How to make vietnamese coffee

The strong coffee (served hot or ice usually with condensed milk) is gaining popularity in America. Learn about the traditional brewing method and how to make Vietnamese coffee at home.

There are two things I always love to do any time I travel: experience new restaurants and search for the best coffee in town. Whenever I find the two in one spot it’s a dream. I can gladly say this usually happens at Vietnamese restaurants, where my order starts with a couple summer rolls and a sweet Vietnamese iced coffee. If you’re new to Vietnamese coffee (or your local shop added it to the menu and don’t know what it is), you’re in the right place. Learn all about the beans from the world’s second largest coffee producer and then give the unique brewing method a try at home.

What Is Vietnamese Coffee?

Coffee first entered the scene in Vietnam in the 19th century with the French colonization. What sets Vietnamese coffee apart from the rest of the world is that 90% of the coffee beans are of the robusta variety. Unlike the more common arabica beans (which is probably what’s in your pantry right now), robusta is a strong, nutty, dark bean. Robusta also has a much higher caffeine count than arabica.

How to Make Vietnamese Coffee

To brew Vietnamese coffee the traditional way, you’ll want to use a phin filter ($10, Amazon), a slow drip-style tool that consists of a small stainless brewing chamber, a perforated insert, and a cap. Place the filter over a mug or glass that will hold the amount of coffee you’re brewing.

Step 1: Add Vietnamese Coffee to Phin

The amount of coffee you need will depend on the size of your filter, but the recommended ratio to follow by Nguyen Coffee Supply is 2 tablespoons of finely ground Vietnamese coffee ($14, Nguyen Coffee Supply) to 4 ounces of water. Once the coffee is in the chamber, drop the press in to cover the grounds.

Step 2: Add Hot Water

Pour about 0.8 ounces of hot water just off the boil (about 205°F) to bloom the coffee for 30-40 seconds. (Blooming lets carbon dioxide escape for a better-tasting result.) From there, add 3.2 ounces of water or enough to fill the chamber.

Step 3: Watch the Coffee Drip

After about two minutes, you should start to see a slow drip coming from the phin into the glass or cup. And when I say slow, I mean slow. The process takes about 5 to 6 minutes total.

Step 4: Enjoy Your Vietnamese Coffee

Once it’s brewed, it’s time to drink! The most common way to serve Vietnamese coffee is with sweetened condensed milk ($14, Amazon). The sweet creamy flavor cuts through the strong notes from the coffee. You can add a couple of tablespoons of condensed milk to the bottom of the cup before brewing and stir to combine. Of course, you can also drink black or sweeten to taste.

How to Make Vietnamese Iced Coffee

This is my favorite way to cool off on summer days. To make Vietnamese iced coffee simply follow the steps above, but brew over a glass ice or serve over ice once the process is finished. Not into sweetened condensed milk or dairy-free? Try making a vegan version with coconut milk and simple syrup.

Think someone else may like this? Share the love!

Vietnamese Iced Coffee is an intensely brewed coffee concentrate that drips down into a tall glass of ice and a big spoonful of sweetened condensed milk.

To make Vietnamese Iced Coffee, start with medium grind French Roast coffee, brew in a Vietnamese coffee press with 2 tablespoons of sweetened condensed milk, and then pour over ice.

How to make vietnamese coffee

If you love coffee, and have only tried weak, watered down coffee served over ice, you’re in for a big revelation.

Vietnamese Iced Coffee is creamy, rich, smooth and sweet. Oh, and intense coffee flavor. It’s bold in flavor and the coffee makes a wonderful Vietnamese Coffee Ice Cream as well.

How to make vietnamese coffee

When I made this on TV years ago, I was grateful that I brought extra coffee, ice and sweetened condensed milk – the entire television crew and morning hosts/hostesses all wanted a gallon of Vietnamese Iced Coffee for now….and another one to save for their afternoon treat!

Ingredients for Vietnamese Iced Coffee

  • Medium-ground coffee
  • Sweetened condensed milk
  • Ice

How to make vietnamese coffee A tall glass of Vietnamese Iced Coffee

What type of coffee for Vietnamese Iced Coffee?

Option 1: The Standard Coffee

To make Vietnamese Iced Coffee, start with using the right grind of coffee. Look for MEDIUM coarse grind coffee. I’ve found French Roast is best, but you can use any type of coffee, as long as the coffee is medium coarse grind.

Fine grind coffee would fall right through the little holes of the coffee press.

How to make vietnamese coffee

Many Vietnamese in America like using Café du Monde coffee from New Orleans. If you are interested in the history of why the Vietnamese use Café du Monde, head over to The Secret Ingredient to America’s Vietnamese Coffee. The yellow can is the most popular (I prefer this over the Café du Monde French Roast – but try both!)

Option 2: The Upgrade Coffee Experience

The coffee in the mustard yellow can is okay. It’s not the best coffee, but it is the standard amongst 90% of Vietnamese restaurants in America.

To me, the stuff is bitter and flat. But the sweetened condensed milk will cover the coffee’s flaws.

How to make vietnamese coffee Nguyen Coffee Company

If you are looking to upgrade your Vietnamese Coffee experience, try Nguyen Coffee Company.

Nguyen Coffee Supply is the first ever Vietnamese-American-owned importer, supplier, and roaster of green coffee beans from Vietnam in New York. They’ve partnered with a 4th generation farmer, Mr. Ton, who owns and operates his family farm in Vietnam’s famed Central Highlands.

Give their coffee a try! UPDATE: They are giving Steamy Kitchen readers 10% off (use code STEAMY)

Use Sweetened Condensed Milk

It’s the sweet, sticky, thick stuff – NOT evaporated milk! No substitutions here! Find this at any grocery store.

How to make vietnamese coffeeSweetened Condensed Milk

Get a Vietnamese Coffee Press

Found at any Asian market – they usually cost a few dollars, or online – Amazon sells them! I’ve purchased several from this seller on Amazon and they’ve been fantastic. Don’t pay more than $12 per press.

How to make vietnamese coffee Vietnamese coffee press

Step 1: Add 2 tablespoons of sweetened condensed milk to a glass

How to make vietnamese coffee

Step 2: Add 2 tablespoons of ground coffee to the base of the coffee press. Wet the grounds just a little bit with some hot water.

How to make vietnamese coffee

Step 3: Screw on the press tight. The coffee should be packed well.

How to make vietnamese coffee

Step 4: Pour boiled hot water into the coffee press.

How to make vietnamese coffee

Cover with its little hat.

How to make vietnamese coffee

Step 5: Wait. It will drip veeerrrry….veeerrrry slowly. It takes 3-5 minutes to finish brewing.

How to make vietnamese coffee

The longer it takes, the stronger the coffee. Notice that there are only a few drops per second. For me, I can’t wait any longer than 5 minutes. If the coffee is dripping too fast, then use a small spoon or tip of knife to screw the press on tighter, 1 turn clockwise. Or if it’s dripping too slow, unscrew 1 turn counterclockwise.

While it’s dripping, go get some ice in a glass. You’ve got nothing else to do!

How to make vietnamese coffee

Step 6: Once it’s finished, stir well.

How to make vietnamese coffee

You can set your coffee maker on top of its overturned lid to prevent dripping onto your nice table.

Step 7: Pour over a tall glass filled with ice and enjoy!

How to make vietnamese coffee

Ingredients

Makes 1 Servings

Preparation

Step 1

There are two ways to make Vietnamese coffee. The simplest method is to steep coffee grounds in a heatproof container with 2/3 cup boiling water for 4 minutes. Pour through a coffee filter into a heatproof glass.

Step 2

Or use a metal filter, which we recommend. Bring 1 cup water to a boil. Remove top screen from filter, add coffee, then screw on top screen. Place filter over a heatproof 12-oz. glass or measuring cup.

Step 3

Pour a splash of the hot water into filter; this will allow the coffee grounds to bloom. When coffee begins to drip through, add enough water to reach top of filter. Place lid on filter and let coffee drip for 4 minutes. If coffee stops dripping sooner, gently loosen screw to relieve pressure.

Step 4

Stir in condensed milk until blended. Add ice, stir, and serve.

How would you rate Vietnamese Iced Coffee?

Simply the best version of iced coffee , full of unique flavors .

Tastes like gronk

South Sudan, America

I can’t see any other reviews. So that’s fun.

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How to make vietnamese coffee

. The first time I had a Vietnamese coffee made and served the traditional way was in, of all places, Colorado Springs. We were visiting friends who suggested what turned out to be a great Vietnamese restaurant. It served big, flavorful bowls of pho and Vietnamese grilled pork chops with rice noodles (we have a similar Vietnamese noodle salad recipe).

The food was great, but on a whim, I ordered a cup of Vietnamese hot coffee (cà phê sữa nóng), and I was hooked!

How is Vietnamese Coffee Brewed?

The Vietnamese coffee was rich, flavorful, sweet and perfect on a cool day, but the method for brewing and serving the coffee is what really impressed me. The coffee was brought out with a layer of condensed milk at the bottom of a small, clear thick glass, with a stainless steel Phin Vietnamese filter sitting on top.

The coffee was already dripping into the glass and mixing in with the condensed milk. My friend, Philip ordered a Vietnamese iced coffee (cà phê sua dá), so he had the same setup along with another glass filled with ice.

When our coffees were done dripping, we stirred them to combine the coffee and condensed milk. Mine was ready to enjoy. Philip poured his coffee into the glass full of ice, and voila!

As coffee addicts even before this experience, we had to go to the one Asian market in town to buy some of those Vietnamese style stainless steel coffee filters (Phin filters ) so we could make our own Vietnamese coffee recipe.

We also got our hands on some of the Vietnamese coffee that the restaurant used. The condensed milk is the Longevity brand. Philip said he has been using the same brand for years! As for the Trung Nguyen brand of ground Vietnamese coffee, it has a deep rich flavor with just a tiny hint of hazelnut flavor.

Vietnamese Coffee Recipe Instructions

Here’s what you’ll need:

  • 3 tablespoons Vietnamese ground coffee (we used Trung Nguyen brand)
  • 1-3 tablespoons sweetened condensed milk, depending on your preference (we used Longevity brand)
  • 6-8 ounces water that is close to boiling point, depending on your desired coffee strength

How to make vietnamese coffee

We used the Trung Nguyen brand of ground coffee for this Vietnamese coffee recipe, but you can use any good French roast coffee, too.

Our Vietnamese Phin coffee filters are the 6-ounce size, but they come in different sizes depending upon your brewing needs. Alternatively, you can use a French coffee press or your favorite drip coffee method.

Update: We received a suggestion from one of our readers to rinse the phin filter and the cup with/in hot boiling water so the coffee will bloom and drop better. It cleans and pre-heats the filter and it works!

Measure 3 tablespoons of ground coffee, and distribute it evenly into the filter.

How to make vietnamese coffee

DO NOT shake the filters or compress the coffee, or the coffee grounds will drop into the holes of the coffee filter and plug up the holes! The result will be that the coffee takes forever to drip, or the grounds may clog the filter entirely. Place the metal filter gently on top of the coffee.

Pour 1-3 tablespoons of condensed milk into your coffee mug or heatproof glass.

How to make vietnamese coffee

Measure out 6 ounces of near boiling water . Use 8 ounces if you don’t like your coffee with such a strong kick in the pants.

Pour two tablespoons of hot water into the filter and wait for 5 seconds to “bloom” the coffee . This is the part of the brewing process when the water releases CO2 from the coffee and the grounds expand.

How to make vietnamese coffee

Next, press on the filter gently to compress the bloomed coffee. This helps slow down the drip rate when you use all of your water. It also makes for a more flavorful coffee.

With these steps, you’ll be able to achieve the optimum brewing time. Slowly pour the rest of the water into the filter. The coffee will begin dripping into your cup or glass.

How to make vietnamese coffee

Wait about 5 minutes for the coffee to finish drip brewing!

How to make vietnamese coffee

Remove the filter, and stir to mix in the condensed milk. The amount of condensed milk you use is a very personal decision but here are my personal recommendations:

  • 1 tablespoon sweetened condensed milk for a regular coffee
  • 2 tablespoons of sweetened condensed milk for a sweet coffee
  • 3 tablespoons of sweetened condensed milk; your coffee will taste closer to a caramel coffee hard candy, and sometimes there ain’t nothin’ wrong with that!

How to make vietnamese coffee

Enjoy your Vietnamese hot coffee (cà phê sữa nóng)! To make a Vietnamese iced coffee (cà phê sua dá), pour your coffee over a glassful of ice once it has been brewed and stirred.

How to make vietnamese coffee

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Brewed in a traditional Vietnamese coffee maker

How to make vietnamese coffeeThis is a step-by-step recipe for preparing delcious Vietnamese Coffee using a traditional Vietnamese coffee maker known in Vietnam as a phin (or French press). The phin most likely originated in Cambodia in the 1800’s and is essentially a single-serving coffee brewer and filter that sits atop the coffee cup or glass.

Vietnamese coffee prepared in this way ensures the grounds of the coffee are steeped for longer than some other brewing techniques and results in a richer and more intense flavor that is delcious served either hot or iced.

You can watch the Trung Nguyen Iced Coffee Video below, demonstrating this Vietnamese coffee brewing technique for making delicious iced Vietnamese coffee.

How to make vietnamese coffee

You will need:

  • 2 tablespoons ground Vietnamese Coffee
  • 1/2 cup boiling hot water
  • 1-2 tablespoons of Sweet Condensed Milk (to taste)
  • 1/2 cup ice cubes or crushed ice
  • Vietnamese Coffee Filter

Preparation

  1. In a stainless steel Vietnamese Coffee Filter, add 2 tablespoons of Vietnamese Coffee. Screw the smaller filter into the coffee filter.
  2. Add 1 to 2 tablespoons of Sweet Condensed Milk into a drinking glass. Place filter on top of the drinking glass. Pour hot water into the filter.
  3. Once hot water has filtered through, remove the filter from the glass. Stir the milk to dissolve into the coffee. Add ice with coffee and stir again.

Hot Vietnamese Coffee is made the same way but excluding the ice.

Recipe © Trung Nguyen 2007

Iced Coffee Video

Many people are surprised to hear that despite its small size Vietnam is the second largest coffee producing nation after Brazil and has an ideal coffee growing climate in regions like the Annam Highlands which shares its coffee producing heritage with neighboring Laos.

Also See:

  • Trung Nguyen Vietnamese Coffee
  • Buy a Vietnamese Coffee Filter
  • Thai Iced Coffee Recipe
  • Thai Iced Tea Recipe

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Vietnamese Drip Coffee

Equipment

Ingredients

  • 10 grams Ground Coffee
  • 60 mL Water
  • 2 teaspoons Condensed Milk

Instructions

The Coffee Drip used in this process is thought to be able to hold the coffee’s flavor.In addition, the fast-brewing process and low cost of Vietnamese Coffee Drip are two other factors that have contributed to the popularity of this form.

Why you Should Try It?

If you’re a fan of pour over coffee, iced coffee or a solo coffee drinker, you should try a Vietnamese Drip coffee maker!

The dripper, also called a Phin, is an easy-to-use single cup brewer that makes a delicious cup of Charleston Coffee Roasters coffee in about 4-5 minutes that is somewhere between pour over and a French press.

Is it possible to make Vietnamese coffee in a French press?

Well… Why Not?

A French press is used to produce coffee. It’s soft and creamy with a blast of caffeine. A Phin, a traditional Vietnamese coffee maker and filter, isn’t needed. By soaking coffee grounds in hot water, the French press imitates the Phin.

3 parts of Vietnamese Coffee Drip

The Lid / Cover

The stainless-steel lid parts are built to cover the upper cup during the work phase, ensuring that the water temperature within the cup remains continuous.

The Presser / Plunger

A section that serves as a separator between the water room and the coffee powder room serves a dual purpose. The first feature is a coffee powder presser, which has a compact shape below it. The separator and water filter between the water room and the coffee powder room is the second feature.

Filter

Water will be blended as it passes through the plunger from the uppermost room to the coffee powder room. Water that’s been combined with coffee powder can drip into the glass through the filter.

After you understand the functions of the parts above, you see how the dripping mechanism works: water flows via a water chamber, then through the plunger to reach the coffee room, and finally, water and coffee that is been extracted falls drop by drop into the container below.

Without a Press, how do you Make Vietnamese coffee?

Over the coffee, pour 8 ounces of boiling hot water. Cover the container with the lid and set aside for 5 minutes. The coffee will begin to drip into the cup once it has been brewed. Remove the filter from over the cup after 5 minutes, when it is brewed.

But How Do I Make the Perfect Brewing?

Aside from Vietnamese Coffee Drip, you’ll need some other tools, such as a grinder, a digital scale, and a thermometer, to make the perfect brew.

Any of the equipment mentioned above is necessary because you must obtain the ideal size of coffee grounds, the correct coffee-to-water ratio, and the ideal water temperature to use this process.

The cup of coffee that results is smooth and clean, similar to a pour over, but with less bite than espresso. Since there is no paper filter, the oils from the beans can move through to the finished coffee, just like a French press, and you can get some sludge in the bottom of your glass.

FUN FACT – Fish Sauce in a Coffee?!

In certain parts of Vietnam, the end of a toothpick is soaked in fish sauce and then stirred into the coffee. The explanation for this, I suppose, is that a pinch of salt or a salty taste has been known to counteract bitterness. Darker roasted instant coffee, especially French Roast, has a higher bitterness. The heavily roasted coffee can be made to taste smoother by adding a small amount of salty fish sauce. I would skip this phase if the coffee you’re using isn’t a dark roast. Interesting right?

Why is Vietnamese Coffee so Strong?

It takes a long time to brew and demands patience due to the many stages involved. So, what is it about Vietnamese coffee that makes it so powerful? Robusta coffee beans have twice the caffeine level of arabica beans, resulting in a bolder and heavier cup.

Robusta vs Arabica in Vietnamese Coffee Drip

Despite having less caffeine than Robusta, Arabica beans are also thought to have a better flavor. Arabica coffee has a smoother, sweeter flavor, with hints of chocolate and sugar. Robusta, on the other hand, has a grainy or rubbery flavor with a deeper, sharper, and more acidic taste. For me I’m voting Arabica for sure!

Enjoy your cà phê sa nóng (Vietnamese hot coffee)! After your coffee has also been brewed and blended, pour it over a glass of ice to make a Vietnamese iced coffee (cà phê sua dá).

Think someone else may like this? Share the love!

Vietnamese Iced Coffee is an intensely brewed coffee concentrate that drips down into a tall glass of ice and a big spoonful of sweetened condensed milk.

To make Vietnamese Iced Coffee, start with medium grind French Roast coffee, brew in a Vietnamese coffee press with 2 tablespoons of sweetened condensed milk, and then pour over ice.

How to make vietnamese coffee

If you love coffee, and have only tried weak, watered down coffee served over ice, you’re in for a big revelation.

Vietnamese Iced Coffee is creamy, rich, smooth and sweet. Oh, and intense coffee flavor. It’s bold in flavor and the coffee makes a wonderful Vietnamese Coffee Ice Cream as well.

How to make vietnamese coffee

When I made this on TV years ago, I was grateful that I brought extra coffee, ice and sweetened condensed milk – the entire television crew and morning hosts/hostesses all wanted a gallon of Vietnamese Iced Coffee for now….and another one to save for their afternoon treat!

Ingredients for Vietnamese Iced Coffee

  • Medium-ground coffee
  • Sweetened condensed milk
  • Ice

How to make vietnamese coffee A tall glass of Vietnamese Iced Coffee

What type of coffee for Vietnamese Iced Coffee?

Option 1: The Standard Coffee

To make Vietnamese Iced Coffee, start with using the right grind of coffee. Look for MEDIUM coarse grind coffee. I’ve found French Roast is best, but you can use any type of coffee, as long as the coffee is medium coarse grind.

Fine grind coffee would fall right through the little holes of the coffee press.

How to make vietnamese coffee

Many Vietnamese in America like using Café du Monde coffee from New Orleans. If you are interested in the history of why the Vietnamese use Café du Monde, head over to The Secret Ingredient to America’s Vietnamese Coffee. The yellow can is the most popular (I prefer this over the Café du Monde French Roast – but try both!)

Option 2: The Upgrade Coffee Experience

The coffee in the mustard yellow can is okay. It’s not the best coffee, but it is the standard amongst 90% of Vietnamese restaurants in America.

To me, the stuff is bitter and flat. But the sweetened condensed milk will cover the coffee’s flaws.

How to make vietnamese coffee Nguyen Coffee Company

If you are looking to upgrade your Vietnamese Coffee experience, try Nguyen Coffee Company.

Nguyen Coffee Supply is the first ever Vietnamese-American-owned importer, supplier, and roaster of green coffee beans from Vietnam in New York. They’ve partnered with a 4th generation farmer, Mr. Ton, who owns and operates his family farm in Vietnam’s famed Central Highlands.

Give their coffee a try! UPDATE: They are giving Steamy Kitchen readers 10% off (use code STEAMY)

Use Sweetened Condensed Milk

It’s the sweet, sticky, thick stuff – NOT evaporated milk! No substitutions here! Find this at any grocery store.

How to make vietnamese coffeeSweetened Condensed Milk

Get a Vietnamese Coffee Press

Found at any Asian market – they usually cost a few dollars, or online – Amazon sells them! I’ve purchased several from this seller on Amazon and they’ve been fantastic. Don’t pay more than $12 per press.

How to make vietnamese coffee Vietnamese coffee press

Step 1: Add 2 tablespoons of sweetened condensed milk to a glass

How to make vietnamese coffee

Step 2: Add 2 tablespoons of ground coffee to the base of the coffee press. Wet the grounds just a little bit with some hot water.

How to make vietnamese coffee

Step 3: Screw on the press tight. The coffee should be packed well.

How to make vietnamese coffee

Step 4: Pour boiled hot water into the coffee press.

How to make vietnamese coffee

Cover with its little hat.

How to make vietnamese coffee

Step 5: Wait. It will drip veeerrrry….veeerrrry slowly. It takes 3-5 minutes to finish brewing.

How to make vietnamese coffee

The longer it takes, the stronger the coffee. Notice that there are only a few drops per second. For me, I can’t wait any longer than 5 minutes. If the coffee is dripping too fast, then use a small spoon or tip of knife to screw the press on tighter, 1 turn clockwise. Or if it’s dripping too slow, unscrew 1 turn counterclockwise.

While it’s dripping, go get some ice in a glass. You’ve got nothing else to do!

How to make vietnamese coffee

Step 6: Once it’s finished, stir well.

How to make vietnamese coffee

You can set your coffee maker on top of its overturned lid to prevent dripping onto your nice table.

Step 7: Pour over a tall glass filled with ice and enjoy!

If you’re a Java enthusiast, you’ve probably already placed your favorite order. Still, trying something new every now and then can be a fun experience. These Vietnamese coffee drinks are the perfect alternatives to surprise and entertain your taste buds.

Yes, sweet frozen lattes and seasonal mokas can be great treats when you’re looking for something different from your favorite order, but why not be adventurous and go beyond the border to explore new flavors? Vietnam has great pho bo, but did you know it has amazing coffee too? If you are new to this then you have come to the right place because these java based drinks will rock your nerves. Read on to learn more about their stories and easy recipes.

When was coffee introduced to Vietnam?

How to make vietnamese coffeeMr. Travel / Shutterstock.com

Coffee was first introduced to Vietnam by French missionaries in the mid-1800s. When they arrived in the Southeast Asian country, they found the climatic conditions in the mountains particularly favorable for plantations. coffee, which prompted them to create their own, essentially spawning the coffee industry in the country.

It didn’t take long for locals to embrace coffee drinking as part of their daily routines as well, eventually developing their own java traditions that we still enjoy today.

Four Easy Vietnamese Coffee Recipes

If you are curious about what Vietnamese coffee looks like and would like to try it, you are in luck. While the idea of ​​drinking some type of coffee from across the globe might sound exotic, thankfully, the actual brewing doesn’t require any exotic ingredients or specialized tools.

Below are four delicious and traditional drinks that you can easily make at home.

Iced coffee (Ca Phe Sua Da)

How to make vietnamese coffeeConfident kitchen

Because dairy products were never a part of Asian culinary traditions, black coffee was all the Vietnamese knew for much of the 19th century. Back then, fresh milk was hard to come by and importing milk wasn’t even an option, so the French had to wait a bit before they could enjoy a good old-fashioned latte.

Lucky for them, an American inventor, Gail Borden, decided to find a way to make milk shelf stable, which ultimately resulted in the invention of condensed milk. At the start of the 20th century, the French and Vietnamese enjoyed a sweet it phe your daddy every day thanks to long-life milk.

If you often like sweet lattes or Frappuccinos, Vietnamese iced coffee is definitely a staple.

Egg coffee (Ca Phe Trung)

How to make vietnamese coffeeThe spruce eats

It might be hard to believe, but egg coffee tastes better than it looks.

This unique concoction was born out of a wartime milk shortage. Shortly after the French imported condensed milk into Vietnam, the Indochina War began and imports slowed. That’s when the shortage sparked a man’s creativity and led to the invention of one of the most delicious coffee drinks you’ve ever tried.

His name was Nguyen Van Giang and was a bartender at the Sofitel Legend Metropole Hotel. To make up for the lack of milk, he decided to add eggs instead, creating a delicate, frothy filling similar to the foam that coats a cappuccino. His creation was successful and eventually led him to open his own cafe called Cafe Giang in Hanoi, where his family serves from his signature coffee.

Egg coffee is best enjoyed hot and has nothing to do with the egg – it tastes more like tiramisu!

Avocado Coffee Smoothie (Sinh To Bo)

As a Southeast Asian country in the tropics, avocado is ubiquitous in Vietnam. So, it’s no surprise that people have come to find unique ways to incorporate it into their diets. As heavy coffee drinkers, it was inevitable that they would end up mixing it up at some point.

The result is a smooth and creamy drink, sweet with condensed milk, satiating with avocado and invigorating with caffeine. What better drink to enjoy as a mid-afternoon pick-me-up? It’s like an energy drink without all the food coloring and hard-to-pronounce ingredients.

Coconut Coffee (Cafe Cot Dua)

How to make vietnamese coffeeDelicious plate

Much like avocado, coconut can be found wherever you go in Vietnam. However, it is also popular in other neighboring countries, and as the history of the origin of this drink remains unknown, it cannot be fully confirmed that it originated in Vietnam. Either way, it’s been part of the local culture for decades, so it deserves a spot on this list.

Coconut coffee is pretty much a dessert. It’s made with coconut cream or coconut milk and can be enjoyed cold or hot, making it a great alternative to ice cream or your standard cappuccino. How can you say no to that?

Whichever Vietnamese coffee you choose, you can rest assured that your taste buds will appreciate it. Have a good sip!