How to parallel park

How to parallel park

What is parallel parking?

Parallel parking is a technique of parking parallel to the road, in line with other parked vehicles and facing in the same direction as traffic on that side of the road. To do this, you pull up parallel to the vehicle in front of the parking space and slowly back up into the parking space.

Try this interactive parallel parking simulator below: click #1 in the image.

Congratulations!

You are now a parallel park master.

Steps to Parallel Parking

Many drivers go to great lengths to avoid having to parallel park. While parallel parking is a little tricky and takes some practice to master, there is no reason to be nervous about this driving skill. Depending on where you live, you may be required to demonstrate your ability to do parallel parking during your driver license examination. Practice your skills before your road test or before you are required to parallel park on a busy roadway. Place two plastic cones or other objects approximately fifteen feet apart to simulate the standard size of this type of parking space. Use the following directions as a guide for practicing parallel parking for the first time.

Note: If you are practicing in a simulated parking space or an empty parking lot, assume that you are maneuvering around two other cars.

Passing your driving test shouldn’t be hard

Be fully prepared in days, not weeks with Premium.

How To Parallel Park Properly:

How to parallel park
Follow these steps to proper parallel parking

Position your car

Slowly steer your car so that it is parallel to the car parked in front of the empty space. Your car should be 2-3 feet from the side of the parked car.

Check your mirrors

Check your rear-view mirror, as well as your left and right side mirrors for other traffic. Once you are certain that there are no other vehicles in your blind spot, shift your car into reverse.

Start backing up

Slowly begin to reverse your vehicle along the side of the parked car. Begin to turn your steering wheel to the right.

Straighten the steering wheel

As your car moves into the empty parallel parking spot, slowly straighten your steering wheel as you continue to move backwards towards the parked car at the other end of the parking space. As you are maneuvering your vehicle, continuously check all mirrors and through your windows and front windshield to ensure you are not in danger of hitting either of the vehicles bordering the parallel parking space.

Begin turning your steering wheel to the left

Once the front of your vehicle has passed the back bumper of the vehicle in the parking spot in front of you, begin to turn your steering wheel to the left.

Check how close you are

Continuing to inch backwards in reverse and while beginning to straighten your steering wheel, look into your rear view mirror to see how close your vehicle is to the car in the parallel parking spot behind you.

Adjust your position

Once you have your vehicle straight and as close to the curb as possible, you may need to shift into forward to position your car so that there is an equal amount of space in front and behind your vehicle.

Don’t forget to pay before you leave

Many parallel parking spaces are assigned a parking meter. This is particularly true in major metropolitan areas. Make sure that you remember to feed coins into your parking meter after you parallel park your car.

Put the car into reverse

To exit a parallel park, first put your car into reverse and back towards the car behind you. Back as close as you reasonably can without putting yourself in danger of hitting the other vehicle.

Turn your steering wheel to the left

Next, turn your steering wheel to the left and shift your car into forward. Check for traffic in the lane you are about to enter. Making sure that you are not too close to the back bumper of the vehicle parked in front of you, slowly drive out of the parallel park.

The ability to perform parallel parking is an extremely useful driving skill.

Being confident in your ability to parallel park with ease will save you from having to search for a regular parking space in which to place your vehicle. With a few tries, you should be able to get the feel of parallel parking and impress your driving instructor.

Be honest: Do you get sweaty palms just thinking about parallel parking?

You’re not alone. Many drivers feel pressure when faced with squeezing their car between two others. But that doesn’t mean it’s difficult, says Joe Giammona, the CEO of 911 Driving Schools, where police officers and first responders teach this maneuver, along with other basics. “It’s just a matter of learning how to do it right,” he says. So consider this your crash course on how to parallel park correctly—every time.

  1. Find a Parking Spot
  2. Signal and Assume the Position
  3. Check Your Surroundings
  4. Start Reversing and Turn the Wheel
  5. Straighten Out and Turn the Wheel the Other Way
  6. Straighten and Align
  7. Admire Your Work

How to parallel park

How To Parallel Park

Step 1: Find the right fit.

Don’t try to parallel park in the first spot you see. Giammona suggests looking for something that’s roughly one-and-a-half times the length of your vehicle.

As you approach a space, he says, remember this handy acronym: MSMOG. Check Mirrors, turn on the right Signal, check Mirrors again, look Over your right shoulder, and Go when safe. Then pull up next to the car you’re going to parallel park behind, keeping a safe distance (two to three feet away) from its side.

Step 2: Put it in reverse.

Before you start moving, get into the proper backing position for parallel parking. For Giammona, that means sitting up tall and turning your shoulders 90 degrees from the back of your seat.

Next, reverse slowly until the middle of your car lines up with the other car’s rear bumper. If another car approaches from the rear, Giammona recommends remaining in position with your signal on and your car in reverse. “That way, the driver approaching knows your intention,” he says.

Step 3: Head toward the curb.

When the coast is clear, cut the steering wheel sharply toward the curb to approach at a
45-degree angle; continue until you can see the headlights of the car behind you in the driver’s-side wing mirror.

For most cars, when the passenger’s-side wing mirror is in line with the rear bumper of the car in front of you, that’s your cue to turn your wheels back the other way. Continue backing until your vehicle is aligned with the cars at either end, and parallel to the curb or road edge.

Step 4: Straighten and align.

Always center your car between the two other vehicles, as it “allows both cars room to exit the spaces,” says Giammona. Though proper distance from the curb varies by state, typically your car should be between 12 and 18 inches from the curb, he says.

If your right rear wheel taps the curb, most of the time you can put the vehicle in drive, turn the wheels all the way to the right and move forward until the vehicle is parallel, says Giammona. Then do one last check on your distance from the curb.

Happy parallel parking.

Do you often have trouble finding parking? Check out the GEICO Mobile app’s Parking Garage Locator feature, and download GEICO Mobile for free from the App Store or Google Play.

Next: Parking can be a stressful part of driving, but it doesn’t have to be. Read more to find out how to handle stressful driving situations.

By Danielle Blundell

How to parallel park

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Leave a comment (cancel reply)

Your paralell parking park was very precise.

I wish to drive a car and parking

Louise Paolillo says,

Drivers need good, smart and sensible tips. I have seen to many senseless acts of stupidity.
Stop rushing around we all want to arrive safely.

Gail DeGruy-Rhodes says,

Excellent articles to simply remind drivers who oftentimes drive on “automatic.” Defensive driving on whether on street, freeway, or highway, can save you the aggravation as well as injury or your life and that of others.

Donna Glanschneg says,

Thanks for info, especially about the round a bout !

Patricia Sadler says,

Thank you! Helpful reminders always help and are appreciated. The parallel parking is easier said than done.

donna lovins says,

I loved all the info thanks so much

Delmi Yates says,

Excellent videos thanks for taking your time teaching us how to drive and park.

Barbara Labbe says,

Thank you I am so pleased that you are providing this service for your insured drivers this demonstration was most helpful.

Barbara J Trueheart says,

Thanks for the reminders to parallel parking.

DId I really just watch this video of you showing a driver to cross their arms while turning…. Bad mojo, wht if they accidently tap the other cars bumper and the air bag goes off? Both arms could be broken and smashed into the face. Shame on you Geico for showing what not to do.

How to parallel park

Are you teenager preparing for your road test? Or perhaps an adult who just wants to park a little closer to that restaurant or special event! Well then you’ve come to the right place. Parallel Parking in 4 Easy Steps!

Parallel Parking Should be Easy

Parallel parking does not have to be so intimidating. Matter of fact it can be quite easy if you follow a few simple steps. The truth is many teenagers will attempt to parallel park on their road test and that will be the last time they ever do it again. Most adults just choose to park farther away because they just don’t want to deal with the frustration.

The truth is most of the driver education gurus will try to sell you on one of the many systems that help get you into that space quick and easy. The problem is those systems only work with cars that are a similar size to the car you are parking behind. Many of those systems also do not work if the car you are parking behind is too far or too close to the curb. I have researched all of these strategies and have found one system that stands out from all the rest. This system requires some practice , but is easily adaptable to any parallel parking situation. You need a minimum of five feet of space beyond the length of your car to parallel park effectively.

Parallel Parking Steps:

  1. Signal right and line your car’s seat or side view mirror up with the car you will parking behind. You should be about 2-3 feet away from the other car.
  2. Crank your steering wheel all the way to the right (Clockwise) and begin to roll backwards. When your seat is even with bumper of the car you are parking behind, straighten your steering wheel (usually 1-1 1/2 cranks of the wheel counter clockwise). You have now formed an angle with the other car. This angle is the most important part of parallel parking. It should be about 45 degrees. If the angle is too big you will hit the curb, too small and you will be too far from curb!
  3. Continue to roll back (look back over your right shoulder) until the front end of your car just passes the other car’s bumper. As soon as this happens crank your steering wheel all the way to the left (counter-clockwise), rolling back into the space.
  4. Shift to Drive and roll slowly forward as you straighten your wheels. Finish with your wheels totally straight.

Congratulations you have parallel parked!

Keys to Using this Parallel Parking System:

  • The first time you try this you may want to stop in between each step. As you become more confident you can simply keep the car moving slowly as you move through the steps.
  • Determine the angle! The reality is that the angle determines how close or far away you will be from the curb. 45 degrees is the ideal angle. Too big an angle and you will hit the curb or perhaps the bumper of the car you are parking behind. Too small of an angle and you will be too far away from the curb. If you are only parking behind one car and there is plenty of space behind it, then it is better to use a smaller angle and crank the car in a little bit later. This is ideal for teenagers taking the road test and are only required to park behind one car.
  • Now get out and practice, practice, practice!

Common Parallel Parking Adjustments

  1. Parking behind a vehicle larger than yours- Don’t wait to line up with a larger vehicles bumper. Set your angle earlier!
  2. Parking behind a vehicle that is too far from curb- In this situation you may want too establish a larger angle of entry (over 45) or simply roll back a little bit farther, after you have passed the cars bumper.
  3. Parking behind a vehicle that is crooked- Just line up your car straight. Do not line up parallel with the “crooked car.” Then just go through the steps normally.

Conclusion

Like any other system you must learn the steps and then practice them over and over. It is suggested that you stop in between the steps the first few times you practice parallel parking. As you begin to feel confident you can pick up the pace.

Don’t forget to signal right as you approach the vehicle you are parking behind. Also remember to always look in the direction you are moving. That means looking over your back shoulder when the car is in reverse. If you are a teenager taking your road test. Parallel parking may be the only time the examiner observes you driving in reverse. Finally don’t forget to signal, check your mirror and then check your blind spot when you leave the parking space.

Happy Parallel Parking!

Want more Driver Education tools and strategies. Check out our RESOURCES page. All the content is FREE! Want some important tips to passing the road test? Submit your email and get your FREE copy of “Keys to Passing your Road Test.”There is also a coupon code to receive $10 off the Insurance and Point Reduction class! Good Luck and Happy Driving!

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How to parallel park

Few driving tasks are as intimidating as parallel parking. Many new motorists have failed an otherwise perfect driving test on this technicality alone. How many of us avoid parking on busy streets because we’re just not good at parallel parking? Thank goodness for strip-mall parking lots the size of a small state―maybe humiliation-free parking is the real motivation for suburban sprawl..

  1. Seek out a space you feel comfortable that you can safely get your car into without crunching into another car. Drive around the block until you find a larger gap if you need to; you will need a space that’s several feet longer than your car.
  2. Check your rearview mirror and driver-side mirror as you approach the space to ensure another car is not riding on your tail. Signal toward the space as you approach it, slow down, and stop. If another motorist rides up on your rear, simply maintain your position and keep signaling. You might even need to roll down your window and wave the other driver around; they might not have realized you’re trying to park.
  3. Line up your vehicle with the parked vehicle directly in front of your desired spot. Don’t get too close on the side, or you might scrape the other car when you make your move. But you also don’t want to be too far away―two or three feet will suffice. Position your vehicle parallel to the parked car, aligning your bumpers.
  4. Checkyour surroundings. Use all your mirrors and check your blind spotsfor cars, bicyclists and pedestrians BEFORE you begin to reverse your car.
  5. Put your vehicle in reverse. Look over your other shoulder at the space to assess the gap.
  6. Release the brakes and slowly begin backing into the turn.
  7. Turn the steering wheel when you see the front car’s back bumper. When your back axel is aligned with the front car’s bumper, turn your steering wheel all the way to the right (assuming you’re parking on the right-hand side of the road).
  8. Reverseuntil your car is at a 45-degreeangle. Then, turnyour steering wheel in the opposite direction. Imagineyour car is creating an S shape as you are maneuvering into the spot.
  9. Keep backing up until your car is in the spot. Besure to take a few quick glances at the front of your car to make sure youdon’t hit the vehicle in front of your spot.
  10. Pullforward to straighten out. Once you’re in the spot, you can turn the steeringwheel so your tires are parallel to the curb.

Voila! At this point, if all went well, you should be tucked nicely in the space and parallel parked. If you aren’t, there’s no harm done. Just signal that you’re about to leave the curb, pull out and alongside the car in front of you, signal toward the curb again, and start over. You won’t be the first person―and certainly not the last―who tries parallel parking a few times before getting it right.

Keep in mind that some states require your vehicle to be within a certain distance from the curb. The ideal distance when parallel parking, for the safety of you and your vehicle, is to be within a few inches of the curb. If you’re not close enough, don’t be afraid to start again. And remember—practice makes perfect!

How to parallel park

Although parallel parking is not a routine occurrence while driving, most states require that you show proficiency at it as part of your required driver’s license examination, especially when you are first acquiring your license. Practicing with traffic cones is the safest and easiest method to learn how to parallel park and helps prepare you to handle tricky real-life driving scenarios. With practice, parallel parking can become a natural part of your driving skills.

Step 1

How to parallel park

Park your car by a curb in an empty parking lot. Place one cone three feet behind your car and place another cone three feet in front of your car. Get into your car and slowly drive your car away from the cones and the curb.

Step 2

How to parallel park

Check your mirrors to be certain no cars or pedestrians are coming. Put on your turn signal and drive slowly to the cones, then come to a stop.

Step 3

Line the front seat of your car up with the front cone. Apply strong pressure to your steering wheel and turn it toward the curb. Place your car in reverse and slowly back up while looking over your shoulder to ensure you will not hit anything. Continue to slowly back up until you have an ample amount of room to maneuver your vehicle between the cones.

Step 4

Place your foot on the brake. Turn your steering wheel away from the curb and continue to reverse slowly. Look in your mirrors and in front of you to ensure your vehicle is moving correctly between the cones. Move your car until you are close to the rear cone.

Step 5

Place your foot on the brake and put your car into drive. Slowly remove your foot from the brake and move your car forward so that you are aligned between the two cones.

Practice as many times as needed. Move the cones to two feet within the front and back of your car when you feel more comfortable with your abilities. Note that each state has different requirements as to how close the cones will be during your driver’s license examination. Check with your Department of Motor Vehicles for specific information on parallel parking in your state.

How to parallel park

What is parallel parking?

Parallel parking is a technique of parking parallel to the road, in line with other parked vehicles and facing in the same direction as traffic on that side of the road. To do this, you pull up parallel to the vehicle in front of the parking space and slowly back up into the parking space.

Try this interactive parallel parking simulator below: click #1 in the image.

Congratulations!

You are now a parallel park master.

Steps to Parallel Parking

Many drivers go to great lengths to avoid having to parallel park. While parallel parking is a little tricky and takes some practice to master, there is no reason to be nervous about this driving skill. Depending on where you live, you may be required to demonstrate your ability to do parallel parking during your driver license examination. Practice your skills before your road test or before you are required to parallel park on a busy roadway. Place two plastic cones or other objects approximately fifteen feet apart to simulate the standard size of this type of parking space. Use the following directions as a guide for practicing parallel parking for the first time.

Note: If you are practicing in a simulated parking space or an empty parking lot, assume that you are maneuvering around two other cars.

Passing your driving test shouldn’t be hard

Be fully prepared in days, not weeks with Premium.

How To Parallel Park Properly:

How to parallel park
Follow these steps to proper parallel parking

Position your car

Slowly steer your car so that it is parallel to the car parked in front of the empty space. Your car should be 2-3 feet from the side of the parked car.

Check your mirrors

Check your rear-view mirror, as well as your left and right side mirrors for other traffic. Once you are certain that there are no other vehicles in your blind spot, shift your car into reverse.

Start backing up

Slowly begin to reverse your vehicle along the side of the parked car. Begin to turn your steering wheel to the right.

Straighten the steering wheel

As your car moves into the empty parallel parking spot, slowly straighten your steering wheel as you continue to move backwards towards the parked car at the other end of the parking space. As you are maneuvering your vehicle, continuously check all mirrors and through your windows and front windshield to ensure you are not in danger of hitting either of the vehicles bordering the parallel parking space.

Begin turning your steering wheel to the left

Once the front of your vehicle has passed the back bumper of the vehicle in the parking spot in front of you, begin to turn your steering wheel to the left.

Check how close you are

Continuing to inch backwards in reverse and while beginning to straighten your steering wheel, look into your rear view mirror to see how close your vehicle is to the car in the parallel parking spot behind you.

Adjust your position

Once you have your vehicle straight and as close to the curb as possible, you may need to shift into forward to position your car so that there is an equal amount of space in front and behind your vehicle.

Don’t forget to pay before you leave

Many parallel parking spaces are assigned a parking meter. This is particularly true in major metropolitan areas. Make sure that you remember to feed coins into your parking meter after you parallel park your car.

Put the car into reverse

To exit a parallel park, first put your car into reverse and back towards the car behind you. Back as close as you reasonably can without putting yourself in danger of hitting the other vehicle.

Turn your steering wheel to the left

Next, turn your steering wheel to the left and shift your car into forward. Check for traffic in the lane you are about to enter. Making sure that you are not too close to the back bumper of the vehicle parked in front of you, slowly drive out of the parallel park.

The ability to perform parallel parking is an extremely useful driving skill.

Being confident in your ability to parallel park with ease will save you from having to search for a regular parking space in which to place your vehicle. With a few tries, you should be able to get the feel of parallel parking and impress your driving instructor.

Parallel parking can be frightening for any driver. You are oftentimes forced to park in a tight parking spot in-between two cars. Your goal is not to hit any of the vehicles around you while not parking too close to the road, curb or any cars. Also, you may be trying to parallel park in a busy street, which can trigger anxiety.

With all these different factors at play, parking parallel can be difficult. However, there are parallel parking rules and a specific process that will help you understand how to parallel park . Additionally, there are 34 states that have a DMV parallel parking section in the driving test , so knowing how to parallel park perfectly is crucial. Learn about the process, tips and places where you can and cannot park below.

The Process of Parallel Parking

Trying to learn how to parallel park can be tough. It is something that many drivers are not forced to do on a daily basis. Also, it is a parking method that is difficult to learn because of all the specific steps that must be followed.

If you are preparing to take your driving exam or just want to improve your parking, the parallel parking guide below will help you. If you follow each step, you will learn the easiest way to parallel park .

Find a Parking Spot

Find a parking spot where you can safely park in without damaging your vehicle. The parallel parking measurements are something to consider.

You want to find a space that is approximately nine feet long and 20 feet wide. Also, make sure the location that you find is a legal parking area and not a tow-away zone.

Check Your Mirrors

The second step in the parallel parking instructions is to check your rear-view, left and right side mirrors for traffic as you approach the parking spot.

You want to ensure that there is no vehicle immediately behind you. As you begin to approach the parking space, slowly brake and use your turning signal.

By doing so, you are letting drivers know that you are trying to park. If another vehicle comes up behind you and is not going around you, let them know that you are parking.

Position Your Vehicle

You want to position your car with the vehicle that is parked in front of the spot you want to park in. The best way to parallel park is by aligning your bumper with that adjacent vehicle’s bumper.

Make sure that you do not get too close or far from the automobile. You want to be two feet away from the car. This will allow you to have enough room to back into the parking spot without scraping the other vehicle.

Put Your Car in Reverse

Make sure that there is no traffic, bike or pedestrian behind you before parallel parking . Once you see the road is clear, put your vehicle in reverse.

Look over your shoulder towards the space and slowly begin to reverse into the parallel parking space . Once you see your back seat is aligned with the front car’s bumper, turn your steering wheel quickly towards the parking space.

You want to slowly continue to reverse until your car is at a 45-degree angle entering the spot.

When your tire is near the curb, you must turn your steering wheel back towards the road and slowly move backwards. You want to continue driving in reverse until you are close to the vehicle parked behind you.

Move Forward and Center the Vehicle

Put your car in drive and align yourself in-between both vehicles. Once your vehicle is straight and you are in the parking spot, make sure your parallel parking distance from the curb is no more than one foot.

You do not want to be far from the curb, as that increase the chances of a passing vehicle scraping the side of your car.

How to Exit a Parallel Parking Space

Now that you know the steps to parallel parking , it is just as important to know how to exit the parking space. You cannot just turn and drive out of the parking spot. There is a guide that you must follow to leave as well.

Put Your Car in Reverse

When you are ready leave, it is important to make sure there are no pedestrians behind your vehicle. Once your surroundings are clear, put your car in reverse and get as close to the car behind you as possible without hitting it.

Put Your Car in Drive

You now have to turn your steering wheel all the way to the left. Before driving off, you must put your turning signal on. This will indicate to other drivers that you are leaving the parking spot. Once there is no traffic or pedestrians in the area, make sure you have enough room from the car in front of you and drive out of the parallel parking space .

Where to Practice Parallel Parking

Now that you are familiar with the parallel parking guide , you are probably wondering where to practice parallel parking . If you are looking to practice parking parallel for the first time, you can train on your driveway.

You do not want to practice parking in between two cars right away because of the possibility of an accident. Instead, place two cones 20 feet away from each other and start practicing.

Once you are comfortable enough, you can begin to park in between vehicles. Also, you can train in an empty parking lot or any area that will allow you to place cones. Furthermore, it is important to avoid practicing in a location with heavy traffic.

Where You Cannot Parallel Park

You are not able to parallel park anywhere you would like. Just because you see an open space on the side of the road does not mean you can park there. You cannot park:

  • Near a fire hydrant.
  • Within 30 feet of a stop sign.
  • In a train or bus lane.
  • Where curbs are marked red.
  • On a crosswalk or bike path.
  • On private property
  • On another person’s driveway without consent.

If you find a parallel parking spot that is not in any of the locations listed above, you can probably park there. Just make sure to follow this parallel parking guide .

How to parallel park

Parallel parking can be intimidating. Especially if you’ve seen videos of people doing it horribly, you might be scared to try to parallel park by yourself. But luckily, there are a few steps you can follow that will work like a charm every time. If you’re ready to parallel park like a pro, just follow the below parallel parking tips, practice a few times, and you’ll be confident to parallel park anywhere, anytime! Are you ready to learn how to parallel park?

Depending on where you live, learning how to parallel park might be a required part of your driver’s license test. But, even if it’s not required, it’s still a great idea to learn how to parallel park. It comes in handy more often than you might think! In order to practice parallel parking, we recommend using two cones in place of the other parked cars before trying out your skills on a busy street—just in case you make a mistake.

Step-by-Step Tips on How to Parallel Park

These tips will go over how to parallel park in a real-life situation. Are you ready to master this maneuver?

1. Drive around until you find a spot that looks big enough for your car, plus a little extra room.

You don’t want to be trying to cram your car into a tiny space. Generally speaking, the more room you have, the better chance you have of parallel parking successfully. It’s OK if you have to drive around a little to make sure you find a great-sized spot. You can refer to the average parallel parking spot dimensions here if you want to get a better feel for the space you’ll be working with.

2. Once you find your spot, slow down, and put on your blinker.

There will likely be other cars behind you, so you will need to let them know that you plan on parallel parking. The spot will always be on your right-hand side because you are supposed to park the car facing the way traffic goes, so put your right blinker on before slowing down to a halt.

3. Pull up next to the parked car in front of the spot.

The key here is to try to line up your car with the parked car. The back of your car should be at about the same spot as the back of the other car. You should be approximately two to three feet from the side of the parked car as well. OK, now, are you ready to back it up?

4. Check your mirrors, then turn your steering wheel all the way to the right while stopped.

Before you back up, double-check no one is behind you or in your blind spots. Then, turn the steering wheel completely to the right before you put the car into reverse. This will enable you to cut the angle drastically so you can back into the spot.

5. Look out the back window and inch backward.

Always keep an eye out for other motorists. Keeping your steering wheel completely turned, put the car into reverse and slowly back into the spot.

6. STOP when you can see the right-front part of the rear-parked car in the middle of your windshield.

When you are looking back as you reverse, you should be able to see out the back window. Once the back window view shows more of the sidewalk and the right-front of the parked care behind you, take that as a stern command to stop reversing. If this part sounds difficult to you, or you just want a little more confidence, you can always buy a backup camera for your car—it is super useful and will also make you a safer driver overall.

7. Turn your steering wheel all the way left and slowly continue backing up.

If you think you are too close to the rear car before doing this, feel free to jump out of the car quickly (while it’s in park) to assess how much space there is between you and the car. Once you parallel park more often, you will get a feel for how close is too close without checking. When you decide all is clear, turn the steering wheel all the way to the left and continue backing up. Doing so is going to help straighten you out a little more.

8. STOP, then adjust your car.

Once you get as close as possible to the rear-parked car and your car feels pretty straight, stop. Then, turn your steering wheel to the middle or to the right one last time (depending on how straight your car is) and inch forward to completely adjust and straighten out your car. If you did all the steps correctly, you should be sitting pretty directly and safely in-between the two parked cars!

And voila! You’ve learned how to parallel park your car. Remember that parallel parking isn’t so much a magic skill as it is simply following the parallel parking rules. As long as you follow these steps, you will be able to parallel park in any space that’s big enough for your car. Let us know in the comments if you have any additional questions, and we’ll try to help you out.