How to password protect internet explorer

If for some reason, you wish to restrict the use of the Internet on your computer, you can restrict the use of Internet Explorer, by password protecting its use. That, of course, makes sense if you have no other browsers installed.

Password protect Internet Explorer

In Internet Explorer 9 and earlier, you have to start Internet Explorer > Tools > Internet Options > Content tab > Content Advisor > Click Enable.

In the Content Advisor dialog box which opens up, click on General tab > Ensure Supervisor can type password is checked > Click Create password.

In the Create Supervisor Password box which opens, fill in the details.

Click OK / Apply all the way! Restart IE.

Now the next time anyone tries to open a website with Internet Explorer, the user will be presented with a dialog box asking him/her to enter the password and be presented with 3 options:

– Always allow the site to be viewed without the password.
– Always allow that specific web page to be viewed without the password.
– Allow the site to open one time only.

This way you can also decide on which sites you would like to allow unrestricted access and which sites you’d like to disallow.

Internet Explorer 10 onwards, things have changed.

Now you will not see Content Advisor section. So to bring up Content Advisor, open the Run box, type the following and hit Enter:

Now you can click on the General tab and follow the same procedure.

In this way, you can password protect Internet Explorer 11 on Windows 10 and Windows 8.1 too.

You might also want to check out how to password protect and restrict access to any application using AppAdmin.

Date: September 11, 2015 Tags: IE, Online safety

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Anand Khanse is the Admin of TheWindowsClub.com, a 10-year Microsoft MVP (2006-16) & a Windows Insider MVP. Please read the entire post & the comments first, create a System Restore Point before making any changes to your system & be careful about any 3rd-party offers while installing freeware.

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Here is a guide on How to protect the various Internet Browsers using Password. This can be done manually and requires no additional plugins or add-ons. Here are the ways to lock your browsers and maintain privacy:

How to password protect internet explorer

Password Protecting Internet Explorer:

In the Internet Explorer, Click on the Tools > Internet Options > Content tab

Enable the Content Advisor. Click OK. Enter a Default Supervisor password.

After this next step is to set the password. To do so, click on Settings > General tab in the Content Advisor. Tick the option like in the screenshot below.

How to password protect internet explorer

The content control in IE is now password protected. You can’t it unless you enter the password. You will be prompted for your password everytime you will the content control panel.

Password Protecting Mozilla Firefox:

Firefox gives the user the option of setting up a master password for entering the stored passwords in the respective sites. For example, you have stored a password [i.e. asked the firefox to remember the password for an account the you use frequently]. You can stop others from getting the stored passwords. To do that, Just follow the steps:

  • From the Menu bar, Go to Tools > Options
  • In Options window , click on the security tab and check Use a master password.

How to password protect internet explorer

Thats it. You have created a master password and next time you open firefox, you will be promoted to enter the master password when you try to enterstored passwords into the sites.

The master password just protects info such as passwords, but if you are looking to protect the entire Firefox profile, then use the ProfilePassword add-on for firefox.

How to password protect internet explorer

Setup the password from the add-on options, so that next time you try to access Firefox, you will be promted to enter the profile password without which access is not granted.

Password Protecting Google Chrome:

Password Protecting the Chrome Browser can be done by installing a simple extension called the Simple Startup Password. Just install this and set it up so that you can protect your chrome. After you install this, do the following:

Click on the spanner icon next to the address bar. Go to Options > Extension Tab

Search for Simple Startup Password and click on the Options for that Extension.

How to password protect internet explorer

Set the password according to your convenience. Thats it! Next time you access Chrome, you will see the screen below:

How to password protect internet explorer

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How to password protect internet explorer

Privacy is very important when it comes to the digital world, but do you know exactly how your browser saves your passwords ? Read on to find out what goes on behind the scenes.

When it comes to web applications, there are many different types of authentication. One of the types is called basic authentication, which is when you navigate to website and a dialog box opens to ask for a username and password. This also happens to be the authentication mechanism defined in the RFC for HTTP.

How to password protect internet explorer

You can see in the screen shot above that there is a check box that you can use to remember your credentials, but what does that do ? You might also ask yourself what happens if you are not using Basic authentication. There is another type of authentication called Form authentication, this is when the authentication is built right into the web application, like the How-To Geek website. This allows the Developer to control the look and feel of the form that we use to log in.

How to password protect internet explorer

No matter what type of authentication we use Internet Explorer will offer a way to remember your login credentials. You can see another method, which is used for form authentication, below.

How to password protect internet explorer

Underneath the hood, Internet Explorer is using a little part of Windows that not many people know about called the Credential Manager, which has been improved in Windows 8.

How to password protect internet explorer

To get to it, open the Control Panel, which can be done by pressing the Win + X keyboard combination and launching it from the context menu.

How to password protect internet explorer

Then click on User Accounts and Family Safety.

How to password protect internet explorer

Now click on the Credential Manager.

How to password protect internet explorer

In my own testing I found that it’s a bit tricky to find whether is saves your credentials under the Web or Windows Credentials. I came to the conclusion that it really depends on the authentication type. If you are using form authentication, it saves them under Web Credentials.

How to password protect internet explorer

When I used basic authentications it saved them under the Generic Credentials section of Windows Credentials.

How to password protect internet explorer

If you want to remove a password that Internet Explorer has saved, it is as easy as clicking on the Remove link.

How to password protect internet explorer

You might also want to remove all the passwords that Internet Explorer has saved, to do this open Internet Explorer and open the Safety and choose to Delete browsing history…

How to password protect internet explorer

Now make sure to check Form data and Passwords before clicking delete.

Internet Explorer 11 support ended

Support for Internet Explorer 11 has ended on June 15, 2022. If any site you visit needs Internet Explorer 11, you can reload it with Internet Explorer mode in Microsoft Edge. We recommend you use Microsoft Edge for a faster, more secure and more modern web browsing experience.

For Windows 10 and Windows 8.1

Remember passwords for websites

When you visit a website that requires you to sign in to your account—like an email, banking, or shopping site—Internet Explorer will ask if you want your user name and password remembered. The next time you visit the site and start entering your user name, Internet Explorer will finish filling in your account info.

Password saving is turned on by default in Internet Explorer, but here’s how to turn it on or off:

In Internet Explorer, select the Tools button , and then select Internet options.

On the Content tab, under AutoComplete, select Settings.

Select the User names and passwords on forms check box, and then select OK.

To turn off password saving, clear the User names and passwords on forms check box.

If you’re using a public computer, Internet Explorer will ask if you want to save passwords and user names. You might not want to save your personal sign–in info on public computers.

Your account info is encrypted and stored on your computer—it isn’t shared between user accounts and other apps on the PC can’t read the passwords. But, if you sign in to a different PC with your Microsoft account, you’ll be able to sign in to sites with your saved account info in Internet Explorer because this info is roamed across devices.

When you save sign–in info for a site that shares a domain with an app you’ve downloaded from Microsoft Store, Windows will sign in to that app automatically.

Fill out forms with AutoComplete

If you perform tasks online that require entering personal info—like shipping and billing addresses—on websites, AutoComplete can save time by filling out forms automatically. The next time you visit a site with forms and start entering your info, Internet Explorer will finish filling out the form based on what you’ve previously entered. Here’s how to turn on AutoComplete:

In Internet Explorer, select the Tools button , and then select Internet options.

On the Content tab, under AutoComplete, select Settings.

Select Forms, select OK, and then select OK again.

Help protect your privacy while using AutoComplete

AutoComplete saves you time by remembering passwords and other info you enter into forms online. Since this info is securely stored on whatever PC you’re using at the time, you should be careful about using AutoComplete on public or shared computers. When you’re using a public or shared PC, make sure AutoComplete is turned off. You can also remove AutoComplete history from that PC if you accidentally enter info that you don’t want to share—like the billing address for a credit card.

To delete AutoComplete history on a PC

In Internet Explorer, select the Tools button , and then select Internet options.

On the Content tab, under AutoComplete, select Settings, and then select Delete AutoComplete history.

In the Delete Browsing History dialog box, select Form data and Passwords. To clear web address entries, you must select the History check box, which also deletes your browsing history.

Select Delete to clear your AutoComplete history. Select OK, and then select OK again.

For Windows 7

Remember passwords for websites

When you visit a website that requires you to sign in to your account—like an email, banking, or shopping site—Internet Explorer will ask if you want your user name and password remembered. The next time you visit the site and start entering your user name, Internet Explorer will finish filling in your account info.

Password saving is on by default in Internet Explorer, but here’s how to turn on or off password saving:

In Internet Explorer, select the Tools button , and then select Internet options.

On the Content tab, under AutoComplete, select Settings.

Select the User names and passwords on forms check box, and then select OK.

To turn off password saving, clear the User names and passwords on forms check box.

You shouldn’t save your personal sign–in info on public PCs, or on PCs that are shared with other people.

Your account info is stored on your PC—it isn’t shared between user accounts. If you choose to save passwords in Internet Explorer, be sure to use a password on your PC and keep it locked when not in use.

Fill out forms with AutoComplete

If you perform tasks online that require entering personal info—like shipping and billing addresses—on websites, AutoComplete can save time by filling out forms automatically. The next time you visit a site with forms and start entering your info, Internet Explorer will finish filling out the form based on what you’ve previously entered. Here’s how to turn on AutoComplete:

In Internet Explorer, select the Tools button , and then select Internet options.

On the Content tab, under AutoComplete, select Settings.

Select Forms, select OK, and then select OK again.

Help protect your privacy while using AutoComplete

AutoComplete saves you time by remembering passwords and other info you enter into forms online. Since this info is securely stored on whatever PC you’re using at the time, you should be careful about using AutoComplete on public or shared computers. When you’re using a public or shared PC, make sure AutoComplete is turned off. You can also remove AutoComplete history from that PC if you accidentally enter info that you don’t want to share—like the billing address for a credit card.

To delete AutoComplete history on a PC

In Internet Explorer, select the Tools button , and then select Internet options.

On the Content tab, under AutoComplete, select Settings, and then select Delete AutoComplete history.

In the Delete Browsing History dialog box, select Form data and Passwords. To clear web address entries, you must select the History check box, which also deletes your browsing history.

Select Delete to clear your AutoComplete history. Select OK, and then select OK again.

How to password protect internet explorer

One of the most convenient tools browsers offer is the ability to save and automatically prefill your passwords on login forms. Because so many sites require accounts and it is well known (or should be at least) that using a shared password is a big no-no, a password manager is almost essential.

So if you are an IE user and answer “yes” to allow the browser to remember your password, how secure is this information?

Where are they saved?

Starting at Internet Explorer 7, password are stored in the system registry (KEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Internet Explorer\IntelliForms\Storage2) and ciphered against the Windows user’s login password using the the Data Protection API which utilizes Triple DES encryption.

How secure is this data?

At the time of this writing, Triple DES is practically unbreakable through brute force methods. However, there really isn’t a need to brute force the encryption once you are logged into the Windows account where your password data is stored as Windows makes the assumption that once logged in it is safe for applications to access this data. As a result of IE not utilizing a master password (such as what Firefox offers) to protect its saved passwords, the respective Windows account password is the Triple DES decryption key.

Simply put, if you can log in to Windows with the account and password, you can see the saved browser passwords. Using a freely available utility such as NirSoft’s IE PassView, you can view and export every saved IE password.

How to password protect internet explorer

So can malware access this?

After seeing how easy it is to get to this data, the next logical question is can malware easily get to this data. I am not a malware developer, but I don’t see any reason it could not. If I scan the IE PassView utility using Virus Total, you can see 55% of the scanners they use detect it is malware (one of which is Security Essentials).

How to password protect internet explorer

While in our case the result is a false positive, this shows that it is possible for a piece of malware to access this data undetected even when the system runs anti-virus. Additionally, because the encrypted data is user specific no UAC prompt will be triggered by an application trying to access this data. Before thinking this is a flaw in the OS, this is really the way it has to be otherwise IE and a host of other Windows applications which utilize the protected storage would trigger a UAC prompt every time they opened.

What if my computer is stolen?

The simple answer is this data is as secure as your Windows account password. As we have shown above, when you login to the account using the appropriate password all of this data is easily accessible. If you use no password, you have no protection.

To take this a step further, I did a reset of the account password to see what would happen when the password was forcefully changed outside of Windows. After the reset, I saved a new Gmail address password ([email protected]) and ran IE PassView. I was able to see the previous user name ([email protected]) which was saved before the password was reset, but because the account passwords (i.e. “master password”) used to save the data are different, it was not able to decrypt the IE password saved under the previous Windows account password. This is definitely a good thing.

How to password protect internet explorer

Conclusion

At the end of the day, the security of your IE saved passwords depends totally on the user:

  • Use a very strong Windows account password. Keep in mind, there are utilities which can decipher Windows passwords. If someone gets your Windows account password then they have access to your saved IE passwords.
  • Protect yourself from malware. If utilities are able to easily access your saved passwords, why can’t malware?
  • Save your passwords in a password management system such as KeePass. Of course, you loose the convenience of having the browser auto-fill your passwords.
  • Use a 3rd party utility which integrates with IE and uses a master password to manage your passwords.
  • Encrypt your entire hard drive using TrueCrypt. This is completely optional and for the ultra protective, but if someone can’t decrypt your drive they surely can get anything off of it.

Of course both of these go without saying, but this just reinforces the importance of taking steps to keep your system secure.

If you’ve got files you’d rather others couldn’t access, locking them up with a password can be the simplest way to get peace of mind. Windows has built-in support for basic password protection, letting you keep your files safe from prying eyes.

Before we get started, we should offer a warning – while this method is simple and effective, it’s not intended for large-scale or mission-critical use. It goes without saying you should invest in purpose-built encryption software if you’re storing really sensitive information on your device.

How to password protect internet explorer

To begin, use File Explorer to find the file or folder you wish to protect. Right-click on it and click “Properties” at the bottom of the context menu. From here, press the “Advanced…” button in the Attributes section of the window.

How to password protect internet explorer

At the bottom of this pane, tick the “Encrypt contents to secure data” checkbox. Click the “OK” button to get back to the main Properties window. Now press “Apply” and Windows will begin to encrypt your files.

How to password protect internet explorer

When the process completes, you’ll be prompted to back-up your encryption key if you’ve never used the feature before. Click the toast notification and follow the prompts to make a note of your encryption key. You’ll need this information if you ever lose access to your encrypted files, so it’s important you take the time to back it up now.

How to password protect internet explorer

With the back-up done, your files are now secured. They’re encrypted with a key that’s tied down to your Windows user account. If anyone else tries to access the file – whether from another user account, or by physically removing your hard drive – the contents will appear to be meaningless garbled text.

How to password protect internet explorer

You can reverse the encryption at any time by heading back to the Properties window and opening the Advanced Attributes pane again. Just untick the “Encrypt contents to secure data” checkbox and click OK to close the windows. After encryption, you can also press the “Details” button next to the checkbox to see information about the encryption certificate and available recovery procedures.

That’s all there is to it. Once again, we’ll remind you this method isn’t intended for high-security purposes. However, it’s ideal if you’re using a shared PC and just want to keep some files inaccessible to other user accounts on the device. Just remember to lock your account (Win+L) whenever you walk away from the screen – your files will be unencrypted as soon as you login!

If you need stronger protections, you might want to consider investing in third-party software that’s specially designed for this purpose. Enabling Windows’ BitLocker feature (Pro and Enterprise edition only) can also give peace of mind if you want all your files to be encrypted. This offers full-disk encryption with the keys tied down to a TPM, a hardware module dedicated to certificate storage.

BitLocker operates at a different level to file-based encryption, solving different problems. The feature encrypts the entire drive, not individual files – so once Windows starts, everything on the drive is decrypted and made available to everyone. File-based encryption gets unlocked only after you login, and deals with individual files and folders.

Want to learn more? Be sure to check out these related posts:

Steps to Disable Protected Mode in IE 7, 8, 9, 10, and 11

How to password protect internet explorer

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What to Know

  • In Internet Explorer, select Tools >Internet options >Security tab > uncheck Enable Protected Mode >OK.
  • If you’re looking for a more advanced way to disable Protected Mode, use the Windows Registry.

This article explains how to disable Protected Mode in Internet Explorer through the browser and through the Windows Registry. Steps apply to Internet Explorer versions 7, 8, 9, 10, and 11, when installed on Windows 10, Windows 8, Windows 7, or Windows Vista.

Microsoft no longer supports Internet Explorer and recommends that you update to the newer Edge browser. Head to their site to download the newest version.

Internet Explorer Method

To disable Protected Mode in Internet Explorer:

Open Internet Explorer.

How to password protect internet explorer

Protected Mode helps prevents malicious software from exploiting vulnerabilities in Internet Explorer, protecting your computer from the most common ways that hackers can gain access to your system.

From the command bar, go to Tools > Internet options.

How to password protect internet explorer

In Internet Explorer 9, 10, and 11, the Tools menu reveals when you press the Alt key once. See What Version of Internet Explorer Do I Have? if you’re not sure.

Select the Security tab.

In the bottom half of this window, directly above the several buttons you see, uncheck Enable Protected Mode, and then select OK.

How to password protect internet explorer

This will require a restart of Internet Explorer, as you may have seen next to the checkbox in this step.

Choose OK if you’re prompted with a Warning! dialog box, advising that The current security settings will put your computer at risk.

Close Internet Explorer and then open it again. You can verify that Protected Mode is truly disabled by checking the setting again, but there should also be a brief message at the bottom of Internet Explorer saying it’s turned off.

Verify that Protected Mode is truly disabled by checking the setting again, but there should also be a brief message at the bottom of Internet Explorer that says it’s turned off.

Try again to visit the websites that were causing your problems to see if resetting the Internet Explorer security settings on your computer helped.

As important as Protected Mode is, it’s been known to cause problems in specific situations, so disabling it might be beneficial in troubleshooting certain scenarios. However, don’t disable it unless you have reason to believe it’s causing a major problem in Internet Explorer. If it’s otherwise behaving normally, it’s safest to keep it enabled.

Windows Registry Method

An advanced way to disable Protected Mode in Internet Explorer is through the Windows Registry.

How to password protect internet explorer

Use the folders on the left to open the following key within the HKEY_CURRENT_USER hive:

In the Internet Settings key, open the Zones subkey and then open the numbered folder that corresponds to the zone that you want to disable Protected Mode in.

  • 0: Local computer
  • 1: Intranet
  • 2: Trusted sites
  • 3: Internet
  • 4: Restricted sites

Create a new REG_DWORD value called 2500 within the zone.

How to password protect internet explorer

Open the new value and set it as 3 to disable Protected Mode (0 enables it).

How to password protect internet explorer

More Information About IE Protected Mode

Protected Mode isn’t available with Internet Explorer installed on Windows XP. Windows Vista is the earliest operating system that supports it.

There are other ways to open Internet Options. One is with Control Panel, but an even quicker method is through a Command Prompt or the Run dialog box, using the inetcpl.cpl command.

Another is through Internet Explorer’s menu button at the top right of the program (which you can trigger with the Alt+X keyboard shortcut).

You should always keep software like Internet Explorer updated. See How to Update Internet Explorer if you need help.

Protected Mode is disabled by default only in the Trusted sites and Local intranet zones, which is why you have to manually uncheck the Enable Protected Mode checkbox in the Internet and Restricted sites zones.

Some versions of Internet Explorer on some versions of Windows can use what’s called Enhanced Protected Mode. This is also found in the Internet Options window, but under the Advanced tab. If you enable Enhanced Protected Mode, you have to restart your computer for it to take effect.

Last Pass is a password management add-on for Microsoft’s Internet Explorer that can store login credentials of web services in a securely encrypted password vault.

The password manager is compatible with most editions of Internet Explorer including the latest Internet Explorer 11 edition that has been released a while ago. The passwords are encrypted, and stored on Last Pass servers. This means that the password manager may be used to sync data between multiple devices running Internet Explorer.

It is for example possible to access the passwords on other computer systems without having to carry them around on storage devices like USB sticks. And since Last Pass iscompatible with Internet Explorer and other web browsers, it is handy for users who work with web browsers like Firefox or Chrome as well.

If you install LastPass in all browsers that you use and the service supports, you gain access to the same set of passwords in all of them.

LastPass for Internet Explorer

How to password protect internet explorer

The Internet Explorer plugin is provided as a universal installer that you may use to install the add-on in other supported browsers as well. It supports Internet Explorer 11 or newer, Firefox 2.0 or newer, Chrome 18 or newer, Safari 5 or newer, and Opera 11 or newer at the time of writing.

Make sure you select Advanced Options during installation to select the browsers that you want LastPass to be added to. All installed browsers are selected automatically by default.

How to password protect internet explorer

New users can create an account during the installation, while existing users need to supply their login credentials to complete the installation procedure.

Last Pass adds a button to the Internet Explorer toolbar that provides quick access to most of the features offered by the password management. It is for example possible to open some of the recently opened websites, switch identities, edit the preferences or add secure notes.

Password Management is not the only feature offered by Last Pass. The program can store notes in the password vault and offers an option to create form profiles to fill out forms on websites more easily.

The add-on recognize username and password forms on websites automatically, and acts accordingly. It can fill out the form automatically if the login credentials are already stored in its database. New passwords can be generated with the versatile password generator, and once you submit the new password, it may be added to the LastPass database so that it is remembered from that moment on.

Verdict

Internet Explorer users have access to a handful of browser add-ons and plugins only. The LastPass add-on for Internet Explorer adds better password management, password synchronization between different Internet Explorer installations and other supported browsers, and support for nice to have features such as secure note taking, form filling, and more.

The Internet Explorer 11 desktop application is retired and out of support as of June 15, 2022 for certain versions of Windows 10.

You can still access older, legacy sites that require Internet Explorer with Internet Explorer mode in Microsoft Edge. Learn how.

The Internet Explorer 11 desktop application will progressively redirect to the faster, more secure Microsoft Edge browser, and will ultimately be disabled via Windows Update. Disable IE today.

When you try to view a Web site that is protected with a password, you are prompted to type your security credentials in the Enter Network Password dialog box. If you click to select the Save this password in your password list check box in this dialog box, the computer saves your password so that you do not have to type the password again when you try to use the same document. This behavior is known as password caching. However, you may need to disable this feature. This article provides you the steps that you can follow to disable the password caching.

Original product version: В Internet Explorer
Original KB number: В 229940

More Information

This section, method, or task contains steps that tell you how to modify the registry. However, serious problems might occur if you modify the registry incorrectly. Therefore, make sure that you follow these steps carefully. For added protection, back up the registry before you modify it. Then, you can restore the registry if a problem occurs. For more information about how to back up and restore the registry, see How to back up and restore the registry in Windows.

To disable password caching, follow these steps:

  1. Click Start, click Run, type regedit, and then click OK.
  2. Locate and then click the following registry subkey:
    HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Internet Settings
  3. On the Edit menu, click New, and then click DWORD Value.
  4. Type DisablePasswordCaching to name the new registry entry, and then press ENTER.
  5. Right-click DisablePasswordCaching, and then click Modify.
  6. Make sure that the Hexadecimal option button is selected, type 1 in the Value data box, and then click OK.
  7. Quit Registry Editor.

You can also disable password caching by using the Microsoft Internet Explorer Administration Kit (IEAK) to create an executable file, and then attaching it as an add-in component. When you use this method, Setup adds the DisablePasswordCaching entry to the registry during the installation process.

In some cases, you can create a custom .adm file to modify this registry key, and then import it into the IEAK Wizard.

To re-enable password caching, you can either delete the DisablePasswordCaching entry, or change its value to 0.

If your heart sinks every time your favourite Web service has its passwords hacked, protect your growing list of log-ins wiith LastPass.

How to password protect internet explorer

How to password protect internet explorer

David Gilson has always revelled in tech and started writing about it in 2009. He covers the smartphone world and is rather partial to a spot of BASH scripting. David is a freelance writer and is not an employee of CNET.

Who can recall the countless website passwords we’re asked to stuff into our overspilling brain boxes? And how do we make sure they don’t fall into the hands of rogues? One answer is to turn to password manager LastPass — a service that creates a secure ID on your computer that will remember your passwords and effortlessly log you into your favourite sites.

Each Web account we hold stores data we’ve entered about ourselves and it all has to be protected. In this guide, we’ll look at why you should be using a better password protection strategy, reasons to trust LastPass, how to install it and how to use it.

Password security should be on everyone’s mind, whether you’re nervous about the effects of Heartbleed, reported hacking attacks, or if you’re using common sense on the Internet.

It’s no longer as simple as coming up with a clever password. These days it’s best to take extra precautions.

How LastPass looks after your passwords

How to password protect internet explorer

Like most Web sites, LastPass uses hashing algorithms to process your account details and authenticate you. However, hashing algorithms aren’t completely bulletproof , especially when applied poorly.

LastPass stores a hash of your email address and master password on your computer (not its servers), which it uses as an encryption key to encode your log-in details for other sites (with a 256-bit AES cypher), before storing them on its servers.

The company doesn’t want to know any of your details or your encryption key, so it creates a unique ID token for you by hashing your password and local encryption key together. That ID token is then hashed with a random number when you create your account, which is — finally — how it authenticates your account.

Assuming this has won your trust, let’s get down to business.

Installing LastPass on your desktop and browsers

Whether you’re a Linux, Windows, or OS X user, there’s a desktop download available for you. Just download the installer for your operating system and follow the instructions.

The first option you’ll be presented with is which browser plug-ins to install — Chrome, Firefox, Internet Explorer, and Safari are all supported.

If your browser isn’t listed, you can use LastPass’ bookmarklets (see below). The following options ask whether you want to replace the password manager in each of the browsers you’ve opted to add a plug-in to.

The install interface is simple and clean.

Screenshot by Eric Franklin/CNET

Next, you’ll be asked to create, or log in to, a LastPass account, after which you then import passwords from your desktop browsers. Once you’ve imported any saved passwords, it will even offer to cover your tracks by removing all those passwords from your various browser password caches.

Screenshot by Eric Franklin/CNET

Bookmarklets for browsers that don’t support plug-ins

If your browser doesn’t support plug-ins, you can install bookmarklets that will retrieve your log-in details for you instead.

Sign in and click ‘bookmarklets’ in the left-hand column of your Vault page. This will launch a pop-up box with three links you can drag onto your bookmark bar.

Firstly, ‘LastPass Login!’ gives you a one-click log-in for most Web sites (the JavaScript bookmarklet won’t work properly with some Web sites). Secondly, ‘Lastpass Fill!’ fills in log-in forms without logging you in. And finally, ‘LastPass Fill Forms!’ actually fills in Web forms such as your contact and payment details with info you’ve stored in your account.

Plenty of clear useful instructions.

Screenshot by Eric Franklin/CNET

Mobile devices

Use of mobile apps for LastPass is one of the few features that require a premium account — which is actually quite cheap. Priced at just one US dollar per month, the cost should be trivial to most people. There is a mobile application for just about every mobile platform you can think of — Android, iOS, Windows Phone 7, Symbian, BlackBerry, and even webOS.

LastPass for mobile requires a premium account.

The mobile apps not only provide access to all of your account data, but also feature a built-in browser that can automatically log you into your Web accounts. This circumvents having your sensitive accounts, like with banks, saved in your default browser’s history.

If you’re using a mobile device that doesn’t have an app, there’s also m.lastpass.com, where you can view your account data and install bookmarklets in your mobile browser.

Using LastPass on the desktop

After installing the plug-in on your desktop browser, you’ll notice pop-up toolbars offering to remember or fill in your log-in details as you visit Web sites. Via this toolbar, you can set whether LastPass will fill in the username and password fields on a per-site basis. Clicking the options button in the LastPass toolbar allows you to set more preferences, such as auto-log-in, and adding the site to your favourites list.

The plug-in is smart enough to know when you’re changing your password too. By clicking the ‘Generate’ button, you’ll be given a new random password, which LastPass will submit to the Web site in question for you, and update your password database.

This is the real value in using LastPass. It makes changing your passwords easy and gives you the auto-log-in ability so you never need to remember your passwords again.

As you explore the LastPass settings, you’ll find that you can even store various profiles for filling in forms that contain your contact and credit card details.

Making LastPass even more secure

If using a simple username and password isn’t good enough or you, LastPass offers a range of methods to make authenticating yourself even more secure — if you’re a premium user. You can create a set of One Time Passwords (OTPs), which is a list of passwords where each expires after being used once. Taking OTPs a step further, you can combine them with multifactor authentication via your smart phone with Google Authenticator, via a YubiKey device, running Sesame on any USB drive, or even a printed grid of characters.

If you’re looking to get really hardcore about protecting your passwords.

I had a working script (Windows 32 bit) that sucessfully read a txt file from a password protected web site onwith read.csv. Below is a snippet of the very simple code:

Then I got a new computer (Windows 64 bit) and the read.csv is no loger seems able to get beyond the websites authentication. Instead of reading in the data it reads in a garbled dataframe that seems to be related to the web sites authentication:

Uncessfully, I’ve tried several things to try to get it to work:

  1. Transfered cookies over from old machine
  2. opened website and when prompted allowed windows to save user name and password
  3. prefixed URL (in fname) with “user:[email protected]
  4. In interent explorer set website where data is stored as a “trusted site”.
  5. Checked that all ackages are the same on the new computer and old computer
  6. Verified that both the old and new machine are running the same version (version 9) of Internet Explorer

Any assistance or direction would be greatly appreciated.

How to password protect internet explorer

1 Answer 1

I figured out my problem and since I wasted an entire day trying to solve this, I wanted to share my solution so hopefully it won’t cause the same consternation for others as it caused me.

First, as far as I can tell, the problem has absolutely nothing to do with R or switching from a 32 to 64 bit machine. Instead it all seems to stem from a new setting in Internet Explore that was introduced beginning with Internet Explorer 7.

In Internet Explorer’s options there option to “Enable Protected Mode (requires restarting Internet Explorer)” that is turned on (checked) by default. Internet Explorer allows you to change the setting for each of the following security zones: Internet, Local Intra Net, Trusted Sites, and Restricted Sites.

After adding the URL where my data was being sourced to the list of Trusted Sites, I turned off the Enable Protected Mode by unchecked the box. Once this change was made and Internet Explorer was restarted the read.csv (above) worked perfectly.

After doing some further research I found the following:

Protected Mode helps prevents malicious software from exploiting vulnerabilities in Internet Explorer 7, protecting your computer from the most common ways that hackers can gain access to your system. -How To Disable Protected Mode in Internet Explorer 7

Presumably by having the Protected Mode enabled (a default setting that came with my new computer); it was preventing R from accessing the cookies which contained my username and password from being fed to R and/or back to Internet Explorer to retrieve the data.

If you leave a room without locking your Windows account, your siblings or friends can read all your passwords saved in Chrome. Firefox and IE aren’t much better. Here’s how to protect those passwords.

How to password protect internet explorer

How to password protect internet explorer

A blog post published yesterday by software developer Elliott Kember caused quite a stir. Titled “Chrome’s insane password security strategy (Opens in a new window) ,” the post points out that anybody with access to your Windows account can view all of your Chrome-saved passwords in plain text. That’s a huge security risk, and Chrome is not the only browser affected.

To see the extent of the problem, launch Chrome’s Settings page and click the link at the bottom that says “Show advanced settings. ” Scroll down to the section titled Passwords and forms, then click the link titled Manage saved passwords.

It doesn’t look so bad at first—just a list of the sites for which you’ve let Chrome save passwords. However, when you click on any item in the list a button labeled Show appears next to the password. Yes, clicking the button displays the password in plain text. You can see it, and anybody else who gets access to your computer can see it.

Firefox, Too
Is Firefox your preferred browser? In that case, you’ve got a little more security available. Select Options from the Tools menu and click the Security tab. Note the checkbox titled “Use a master password.” If you’ve checked this and defined a strong master password, your credentials are safe from casual snooping. If not, they’re even more exposed than in Chrome.

To see why, click the Saved Passwords button. Initially it just displays the websites and corresponding usernames, but with the click of a button you can show all the passwords at once.

Internet Explorer’s Better
A recent study by NSS Labs revealed that Internet Explorer’s default settings protect your privacy better than Firefox, Safari, or Chrome. In fact, Chrome came in last for privacy protection.

IE also handles saved passwords better. The encrypted passwords reside in the Registry, and there’s no mechanism to display them in IE. However, there are plenty of free third-party utilities that will dump this password cache and make all the passwords visible.

Google Responds
In a response to the original post (Opens in a new window) , Chrome browser security tech lead Justin Schuh defended Chrome’s password-handling behavior. Schuh contends that once a malefactor gets into your Windows user account, it’s already Game Over, so adding a master password or otherwise protecting the saved passwords is pointless.

The comment thread is entertaining; it’s a virtual fistfight right on the page. I have to agree with those who point out that theft of your system by a hacker is just one possible scenario. Do you lock down your user account when you briefly leave a roomful of friends? They could grab a password to prank you, or a jealous ex could do some real harm.

Twitter is abuzz with comment. One wag tweeted (Opens in a new window) , “@justinschuh if you think that’s a response then Chrome is in trouble. It’s worse than Steve Jobs ‘Don’t hold it that way’ response.” On a more serious note, Tim Berners-Lee himself weighed in (Opens in a new window) , saying, “How to get all you big sister’s passwords http://blog.elliottkember.com/chromes-insane-password-security-strategy. (Opens in a new window) and a disappointing reply from Chrome team.”

Protect Your Passwords!
Whichever browser you use, this simple four-step plan will protect your passwords from snooping.

  • Install a password manager
  • Import passwords saved by your browser
  • Delete all browser-saved passwords
  • Turn off password-saving in the browser

The mere fact that third-party password managers can import passwords from your browser should be a red flag. If they can do it, a malicious application that got past your antivirus could do it too.

LastPass 2.0 (free) and Dashlane 2.0 (inexpensive) do a great job with browser-saved passwords. Not only can they import from Chrome, Firefox, and Internet Explorer, they’ll also delete those passwords from the browser and turn off the password-saving feature. Not surprisingly, both are Editor’s Choice products in this category. Note that LastPass extends this feature to Opera and Safari as well.

In Chrome, Firefox, and IE, manual deletion of saved passwords starts with pressing Shift+Ctrl+Del. The dialog that appears lets you delete a variety of browsing history components. Use it to specifically delete passwords. Firefox and Chrome ask what time period to clear. In Firefox, choose “Everything”; in Chrome, select “from the beginning of time.”

That just leaves turning off the password-saving feature. In Chrome, launch Settings, click the link for advanced settings, and un-check “Offer to save passwords. “. In Firefox, click the Security tab in the Options dialog and un-check the box “Remember passwords for sites.” For IE, you have to dig a little deeper. In the Internet Options dialog, click the Content tab and then click the Settings button in the AutoComplete panel. Un-check the “User names and passwords. ” box to turn off this feature.

Improve Your Passwords
Now that you’ve gotten your passwords out of insecure, browser-based storage, take a little time to upgrade them. Both LastPass and Dashlane will provide you with a security report listing the weakest passwords and also identifying those you’ve used on multiple websites (a security risk). Take a little time each day to replace the worst passwords with strong ones—since you’ve got a password manager you can have it generate crazy-strong passwords like 5GZk8cpC*XYs (freshly generated by LastPass).

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Password-protect and hide personal files and folders with Folder Guard for Windows 11,10,8.

User rating: How to password protect internet explorer4.6/5

It’s possible to set up Folder Guard to stop downloads of programs with any web browser, including Internet Explorer, Firefox, Chrome, Opera, Safari, and so on.

Suppose you don’t want users to download programs from the Internet, yet you would rather not to block the Internet access completely and allow the users to to browse the web sites, use email, etc.

For such a goal, you could set up Folder Guard to restrict Internet Explorer from downloading the programs from the Internet. Folder Guard lets you create the file access filters. You could create a filter that would apply to any executable file or a script, but skip other files. You would assign the Read-only attribute to such a filter, and that would stop any attempt to create a new executable file (and thus prevent downloading them!), while allow the use of the existing programs.

To do that, run Folder Guard and choose View – Filters command from the menu to switch to the Filters view. The filter we need may already be there, look for the name Stop common downloads. If it’s not in the list, choose the Filter – New command from the menu to start creating a new filter. Click on the […] button next to the Apply to files box to specify which files this filter should apply to. The names of the executable files have the extension .exe, so you need to specify the mask *.exe to make the filter apply to any such file. You don’t want the users to download the DLL files either, so add the mask *.dll to the list, too. In fact, add a few other masks to make the filter apply to the files commonly used to run scripts, as well (because you probably don’t want the users to run arbitrary scripts!). Here is the text of the Apply to files box that you can use as a starting point for the list:

Your may need to make some modifications to this list: for example, if your users are supposed to be able to modify the BAT scripts, remove the *.bat mask from the list.

Leave the rest of the properties of the new filter empty:

How to password protect internet explorer

Press OK to close the properties window. If it’s a new filter you’ve just created, you will be prompted to enter a name for the filter. Give it a meaningful name such as Stop common downloads to remind yourself later on why you’ve created the filter:

How to password protect internet explorer

After the filter has been created, move it to the top of the list (using the Move Up command on the Filter menu) and assign the Read-only attribute to it (by, for example, clicking on the Read-only button in the toolbar):

How to password protect internet explorer

(You may have other filters in the list, you can leave them as they are: if they have no icons in front of them, they will have no effect).

A couple more things to do: check the Trusted Users list of Folder Guard and verify that the SYSTEM user is there. Also check the Trusted programs list, and make sure the following programs are listed:

The above entries ensure that Windows Update has an unrestricted access to all files and folders of your computer. Without them, the filter we’ve created would prevent Windows Update from installing the updates.

At this point Folder Guard is ready to start protecting your computer. Apply the changes (or resume the protection) and test it by trying to download a few programs from various web sites. (If you a looking for a few files to test, you are welcome to use the download page of our web site.)

If you try to download an executable file with Internet Explorer while the filter is in effect, the following error message is displayed:

How to password protect internet explorer

Other web browsers could give similar messages, or they could just sit there forever expecting the download to start. The end result is, the users cannot download programs anymore while they still can use the existing programs!

Attention System Administrators: Folder Guard is enterprise-ready! The Folder Guard Administrator’s Kit is available now.

What if at some point you do need to download or install a new program, or remove an exiting one? Well, just pause the protection of Folder Guard, perform the task, then resume the protection back (no Windows restart required).

One side effect of the protection we’ve just set up is that the filter will not only prevent downloading the programs, but it will also prevent installing or copying programs from/to the CD or removable drives. It may be a good thing, or not, depending on your specific requirements. If you want the users to be able to run programs from the removable drives while the Stop downloading filter is in effect, you need to create another filter that would specifically allow full access to the executable files located on the removable drives.

If you want to link to this article, you can use this HTML code: How to stop users from downloading programs from the Internet

If you are looking to password protect a file or folder on Windows 11, here’s what you need to do:

1. Right-click on a file or folder you want password protected
2. Click on Properties
3. Click on Advanced…
4. Select “Encrypt contents to secure data” and click Apply
5. If it’s the first time using this feature, you will be prompted to back up your encryption key, keep it somewhere safe; you’ll need the encryption key to view your encrypted files or folders.

Password protect is a great way to guard your files and folders against people you don’t want seeing your stuff on Windows 11. As mentioned in our previous post, Windows has built-in support for basic password protection, but it’s not intended for enterprise use.

Microsoft doesn’t offer much help when it comes to providing information on how to password protect a file or folder.

If you are looking for quick and easy way to safeguard your files and folders from wandering eyes, here is a quick way to password protect a file or folder.

Password protect a file or folder

Keep in mind, this method is quick and effective, but you shouldn’t be using this method for enterprise use. This method is great for protecting a few files and folders on your personal Windows 11 PC.

1. Use File Explorer to find the file or folder you want to protect. Once you find the file or folder that you want to protect, right-click it.
2. Select Properties.
How to password protect internet explorer
3. Click Advanced. to be taken to Advanced Attributes menu for the file or folder.How to password protect internet explorer
4. Here, you can choose the settings you want for this file or folder. Under Compress or Encrypt attributes, click the checkbox for Encrypt contents to secure data and Click OK.
How to password protect internet explorer
If you are only trying to encrypt a file, instead of a folder, you will be greeted with an encryption warning as seen below.
How to password protect internet explorer
Of course, the best method to protect all of your files by putting them in a separate folder and encrypting the entire folder.
However, you can choose to encrypt only the file if you wish. Once you click OK, you will be taken back to the parent folder properties.

Click Apply to apply the changes, and click OK to verify to encrypt the file and the parent folder.
You can view the encryption details whenever you want (provided you were the user who encrypted them) by following the first 3 steps and clicking on Details. Here you can access the details on who has access to the encrypted files or folders, encryption certificate, and available recovery procedures.
How to password protect internet explorer

If you are looking to reverse the encryption, all you need to do is go back to Properties > Advanced. (Steps 1-3) and uncheck the “Encrypt contents to secure data” checkbox and click OK to confirm the changes.

Just to reiterate, this method is quick and effective, but not intended for enterprise use. This is best used for situations where you use a shared PC and you want to keep some files inaccessible for other accounts on the same device.

Just remember to lock your account (Windows key + L) when you leave your shared PC! When you log back in, your files will be unencrypted.

Not much has changed from Windows 10 when it comes to encrypting files or folder on Windows 11, but stay tuned, and check out our extended Windows 11 coverage as these options and more may change in a future Windows 11 Preview build!

Microsoft Edge is the faster, more secure browser recommended browser by Microsoft.

Support for Internet Explorer 11 has ended on June 15, 2022. If any site you visit needs Internet Explorer 11, you can reload it with Internet Explorer mode in Microsoft Edge. The same Internet Explorer 11 apps and sites you use today can open in Microsoft Edge with Internet Explorer mode.

With improved security, privacy, speed, and ease of use, Microsoft Edge surpasses the experience you’ve come to know with Internet Explorer. When you make the switch to Microsoft Edge, we’ll automatically import your favorites, preferences, and other browsing data from Internet Explorer.

Better security

Microsoft Edge includes Microsoft Defender SmartScreen, which helps identify suspicious sites that may present phishing or malware attacks. SmartScreen also checks your downloads to help you recognize possible risks. For more information about security in Microsoft Edge, see How can SmartScreen help protect me in Microsoft Edge?

Increased privacy

Tracking prevention

Microsoft Edge provides better control over how your data is tracked as you browse the web. It provides three levels of tracking prevention: Basic, Balanced, and Strict. You can choose the option that best suits your desired balance of personalization and privacy. For more information about tracking prevention, see Learn about tracking prevention in Microsoft Edge.

InPrivate browsing

Microsoft Edge offers InPrivate browsing, which allows you to hide your browsing history, site and form data, cookies, and passwords from other people who use the same device. InPrivate browsing includes InPrivate search with Microsoft Bing, so any searches on Bing won’t be associated with you or influence your Bing search suggestions. For more information about InPrivate browsing, see Browse InPrivate in Microsoft Edge.

Smarter browsing

Microsoft Edge features built-in learning and accessibility tools that enhance your browsing experience, making it easier to find the information you need and connect to it in the way that suits you best.

Microsoft Edge integrates Immersive Reader for some websites, so you can hear web content read to you or view articles without distracting ads.

You can use Collections to organize content on the web around specific themes. Collections is useful whether you’re organizing your research, planning a trip, doing comparison shopping, of just want to pick up your browsing later. For more information about using Collections, see Organize your ideas with Collections in Microsoft Edge.

Sync across all devices

With Microsoft Edge, you can sync your favorites, passwords, and other info across multiple devices. Just sign in to Microsoft Edge using the same Microsoft account on each device.

For more information about syncing across multiple devices, see Sign in to sync Microsoft Edge across devices.

Want Microsoft Edge for your mobile device? Get Microsoft Edge for iOS or Android.

Customize your browser

There are many ways to customize how your Microsoft Edge browser looks, feels, and behaves. You can change the browser’s appearance (themes, toolbar, display fonts), set how a new tab page looks, and choose the startup behavior. To access these settings:

At the top corner of the browser, select Settings and more > Settings .

Under Settings, do any of the following:

To change appearance, select Appearance and make the changes you want to your default theme, zoom, toolbar, and fonts.

To change startup behavior, select On startup, and then select what you want Microsoft Edge to display on startup.

To set how the page looks when you open a new tab, select New tab page, then select Customize, and in the window, select the options you want for Page content and Page layout.

You can also personalize the new tab page in Microsoft Edge.

Above the address bar, select the + button to open a new tab.

At the top corner of the new tab page, select Page Settings .

Choose your page layout, background image, quick links, and more.

Scroll down to see your news feed and select Personalize to choose your interests.

Quickly import your favorites, passwords, and other browser data from Internet Explorer

To make your switch to Microsoft Edge as seamless as possible, you can import data from Internet Explorer and have all your saved favorites, passwords, and other info available to you. There’s no need to recreate this data in Microsoft Edge.

How to password protect internet explorer

For more information about importing your browser data, see Import favorites in Microsoft Edge.

Make Microsoft Edge your default browser

If you’ve downloaded Microsoft Edge but it’s not your default browser, you can easily set it to be your default for Windows 10 or macOS.

Windows 10

Go to Start > Settings > Apps > Default apps > Web browser.

Select the icon for the current default browser, and then, in the list, select Microsoft Edge.

macOS

Go to the Apple menu > System Preferences > General > Default web browser.

From the Default web browser list, select Microsoft Edge.

Get tips and tricks for Microsoft Edge

To get the most out of Microsoft Edge, check out Microsoft Edge Tips.

After installing Trend Micro Password Manager, you can also use our toolbar to manage your website passwords and login IDs in one secure location.

  1. Open Google Chrome.
    This pop up should appear:

Click Get Extension.

If you did not see the pop up, you can install it here.

Click Install Extension.

It will open a new tab and will take you to this Chrome Web Store page.

Click Add to Chrome, then click Add extension.

  1. Open Mozilla FireFox.
    A pop up will show, like this:

How to password protect internet explorer

Click Get Extension.

If you did not see the pop up, you can install it here.

Click Install Extension.

You will get a message “Firefox prevented this site from asking you to install software on your computer.”.

Click Allow.

Since Password Manager Toolbar is not hosted from Firefox Store, Firefox will provide you the option to Allow or Prevent the toolbar from installing on your Firefox Browser.

Click Install.

  1. Open Microsoft Edge.
  2. Get the extension from this link:
    https://pwm.trendmicro.com/installExtension/edge.
  3. Click Install Extension. This will open a new tab.
  4. Click Allow extensions from other stores, then select Allow.
  5. Select Add to Chrome, then select Add extension.

Note: Password Manager Extensions for other browsers, such as Opera, are currently not supported, nor available as of this time.

Whichever web browser you use, each comes with a way to surf the net “secretly.” While nothing on the internet is truly anonymous, private browsing modes can help keep your movements hidden from those who might have access to your data. The “secret mode” for the Samsung Internet app goes a step further on Android, by locking your private browsing behind a unique password.

Everyone has their reasons for using secret mode, otherwise known as private or incognito modes, but in many cases, we don’t want our private browsing history falling into the wrong hands. Setting a password for secret mode is a quick way to ensure that the information you want to remain private stays that way.

Enabling a Secret Mode Password

Setting a password for secret mode is fairly simple. To begin, tap the vertical ellipsis in the top-right corner of the display, then tap “Settings.” On the following page, select “Privacy,” then tap “Secret mode security.”

How to password protect internet explorer How to password protect internet explorer How to password protect internet explorer

Under Secret mode security, tap the slider next to “Use password.” This will launch a password creator tool. Samsung Internet requires your password to be at least four characters and contain at least one letter. While it’s nice to see them push for a more “secure” password, four characters isn’t secure. If you truly want to keep intruders out of your secret mode browser, you’ll need to make something stronger.

Once you’ve entered a password, tap “Continue” to confirm it. Tap “Continue” once more, and Samsung Internet will return you to the Secret mode security page.

How to password protect internet explorer How to password protect internet explorer How to password protect internet explorer

Using Biometrics (Samsung Devices Only)

On Samsung devices only, you have the option to use biometric passkeys, like your fingerprint or iris scan, to unlock secret mode. Just make sure “Also use biometrics” is checked when setting up your password, and you’ll be able to use either your fingerprint, iris scan, or both when trying to unlock a secret mode session.

How to password protect internet explorer How to password protect internet explorer How to password protect internet explorer

You can disable either of these settings underneath Biometrics.

Browsing in Secret Mode

To enable secret mode, tap the “Tabs” button in the bottom-right corner of the display to view all open tabs. Next, tap the aptly named “Turn On Secret Mode.” Without a password enabled, this button would launch a secret mode window. However, a popup will appear requesting your newly-made password (or biometrics).

If using a Samsung device, you can opt to use your password instead of biometrics by tapping “Use Password” when opening a secret mode session.

Once you enter your password correctly, you can browse in secret mode to your heart’s content, knowing nothing you do will be visible to anyone with physical access to your device. Unless of course, they discover the password.

How to password protect internet explorer How to password protect internet explorer How to password protect internet explorer

It’s important to note that you cannot take screenshots in secret mode. If you need to capture something you find on the web, you’ll have to leave secret mode before taking that screenshot.

What if You Forget Your Password?

Ah, forgetting your password . It happens to the best of us, especially when it’s complicated. If your password does leave your head, there’s a quick fix. Unfortunately, it requires wiping all secret mode data and settings. You might want to keep your password on-hand or in a password manager if you don’t want to lose your secret mode browsing.

To reset your password, and secret mode with it, head back to the secret mode security page in settings (Settings –> Privacy –> Secret mode security). Tap “Reset Secret mode,” then tap “Reset” on the popup. Once you do, you’ll return to the Secret mode security page with “Use password” disabled.

How to password protect internet explorer How to password protect internet explorer How to password protect internet explorer

You don’t need to have a Samsung device to benefit from Samsung Internet’s secret mode. You can get the browser on almost any Android device you may own. Check out our guide below to find out how.

Keep Your Connection Secure Without a Monthly Bill. Get a lifetime subscription to VPN Unlimited for all your devices with a one-time purchase from the new Gadget Hacks Shop, and watch Hulu or Netflix without regional restrictions, increase security when browsing on public networks, and more.

Keep the kids from jumping over your firewall

How to password protect internet explorer

How to password protect internet explorer

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What to Know

  • Try first: Physically lock the router, set router-enforced time limits, disable remote administration, scan for unsecured access points.
  • Try next: Enable parental controls on devices, keep the PC where you can watch it, enable activity logging.

This article explains ways to prevent children from accessing the internet without your permission on PCs and other devices.

How to Set Up Internet Parental Controls

Our kids are more tech-savvy than we can ever hope to be. We block a website, and they find a way around our blocking software. We put up a firewall; they go through it. What’s a parent to do? We can never be sure that any of our parental controls will work, but we try our best to keep our kids safe. Here are several ways to your internet parental controls a little more effective and harder to circumvent.

How to password protect internet explorer

Talk to Your Kids and Set Boundaries and Expectations

Let your kids know what is expected of them by teaching them about child internet safety. Explain to them that you are trying to keep them safe and that you expect them to be responsible. Let them know that while you trust them, you will still verify that they are following the rules and that their online use can and will be monitored. Explain that internet access is a privilege that shouldn’t be abused and that it can and will be taken away if they don’t meet your expectations.

Physically Lock up Your Router

One of the easiest ways for your child to circumvent your security settings is to reset your router to its factory default settings. This usually involves simply pressing and holding a reset button located on the back of the router. Once the router is reset, most routers will default to wide-open wireless with no encryption, revert to an easily googled factory-set password, and have most of their security features disabled. The kids have an easy alibi because they can plead ignorance and blame it on a power spike. Lock the router in a closet or somewhere way out of reach to prevent them from pressing the reset button.

Set Router-Enforced Time Limits for Internet Access

Most routers have a setting that gives you the ability to cut off access to the internet at a certain time of day. You lock your doors at night. Do the same for your internet connection. Go into your wireless router’s setup and turn off your internet connection from midnight to 5 in the morning. It’s like a child lock for the internet. Time limits also prevent hackers from being able to attack your network during the set time-frame. You have effectively isolated yourself from the rest of the internet during the hours when most hackers are just starting on their second can of Red Bull.

Disable Wireless Remote Administration of Your Router

If you turn off the Remote Administration via Wireless feature on your router, then someone trying to hack into its settings (such as your child or a hacker) would have to be on a computer that is physically connected (via an Ethernet cable) to the router. Disabling this feature doesn’t prevent you from changing your router’s settings; it just makes it a little more inconvenient for you, your child, and hackers.

Scan for Nearby Unsecured Wireless Access Points

All of your firewalls and filters go out the window if little Johnny attaches to your neighbor’s unsecured wireless access point and starts leeching off of their internet connection. This overrides your internet parental controls because your child is using a different network entirely.

Use the Wi-Fi search feature of your Wi-Fi enabled cell phone or laptop to see if there are any open Wi-Fi hotspots near your house that your child could connect to. It’s best if you do the search from inside their bedroom or wherever they normally get online from. You may be able to determine where the hot spot is originating from by looking at the signal strength meter as you walk around their room. Talk to your neighbor, explain your objective, and ask them to password-protect their wireless access point. It not only helps you enforce your parental controls, but it also helps keep people from getting a free ride courtesy of their unsecured Wi-Fi hotspot.

Enable the Parental Control Features on Your Child’s Game Systems and Mobile Devices

Parents often overlook the fact that kids can get to the internet via game consoles, iPods, and cell phones. It’s important to set internet parental controls on all personal devices. These gadgets have web browsers just like your home PC does. The filters you install on your computer will do nothing to stop your kids from visiting forbidden sites using their mobile device or game system. Thankfully, most devices kids would use, such as the iPad and PlayStation 4, have parental controls that you can set to restrict the content that your kids can access. Read up on these features and implement them. Periodically check the device to see if the password you set is still in effect. If not, your child may have reset it and disabled the controls.

Put Their PC in an Open Area of the House

It’s hard for your children to visit inappropriate websites if they have to use the PC in the kitchen. If the PC is in a well-frequented area where you can see it, your kids are less likely to attempt to go to unauthorized sites. Kids may love having a PC in their room, but consider moving it somewhere less private so you can keep an eye on what is going on.

Enable Activity Logging on Your Router and PCs

Your child will most likely figure out how to cover their tracks by deleting browser histories or by enabling private browsing mode where no history is kept. The best thing you can do is purchase monitoring software that your child will not easily defeat or detect. Periodically review the log files to make sure your kids are staying out of trouble. You can also configure parental controls in different browsers for another layer of protection.

Another option is to enable activity logging on your wireless router. Logging into the router will allow you to capture connection information even when your child uses their mobile devices or game consoles (unless they are using another wireless access point other than yours).

  • How to password protect internet explorer
  • How to password protect internet explorer
  • How to password protect internet explorer
  • How to password protect internet explorer
  • How to password protect internet explorer
  • How to password protect internet explorer

Overview Passwords are an integral aspect of our computer security program. Passwords are the front line of protection for user accounts. A poorly chosen password may result in the compromise of critical (organization) resources. As such, all (organization) staff and outside contractors and vendors with access to our systems are responsible for taking the appropriate steps, as outlined below, to select and secure their passwords.

Purpose The purpose of this policy is to establish a standard for creation of strong passwords, the protection of those passwords, and the frequency of change.

Scope The scope of this policy includes all personnel who have or are responsible for an account or any form of access that supports or requires a password on any (organization) system.

Policy: IT Support Professional All system-level passwords (e.g., root, enable, admin, application administration accounts, etc.) must be changed every 90 days. All systems administrative-level passwords for production environments must be part of an ITSS administered global password management database. User accounts that have system-level privileges granted through group memberships or programs must have a unique password from all other accounts held by that user. Where SNMP (system network management protocol) is used, the community strings must be defined as something other than the standard defaults of “public,” “private” and “system” and must be different from the passwords used to log in interactively. A keyed hash must be used where available (e.g., SNMPv3).

General Users All user-level passwords (e.g., email, web, desktop computer, etc.) must be changed every 90 days. Passwords must not be included in email messages or other forms of electronic communication. Passwords must be at least 8 characters in length. All user-level and system-level passwords must conform to the guidelines described below.

Guidelines General password construction guidelines are used for various purposes at (organization), i.e. user level accounts, web accounts, email accounts, screen saver protection, voicemail password, and local router logins). It is important that everyone be aware of how to select strong passwords.

Poor, weak passwords have the following characteristics: The password can be found in a dictionary (English or foreign) The password is a common usage word such as: Names of family, pets, friends, co-workers, fantasy characters, computer terms and names, commands, sites, companies, hardware, software, birthdays and other personal information such as addresses and phone numbers. Word or number patterns like aaabbb, qwerty, zyxwvuts, 123321, etc. Any of the above spelled backwards. Any of the above preceded or followed by a digit (e.g., secret1, 1secret).

Strong passwords have the following characteristics: Contain both upper and lower case characters (e.g., a-z, A-Z) Have digits and punctuation characters as well as letters e.g., 0-9, [email protected]#$%^&*()_+|

-=\`<>[]:”;’<>. /) Are at least eight alphanumeric characters long. Are not a word in any language, slang, dialect, jargon, etc. Are not based on personal information, names of family, etc. Try to create passwords that can be easily remembered. One way to do this is create a password based on a song title, affirmation, or other phrase. For example, the phrase might be: “This May Be One Way To Remember” and the password could be: “TmB1w2R!” or “Tmb1W>r

” or some other variation. NOTE: Do not use either of these examples as passwords!

Password protection standards Change passwords at least once every 90 days. Do not write down passwords Do not store passwords on-line without encryption. Do not use the same password for (organization) accounts as for other non-(organization) access (e.g., personal ISP account, on-line banking, email, benefits, etc.). Do not share (organization) passwords with anyone, including administrative assistants or secretaries. All passwords are to be treated as sensitive, confidential (organization) information. Don’t reveal a password over the phone to ANYONE Don’t reveal a password in an email message Don’t reveal a password to the boss Don’t talk about a password in front of others Don’t hint at the format of a password (e.g., “my family name”) Don’t reveal a password on questionnaires or security forms Don’t share a password with family members Don’t reveal a password to co-workers while on vacation Don’t use the “Remember Password” feature of applications (e.g., Groupwise, Instant Messenger, Internet Explorer, Mozilla). If someone demands a password, refer them to this document or have them call the IT Service Desk. If an account or password is suspected to have been compromised, report the incident to IT security and change all passwords. Password cracking or guessing may be performed on a periodic or random basis by security personnel. If a password is guessed or cracked during one of these scans, the incident will be documented and the user will be required to change their password.

This story, “Password Protection Policy” was originally published by CSO .

A lot of people have started using Microsoft Edge as their primary browser on PC. Since the browser is where you have all your saved passwords and are logged into multiple websites, including social media, it’s important to protect it from unauthorized access. If you want to protect your data privacy, it’s advised to protect the browser with a password. Below is how you can lock Microsoft Edge with password protection on your PC.

Lock Microsoft Edge with Password Protection

If you share your computer with your friends and family, they can easily access your Edge browsing history, bookmarks and also open the websites where you’re logged in. This can pose a serious threat to your privacy if someone opens a social media or cloud storage website where you are already logged in.

So, it’s always better to lock Edge with a password. Follow the steps below to secure the Microsoft Edge browser with password protection on your computer.

  1. Open the Microsoft Edge browser on your computer.
  2. Visit the Browser Lock extension on Edge Add-ons Store.
  3. Here, click on Get. Then, tap Add Extension when prompted.
  4. Once installed, it’ll automatically prompt you to lock the browser.
  5. Click on Yes.
  6. Now, set a new password for Edge browser. enter your email address.

Once set, you’ll be redirected to the Browser Lock settings page. Furthermore, you can add Deep Security which locks the browser for 3 minutes after 3 login attempts. You can also set options to clear your browser history automatically.

Now, close Edge and open it again to see if the password lock is working. As you open Edge, Browser Lock will take over control and ask you for the password. Ensure the Browser Lock extension for the incognito mode in Microsoft Edge’s settings for maximum protection.

Wrapping Up

This was a quick guide on how to lock the Microsoft Edge browser with password protection. Do try it and let me know if it works fine for you. If the Browser Lock doesn’t work properly, you can try other similar extensions from the Add-ons store. Stay tuned for more such articles.

You can also follow us for instant tech news at Google News or for tips and tricks, smartphones & gadgets reviews, join GadgetsToUse Telegram Group or for the latest review videos subscribe GadgetsToUse Youtube Channel.

Last Updated : June 4, 2021

Category : Group Policy , Windows 10

In this post, I will show you how to disable Internet Explorer 11 using Group Policy. By using disable Internet Explorer 11 as a standalone browser policy setting, we will disable IE11 on computers.

Microsoft recently made a big announcement about Internet Explorer. Today, we are at the next stage of that journey: we are announcing that the future of Internet Explorer on Windows 10 is in Microsoft Edge.

With Microsoft Edge capable of assuming this responsibility and more, the Internet Explorer 11 desktop application will be retired and go out of support on June 15, 2022, for certain versions of Windows 10.

Microsoft Edge has Internet Explorer mode built in, so you can access those legacy Internet Explorer-based websites and applications straight from Microsoft Edge.

So now that Internet Explorer 11 is going out of support on June 15, 2022 you can look to disable Internet Explorer 11 on computers. You won’t be getting any updates for Internet Explorer once it goes out of Support.

While on the other hand, Microsoft Edge is an excellent browser and gets frequent updates. With SCCM, you can deploy Microsoft Edge and the Edge Updates.

Now the good thing is Microsoft Edge has IE built-in mode. If you have apps and website that rely on Internet Explorer, this is the good time to start using the IE mode and test the apps for compatibility with Edge.

Prerequisites to Disable IE11

The following Windows updates and Microsoft Edge software are required

  • Windows updates
    • Windows 10, version 2004, Windows Server version 2004, Windows 10, version 20H2: KB4598291 or later
    • Windows 10 version 1909, Windows Server version 1909: KB4598298 or later
    • Windows 10 version 1809, Windows Server version 1809, and Windows Server 2019: KB4598296 or later
    • Windows 10, version 1607, Windows Server 2016: KB4601318 or later
    • Windows 10 initial version (July 2015): KB4601331 or later
    • Windows 8.1: KB4601384 or later
    • Windows Server 2012: KB4601348 or later
  • Microsoft Edge Stable Channel

How to Disable Internet Explorer 11 using Group Policy

To disable Internet Explorer 11 using group policy, follow these steps:

  • Launch the Group Policy Management console. Right-click the domain and select Create a GPO in this domain and link it here.
  • Go to Computer Configuration/Administrative Templates/Windows Components/Internet Explorer.
  • Double-click Disable Internet Explorer 11 as a standalone browser.
  • Select Enabled. Under Options, select Always.
  • Click OK to save the group policy.

If you need some explanation with screenshots, here it is. In the Group Policy Management console, expand domains. Right-click the domain and click Create a GPO in this domain, and link it here.

If you don’t want to apply the policy on domain level, you can apply the GPO to a test Organizational Unit first.

How to password protect internet explorerHow to Disable Internet Explorer 11 using Group Policy

Enter the name of the policy as Disable Internet Explorer 11 and click OK.

How to password protect internet explorerHow to Disable Internet Explorer 11 using Group Policy

Go to Computer Configuration/Administrative Templates/Windows Components/Internet Explorer. Look for setting Disable Internet Explorer 11 as a standalone browser. This policy lets you restrict launching of Internet Explorer 11 as a standalone browser. By default, this setting is in Not configured state.

How to password protect internet explorerHow to Disable Internet Explorer 11 using Group Policy

Right click Disable Internet Explorer 11 as a standalone browser and click Edit. To enable this policy, click Enabled.

When you enable this setting, following changes are also applied.

  • Prevents Internet Explorer 11 from launching as a standalone browser.
  • Restricts Internet Explorer’s usage to Microsoft Edge’s native ‘Internet Explorer mode’.
  • Redirects all attempts at launching Internet Explorer 11 to Microsoft Edge Stable Channel browser.
  • Overrides any other policies that redirect to Internet Explorer 11.

Under Notify that Internet Explorer 11 browser is disabled, you see few options.

  • Never – Select this if you don’t want to notify users that IE11 is disabled.
  • Always – Choose this option if you want to notify users every time they’re redirected from IE11.
  • Once per user – If you want to notify users only the first time they are redirected.

For now, I am going to select Always. Click Apply and OK.

How to password protect internet explorerHow to Disable Internet Explorer 11 using Group Policy

On the client computers you can launch the command prompt as administrator and run the gpupdate /force once. The computer automatically checks with a domain controller and applies the settings defined in the GPO.

Now try launching the Internet Explorer and you get the following message. This action is restricted. For more information, please contact your system administrator.

How to password protect internet explorerInternet Explorer 11 Restricted

I hope the steps covered in this post help you to disable Internet Explorer 11. If you have any questions, feel free to add them in the comments section below.

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How to kill Internet Explorer and other unwanted Windows 10 features

How to kill Internet Explorer and other unwanted Windows 10 features

Not all Windows 10 features are great, such as Internet Explorer, and you might want to remove them from your computer. Here’s how.

Must-read Windows coverage

  • Get Microsoft Office for Windows with this lifetime license
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  • How to find your Windows 11 product key: 3 simple methods
  • How to enable access to god-mode in Microsoft Windows 11

If you’re still using Internet Explorer, it’s time to let go. With the launch of Windows 10, Microsoft officially stopped developing new features for its once-flagship browser and is now delivering only security patches intended for use at large organizations with custom apps that require the old browser for compatibility reasons.

You’re much better off choosing a modern browser that works with the web as it exists today. In Windows 10, Microsoft Edge is the default, but you can install a new browser such as Chrome or Firefox and set it as the default. With that task out of the way, you can then disable Internet Explorer for good.

To locate that switch, type Features in the search box and open the Turn Windows Features On Or Off dialog box from the list of search results (Figure A). Clear the check box to the left of Internet Explorer 11, click OK, and restart.

Figure A

How to password protect internet explorer

From that same dialog box, you can also eliminate other older bits of Windows 10 that exist only for compatibility reasons, including Windows Media Player and the Windows Fax and Scan feature.

How to password protect internet explorer

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Be your company’s Microsoft insider by reading these Windows and Office tips, tricks, and cheat sheets.

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How to password protect internet explorer

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Password Protect – software to protect folders against unwanted access.

How to password protect internet explorer

How to put a password on a folder of your choice

Prevent people from viewing, printing, or altering your documents. Lock folders with a password.

Password Protect allows you to lock, encrypt and protect an unlimited number of folders with your passwords. The program supports Windows 8, Windows 7, Vista, XP, 98, 2000, NT, ME.

Install the program and see how easy it is to password protect a folder on your hard drive, USB external and removable drives.

How to password protect internet explorer

What Password Protect can do for you

  1. If your drive is lost or stolen, nobody will be able to access the contents of the folders you protected.
    The password is always required to open locked folders. No matter if your drive is connected to another PC running in Windows Safe Mode, DOS, Linux or Unix, folders always retain their protection.
  2. Password Protect is safe. If your Windows crashes, you will not lose your data.
    You will be able to unprotect your folders. The program does not store passwords in the Windows registry or on your hard drive. Learn how Password Protect processes passwords.
  3. Lock a folder in Windows Explorer.
    You don’t even need to run Password Protect from the Start menu. Simply right-click a folder is the right pane of Windows Explorer and select Protect This Folder.
  4. Unprotect a locked folder with a double-click in Windows Explorer.
    No need to run the program. Just double-click the folder in the right pane of Windows Explorer and enter the password.
  5. Get helpful customer support.
    Our customer support is free and always available. We’ll be happy to answer any questions you may have about Password Protect. Click here to contact us.
  6. Feel how friendly Password Protect is.
    The software program comes with an easy to use step-by-step wizard to select and protect your folders. See screenshots.

“Protecting your files is important and there are many programs available online which help to protect folders and files. I downloaded and tried a lot them, most are just a like. One of the easiest to use was Password Protect.” Mike Albin from KBTX TV.

Free upgrades

Here comes the good part. Password Protect comes with free upgrades to all the future versions. When an upgrade is released, all you have to do is download the latest version of Password Protect from our site. You do not have to pay a penny for upgrades. The registration key you get when you place your order converts the trial version into a full one.

How to password protect internet explorer

Guarantees

Password Protect always comes with a money-back guarantee. It’s very simple. You have one year to see if Password Protect is the very piece of software you were looking for. If you are not happy with the program, e-mail us at [email protected] within one year and we’ll refund the full purchase price minus handling promptly.

How to place your order

Payments are processed by PayPro Global, Inc. The following payment options are available:

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You can select your payment method from the “Payment Method” drop-down menu at the bottom of the secure order form.

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Whether you are protecting your children or hiding personal information, there are ways to block unwanted websites from your computer. Follow this tutorial and learn how to accomplish this on a Windows PC easily.
Step 1: Block websites
Block web sites on Internet Explorer by opening the browser and clicking Tools. Select Internet Options. Click on the Content tab and select Enable.

Step 2: Select Never
Click the Settings button, and then on the Approved Sites tab and type in the web site you want blocked. Select Never, and then add web sites you want blocked.

Step 3: Click OK
Click the OK button at the bottom. A new page will open.

Step 4: Create a password
Create a password so no one can turn off the block. After you click OK, you have successfully blocked that web site on Internet Explorer.

Step 5: Block with Firefox
Block sites of your choice on Firefox by downloading the extension BlockSite. Follow the manufacturer’s instructions for downloading the add-on.
Steps are different for different browsers and versions. If you use Google Chrome, or Safari, visit their help sections to get the same results.

Step 6: Block with Windows
Block web sites for Windows by clicking on the Start button. Then select Run.

Step 7: Type in the box
Type “notepad c:WINDOWSsystem32driversetchosts” in the box and hit OK.

Step 8: Type site address
Go to the last line in the notepad file that pops up and hit Enter. Type 127.0.0.1 and then the web site you want to block. For example: 127.0.0.1 siteaddress.com. Then click Enter and repeat for other web sites you would like to block. Save the file and exit.

Did you know? In 2009, the Iraqi government moved to block web sites deemed to be pornographic or incite conflict.

How to password protect internet explorer

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I have this design where the user inputs some text in input type=text and it is validated via jQuery. Now when user inputs some data, IE10 shows an X sign to clear text box however, by design it overlaps the custom designed X image and also the eye icon overlaps the custom design of the password field.

I’ve tried using ::-ms-clear for input type=text and ::-ms-reveal for input type=password but unfortunately, it does nothing at all. I have read that reveal can only be removed by disabling it from somewhere in system which is of no use.

Can anyone please help me or direct me to fix this issue or tell me how this issue can be solved?

How to password protect internet explorer

3 Answers 3

You can now choose to sort by Trending, which boosts votes that have happened recently, helping to surface more up-to-date answers.

Trending is based off of the highest score sort and falls back to it if no posts are trending.

The following CSS worked for me

See ::-ms-clear and ::-ms-reveal for extra information.

How to password protect internet explorer

Two questions. First, are you sure your CSS is correct as the following CSS works for me:

Second question: Are you running IE10 in IE9 mode or below under Developer Tools. If so, this selector doesn’t appear to work and IE10 still inserts the password eye. I’m looking for a resolution to that issue now.

The answers given are good solutions when you are not running in compatibility mode. This should work great:

Unfortunately there are few good solutions when you are running in compatibility mode. As you can see here, those css selectors do not work in compatibility mode: https://connect.microsoft.com/IE/feedback/details/783743

You could try something like covering it with an image. Depending on the the context of how your application is used and how many people you need to roll it out to, you could also edit the registry to disable the reveal/clear features in IE. You can do that like so:

Add this to the file:

Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00 [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Internet Explorer\Main] “DisablePasswordReveal”=dword:00000001

Save it as DisablePwPeekW7.reg

Double click the file you just made, accept. Login and verify.

How to password protect internet explorer How to password protect internet explorer How to password protect internet explorer How to password protect internet explorer How to password protect internet explorer

Here each entry corresponds to a hash of the website for which username/password has been stored. So one must know the website login link in order to recover the password.

The HTTP basic authentication passwords are stored in the ‘Credentials store’. The ‘Credentials Store’ is newly introduced secret store mechanism by Windows and it is generally used to store the network login passwords. Its location is given below.

Based on IE version, different method need to be used to retrieve the stored passwords. For IE version 4 to 6.0, its enough to decrypt the passwords from ‘Protected Storage’ which contains both Autocomplete and HTTP authentication passwords. For IE version 7 and above we have to decrypt the http authentication passwords from ‘Credentials Store’ and Autocomplete passwords from IE registry storage location.

The remaining section of this article explains all these methods in detail along with sample code.

Protected Storage is also used by other applications such as Outlook, MSN messenger to store the passwords. So we need to separate out these passwords from the Autocomplete and HTTP basic authentication passwords stored by IE.

Windows provides API functions to retrieve the passwords stored in the ‘Protected Storage’. All these API functions are exported from pstorec.dll which is installed as part of Windows system. One can use PStoreCreateInstance function to get the pointer to protected storage and then use the enumeration functions to list all the secrets in plain text. The code sample below illustrate this method using the ‘Protected Storage’ API functions.

void ListIEProtectedStorageSecrets()
<
IPStorePtr PStore;
IEnumPStoreTypesPtr EnumPStoreTypes;
GUID TypeGUID;
char strSiteUrl[1024];
char strSiteCredentials[1024];
char szItemGUID[1024];
char strUsername[1024];
char strPassword[1024];

HRESULT hRes = PStoreCreateInstance(&PStore, 0, 0, 0);

IEnumPStoreTypesPtr EnumSubTypes;
hRes = PStore->EnumSubtypes(0, &TypeGUID, 0, &EnumSubTypes);

//Now enumerate through each of the stored entries.

unsigned long psDataLen = 0;
unsigned char *psData = NULL;
char *sptr;
_PST_PROMPTINFO *pstiinfo = NULL;

char *ptr = strchr(strCredentials, ‘:’);
*ptr = ‘\0’;
strcpy_s(strUsername, 1024, strCredentials);
ptr++;
strcpy_s(strPassword, 1024, ptr);

Website=Microsoft_WinInet_www.google.com:443/Please log in to your Google Account
Username=gmailuser
Password=gmailpass

Website=Microsoft_WinInet_192.168.1.100:80/WebAdmin
Username=admin
Password=admin

IE 7 onwards uses tricky method to store the Autocomplete passwords as explained earlier. Instead of storing the website directly, the hash of the website link is stored in the registry with encrypted username/password information. This way user can always get the username/password automatically whenever he/she visits the corresponding website in IE. But the password stealing is circumvented to certain extent as the cracker now need to know the website login link to get the password.

However one can use the website links stored in the IE history to try for the match similar to the brute force approach used in traditional password recovery method. This is very effective solution as all the visited websites will be stored in IE history automatically unless the user has explicitly deleted it.

The code sample below shows how to calculate the hash of the website link and then decrypting the secrets using Windows cryptography functions. This is the modified and extended version of original article published by SapporoWorks[2].

//
// Calculate the hash for the Website URL
//
void GetURLHashString(wchar_t *wstrURL, char *strHash, int dwSize)
<
HCRYPTPROV hProv = NULL;
HCRYPTHCRYPTHASH hHash = NULL;

CryptCreateHash(hProv,CALG_SHA1, 0, 0,&hHash);

if( CryptHashData(hHash,(unsigned char *)wstrURL, (wcslen(wstrURL)+1)*2, 0) )
<
// retrieve 20 bytes of hash value
DWORD dwHashLen=20;
BYTE Buffer[20];

//Get the hash value now.
if( CryptGetHashParam(hHash, HP_HASHVAL, Buffer, &dwHashLen,0) )
<
//Convert the 20 byte hash value to hexadecimal string format.
char TmpBuf[1024];
unsigned char tail=0; // used to calculate value for the last 2 bytes

for(int i=0;i = (IEAutoHeader->dwSize + IEAutoHeader->dwSecretInfoSize + IEAutoHeader->dwSecretSize) )
<

SecretEntry *secEntry = (SecretEntry*) ( DataOut.pbData + sizeof(IEAutoComplteSecretHeader) );
BYTE *secOffset = (BYTE *) ( DataOut.pbData + IEAutoHeader->dwSize + IEAutoHeader->dwSecretInfoSize );
BYTE *curSecOffset;

// Each time process 2 secret entries for username & password
for(int i=0; i dwOffset;
wstrUserName = (WCHAR*) curSecOffset;

//Get the next secret’s offset i.e password
secEntry++;
curSecOffset = secOffset + secEntry->dwOffset;
wstrPassword = (WCHAR*) curSecOffset;

//move to next entry
secEntry++;

Here each website can have more than one username/password pairs. If user has entered different secrets for same website or if same website link is associated with multiple accounts like in case of Gmail, Orkut etc then multiple secrets will be stored per website.

The final decrypted Autocomplete data will have IEAutoCompleteSecretHeader structure followed by SecretHeader’s and clear text Secret strings as shown below.

Before we proceed, we need to find out number of secrets within this decrypted data. One simple way is to use dwTotalSecrets variable of IESecretInfoHeader structure which is part of IEAutoCompleteSecretHeader. Here dwTotalSecrets stands for total number of secrets stored for this website. Here secret can represent either username or password. So dividing this number by two will give us actual username/password pairs for the website.

Now, we go through each of the secrets, reading 2 secrets (username & password) at a time. Each time SecretEntry header is read to get the offset of associated unicode Secret string and then move on to next SecretEntry header until we have done with reading all the secrets.

IEPasswordDecryptor is the free tool to quickly and easily recover stored passwords from Internet Explorer. It can recover both Autocomplete and HTTP basic authentication based passwords from IE secret store. User can double click on any of the entry to visit the website which makes it easy to verify sign-on passwords. It also comes with distinctive feature which allows the user to reset the IE content advisor password in case user has lost it.

It also presents ‘IE history manager’ interface which not only displays the contents of IE history in detail but also provides the option to add/remove websites with ease. User can save the displayed password list and IE history list to TEXT as well HTML file for offline verification & storage.