook the eggs, but not enough that they’re being scorched. Push the eggs around constantly—with a silicone spatula, so you don’t scratch your pan—and you’ll notice little curds starting to form. As you continue to shuffle them around, the scrambled eggs will pile up. Just make sure you release the cooked part of the egg back into the mixture as you stir—this helps you avoid browning and overcooking them.

    Let them finish cooking off the stove

    When Kelsey’s eggs are almost done, she notes that some of them are still a little wet, while other parts are more set. You can still turn off the heat thanks to carryover cooking—there will still be heat trapped in the pan and in the eggs, so they’ll still cook for a little while even after you take them off the burner. This achieves the slightly wet, soft, and tender consistency she likes, but if you prefer them more cooked, you can keep them on the stove a little longer.

    The finishing touch

    When Kelsey makes her plate, she adds a sprinkle of chives to season the eggs, and then digs in. The dish comes together in a few minutes, so you can easily make them for breakfast, or as a quick weeknight dinner, too—even for company.

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    The Goose gadget can create scrambled eggs INSIDE the shell

    £10 ($17) gadget was created by Chicago-based designer Geraint Krumpe Pulling cords apart causes the capsule to spin, mixing the egg’s contents It makes eggs taste more creamy as it prevents air getting inside the yo lk

    By Ellie Zolfagharifard

    A Chicago-based entreprenuer has come up with something worth getting egg-cited about after inventing a gadget that scrambles an egg inside its own shell.

    The £10 ($17) contraption gently spins the egg, blending the yolk and the white without cracking the shell itself.

    The already-scrambled egg can then be soft or hard boiled – and its creator, Geraint Krumpe, claims the ingenious method makes them taste far better than regular eggs.

    The device, which features a capsule for the egg suspended between two cords, was inspired by a Victorian era child’s toy.

    Pulling the two cords apart causes the capsule to gently spin, mixing the egg’s contents without damaging the fragile shell.

    Mr Geraint is currently seeking funding for the product, named Goose, on crowdsourcing website Kickstarter and if successful plans to launch the product later this year. HOW DOES THE GOOSE WORK?

    Mr Geraint, 37, who is an industrial designer, said: ‘The idea for the Goose all started when I found a video online in which a guy claimed to make an in-shell scrambled egg with a tea towel.

    ‘I didn’t believe it could be done so I decided I had to give it a go. I quickly used up all the eggs in my fridge and not one attempt was successful.

    ‘Something sparked inside me and I became obsessed with trying to find an easy way of scrambling an egg in its shell every time.

    ‘I remembered seeing a Victorian child’s game that involves pulling two cords apart to spin a disc and thought I could apply the same principals in my design.

    ‘I worked on the Goose for one year before I finally got the finished product. The result is a gadget that can fit any egg in and is guaranteed not to break the shell.

    ‘In the culinary world people are always looking to create different flavour profiles using the chemistry of cooking and this is exactly what the Goose does.’

    Because the egg is scrambled inside the shell there, air doesn’t get into the egg.

    ‘The result is a much creamier, custardy tasting egg which is far superior to normal scrambled eggs,’ said Mr Geraint.

    ‘The Goose is all about injecting a little bit of fun back into the kitchen.’

    Add 2 or more to your cart and the 7% discount will be applied automatically.

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    EggSpin is a device that scrambles eggs inside the shell. It encourages children to eat the entire egg, including the yolk.

    • EggSpin egg scrambler is a fun challenge. Spin to scramble eggs, then taste the pure flavor of an egg scrambled inside the shell.
    • EggSpin is the most entertaining way to prepare eggs.
    • A new way to eat egg
    • Easy to assemble, disassemble and dishwasher safe
    • Easy to operate, pull the rope and the machine started to spin
    • Suitable for eggs of all shapes and sizes
    • Easy to make the golden egg without breaking the shell

    Sure, they’re easy to make, but there are actually a few tricks to the creamiest, most delicious eggs you’ve ever tasted.

    How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

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    How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

    Creamy Scrambled Eggs

    For nearly three years, I taught a class at the Culinary Institute of America called Breakfast Cookery. It started at 1:30 a.m. Teaching students how to make breakfast this early in the day was challenging enough, but teaching them how to properly scramble an egg? That was something else entirely.

    Most people think they know how to scramble an egg, but for truly tender, creamy results, there are a few things you need to learn—key among them is when to remove the eggs from the heat so they’re neither runny nor overcooked and rubbery. You also have to know how to treat the eggs in the pan, since the more attention you give them, the better they’ll be.

    What follows are the simple scrambled egg tricks I teach my students. Put them to use and you’ll get soft, creamy results every time, even in the wee hours of the morning.

    Don’t Judge an Egg by its Color

    The next time you stock up on this fridge staple, keep these points in mind:

    • The only difference between white eggs and brown eggs is the breed of hen that produced them; otherwise, they taste the same. This goes for egg yolks, too—their color, which varies based on a hen’s feed, has no impact on quality. For a nutritional boost, you can opt for omega-3 eggs, which come from hens fed a diet rich in heart-healthy flaxseeds.

    • Eggs have porous shells, so they lose moisture and absorb odors easily. Store them away from strong-smelling foods, with their wider, rounded end facing up—there’s an air sack on this side that protects against moisture loss.

    • Eggs are best consumed within one week, though they can be refrigerated in their carton for up to a month. The freshest eggs come straight from the farm or farmers’ market. To determine the freshness of supermarket eggs, look for the Julian date, a three-digit code near the expiration date that indicates the day of the year the eggs were packed. A carton marked “001” was packed January 1; “365” indicates December 31.

    Need to Know

    Scramble slowly over low heat. This reduces the risk of browning and overcooking, and gives you more control over the eggs’ consistency.

    Stir, stir, stir. Egg proteins coagulate into curds as they cook. Constant stirring, while gently shaking the pan, breaks down these curds so they’re smaller, softer, and creamier. If you stir just once or twice, you’ll get large egg clumps that have a firmer, “meatier” texture and a rubbery mouth-feel.

    Move cooked eggs from the outside of the pan towards the center. Pans are often hotter around the edge. Stirring the cooked portion to the middle and the raw portion to the outside evenly scrambles the eggs.

    Cook the eggs until barely set, “barely” being the operative word. The eggs will continue to cook with residual heat even after they’re removed from the pan (this is known as carryover cooking). Pull them off the heat when they still look wet but not runny.

    Cook’s Tip

    Use chopsticks to stir your eggs. Not only are they gentle on nonstick surfaces, they’re also excellent at breaking the eggs into small curds. If you don’t have chopsticks on hand, use a heatproof silicone spatula or a wooden spoon instead.

    How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

    Scrambled eggs: Breakfast of the gods, or just plain old boring? Packed with protein, antioxidants and vitamin D, there’s no question that eggs make for a filling and energizing meal.

    Yet, despite all they have to offer, even the most devoted health nut can get sick of the same ‘ol scramble day after day. That’s where these sneaky cooking techniques and delectable add-ins we’ve gathered come into play.

    Think of these ideas as a choose-your-own-adventure guide — experiment with one, five, or all 13, and challenge yourself to try new ingredients and preparations on a regular basis. Look out, oatmeal —breakfast just got a whole lot more interesting.

    How to Make Scrambled Eggs Even More Amazing

    1. Crack the eggs in a separate bowl . Sorry, lazy chefs — dropping eggs right into a pan is a surefire way to end up with a streaky, lumpy mess. Instead, crack the eggs into a bowl and stir them thoroughly with a fork, or whisk them until the whites and yolks have fully combined. Then they’re ready to add to the pan.

    2. Skip the milk . This may blow your mind, but adding milk, cream or water to eggs before scrambling them is a common mistake that results in an inconsistent texture . Nix these additions and simply warm a pat of butter or coconut oil in the pan before adding the whisked eggs.

    “Guarantee that eggs stay fluffy and moist by cooking them in the oven.”

    3. Salt smarter . Conventional wisdom about when to salt your eggs is mixed at best. Yet, in his new book The Food Lab , author J. Kenji López-Alt says his blind taste-test experiments prove you should salt 15 minutes before you cook your eggs. The salt prevents the protein molecules in the eggs from binding, yielding a softer scramble. (For more hacks from The Food Lab, click here .)

    4. Choose the right pan. Using a pan that’s too large or too small can throw off the eggs’ consistency. A good rule of thumb is that an 8-inch pan works well for two eggs. No matter its size, let the pan warm up for a bit before adding eggs.

    5. Use low heat . Even when you’re ravenous, it’s worth taking the time to cook eggs slowly (that means no turning up the flame to ‘high’). This will help them stay soft and fluffy instead of turning brown or overcooked.

    6. Don’t stop stirring . Pans tend to be hotter around the edge, so use the spatula to push the cooked bits of egg toward the center of the pan. The runny, uncooked bits will stream back out toward the edges; continue this motion until the cooked eggs are all collected in the center. Keep stirring the eggs in the center so they cook evenly and don’t form large chunks (unless large chunks are your bag — in which case, stir less often).

    7. Turn off the heat before they’re done . Even after you remove the pan from heat, eggs will continue to cook (the fancy term for this is “carryover cooking”). Switch off your burner when the eggs look wet but not runny, and let them sit in the pan for another minute or two. Then plate and serve.

    8. Try the microwave . Pressed for time? Make microwaved scrambled eggs in under three minutes (just don’t tell Alton Brown). All you have to do is stir them every 45 seconds until they’re cooked!

    RELATED: 20 Low-Calorie Snacks You’ll Want to Eat Every Day (Under 200 Cals!)


    9. Scramble them in the shell . Say what? This unusual technique demo’d by the folks at the Bristol Science Center involves spinning the fully intact egg until it’s scrambled inside the shell. It’s part arm workout , part cooking routine. Save this one for when you’ve got some time — and you’re ready to get a little wacky in the kitchen.

    10. Bake them . Don’t feel like supervising things at the stove? Guarantee that eggs stay fluffy and moist by cooking them in the oven instead of on the burner. It takes about 10 minutes and works great with large batches (hello, brunch).

    11. Make egg muffins . Thought you couldn’t eat scrambled eggs on the go? Think again. Pour your mix into muffin tins for a perfectly portioned morning snack. We’ve got 10 recipes for you to try right here. (You’ll swoon over the Taco Egg Muffins.)

    12. Cheese it up . There’s a right way to create this classic, protein-rich combination. Instead of adding cheese while the eggs are on the stove, stir it in only after removing the eggs from heat . Be sure to use shredded or crumbled cheese so it melts quickly — try blue cheese, feta or cheddar. Even better: Check out this Mac and Cheese Scrambled Eggs Recipe . Yum.

    13. Go flavor crazy . Red onions, green chili peppers, and cumin seeds make for scrambled eggs that pack a serious kick. Or, when it comes to herbs, make sure to choose tender varieties such as chives, dill, parsley, or tarragon. Sprinkle them over cooked eggs right before eating.

    How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

    A Kickstarter-backed gadget called the Golden Goose is a new kitchen utility that lets you scramble eggs in the shell. Why? Because you can. I have to admit, I sort of love it when people find a way to take something that was totally not broken, and very simple to do – like scrambling eggs, for example – and reinvent it entirely. Seriously, even I can scramble eggs and I’ve been known to burn water and ruin macaroni, so it’s not like the process was crying out for a makeover due to its complexity.

    But the Golden Goose, which has been making its way around the Internet for a few days, including most recently on NPR (. ), has clearly struck a nerve.

    You don’t need this thing, but you might just want it. Because you’re going to make golden hard-boiled eggs that one time, and it’s going to be super. And later, you’ll being trying to get a few dollars for it at a garage sale, gamely demonstrating it to skeptical blue-haired ladies at 7 a.m.

    Until then, however: Golden eggs! (Okay, they’re actually more yellow than gold. Still…)

    How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

    The technology behind the invention is actually kind of clever. The low-tech gadget uses centrifugal force to scramble an egg without breaking the shell.

    There are a few main parts: the Goose’s hinged main shell which is where you place the egg then snap it into place; locking rings; nylon cords on each side; and ergonomic handles that you pull to begin spinning the egg in place. The end result, around 15 seconds later when the process is complete, is an egg that has a “rich and subtle” taste that’s a bit different from traditionally scrambled eggs.

    How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

    “The texture is silky, and depending on how long you boil, or at what temperature, you can create a range of flavors and characteristics,” explains the Kickstarter page. And better yet, you didn’t have to dirty a bowl and whisk along the way. The eggs can then be prepared in a number of ways, like hard-boiled, soft-boiled, deviled, scrambled, egg salads, etc.

    Just like normal eggs!

    The idea comes from designer Geraint Krumpe, an inventor whose professional experience includes over 60 Design and Utility Patents. After being laid off, he started his own product design company and later found a video of a guy spinning an egg inside a shirtsleeve on YouTube. Eleven months later, Golden Goose was released.

    The invention has since far surpassed its original $34,500 fundraising goal, with (as of time of writing) over $87,700 in Kickstarter donations. So yeah, it’s probably going to ship.

    Backers pay $18 and up in order to receive one of the first Golden Goose gadgets, along with recipe guides, a manual and other swag. The plan is to start production this summer, then sell direct to consumers by November, likely at a retail price of around $24. Kickstarter backers will receive their rewards earlier, however.

    The secret to making scrambled eggs is all about patience. and the proper pan. Here’s a quick step-by-step guide to show you how to make scrambled eggs, plus we’ll answer your most frequently asked questions.

    1. Gather ingredients

    To make scrambled eggs for two, you’ll need 4 to 6 eggs, 4 to 6 tablespoons of milk (figure 1 tablespoon of milk for every egg), and salt and pepper to taste. Chopped fresh parsley and other herbs add flavor and visual appeal, but they’re completely optional.

    2. Break some eggs

    Crack eggs on a flat surface (helps ensure shells stay out of the mix) into a bowl that’s deep enough for some serious whisking.

    3. Add liquid (optional)

    If you wish, you can thin the scrambled egg mix with milk, cream, lemon juice, or even a little water. This optional step makes gently cooked scrambled eggs tender, almost custardy. Add up to 1 tablespoon of liquid per egg. Whisk thoroughly. Using a fork to whisk is perfectly fine; just be sure to whisk the eggs until all of the yolks and whites are thoroughly mixed together.

    4. Heat the skillet

    To make scrambled eggs on the stove, melt a teaspoon of butter or olive oil — or a combination of both — in a nonstick skillet over medium heat. Butter and oil add rich flavor to the eggs and help prevent sticking, but you can also use cooking spray.

    5. Add the eggs and stir

    When the butter starts to bubble, or a drop of water added to the pan sizzles, slowly pour in the egg mixture. Immediately reduce the heat to medium-low and as soon as the eggs begin to “set” or form a slightly solid base (a minute or two), gently stir with a rubber spatula.

    6. Add more flavor

    As soft curds begin to form, add minced herbs, shredded cheese, crumbled bacon, chopped scallions, sautéed mushrooms, chopped tomato, or anything else you like. Gently fold those ingredients into the eggs. Season with salt and pepper.

    7. The big finish

    Gently scrap the bottom of the pan, turning the eggs until almost all of the egg mixture has cooked through but there are still a few wet areas. Remove the pan from the heat and continue to stir until the eggs finish cooking using only the residual heat from the pan. This helps prevent the eggs from overcooking. Serve immediately, ideally on plates that have been warmed in the oven. Your perfect scrambled eggs are ready to be tucked into a breakfast burrito, placed onto toast or an English muffin, or on top of your favorite green salad for a French-inspired brunch dish.

    Scrambled Eggs FAQ

    What’s the best pan for scrambled eggs?

    Cooking scrambled eggs is easiest in a nonstick skillet (and it cleans up quickly, too). Here’s how to care for nonstick pans so you get many years of use.

    How much milk do you put in scrambled eggs?

    Adding milk or plain water to scrambled eggs is an optional step that affects the texture of your finished dish. For creamy scrambled eggs, you’ll add up to 1 tablespoon of milk for every egg. For fluffy scrambled eggs, you’ll add up to 1 tablespoon of water for every egg.

    How long does it take to make scrambled eggs?

    The time it takes to make scrambled eggs depends on how many eggs you are scrambling at one time. If you’re going to make scrambled eggs for one, you might be using only 1 to 3 eggs, it might take you 3 to 5 minutes from the time you pour the egg mixture into the pan. If you’re scrambling more eggs, it will take longer. Resist the temptation to turn up the heat to speed up the cooking. If your heat is too high, your eggs could turn out rubbery instead of tender.

    How do you make scrambled eggs in a microwave?

    The most common way to make scrambled eggs in a microwave is by placing one or two whisked eggs in a microwave-safe cup or bowl (wipe with oil to keep the mixture from sticking). Microwave on medium-high until cooked through, stirring every 15 seconds. Or follow the users’ manual that comes with your microwave. Try this recipe for Scrambled Eggs in a Mug, or get a little fancy with Margherita Mug Eggs.

    Browse our entire collection of scrambled egg recipes.

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    How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

    How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

    less than 30 mins

    less than 10 mins

    Learn how to make the best scrambled eggs in minutes with our easy to follow video guide. Breakfast just got better!

    less than 30 mins

    less than 10 mins

    Ingredients

    • 2 free-range eggs
    • 2 tsp butter
    • salt and freshly ground black pepper

    Method

    Crack 2 eggs into a bowl and season with salt and pepper. Lightly beat with a fork until the yolks and whites are combined.

    Heat a frying pan over a medium heat. Melt a teaspoon of butter in the pan so the base and sides are covered. When the butter starts to foam, pour in the eggs and stir immediately with a wooden spoon. Keep stirring gently as they cook to break up the egg and help it to ‘scramble’. This should take 3–5 minutes.

    When the egg is nearly cooked remove from the heat and stir in another teaspoon of butter. The eggs will continue to cook in the residual heat of the pan to produce a smooth and creamy finish. Serve immediately.

    Recipe Tips

    If you prefer a creamier taste to your scrambled eggs add a splash of cream or whole milk when you remove the pan from the heat and stir to combine.

    Make our quick recipe for microwave scrambled eggs for a filling dish that needs no effort. Try our tasty additions for a hearty meal you can make in minutes.

    If you don’t have the time or inclination to get a pan out to make scrambled eggs (or only have a microwave to hand at the office), then you can do it just as easily in a microwave. In fact, if you only want to use one egg, it’s often more efficient.

    Make sure you’re using top kitchen kit with our pick of the best microwaves, tried and tested. Check out our scrambled egg recipe collection for foolproof breakfasts and brunches.

    Learn more about the health benefits of eggs from our nutritionist.

    How to make microwave scrambled eggs

    Microwaves heat ingredients differently from the direct heat of a pan, so you will get a slightly different texture – the eggs won’t be creamy and curdy like pan-made scrambled eggs. If you follow a few simple instructions you end up with eggs with a texture like a soft, broken-up omelette, but they won’t be rubbery.

    You can also control the shape of your scrambled eggs in a microwave, as they’ll mould to the shape of the dish you use, making them perfect for sliding into a split round muffin or pitta pocket.

    The rules for non-rubbery scrambled eggs

    Choose your receptacle carefully. A dish intended for microwaves will always work better – you can buy a dedicated microwave egg cooker made by OXO Good Grips. If you use a ceramic mug or bowl, they will still work, but depending on what they’re made of it may take longer to cook the eggs. Also, a microwave dish with a special lid is easier to take on and off than cling film as you cook the eggs.

    Always oil or butter the dish so the eggs won’t stick.

    Add a little liquid – you need ½ tbsp per egg to make sure they get an airy texture. Use milk, water or something with a little flavour such as stock or coconut milk.

    Cook in 30 second bursts, forking through the eggs after each burst. Depending on the strength of your microwave and how soft you like your eggs, this should take between 30 seconds and a minute and a half. Bear in mind that they will cook for a little longer after you stir them, so wait a few seconds before deciding if they are ready.

    Add more flavour by stirring in herbs at the start, cheese after the first 30 seconds or smoked salmon at the end. You can also add a small knob of butter at the end if you like.

    Microwave scrambled eggs
    Serves 1

    Butter or oil for the dish
    2 eggs
    1 tbsp milk (optional)

    1. Oil or butter the dish you are planning on using, crack in the eggs and season. Add the milk (or water if you prefer) and whisk lightly.
    2. Microwave on high (800W or above) for 30 secs and then fork through the eggs, if they are done enough then stop cooking. If not, give them further 30-second bursts, forking between each cooking time until they are ready. Fork through at the end to break them up.

    Five fabulous scrambled egg recipes

    Akoori

    How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

    Make these spiced scrambled eggs for a breakfast with added oomph, served with chapatis.

    Turmeric scrambled eggs

    How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

    Spinach, turmeric and coconut make this recipe an quick alternative for lunch or supper.

    Cheesy scrambled egg croissants

    How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

    Stuffing the eggs into croissants makes a substantial breakfast or brunch.

    Superfood scrambled eggs

    How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

    Smoked salmon and a sprinkle of pumpkin seeds make these scrambled eggs a smart Sunday option.

    Scrambled eggs & feta hash

    How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

    Low carbs and high protein eggs from Joe Wicks to start your day well. Try this flavoursome recipe as a hearty breakfast for one.

    Find more eggy inspiration.

    What’s your favourite way to enjoy scrambled eggs? Leave a comment below.

    Project Description

    Let me present this amazing recipe that you can make at home, besides enjoying its delicious flavor, it also contains up to 4 different brain foods. Adding to it, all of the ingredients are easy to find in grocery stores.

    AUTHOR

    CATEGORY

    POSTED ON

    February 20, 2021

    What You Will Need

    3 cloves of garlic

    1/2 tsp. Black pepper

    3 leaves of scallion or green onion

    ½ tsp of turmeric

    2 tbsp of olive oil

    The Brainfoods

    How to Create

    First of all, you are going to wash and clean all the vegetables (Onion, garlic, scallion) and leave them aside

    Now you are going to crack your eggs. Make sure you hit the shell in a flat surface, so the eggshell does not get inside the egg. And leave them aside.

    The third step is cutting your vegetables. Get your cutting board ready, and we are going to take care of the garlic first. An easy way to peel the garlic is to smash down with a flat face of the knife, and then use your hands to remove the peel. This way it will be easier and quicker to peel the garlic.

    Now chop your garlic cloves into fine pieces, as fine as possible, so that you have a stronger flavor. Leave it in a plate aside.

    Now we´re going to take care of the onion. You are first going to cut it in thin slices, then chop it down in small pieces. Make sure to be far from the onion because onions can make you cry! Leave it in a plate and keep it aside.

    This next step is to cut the scallion. You are going to place them in your cutting board and cut it in small pieces as well. Place them in a plate and leave them aside.

    Last step of preparation is to beat your eggs until is well mixed and uniform. You can do it with whatever tool that come in handy (fork, chopstick, spoon…)

    Heat up a frying pan, wait 1-2 min until the pan is heated up. Then add the olive oil. Wait until the olive oil is also heated up, it takes about 1 min.

    Add in the eggs and cook it on medium-high heat until it is done. When your eggs are all solid, you can take them out of the pan, and put it in a plate or the bowl that you´ve used to beat the eggs.

    Add more olive oil in the pan, wait until the oil is heated up and add in the garlic and onion, cook until the flavor comes out, and you can smell it.

    Then add in the already cooked eggs in the garlic and onion mixture, scramble the eggs with your spatula.

    Passed a few minutes, add in the scallions, mix it all well. And cook for another 2 min.

    For the last step, you are going to season the dish. Add in the turmeric, pepper, and salt. Make sure that the seasoning gets to every single part of your dish.

    Last but not least, plate your eggs in a pretty plate. And it is free to eat.

    The Image Gallery of this plate

    As you can see, this recipe is extremely easy to make. Garlic is most likely used to season foods, but combining it with eggs can be a great option. My family often makes this recipe for lunch or dinner, and we all relish it together.

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    High Protein Meal Plan

    • By Dave
    • Updated on Dec 12, 2017

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    How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

    Some recipes are deceptively simple. Although I first learnt how to make scrambled eggs with cheese when I was about 13, I just really did not know how great they could and would become.

    Of course, you could just throw some eggs in a pan, launch some cheese on top, and be done with it.

    Or, you could follow a recipe and method that is just as simple, but will deliver top grade scrambled eggs each and every time.

    Quite probably the best scrambled eggs you have ever eaten. That’s a big claim, but one we’re willing to lay on the line. We’re confident.

    Before we move on to the recipe, however, I’d like to talk about eggs themselves, and just how important (and controversial) they are.

    Be warned: once you peep behind the curtain, there’s no turning back. So if you only want the recipe, just skip to the bottom.

    If you want to know more about where eggs really come from, then read on.

    How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

    How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

    Scrambled Eggs with Cheese – the chicken or the egg?

    To keep it brief, although some ‘free-range’ or ‘organic’ chickens live in better conditions than most, there are even deeper problems than the awful conditions of so many factory farms.

    Over time, farmed chickens now generally fall into two categories: chickens bred for meat, or chickens bred for eggs.

    When it comes to egg-laying chickens, the males are no use. They’re also not big or fat enough to be grown quickly for meat, so what happens to them?

    They get culled shortly after birth – within a day. Untold hundreds of millions of baby chicks, gassed, suffocated or sent through to be macerated by a grinder.

    All in the name of efficiency. It’s a nasty world.

    How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

    How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

    How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

    There are some small pieces of good news filtering through. By roughly 2020, it is hoped that the gender of chicks will be able to be seen through the shell – before they are born.

    This changes the problem and creates a new one – what to do with all those male eggs that won’t be hatched.

    Some will be bought for various forms of research – and the rest? Who knows. Though I can probably guess.

    In Germany, there are a couple of organisations set up to save the young males – Bruderhahn (Brother Rooster) for one, where they will keep the males alive with their female counterparts – for a time at least.

    I have yet to find a similar organisation in the US, but if you know of one, I would love to hear about it!

    Long story short – think about where your eggs come from, and then make the decision about which ones you buy. Every step you make to help, helps. No matter how small.

    July 21, 2021 By Chester Hone

    How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

    One of the best breakfast meals is eggs, beans, and sausages, cooked on an outdoor fire and washed down with a rustic cup of coffee. If this sounds appealing, then you’ll enjoy the following guide on how to take eggs camping.

    You’ll learn how to avoid opening your bag to find cracked or broken eggs. One way to do this is to scramble them before packing eggs for camping for your trip and place them inside a resealable plastic bottle.

    Read on for more advice.

    How to Bring Eggs Camping

    How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

    The first thing you need to do is crack all of your eggs. Then, whisk them up before pouring them into a sealable jar or bottle you may add seasoning of your choice so you won’t have to when the time comes to actually cook the eggs.

    Place the bottle in a cooler box along with your other food items and take it out when you’re ready to prepare your camping eggs.

    This is the perfect solution for when you’re traveling with kids and are looking for a fuss-free way to prepare eggs in the wild or you need them to cook biscuits while camping. You’ll find that it’s mess-free as well. Just make sure to label the bottle to avoid any surprises or mistakes and keep it separate from your juices.

    Eggs Camping Hack

    It’s better to use a whole, single egg instead of several eggs because the eggshell of a single egg is designed to protect what’s inside from organisms that would cause it to go off such as bacteria. Once you crack the egg, this causes a pH imbalance where the white and yolk become more acidic.

    For best results, it’s important to scramble your eggs a few hours before you make them to avoid developing neutral pH levels as this could cause bacterial growth. Whole eggs will go bad after a week if you don’t keep food cold when camping, i.e. in a refrigerator.

    Clean Up Everything

    The problem with bringing meat is that it could potentially attract wild animals that would love nothing more than to rip a piece for themselves.

    The same principle applies to eggshells. That’s why you should pack them in a way that doesn’t give away the scent.

    Although biodegradable, the smell of eggshells is not pleasant and you wouldn’t want to leave them lying around if you want to stay away from bugs. It’s not polite for the persons who’ll use the site after you either.

    Extra Tips

    • Get unwashed eggs if possible, from a local farmer. That’s because unwashed eggs can last for several days when compared to the store-bought variety.
    • Use a waxy material like paraffin to coat your eggs and extend their lifespan. This technique helps to ward off bacteria that might try to make their way into the egg through the shell.
    • The Egg Safety Center advises to reconstitute your store-bought eggs with purified water when boating, backpacking or hiking.
    • Camping scrambled eggs can be frozen ahead of time to increase their lifespan during the trip.

    Frequently Asked Questions

    The easiest way is to crack them and pour them into a mason jar or a heavy-duty zip-lock bag for easy transportation. Be sure to place whatever receptacle you decide to use in a wine cooler or freeze it for better longevity.

    If you don’t mind putting in the effort required to keep the eggs cool during your trip, then you shouldn’t have a problem getting them to last for up to 6 months.

    Place the eggs inside a zip-top bag, close it properly and store it in the freezer. Put the bag into your cooler once frozen, right before you drive off so that they will be ready the following morning of your trip.

    Scrambled eggs are a favorite among campers because they have a rustic feel to them. But, there’s always the concern of possibly breaking them. To avoid this, pre-scramble and place them into a resalable receptacle so they won’t spill or spoil on the way.

    Final Thoughts

    Well, there you have it! That’s how you take eggs camping! As you can see, there isn’t much to it and the science of keeping eggs fresh is actually quite simple and straightforward.

    You must find a tightly sealable bag in which to store your scrambled eggs and make sure to season them beforehand to cut preparation time in half, and you’ve got an instant meal that won’t take more than a few minutes to make.

    Real eggs vs liquid eggs – ever wondered what the differences are? Today, we will answer this question and look at all things liquid egg!

    The biggest difference between these two forms of eggs is the state they are sold in. Liquid eggs come in blended liquid form whereas regular eggs are sold whole in their shell. This is only one difference between them, and today, we will look at every aspect. This includes how they are made, sold, used, their nutritional value, and even how you can make liquid eggs at home!

    Table of Contents

    What Are Liquid Eggs?

    Liquid eggs, also commonly known as breaker eggs, are exactly like regular eggs but are sold in liquid form. The eggs have been broken out of their shell and whisked together to create an egg fluid that is usually sold in juice boxes.

    Liquid eggs naturally don’t contain any eggshell or eggshell pieces and have a yellow color to them. The yellow color comes from the egg yolk, exactly like it would when whisking whole eggs together at home.

    Factories usually make liquid eggs, but the process is fairly simple. The eggs are screened for any debris, cracks, or other abnormalities. Then, the whole eggs are cracked and poured into a mechanism that separates the egg whites from the egg yolks.

    This is when the eggs are pasteurized. The reason the egg whites and yolks are pasteurized separately is that they need different temperatures to kill certain bacteria without cooking – you can look below for more information on the pasteurization process.

    Once the eggs have been pasteurized, the blending process begins. To create liquid whole eggs, the producer has to combine the correct ratio of egg white to egg yolk. Once measured, they can combine the two components and package them.

    Production Processes – Pasteurization

    Liquid eggs are almost always pasteurized and homogenized. Both of these processes help reduce the risk of food-borne illnesses, especially in raw (uncooked) products like eggs.

    When liquid eggs are pasteurized, the eggs are basically heated to a specific temperature that is high enough to kill certain harmful microorganisms, but not too high to start cooking the eggs. The eggs should start at room temperature before being pasteurized. Once the eggs have been heated, they are immediately and quite rapidly cooled back to room temperature.

    Like we have mentioned, this process helps reduce the risk of any microorganisms growing inside the juice box and makes pasteurized liquid eggs a very safe product.

    Liquid Eggs Marketing

    This is actually a very important topic, especially because baking is a science that requires specific ingredients (and quantities) to perform specific functions.

    When a product has been labeled as “liquid whole egg”, it has to have the correct ratio of egg white and egg yolk that a regular egg has.

    If they don’t, the manufacturer should state the ratios on the juice box. Many of them do sell only “liquid egg whites” or “liquid egg yolks”.

    Liquid Egg Nutrition

    The nutrition of liquid eggs depends on the ratio of egg white to egg yolk. If you have whole liquid eggs, their nutrition will be pretty much the same as compared to regular eggs.

    However, if you have yolk only liquid eggs, they will have the nutrition of only the yolks and none of the whites’. The same goes the other way around. Liquid egg whites don’t have many nutrients, just like regular egg whites don’t.

    Now, manufactured liquid eggs aren’t usually made from powdered eggs, but if they are, their nutrition will differ a lot from fresh egg products. Powdered eggs have been dehydrated which causes a loss in nutrient value.

    Liquid Eggs Vs Real Eggs – Comparison

    So, finally! Liquid eggs vs real eggs – what are the actual differences. Well, first, the obvious, is the physical characteristics. Regular eggs are sold whole and still inside of the eggshell. Liquid eggs come without a shell and are incompletely blended liquid form. They are also sold in juice boxes instead of egg cartons.

    They both are still made from real fresh eggs and have virtually the same nutritional makeup when comparing one regular egg with one liquid whole egg. This also means that both have a similar color (yellow) when mixed.

    They both will still function in exactly the same way in baking and cooking. Liquid eggs can also act as a binding ingredient, help enrich products like bread and cakes, add nutritional value to meals, and help give color.

    A big difference is how the eggs can be cooked alone. For example, liquid eggs cannot be boiled or poached whereas regular eggs can.

    Liquid Egg Recipes

    There are a ton of liquid egg recipes on the internet, but personally, we feel that everyone is over-complicating the process. It is actually extremely simple! There are mainly two types of liquid eggs you can make.

    Fresh Liquid Egg Recipe

    First, you have to decide what you want. Do you need whole eggs, only egg whites, only egg yolks, or do you need a specific ratio of egg whites to yolks? This method allows you to perfectly customize the liquid eggs to your needs.

    All you do then is blend the components separately and remix them using the correct ratios.

    The biggest pro of using this method is that you are using fresh eggs, but at the same time that is what makes this method a little less than ideal. The fresh eggs won’t last nearly as long as a powder-based recipe and you will have to use the liquid eggs within 4 days.

    But, it is a great method to use if you need bulk eggs in liquid form!

    Powdered liquid egg recipe

    These liquid eggs will last a little bit longer considering they come from the powdered form. They could possibly last a few weeks in the fridge!

    For this method, you will need about 2 cups of water for every 150 grams of egg powder (unless your package states otherwise).

    You can simply place the water inside a large bottle, slowly add the egg powder, and shake it vigorously after every addition to properly combine the components.

    You can actually buy egg powder at the grocery store, but you can also make your very own at home.

    How To Use Liquid Whole Eggs

    With liquid, you can make fried eggs, use them to make scrambled eggs, or make many different kinds of omelets. It can also be used as-is to help crumb ingredients to create a crispy layer. It also works great as egg-wash to help add color and stick pastries together.

    You can use liquid eggs to make cakes, pancakes, muffins, bread, and virtually anything else you can think of that uses eggs! One thing to keep in mind is that you should always check that the liquid eggs have the correct ratio of egg whites and yolks that you need.

    Final Thoughts

    If you found this article on real eggs vs liquid eggs useful, please share it with your baking buddies. You can also let us know how you love to use your liquid eggs or if you have a special recipe.

    Shake it up. A low-tech kitchen gadget on Kickstarter simplifies the process of creating an in-shell golden egg.

    How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

    How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

    Freelance writer Amanda C. Kooser covers gadgets and tech news with a twist for CNET. When not wallowing in weird gear and iPad apps for cats, she can be found tinkering with her 1956 DeSoto.

    I first heard about golden eggs a couple nights ago when the topic came up in a conversation among friends. The idea is to whip around a raw egg around so fast it gets scrambled right in the shell. Then, you hard boil it and eat it in all its mixed-up yellowish glory.

    It sounds like a delicious novelty, but the creation method described to me involves taking an old t-shirt, rolling the egg up in it, and flipping it around until it scrambles. I envisioned trying this. I then envisioned disaster as the shirt unfurls and flings a raw egg at high speed into the wall.

    I was afraid, but I still wanted to try this alleged delicacy. So, I went online and found Kickstarter had already divined my thoughts and was offering up the Golden Goose project, a kitchen gadget designed to safely scramble your eggs without breaking the shell.

    Related Stories

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    The hand-powered device holds a single egg in a container in the center with two handles attached by nylon cords to either end. Pulling on the handles spins the egg rapidly, alternating directions for a thorough internal scrambling. You may be familiar with a Victorian-era spinning toy that works in pretty much the same way.

    The Golden Goose is not too far off its $34,500 funding goal with 21 days left in the campaign. The gadget costs a $24 pledge. Once you’ve gilded your eggs, your options are pretty wide open, from soft boiling to making some really weird-looking deviled eggs.

    Sure, there are DIY ways to make a golden egg, but if you’re a fan of kitchen gadgets, then the Golden Goose is certainly an entertaining way to whip up a snack.

    This is what a golden egg looks like after it’s cooked. Y Line Product Design

    How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

    Nutrition Facts (per serving)
    297 Calories
    26g Fat
    3g Carbs
    14g Protein

    ×

    Nutrition Facts
    Servings: 8
    Amount per serving
    Calories 297
    % Daily Value*
    Total Fat 26g 33%
    Saturated Fat 13g 66%
    Cholesterol 334mg 111%
    Sodium 291mg 13%
    Total Carbohydrate 3g 1%
    Dietary Fiber 0g 0%
    Total Sugars 2g
    Protein 14g
    Vitamin C 0mg 2%
    Calcium 182mg 14%
    Iron 1mg 8%
    Potassium 165mg 4%
    *The % Daily Value (DV) tells you how much a nutrient in a food serving contributes to a daily diet. 2,000 calories a day is used for general nutrition advice.

    This super easy and delicious breakfast recipe for these make-ahead scrambled eggs is a wonderful time saver and a great bet for school mornings. Every spring, my husband and I scramble about 12 dozen eggs using this recipe to serve to school kids before they take standardized tests. The recipe works beautifully, and the kids do well. Make it the night before, then just reheat in the morning.

    To make these eggs even more special, put them in puff pastry shells. But they are delicious on their own, served with sausage or bacon and some fresh fruit, coffee, and orange juice.

    This recipe is also great for entertaining and for the holidays. If you want to double it, make two batches in two separate casserole dishes rather than trying to bake 24 eggs in one pan. You will have better control over the consistency of the eggs this way. Use your favorite cheese in this recipe; havarti, Swiss, or Gouda would be delicious as well.

    An egg piercer is a kitchen tool that is used to break a tiny opening in an egg shell to prevent the shell from cracking and the yolk from turning green while boiling. This tool is typically a sharp steel pin that is housed inside a base and that protrudes only when an egg is pressed onto it. An egg piercer also can be used to prepare egg shells for crafts.

    The base of the piercer typically is spring-loaded, so when the operator presses the egg down on the piercer, the needle will pop up and poke a tiny hole into the shell. An egg piercer can come in a variety of shapes, sizes and colors to fit any kitchen décor. Most piercers are not much bigger than the eggs themselves and are small enough to fit into a drawer for storage. They can be made of stainless steel or plastic, and some even are shaped like a hard-boiled egg. Some people simply use a push pin to pierce an egg shell.

    Air inside an egg expands as it heats up during boiling, and this can cause the shell to crack. Having a small hole in the large end of the egg allows air to escape gradually, which prevents the shell from cracking. All eggs have an air pocket at the larger end. When piercing the egg shell, the pin should go deep enough to pierce the shell where the air pocket is but not deep enough to puncture the inner membrane. If the inner membrane is punctured, the insides of the egg will come out while it is cooking.

    The green ring that forms around the yolk of a hard-boiled egg is from sulfur. When the sulfur cannot escape from the egg shell, it turns the yolk green. When an egg piercer is used to create a tiny hole in the egg shell, the sulfur can escape, and the yolk will not turn green.

    Some people enjoy decorating empty egg shells. This delicate craft requires the removal if the insides of an egg without breaking the shell. An egg piercer is perfect for the job. Two holes are needed, one at each end of the egg. The crafter can then blow the insides of the egg carefully through the egg piercer hole by blowing into the larger end of the egg. Once all the contents of the egg have been removed, the egg shell can be decorated.

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    Discussion Comments

    @recapitulate- my mom had an egg piercer, and they look handy but I was never a big fan of using it. I sort of like the crash of breaking eggs, though.

    Of course, if I spent a lot of time boiling eggs or decorating egg shells, I might find piercers more useful. recapitulate September 26, 2011

    I have always wanted an egg piercer. I used to cook a lot with eggs, and do a lot of baking, and it seemed so much simpler than constantly breaking eggs on bowls and risking making a mess.

    I live somewhere with a kind of poor kitchen right now though, so I will probably wait before I get one. Monika September 26, 2011

    @sunnySkys – I don’t know about that. One of my aunts like to decorate egg shells. She claims the egg piercer is far superior to just using a pin. I suppose you would probably have to try both methods and see which one you liked better. sunnySkys September 25, 2011

    I’ve actually never seen a hard boiled egg with a green ring on the inside. So I guess all the hard boiled eggs I’ve eaten have been made by someone with an egg piercer.

    I don’t like hard boiled eggs enough to make them myself on a regular basis. I’m glad to know that if I ever need to make them for some reason I could just use a pin for this. I’m sure it’s not as precise as using an egg piercer, but I bet it still works! ZsaZsa56 September 24, 2011

    I always like hard boiled eggs but there was something about the green ring that always put me off. In fact, for a long time i didn’t even eat them because I was just so unappetitzed.

    That’s why I was so relieved when I heard about the egg piercing trick. I was amazed how well it worked when I tried it for the first time. Now I eat hard boiled eggs all the time and I don’t get why more people don’t try the trick. They look so much nicer when they are white rather than green. tigers88 September 24, 2011

    I like to use an egg piercer for craft projects but probably not the kind that you are expecting.

    Here is what I do. I get a griddle really hot and covered in oil. Then I use an egg piercer and puncture an extra large egg. As the egg drips out of the bottom I draw pictures and designs with the liquid on the hot griddle. It cooks instantly and then I can make pictures using eggs. You do a lot of interesting effects with the yolks and the whites and the different cooking times.

    Of course these pictures don’t last long and they are almost impossible to transport. I usually just take a picture to preserve it. I know this sounds kind of weird but it is really fun. Sara007 September 24, 2011

    There are so many great foods you can make with the help of an egg piercer. Though I still prefer to use my egg shells for decoration. I usually pierce the egg and remove the insides to make scrambled eggs, which leaves me wit a perfect shell to paint.

    My grandmother originally got me started with decorating real egg shells, and I have to say it is quite the art. I am no where as good as my grandma used to be, but I am trying. Right now I am working on making egg shell decorations for Christmas, as I think they would make fantastic hanging ornaments. Mae82 September 23, 2011

    An egg piercer is just one handy tool you should have on hand if you are looking to make perfect eggs. I also like to have an egg cooker and poacher, as it takes a lot of the guess work out of timing your eggs so they are just right.

    If you purchase an electric egg cooker it is a good idea to shop around a bit. I found that egg cookers can be pretty pricey, but I managed to get mine on clearance for 50% off which really swayed me into buying it. I can say that it was a great purchase and it makes preparing breakfast a whole lot easier than it used to be.

    How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

    Schedivy Pictures Inc. / Getty Images

    Whether you use store-bought eggs and your refrigerator is set too cold, or it’s wintertime and you own chickens, sometimes eggs can freeze in the shell before you use them. But are these chilly eggs still usable? The answer is yes, although their use is limited.

    The United State Department of Agriculture says you should not intentionally freeze eggs. According to the USDA: “Shell eggs should not be frozen. If an egg accidentally freezes and the shell cracked during freezing, discard the egg. Keep any uncracked eggs frozen until needed; then thaw in the refrigerator. These can be hard cooked successfully but other uses may be limited. That’s because freezing causes the yolk to become thick and syrupy so it will not flow like an unfrozen yolk or blend very well with the egg white or other ingredients.”

    If you intend to use your once frozen eggs, make sure to follow the following advice.

    How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

    Make Sure They Are Clean

    Salmonella and other illness-causing bacteria are commonly found on the shells of eggs. When the shells are cracked, the bacteria will spread to the egg inside. This is why you shouldn’t eat batter with raw eggs. Because of the possibility of contamination through a crack in the shell, toss any eggs that are dirty and cracked. Wash the uncracked eggs well in the kitchen and store them in a ziplock bag in the freezer until you’re ready to use them.

    How to Defrost Frozen Eggs

    Place the bag of frozen eggs, or the number of eggs you need, in a container of warm tap water and let them sit for about five minutes to begin the thawing process. Put the eggs in the warmest part of the refrigerator and let them thaw gradually, preferably overnight. When you are ready to use the eggs, you must break the shells over a bowl. If the egg whites are fully thawed, the entire egg should fall into the bowl. The yolks don’t thaw as quickly as the whites, so if they are still frozen break them up with a fork.

    What to Make With Frozen Eggs

    Do frozen eggs work as well as fresh? Well, almost. You probably can’t make a souffle with them, but they work fine as scrambled eggs, in baked goods or in a recipe where they are blended with other ingredients. They don’t work as well for fried or poached eggs where you want to keep the yolk intact. You can boil the eggs in their shells after they are thawed, but the texture of the yolk is changed by the freezing process, so go with hard-boiled eggs that you can cut up in a salad, instead of soft-boiled eggs.

    Thawed eggs shouldn’t be kept for more than a day or so in the refrigerator, so only thaw out as many as you think you will use right away.

    Use the eggs for scrambled eggs or omelets or when baking a cake or cookies that call for eggs. When you are familiar with working with previously frozen eggs, try using them in a recipe like classic deviled eggs or hot tuna and egg salad rolls.

    Perfect this breakfast classic and learn how to make silky scrambled eggs every time with our simple step-by-step recipe and top tips from our cookery team

    Scrambled eggs are a fantastic source of protein and an absolute staple recipe for any kitchen. Whether you’re looking for a speedy supper, relaxed brunch dish or classic breakfast, eggs are the answer. It can be easy to overcook them, resulting in a dry, rubbery texture but this guide will guarantee deliciously soft, creamy eggs every time. The trick is not leaving them on the hob for too long and to use our key, creamy ingredient.

    Basic recipe
    (Serves 1, but easily doubled)

    • 2 large Free Range eggs
    • 6 tbsp single cream or full-cream milk
    • A knob of butter
    • Pinch of salt

    How to make scrambled eggs

    1. Crack your eggs into a bowl and add the cream and a pinch of salt. Beat well with a fork or whisk until the mixture has a smooth and uniform consistency.
    2. Heat your pan on the hob over a low to medium heat for about a minute, then add the butter. Wait for it to melt fully before pouring in your egg mixture. Avoid letting the butter brown, or it will discolour the eggs.
    3. Leave the egg mixture to start cooking for about twenty seconds before beginning to gently lift it from the sides and bottom of the pan and fold it over into the middle of the pan. Leave it for another 10 seconds and then start folding again until the eggs are softly set and runny in places.
    4. At this point, take the pan off the heat and allow the eggs to finish cooking through the heat of the pan alone – this is the key to the perfect scrambled eggs.
    5. Give it a final stir, taste and adjust the seasoning if necessary, then serve immediately.

    Watch our video guide on how to make perfect scrambled eggs:

    Get some recipe inspiration

    Scrambled eggs & slow-roast tomatoes on toast

    How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

    Ideal for lazy Sunday mornings, these indulgent, extra buttery scrambled eggs are served with sweet, slow-roasted tomatoes and spinach. Prep this simple veggie dish in minutes and serve on toasted granary bread. Turmeric scrambled eggs

    How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

    Add turmeric, spinach and coconut to your scrambled eggs for a vibrant, Indian-inspired dish packed full of extra nutrients. Perfect for brunch or a speedy dinner, it’s ready in just 15 minutes.Scrambled eggs in bacon bowls

    How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

    Forget egg on toast, why not jazz up your weekend breakfast spread with these bacon bowls? Serve your scrambled eggs, roast tomatoes or even baked beans inside these little bacon cups.

    Enjoy this classic breakfast recipe? Try our other eggy treats.

    What’s your favourite way to eat scrambled eggs? Let us know in the comments below.

    If you are scrambled when cooking eggs, here are some expert tips from one of the best.

    Alexandra Torres-Perez

    By adding your email you agree to get updates about Spoon University Healthier

    Anthony Bourdain is one of the most well-known American chefs. He stars in the shows Parts Unknown and No Reservations, where he travels the world and tries new foods. As college students, we can’t afford to travel and eat fancy foods regularly. So we stick to the simple and cheap eats, like scrambled eggs. There are many ways to cook this breakfast staple, like in the microwave. But Anthony Bourdain finally revealed his secret to making great scrambled eggs. Here’s how to make scrambled eggs like Anthony Bourdain.

    What You Need:

    Step 1

    Heat up the pan with butter so that the eggs don’t stick. The pan shouldn’t be too hot, or else you risk over cooking the egg.

    How to make scrambled eggs inside the shellAlexandra Torres-Perez

    Crack the egg inside a little cup or a container to make sure there are no egg shells in the mix.

    Step 3

    Beat the egg with a fork, but be careful to not over beat it.

    You do wanna, sort of, have a ripple of white and yellow throughout. You just don’t wanna make it complete, sort of, homogenous yellow,” Bourdain says in a video with Tech Insider.

    You also want to make sure to beat the egg right before putting it in the pan. That way your egg stays fresh, and it doesn’t sit.

    This step is always tricky for me because I’m guilty of beating the egg until it’s all yellow. But now I know that with one egg, you just have to beat it 2-3 times at most.

    Step 4

    Add salt and pepper to your liking, but only salt and pepper. One of Bourdain’s trick is to NOT add water, cream, milk, or whatever else other people may add.

    Step 5

    Put eggs in the hot pan with plenty of hot, foaming butter.

    Step 6

    Wait until the egg bubbles up in the pan and then push the eggs around in a repetitive figure eight pattern to fold your eggs over each other.

    Step 7

    Then, serve on a plate and enjoy. Bourdain explains the final product should be “something fluffy, airy, rippled with a nice textural note when you taste the egg”.

    I didn’t have any toast, so I improvised and added a toasted tortilla for a little crunch. This is the easiest, best scrambled eggs recipe I’ve ever tried. Remember, making the best scrambled eggs takes practice. Even Anthony Bourdain said it took him some time before he just got good at it.

    Very, very simple dish, but like a lot of really good simple things, more often then not, people find a way to overcomplicate them and screw them up.

    Published: Jun 11, 2019 Updated: Jul 12, 2020 by Sophie 3 Comments

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    This Crab Scrambled Eggs is an easy yet fancy breakfast to treat yourself on weekends or impress others on special occasions. It also doesn’t take much more time to prepare than normal scrambled eggs.

    How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

    One of our favorite weekend breakfasts is this crab scrambled eggs. We have been making it at home many times for the last few years after we tried a similar dish at a restaurant in downtown Chicago. It was a special seasonal menu item back then and they no longer made it.

    The dish features soft and luscious scrambled eggs, and the fresh crab meat brings a subtle sweetness that pairs very well with the richness of the eggs. It doesn’t take a lot of efforts to prepare, but the result is beautiful. Serve it on a slice of bread and a glass of smoothie or milk on the side for an absolutely healthy, delicious and filling breakfast.

    Ingredients

    The two main ingredients of this dish are eggs and fresh crab meat. To season it, you just need salt and pepper. When serving, you can sprinkle some thinly sliced chives or scallions on top.

    How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

    Try to use the best eggs you can find. I love using eggs from my local farmers’ market. An important tip to increase the richness of scrambled eggs as well as enhance the color is to remove some of the egg whites. It is a wonderful tip we came across on Quora a couple of years ago. For two people, I suggest using four large eggs less one egg white.

    For this crab scrambled eggs, I like to use dungeness crab meat. Other options that will work are blue crab, snow crab, king crab or even refrigerated canned fresh crab meat. The version we had at the restaurant used snow crab.

    How to Make Crab Scrambled Eggs

    There are more than one way to make scrambled eggs. The method we suggest in this recipe is what we think works best for this dish. The goal is to have soft, fluffy scrambled eggs and the crab meat incorporates nicely with the eggs.

    The first step is to briefly sauté the crab meat. This step helps removing excess moisture, thus concentrating flavors and improving textures. In addition, we also break the crab meat into smaller pieces so that later they will incorporate with the eggs better.

    How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

    If you use refrigerated lump crab meat, this step is important since this type of crab meat often has quite a bit of excess moisture and sometimes, an aftertaste.

    Next, pour beaten eggs into the pan. Once you see the eggs start to set around the edges, use a spatula to pull the set outer edges towards the center. Keep doing that to gather all the egg curds in the center of your pan.

    How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

    Quickly turn the pile of egg curds over so that any undercooked parts can get some heat. Swirl and move around to break up the scrambled eggs slightly. The eggs will continue to cook from residual heat, so remove it from the pan when it’s 90-95% cooked to your liking to avoid overcooking.

    How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

    It is best to make this crab scrambled eggs in a nonstick pan. I use a Scanpan skillet to make this dish. Also, when scrambling the eggs, pay attention to the heat and adjust the heat or briefly take the pan off the heat as needed to avoid overcooking the eggs. I usually stick with low to medium-low heat.

    I’d love to hear what you think about the dish, so please feel free to leave a comment. New recipes are added every week so let’s connect on Facebook, Pinterest and Instagram for the latest updates.

    Scrambled eggs are great for breakfast, but here are some dinner recipes featuring scrambled eggs:

    Eggs stay fresh a long time. Here’s everything you need to know, including the secret behind the date stamped on the carton.

    How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

    How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

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    How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

    Eggs are a refrigerator staple. We’re almost never without a carton to bake with, turn into quick and satisfying breakfasts, and even easy dinners.

    While you’ll find a “best by” date stamped on every dozen you take home from the grocery store, it can be confusing to know what that really means. Is it safe to cook with and eat your eggs if it’s past that date?

    In general, eggs should last from 4-5 weeks in the fridge. Here’s a bit more about why that’s a safe estimate.

    How to Read the Dates on an Egg Carton

    No two egg cartons are the same when it comes to the date stamped on them. Some say “best buy” or “sell by” while other say “use by.” It’s cryptic messaging at best, leaving us all a little confused as to whether or not those eggs are fresh and safe to eat!

    A more reliable date is what is known as the Julian date. This is a three-digit code you’ll find at the end of the long set of numbers and letters below or above the “best by” date. It’s the exact date the eggs were packed, 001 representing January 1 and 365 representing December 31.

    The USDA has a chart available online to help you figure out that date. Your eggs will be safe to eat for up to 5 weeks past this date.

    How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

    Why You Should Store Eggs in the Fridge

    In Europe and in many other places outside of the United States, eggs are sold at room temperature.

    The United States is an exception to this practice because, as an extra precaution against Salmonella contamination, the USDA requires eggs to be washed and sanitized before they’re sold to consumers. This process removes potential contaminants, but it also removes a natural protective coating on the shell that allows eggs to be stored safely at room temperature.

    Thus, eggs in the United States must be refrigerated.

    How to make scrambled eggs inside the shell

    The Right Fridge Temperature for Storing Eggs

    Eggs should be stored at a 40°F or below.

    According to the USDA, when you do take them out of the refrigerator, you shouldn’t keep them out at room temperature for any longer than 2 hours. This is because eggs can sweat at room temperature, which can lead to potential bacteria growth that can enter the eggs through their porous shells.

    How Long Cooked Eggs Will Keep in the Fridge

    If you cracked and separated eggs to make meringue cookies or ice cream, you can store remaining yolks or whites in an airtight container in the fridge for up to 4 days.

    Scrambled eggs or cooked eggs that have been made into egg salad or a quiche should be refrigerated and eaten within 3 to 4 days. Hard-boiled eggs will last for a full week if stored unpeeled in the fridge.