How to pass the maryland non commercial class c driver’s test

Updated May 2022

We know that taking your Maryland road test can be nerve-wracking. With a little preparation and insight into the test itself, there’s nothing to be worried about. To start, make sure you know the specific requirements in Maryland, that you understand what you’ll be tested on, and then practice a lot. Here we break down exactly what you need to know to pass your Maryland road test.

What to know before your Maryland road test

First, you’ll need to have a road test scheduled. There are no walk-ins. Save time and make a Maryland road test appointment online. Next, make sure you have the current registration and insurance for the vehicle you’ll be using for your test. You’ll need these when you check-in at the DMV. Then, you’ll need to make sure your vehicle meets all of the state requirements and that you have a licensed driver to accompany you to your road test . We’ve listed out the car requirements for you below, to make it easier to go through and check off each one.

Once you confirm your road test date, paperwork, and vehicle, it’s time for more practice. Specifically, we recommend you practice the maneuvers listed below in the neighborhood around the DMV where your road test is scheduled. Most Maryland RMVs start with a closed portion of the test and then have you drive a route in the neighborhood. Pay special attention to anything unusual like closures and construction — examiners love to add these into the test.

What are the vehicle requirements for the Maryland road test?

We’ve seen many people not be able to take their test because their car did not meet these requirements. So check and check again. We also recommend you take the time to learn how all the controls work. Here’s what your testing vehicle needs to have in Maryland:

  • Current registration and insurance
  • A windshield with no cracks or debris that would obstruct the view
  • At least 1/2 a tank of gas
  • Tires properly inflated
  • Driver and passenger doors that open and close properly from inside and outside
  • Working lights: headlights, taillights, brake lights, and turn signals as well as a working horn and rearview mirror

If you don’t have a vehicle that meets all of these requirements and/or a sponsor to take you to your road test, you have a few options. You can get a car through a driving school, see if a friend or family can accompany you with their car, or Skip offers a car and driver for the Maryland road test which you can reserve ahead of time online.

What to know the day of your Maryland road test

First, get to the DMV early! If you’re late, the Registry of Motor Vehicles (RMV) will ask you to reschedule. We recommend arriving 15 minutes before your scheduled test time. At most RMVs i n Maryland, there is a dedicated window specifically for road tests. So when you arrive, first look for that window to avoid the long general line.

After check-in, your licensed driver will drive you both around to the side of the RMV where you’ll see marked lanes to wait for your road test. An examiner will come out and meet you, verify the registration and insurance for the vehicle and ask for your permit. Then your licensed driver will get out of the vehicle, you’ll move over to the driver’s seat and the examiner will begin the test, which starts with the vehicle safety check. The examiner will ask you to show working lights, turns signals, hand signals, and horn.

Then it’s time for the driving portion, which is about 15 minutes. At most locations, this starts in the closed track at the RMV. This is usually where they will test you on the reverse 2-point parking. Be sure to signal when leaving the track. Many people get points off for forgetting to do this.

Each RMV location is a bit different. Gaithersburg, for example, is incredibly busy all the time, so you can expect longer waits at that location. Glen Burnie is the DOT headquarters and a much larger facility, so there they have room to have the entire road test in a closed track.

Lastly, most examiners take notes on a tablet during your test. This is nothing to worry about! They’re likely just checking off maneuvers as you do them.

What driving maneuvers will be on the Maryland road test?

You’ll be happy to hear that in Maryland, there is no parallel parking or 3-point turns on the road test. So use the time you’re not practicing those maneuvers to get the ones listed below down pat! Maryland testers are strict. Practice these maneuvers:

  1. Reverse 2-point parking. Where you drive past the parking space and then back into space.
  2. Observe right-of-way: allow pedestrians to cross. Remember to pull over and stop for emergency vehicles to pass and don’t enter an intersection where you’ll interfere with other traffic.
  3. Stop quickly: be able to make a quick and safe stop when the examiner instructs you to at 20 mph.
  4. Backing up: back for a distance of 50 feet at a slow speed while turning your head and looking over your right shoulder to the rear. You cannot use a backup camera on your test, so don’t rely on this. We’ve seen many people get points off for not actually turning and looking.
  5. Signal and turn: get into the proper lane and signal your turn for the last *200 feet*. Right and left turn will be on your test. Even though they’re basic, don’t forget to practice these.
  6. Passing: Always look ahead and behind to make sure you can pass safely.
  7. Follow at a safe distance: don’t follow too close behind other cars. Keep a minimum following distance of three to four seconds.

In addition to the above, make sure to watch for bike lanes and pedestrians. Also remember to always be checking your mirrors, in addition, to actually turning and looking.

What is the most common mistake on the Maryland road test?

The reverse 2-point turn. People get this wrong all the time. We understand, it’s not a maneuver many of us use often in everyday life, so it can be easy to forget about or dismiss. Now you know, so practice this on repeat until it’s smooth and comfortable.

What happens after my Maryland road test?

First off, congrats on taking your road test! You won’t get a score sheet in Maryland, just a mark of a pass or fail. If you passed, you’ll go right back into the RMV where they will issue you your temporary license. Your actual laminated license will come in the mail to you. If you failed, not to worry, most people pass by their second try. Each time, make sure you have a licensed driver and car for your road test. In the meantime, practice what you missed and reschedule when you feel ready 🙂

More Maryland DMV Questions?

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How to pass the maryland non commercial class c driver's test

If you are applying for a new drivers license in Maryland, you will be required to take a Motor Vehicle Administration (MVA) driving skills test.

The MVA is administered by the Maryland Department of Transportation and is the agency in charge of issuing drivers licenses and other driving and vehicle-related transactions in the state of Maryland.

Preparing for the Non-Commercial MOV Driving Skills Test

By studying the Maryland Driver’s Manual, you can learn all of the required information needed for passing the written part of the test for a drivers license. Knowing the information in this handbook is also essential for passing the road skills driving test.

This booklet covers traffic laws in Maryland, the meaning of traffic signs and signals, and safe driving practices every driver must know. The booklet has easy-to-read text and colored graphics, making comprehension simple.

The Maryland MVA also produces this same information in audio form, available at their website, and you can download a free pdf copy online. The booklet and audios are free of charge and are available in English, Spanish, Chinese, Vietnamese, French, Korean, and Nepali versions.

The driving knowledge test at MVA offices is given on a computer screen, and versions of the test are available in all of the languages listed above. Oral examinations are also available, but they must be scheduled in advance.

Preparing for the driving section of the test requires 60 hours of practice driving with supervision by a licensed driver.

Scheduling a MOV Driving Test

Driving skills tests in Maryland must be scheduled in advance online at the MVA website. You can also call the Customer Service Center toll-free at 1-800-950-1682 for further help in arranging a driving test.

Taking the MOV Driving Skills Test

You must provide the vehicle for driving during your test, and a licensed driver must drive you to the testing location and then remain with you until the examiner arrives and verifies his or her drivers license.

While taking the driving test, no one may be in the car except the license applicant, the examiner, and an approved interpreter, if one is needed.

You can take the Maryland non-commercial, Class C driving test at any full-service MVA branch office. The first part of the test is conducted on a closed driving course, followed by driving on public roads. If you fail any part of the test on the closed course, the test will be terminated and will not proceed to the open-road driving portion.

Before taking the test, you will be required to show:

  • proof of valid insurance and vehicle registration
  • current registration tags on the license plate
  • functional seat belts
  • unobstructed windshield and operational windows
  • rear view mirrors are working
  • tire pressure is correctly inflated
  • at least ½ a tank of gas in the vehicle

If you are applying for a new drivers license in Maryland, you will be required to take a Motor Vehicle Administration (MVA) driving skills test.

The MVA is administered by the Maryland Department of Transportation and is the agency in charge of issuing drivers licenses and other driving and vehicle-related transactions in the state of Maryland.

Preparing for the Non-Commercial MOV Driving Skills Test

By studying the Maryland Driver’s Manual, you can learn all of the required information needed for passing the written part of the test for a drivers license. Knowing the information in this handbook is also essential for passing the road skills driving test.

This booklet covers traffic laws in Maryland, the meaning of traffic signs and signals, and safe driving practices every driver must know. The booklet has easy-to-read text and colored graphics, making comprehension simple.

The Maryland MVA also produces this same information in audio form, available at their website, and you can download a free pdf copy online. The booklet and audios are free of charge and are available in English, Spanish, Chinese, Vietnamese, French, Korean, and Nepali versions.

The driving knowledge test at MVA offices is given on a computer screen, and versions of the test are available in all of the languages listed above. Oral examinations are also available, but they must be scheduled in advance.

Preparing for the driving section of the test requires 60 hours of practice driving with supervision by a licensed driver. Driver’s education courses offer the behind-the-wheel training needed to meet this qualification.

Scheduling a MOV Driving Test

Driving skills tests in Maryland must be scheduled in advance online at the MVA website. You can also call the Customer Service Center toll-free at 1-800-950-1682 for further help in arranging a driving test.

Taking the MOV Driving Skills Test

You must provide the vehicle for driving during your test, and a licensed driver must drive you to the testing location and then remain with you until the examiner arrives and verifies his or her drivers license.

While taking the driving test, no one may be in the car except the license applicant, the examiner, and an approved interpreter, if one is needed.

You can take the Maryland non-commercial, Class C driving test at any full-service MVA branch office. The first part of the test is conducted on a closed driving course, followed by driving on public roads. If you fail any part of the test on the closed course, the test will be terminated and will not proceed to the open-road driving portion.

Before taking the test, you will be required to show:

  • proof of valid insurance and vehicle registration
  • current registration tags on the license plate
  • functional seat belts
  • unobstructed windshield and operational windows
  • rear view mirrors are working
  • tire pressure is correctly inflated
  • at least half a tank of gas in the vehicle
  • no dashboard warning lights displaying

During the closed-course section of the test, you will be required to make a reverse, two-point turn in less than 3 minutes and show that you have basic control of the vehicle.

Finally, you must drive on public roads in a variety of traffic situations while following traffic rules and driving safely.

There are separate classes of commercial driver’s licenses in the Act. All states issue licenses in these categories. These class designations are from the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration.

  • Class A: These include a combination of vehicles that have a gross vehicle weight rating ( GWVR ) of 26,001+ pounds. Also, the GVWR of the vehicles being towed is over 10,000 pounds.
  • Class B: Class B includes a single automobile with a GVWR of 26,001+ pounds, or any likely motor vehicle carrying another vehicle having 10,000 pounds GVWR .
  • Class C: Class C includes vehicle or any combination of them not meeting the specifications of Class A or Class B, but is either designated to transport 16 or more commuters (that includes the driver, or is designated for hazardous materials carriage.

When a person obtains their CDL , they take the required General Knowledge test , which is mandatory for any CDL , and the necessary tests for whichever endorsements they need or want for that particular class of the license. The driver takes the behind the wheels test in the vehicle that falls into one of the above classes.
Some states may make exceptions for snow removal vehicles, farm vehicles, some military vehicles and fire and emergency vehicles.

Exam requirements for Class C CDL License

For a CDL of Class C , you will need to pass the following exams:

  • General Knowledge Test- This test will gauge your basic control of the vehicle, gear shifting, vehicle inspection, seeing hazards and communicating, anti-lock braking systems, etc.
  • Pre-Trip Inspection – This test entails internal and external inspection, emergency exit and evacuation, special safety considerations.
  • HazMat-This entails learning and knowing the intent of regulations; bulk tank loading, unloading and marking; driving and parking rules; driver responsibilities; communication rules; emergencies; loading and unloading, etc.
  • Passenger Transport- This entails vehicle inspection; loading and unloading passengers; emergency exits; rail road crossing and draw bridges; after-trip vehicle inspection; prohibited practices; use of brake-door interlocks, etc.

Other state required CDL exams may also be required depending on the state you reside in. You can find Maryland-specific information here

Requirements for getting a CDL in Maryland

The following are the requirements for obtaining a CDL in Maryland:

  • You must own a standard class driver license
  • You must prove your identity by establishing your age and proving that you are a US citizen
  • You must furnish two forms of documentation that prove your residency in Maryland
  • You must reveal your Social Security Number
  • You should be 18 years old in order to obtain an intrastate CDL and 21 years of age for an interstate one
  • You are required to pass a physical exam from the Department of Transportation and provide the examiner with a card or report.
  1. Fees

The fee includes a learner’s permit (including tests) for $90; license renewal for $50; duplicate license – $20 and license conversion (out-of-state to MD license) for $65.

  1. Federal Requirements

You will self certify in one of these driving categories below:

1- Excepted Interstate
2- Excepted Intrastate
3- Non-Excepted Interstate
4- Non-Excepted Intrastate

You will be asked to provide the Division of Vehicles and a federal medical certificate if you pick the Non-Excepted Interstate.
In case you aim to drive a certain kind of equipment, then you will be asked to maintain an additional endorsement for that particular equipment. In addition, you will need the following, which require additional testing:

  • S- School Buses (knowledge and skills tests)
  • P- Passenger (knowledge and skills tests)
  • N- Tank Vehicle (knowledge test only)
  • H- Hazardous Materials (knowledge test only)
  • T- Double/Triple Trailers (knowledge test only)

If you vehicle bears air brakes, then you will be required to pass a written knowledge test about them too.
Those CDL holders who also have a hazmat, or a hazardous material endorsement, have to go through a background investigation and fingerprinting which are both undertaken by the Transportation Safety Administration ( TSA ).

DC DMV offers a commercial driver license (CDL) to professional drivers who reside in the District. The DC DMV CDL is a credential that complies with federal identification guidelines and can be used as a federal-level ID. It is valid for 8 years and can be renewed. CDL holders are held to a higher standard when they operate any type of motor vehicle on public roads.

Driving a commercial motor vehicle (CMV) requires a higher level of knowledge, experience, skills, and physical abilities than driving a car or other non-commercial vehicle. To get a DC DMV CDL, you must pass both skills and knowledge testing geared to these higher standards. Additionally, you must take Entry-Level Driver Training by a FMCSA approved training provider for first time Class A and Class B CDL holders; CDL upgrades to Class B and A; and Endorsements S, P and H.

DC DMV groups types of CMVs and provides a DC DMV CDL for these classes of CMV with additional endorsements and restrictions for specific types of vehicles.

To get a DC DMV CDL, you must:

  • Have a valid non-commercial driver license (NCDL).
  • Meet identity, residency, and good driving history eligibility qualifications.
  • Take the applicable CDL knowledge tests.
  • Get a CDL learner permit.
  • Take Entry-Level Driver Training (ELDT) by an approved FMCSA training provider, if required.
  • Pass the CDL road skills test.

More information on each of the steps and requirements is available at the links below: