How to play an e7 chord on guitar

The E7 chord is one of the easiest chords you can learn to add just a little bit of flair to your chord progressions. The addition of the 7th note always gives a song that extra little jazzy something.

If you are familiar with any of the other 7th chords we’ve learned, like the A7 or B7, you are already familiar with how much they can add to your music.

Today we will be covering several ways you can play this chord along the neck. We will also cover some of the theory behind building this chord as well as how to make your own chord progressions using this chord.

Let’s get into it!

How To Play The E7 Chord

How to play an e7 chord on guitar

As you can see, with this version of E7, you simply play an E chord and leave out the E root note on the D string.

  • index finger (1) on the G# note of the G string on the 1st fret
  • middle finger (2) on the B note of the A string on the 2nd fret
  • play the rest of the strings open

Variations Of The Chord

You can also give your E7 an extra boost by adding in a D note to the shape you learned above.

How to play an e7 chord on guitar

  • index finger (1) on the G# note of the G string on the 1st fret
  • middle finger (2) on the B note of the A string on the 2nd fret
  • pinky finger (4) on the D note on the B string at the 3rd fret
  • play the rest of the strings open

How to play an e7 chord on guitar

While the above two chord forms are simple, this may be the easiest version of the E7 chord. It is primarily used as a power chord in rock music.

  • play the low E string open
  • pinky finger (4) fretting the D note on the A string at the 5th fret
  • mute the remaining strings

Another, rather simple, version of this chord is using the D7 chord shape moved up a couple of frets.

How to play an e7 chord on guitar

You use an Em7 barre chord shape on the 10th fret. Fret the strings like so:

  • index finger (1) on the D note of the B string on the 3rd fret
  • middle finger (2) on the B note of the G string on the 4th fret
  • ring finger (3) on the G# note on the high e string on the 4th fret

Perhaps the most difficult version of this chord is using the open B7 chord shape.

How to play an e7 chord on guitar

This shape may make you fingers feel a bit like a twisted pretzel at first. But, after some practice, it will likely become one of your favorites to play.

  • index finger (1) on the G# note of the D string on the 6th fret
  • middle finger (2) on the E note of the A string on the 7th fret
  • ring finger (3) on the D note on the A string on the 7th fret
  • pinky finger (4) on the B note on the A string at the 7th fret
  • play the rest of the strings open

The Theory Behind It

Learning how to build your own chords is a great skill to have. The way you build a major chord is by using pieces of the major scale to create what is called a major triad. The major triad uses the I, III, and V notes of the major scale. An E major chord uses:

  • E (I)
  • G# (III)
  • B (V)

How to play an e7 chord on guitar

The E major scale looks like this:

How to play an e7 chord on guitar

To make your E chord a 7th chord, all you need to do is add in a bVII, or flat 7th, note.

  • E (I)
  • G# (III)
  • B (V)
  • D (bVII)

Complementary Chords

A chord is only as useful as the other chords around it. A key component of playing guitar is learning how to build progressions around each of your chords. Today we will learn how to build a progression around the E7 chord.

To do so, we will take a similar approach as we did to chord building. We will use a chord scale instead of a note scale.

How to play an e7 chord on guitar

The chords available in a E major chord scale are:

  • E (I)
  • F#m (ii)
  • G#m (iii)
  • A (IV)
  • B (V)
  • C#m (vi)
  • D#dim (vii°)

Note: when a scale degree is lower case (example “iii”) that means it is a minor chord. When a note contains the degree symbol (°) that means it is a diminished chord.

All you need to do to make your chord progression is choose some from the scale degrees. For instance, we went with the I7 – V – IV7 – vi7 progression, or E7 – B – A7 – C#m7.

A staple in the blues and beyond.

By Kristin Bigness

The E7 guitar chord is an undeniable staple. It’s like that old friend who is always there for you and who consistently makes life more interesting. You can find the E7 everywhere in the blues and also in other genres such as rock, folk, soul, and funk.

Given how useful a chord the E7 is, it’s time to start making it a staple of your own playing repertoire. Let’s learn a little more about the E7 chord, a few ways to play it, and how it plugs into songs across a variety of genres.

What Notes Make Up an E7?

A standard E chord is made up of the notes E, G#, and B. An E7 adds one note to the original triad; it’s comprised of E, G#, B, and D. The D is the key note here. That is the “7” of the E7. Because it’s only one whole step away from the root note (E), it creates a tension that begs to be resolved. Let’s learn how to play a few different formations of the E7 guitar chord.

A Simple E7 Guitar Chord in Open Position

In standard tuning, you only need to fret two fingers to get a beautiful, deep E7.

E7 Chord Open Position (v1)

  • – Index finger: 1st fret of the G (3rd) string
  • – Middle finger: 2nd fret of the A (5th) string
  • – Strum 6 strings down from the low E (6th) string

This chord formation gives you the following notes from low to high: E, B, D, G#, B, E.

How to play an e7 chord on guitar

John Lee Hooker starts “Boom Boom” with the E7. It sets the vibe for the entire song; it’s the backdrop for the composition’s irresistible beat and swagger (just try listening to that song without tapping your foot). “Boom Boom” was released in 1962. British rockers like Eric Clapton and The Beatles were heavily influenced by American blues, and you can hear that translate to songs like “I Saw Her Standing There”, which was released just one year later in 1963. “I Saw Her Standing There” takes blues concepts and weaves them into infectious rock song with pop hooks and hand claps. And just like “Boom Boom”, it’s grounded in the E7.

Two More Frets for Added Mystery

Once you’re comfortable with that first formation, try adding your ring and pinky fingers into the mix.

E7 Chord Open Position (v2)

  • – Index finger: 1st fret of the G (3rd) string (same as v1)
  • – Middle finger: 2nd fret of the A (5th) string (same as v1)
  • – Ring finger: 2nd fret of the D (4th) string (new!)
  • – Pinky finger: 3rd fret of the B (2nd) string (new!)
  • – Strum 6 strings down from the low E (6th) string

How to play an e7 chord on guitar

This formation gives you the following notes from low to high: E, B, E, G#, D, E. What does this mean? The D (the 7) is played one octave higher than in the previous formation. Because it’s in a higher register, it cuts through the rest of the notes and is more noticeable. It sticks out more. It sounds “more 7.” It also gives you the opportunity to strengthen your ring and pinky fingers.

The E7 Guitar Chord at the 5th Position

There are a few reasons you may want to learn the E7 at the 5th position. For starters, it has a beautiful, higher, more delicate sound than the E7 at open position. Second, it may also make it easier to transition to and from other chords in a song. Both of these factors are at work in the bridge of the classic ballad “At Last”, performed most famously by Etta James. During the line, “A dream that I can call my own”, there are some quick chord changes from D#7 to E7. This formation is perfect for achieving that musical moment.

Here’s how to play it:

E7 5th Position (v1)

  • – Index finger: 5th fret of the B (2nd) string
  • – Middle finger: 6th fret of the D (4th) string
  • – Ring finger: 7th fret of the A (5th) string
  • – Pinky finger: 7th fret of the G (3rd) string
  • – Strum 6 strings down from the low E (6th) string

E7 Everywhere

The E7 guitar chord is versatile and finds its way into most every genre. Hear it in traditional songs such as “Amazing Grace” and “Oh! Susanna”. Spot it in the Motown hit, “My Guy”. Fast forward to artists such as Amy Winehouse, who put a contemporary spin on soul, blues, and jazz on tracks like “You Know I’m No Good”.

Start learning more chords and songs you love with Fender Play and if you’re not a member, sign up for a free trial!

BY KATE KOENIG

Welcome to the latest installment of Chord by Chord, a series designed to build your understanding of harmony and the fretboard. In the last lesson, you learned how to make A7 chords all around the fretboard. This time you’ll do the same, but with E7.

The Work

E7 is a type of dominant seventh chord—remember, a major triad plus a flatted seventh. An E major triad is spelled E G# B, as shown in Example 1, and an E7 chord contains the notes E, G#, B, and D (Example 2).

How to play an e7 chord on guitar

If you play a basic open E chord, you can make an E7 just by removing your third finger, as depicted in Example 3a. You could also get an E7 by taking the open E shape and adding your fourth finger on the third-fret D on string 2 (Example 3b).

Example 4 shows how to make a closed E7 voicing on the inner four strings, and Example 5 demonstrates how to form E7 from an E barre chord in seventh position. Remember that you could include the open low E string for a thicker sound. See Example 6 for some less common voicings higher up the neck with the third (G#) as the lowest note.

The Result

You should now know a variety of ways to play E7 across the fretboard. The Beatles’ “Eight Days a Week” is a great example of a song that makes use of the E7 chord. In the next lesson, we’ll continue exploring dominant seventh chords, focusing on B7.

E7 Chord Guitar Instructions

To play the E7 chord on your guitar, picture the E7 chord chart shown to the left above as your fret board and neck (if you were to stand your guitar up vertically).

The horizontal lines represent the fret bars, the vertical lines show the strings and the dots show where to place your fingers.

Play the E7 chord by placing your fingers exactly where the diagram shows and strumming the correct strings.

E7 Guitar Chord Finger Positions

Here’s where you need to position your fingers when playing the E7 guitar chord:

  1. Tune your guitar Tune your guitar to standard guitar tuning
  2. Index finger: 1st fret, 3rd string. Place your index finger on the 1st fret of the 3rd string.
  3. Middle finger: 2nd fret, 5th string. Place your middle finger on the 2nd fret of the 5th string.
  4. Play chord. Strum all strings.

Do you want to get better at playing E7 and all other guitar chords? Over 1.79 million people across the world went from average to impressive fast when they took this online class (and it’s free for 2 weeks)

These Songs Use The E7 Chord

Mastered playing the E7 chord on your guitar? Challenge yourself by trying to play these songs to help you memorise it (they all use the E7 chord)!

Nailed It?

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E7 chord for guitar in different forms, including open and barre chords.

How to play an e7 chord on guitar

A common way to play the chord ( 020130 , shown below, and 022130 are also common). E7 is a four-note chord consisting of E, G#, B, D.

Alternative shapes

E7 barre

  • How to play an e7 chord on guitar

  • How to play an e7 chord on guitar

  • How to play an e7 chord on guitar

  • How to play an e7 chord on guitar

Relevant chords

E7sus4

  • How to play an e7 chord on guitar

Try in a chord progression

C – F – E7 – Am (see with diagrams in pdf)

Theory and information

Chord names

E7 is a dominant chord. E7/B, E7/G# and E7/D are inversions of the chord.

Notes in the chord

The notes that the E7 chord consists of are E, G#, B, D.
To get E9 add F#.
To get Emaj7 replace D with D#.

Inversions

1st inversion: E7/G# (means that G# is the bass note).
2nd inversion: E7/B (means that B is the bass note).
3rd inversion: E7/D (means that D is the bass note).
Diagrams of these inversions

Assorted slash chords

Versions with alternate bass notes in short notation:

E7/F#: 220100
E7/A: X00100
E7/C: X30100
E7/C#: X40100

Alternative chord names

E7/F# is theoretically identical with E9/F#.
E7/A is theoretically identical with E11/A.
E7/C# is theoretically identical with E13/C#.

Omissions

E7 (no3) is an E dominant 7th with no third (G#).
E7 (no5) is an E dominant 7th with no fifth (B).

E7#11 Chord Guitar Instructions

To play the E7#11 chord on your guitar, picture the E7#11 chord chart shown to the left above as your fret board and neck (if you were to stand your guitar up vertically).

The horizontal lines represent the fret bars, the vertical lines show the strings and the dots show where to place your fingers.

Play the E7#11 chord by placing your fingers exactly where the diagram shows and strumming the correct strings.

E7#11 Guitar Chord Finger Positions

Here’s where you need to position your fingers when playing the E7#11 guitar chord:

  1. Tune your guitar Tune your guitar to standard guitar tuning
  2. Index finger: 2nd fret, 5th string. Place your index finger on the 2nd fret of the 5th string.
  3. Middle finger: 3rd fret, 3rd string. Place your middle finger on the 3rd fret of the 3rd string.
  4. Play chord. Strum all strings.

Want to get better at playing E7#11 and all other guitar chords? Over 1.79 million people across the world went from average to impressive fast when they took this online class (and it’s free for 2 weeks)

These Songs Use The E7#11 Chord

Mastered playing the E7#11 chord on your guitar? Challenge yourself by trying to play these songs to help you memorise it (they all use the E7#11 chord)!

Nailed It?

Great job! Let others know you’re learning a REAL instrument by sharing it on social media!

Save For Later!

Want to make sure you don’t forget the E7#11 Chord? Bookmark this page to make it easier for you to find again!

Press Ctrl+D to bookmark this page

Want To Learn More?

We hope you enjoyed learning how to play the E7#11 chord on your guitar. Don’t stop now! We’re got loads more guitar chords for you to learn at Guvna Guitars!

All about stringed musical instruments

What is an e7 guitar chord?

A standard E chord is made up of the notes E, G#, and B. An E7 adds one note to the original triad; it’s comprised of E, G#, B, and D. The D is the key note here. That is the “7” of the E7. … Let’s learn how to play a few different formations of the E7 guitar chord.

What is the easiest chord to play on a guitar?

Basic Em Guitar Chord (E Minor Chord)

Em is the first beginning guitar chord you should learn. It’s one of the most basic guitar chords not only because it’s easy, but because it’s used all the time in a lot of different songs. The small m after the E means minor. Think of minor as a flavor of sound.

What does an e7 chord look like?

This scale consists of the notes E, F#, G#, A, B, C#, D# and E. Since the 7 chord formula is 1 – 3 – 5 – 7b, the notes of the E seventh chord is E – G# – B – D. What we’ve done here is combine the root, major third, perfect fifth and flat seventh of the E major scale.

What is am7 chord?

The Am7 (sometimes written as “A minor 7” or “Amin7) chord is built to create tension and amp up the emotion in a song. Like most seventh chords, it has a sound that’s neither happy or sad. This is due to the fact that there is both a minor chord with a 7 interval wrapped up in the composition of a seventh chord.

How many guitar chords are there?

For example, the typical twelve-bar blues uses only three chords, each of which can be played (in every open tuning) by fretting six strings with one finger. Open tunings are used especially for steel guitar and slide guitar.

Key signatureMajor keyMinor keyB♭F majorD minorC majorA minorF♯G majorE minor

Why is it called a7 chord?

It was the first seventh chord to appear regularly in classical music. The name comes from the fact that the flat seventh occurs naturally in the chord built upon the dominant (i.e., the fifth degree) of a given major diatonic scale. The note G is the dominant degree of C major—its fifth note.

What are the 3 basic guitar chords?

The Three Essential Guitar Chords

According to my bud, Andy B, the three most common guitar chords every man should know are G Major, C Major and D Major.

What is the first thing to learn on guitar?

Here’s your quick open major chords lesson: Start with a very basic open chord, like G. Then, strum the guitar to make sure you’re hearing a clear chord. Once you have mastered a single open chord, learn a second open chord. Then, practice transitioning between the two chords.

What are the 4 chords on guitar?

These four chords are the magic I, IV, V and vi.

What is the Bm chord?

The Most Common Version. Unlike some other commonly used minor chords (like Em or Am), the B minor chord doesn’t use any open strings. For this one you must use one finger to fret multiple strings in what is called a “barre chord.” Your index finger rests across every string but the low E.

All about stringed musical instruments

What’s an e7 chord?

What Notes Make Up an E7? A standard E chord is made up of the notes E, G#, and B. An E7 adds one note to the original triad; it’s comprised of E, G#, B, and D. The D is the key note here. … Let’s learn how to play a few different formations of the E7 guitar chord.

What does d7 mean in guitar?

D dominant seventh chord

What does an e7 chord look like?

This scale consists of the notes E, F#, G#, A, B, C#, D# and E. Since the 7 chord formula is 1 – 3 – 5 – 7b, the notes of the E seventh chord is E – G# – B – D. What we’ve done here is combine the root, major third, perfect fifth and flat seventh of the E major scale.

What is am7 chord?

The Am7 (sometimes written as “A minor 7” or “Amin7) chord is built to create tension and amp up the emotion in a song. Like most seventh chords, it has a sound that’s neither happy or sad. This is due to the fact that there is both a minor chord with a 7 interval wrapped up in the composition of a seventh chord.

What notes are in a a7 chord?

A7 is a four-note chord consisting of A, C#, E, G.

What is the G chord on the piano?

The G major chord, perhaps second to the C major chord is one of the first chords that one learns when learning to play the piano or keyboard. It is a very simple chord and consists only of white keys. A G maj chord is formed by combining the notes G B D(G, B and D).

How many guitar chords are there?

For example, the typical twelve-bar blues uses only three chords, each of which can be played (in every open tuning) by fretting six strings with one finger. Open tunings are used especially for steel guitar and slide guitar.

Key signatureMajor keyMinor keyB♭F majorD minorC majorA minorF♯G majorE minor

How are guitar chords named?

Chords derive their names from the root note; so a C chord has C for its root note and a G7 chord will have G. The interval between the root note and the third determines whether a chord is a major or minor. Chords may be strummed or the notes picked individually though beginners find strumming much easier.

What is G chord on guitar?

How to Play the G Major Chord. The most common way to play the G Major Chord is in the open position, like this: – Index finger on the 2nd fret of the A (5th) string. – Middle finger on the 3rd fret of the low E (6th) string. – Ring finger on the 3rd fret of the E (1st) string.

What is e7 in the army?

Sergeant First Class/SFC (E-7)

This rank normally means the soldier has 15 to 18 years of military experience. This level is now considered as a senior NCO (Non-Commissioned Officer). Their job entails being the key assistant and advisor to the platoon leader.

Chord Description

How to play an e7 chord on guitar

This chord is made up of the Root, Major Third, Perfect Fifth, Minor Seventh, and Sharp Ninth

Some books show this chord as:

  • E Dominant Seventh Sharp Ninth Added
  • E Dom7#9
  • E 7#9
  • E 7+9
  • E 7aug9
  • E7(#9)

The E7(#9) chord is made up of the notes E, G#, B, D, and F##.
This chord is known as The Hendrix Chord (in particular position n.2 below) because it was often used by the guitar wizard.

E 7(#9) chord Notes:

How to create the Dominant Seventh Sharp Ninth Added chord:

How to play an e7 chord on guitarWant to learn everything about chords?

Check Chords Domination out: a unique ebook that shows you finger positions, note names and intervals in the chords (plus a tones fretboard maps)

You’ll learn how to play 44 chords types across all the fretboard, with many voicings and fingerings

  • Download Free Excerpt
  • Learn More Here

Guitar Patterns for the E7(#9) chord

Chord boxes are sorted from the easiest to the hardest. Learn how to read chord diagrams.

If you have difficulties with bar chord shapes, check the Bar Chords Tips tutorial.

Position 1
Open

Position 2
Movable

Position 3
Open

Position 4
Open

Position 5
Open

Position 6
Barre Movable

Position 7
Barre Open

How to play an e7 chord on guitarWant a printable pdf?
Download the Free Guitar Chords Chart Pdf

52 Chord Progressions | Learn How To Connect Chords and Create Great Songs

Do you know some chords, maybe many, but you’re not sure how to play them together?

This ebook will show you 52 chord progressions, that are the foundation of many genres and styles of Western Music.

Before you know it you will be picking out progressions from songs on the radio!

  • Download Free Excerpt
  • Learn More Here

Use Fretboard Maps To Build Chords Along All The Fretboard

Complete Fretboard Map of E 7(#9) chord tones

Pick some of the tones from the fretboard map below and play this chord in new ways.

These maps show you the tones in a chord all along the fretboard. They are incredibly helpful because allow you to:

  • Create new voicings on the fly, across all the neck
  • Improvise targeting the right notes
  • Unlock the fretboard and expand the CAGED system.

In the new ebook, Chords Domination, you’ll find the fretboard tones maps for 44 different qualities of chords. Check it out:

  • Download Free Excerpt
  • Learn More Here

Comprehensive Ebooks To Advance Your Skills Further

How to play an e7 chord on guitar

Find all the resources you need, organized in a step-by-step program, to master chords, scales and progressions.

FaChords comprehensive guitar ebooks will help you advance your skills further.

How to play an e7 chord on guitar

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Are you a beginner guitar player? Learn how to play an E7 open chord with the step-by-step instructions in this video tutorial. Our expert shows you two ways: the hard way and the easy way.

E7, E7 there’s two ways to make it. There’s the hard way and then there’s the easy way. So let’s talk about the easy way. E7 is your first finger on the 3rd string, 1st fret. And then your 2nd finger on the 5th string, 2nd fret. That’s all you need, that E7. Right, so I’m, I don’t have to be careful here I’m just hitting all the strings right? And uh, E7’s whole, whole job in life is to try to get to some kind of A. Right, so E7, A. So that’s one way to make E7. Then let’s say the harder way would be to use all four fingers and what we’re gonna do is make an E major chord. So how did I do that? I did my first finger went on the 3rd string, 1st fret. My 2nd finger went on the 5th string, 2nd fret. And then my ring finger, my 3rd finger went on the 4th string, 2nd fret. There’s my E chord, right? And then if you can manage to get your pinky on the 2nd string, 3rd fret, then you’ve got E7. Sounds a little different. Here’s the full you know, here’s the hard E7, and then the, the easy E7. That’s how you make E7.

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Ključna beseda s sklicem na vsebina e7 akord.

#Play #Open #Chord #Guitar #Lessons.

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How to Play an E7 Open Chord | Guitar Lessons.

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Last Updated On: February 7, 2021

How to play an e7 chord on guitar

E major is a foundation chord heard in several country, pop, blues, and rock songs. It’s also one of the primary major chords that new guitar players learn.

In this quick guide today, we show you how to play E major on guitar and simplified versions to help you get started.

How to Play E Major on Guitar

Many beginners find it challenging to learn because it requires finger agility and coordination. Fortunately, there are simplified versions, making it a breeze to play without compromising good sound.

We’ll start by diving into the deep end and explaining the most common—and trickiest way—to play the E chord. Here, you’ll use three fingers to produce a deep, thick sounding E major, which you can later play together with other chords.

How to play an e7 chord on guitarE chord chart (above)

Here’s how you do it:

  1. Place your pointer finger on the first fret on the G string (the third string)
  2. Set your second finger on the second A string fret (the fifth)
  3. Then lay your ring finger on the second fret on the D string (the fourth)
  4. Hit all six strings as you strum in a downward motion from the low E string

Learning how to play the E chord this way will give you a much better sound since you’re hitting several notes, such as E, B, G#, E, B, E.

Read next: Try some great online guitar lessons to ramp up your playing ability quick!

Simplified Ways to Play E Chord

Because the above is a medium-difficulty chord to hit, especially in an up-beat tempo, we’ve collected some alternative ways that you can hit that angelic E:

If you’re doing a simplified E major, E7 is the best way to go without compromising sound. Although it requires fewer fingers, it offers a solid balance of sound quality and playability.

How to play an e7 chord on guitarE7 chart (above)

To play this version, you need your index finger and middle finger:

  1. Lay your index finger on the first fret third string.
  2. Set your second finger on the second fret on the A (fifth) string
  3. Strum all six strings in a downward motion for the best sound

Another two-finger version of the E chord is E5. Although similar to E7, E5 is more bass-heavy and ideal for heavy blues, rock, punk, and even metal. However, it’s also the easiest to mess up. This is because it sounds like an E major due to the top half, but the sound will be off if you hit all the strings.

How to play an e7 chord on guitarThe E5 chord (above)

To play E5, here’s what you do:

  1. Apply your first finger to the A string fret (the fifth string) on the second fret
  2. Then with your middle finger, place it on the second D string fret (the fourth string)

Now, when playing E5, it’s crucial that you only play the fourth, fifth, and sixth string. If you play more than this, the sound will be off, and it will no longer be an E5 but an E minor chord. It can be tricky hitting the right strings, so keep practicing.

Once you get it, try it on an electric guitar with an overdriven or distorted channel. It’s also a decent sound on an acoustic guitar, but it needs some of that depth the electric gives it.

One-Finger E Chord

If you’re new to the guitar, an easier way to play the E chord is using the one-finger method. This will give you the basic sound of the E. However, it doesn’t have the same fullness and character as the other methods, so we recommend focusing on the above.

How to play an e7 chord on guitarE chord with just one finger (above)

Still, to play E major with one finger, all you do is place your index finger on the G string—the third from the bottom. Now, unlike the method above, with this, you should only hit three strings—one to three.

As you may guess, this is where the E loses some of its sound since you aren’t hitting all the strings.

Additional One-Finger E

There are more ways to play the E note, although these aren’t technically chords but single notes. Simply place your finger on the E note—the second fret on the fourth string—and then play the top and bottom strings open.

The sound isn’t very full, but it’s a good starting point if you’re just learning how to play E major on guitar.

Give some of these variations a go and you’ll be well on your way to learning guitar quickly!

Give some other chords a try:

HOW TO PLAY: CLICK HERE FOR THE COMPLETE TOP 30 LIST OF CHORD VIDEOS!

HOW TO PLAY THE E7:

How to play an e7 chord on guitar

For guitar lessons, The E7 chord is a very common chord used in thousands and thousands of pop songs it is most commonly associated with blues music such as the 12 bar blues structure however you will find it in everything from Jimi Hendrix to Stevie Ray Vaughn or Zeppelin. Unexpectedly, you can also find it in minor progressions as well as classical pieces where the dominant seventh chord is a borrowed chord from the parallel harmonic minor key (more on this in advanced theory and composition!). Scales that work with it include the mixolydian, minor pentatonic, and Phrygian dominant, common scales used by guitar teachers. Popular songs that include it are lots of 12 bar blues progressions of lots of songs by Stevie Ray Vaughan such as Pride and Joy and also Metallica’s unforgiven as well as “born on the Bayou” by Creedence Clearwater revival. Know this chord ! It is very common and one of the first taught in guitar lessons with Jimmy Cypher

How to play an e7 chord on guitar

It is composed of the root note E the major third G# the perfect fifth B and the minor seven or flat seven which is D. (E-G#-B-D). It’s chord formula is 1-3-5-b7 . Is useful to think of it as a hybrid of both a major chord and a minor seven chord as it has qualities of both and thus an unusual amount of tension allowing for a lot of scale options including the chromatic scale used in jazz. Dominant seven Harmony gives you the greatest number of soloing options for wild crazy stuff when you hear bucket head, dime bag Darrell Vernon Reed from living color or Hendrix on voodoo chile these are all examples of stretching out over dominant seven harmony, something we explore in advanced lead guitar lessons.

As with most of the chords in the beginner section there are many different “voicings” of the chord whereby the order of the notes played will change, the notes that are doubled, the notes that are omitted or where they are played on the guitar fretboard and what register. However the open form showed here is E7 chord to know first which is what guitar teachers focus on. Songwriters, rhythm guitar players, lead guitar players will all need to know this chord as as such, it is taught in guitar lessons the very first week.

How to play an e7 chord on guitar

Artists who use the E7 chord: Stevie Ray Vaughn, John Fogerty, Jack Johnson, Sheryl Crow, Bonnie Raitt, Dixie Chicks, Jimi Hendrix, metallica, Santana, Joe Satriani, Van Halen, Eric Clapton, Jimmy Page, Led Zeppelin, Supertramp, One Direction, Sam Smith, Taylor Swift, Neil Young, James Taylor, Stone Temple Pilots, AC/DC, Lynard Skynard, Bob Marley, Pink Floyd, Johnny Cash, Bob dylan, Kasy Musgraves, The Beatles, Rolling Stones, Pantera, Foo Fighters, Queen, Audioslave, Rage Against the Machine, Rush, Dream Theater, Fleetwood Mac, Crosby, Stills & Nash, Oasis, Ozzy Osbourne, Tool, Lucinda Williams, Ben Harper, Tracy Chapman, emerson, Lake and Palmer, Lenny Kravitz, Aerosmith, Kenny Wayne Shepherd, Ed Sheeran, Maroon 5, Dave Matthews, John Mayer, Susan Tedeschi, Allman Brothers.

How to play an e7 chord on guitar

This chord list is by no means complete but gives students the most bang for the buck for a very small amount of information. Jimmy cypher is often asked by students in guitar lessons if ALL of these chords are necessary since some are not easy to play on the first day. The answer is YES 🙂 Most chord encyclopedias list over 1000 chords in mostly random order, irrespective of importance. Jimmy has pared it down to less than 50, and every one of them will eventually appear in student’s favorite songs that they bring into guitar lessons.

The 7th chord (also known as dominant 7th) adds another tone to the major triad chord. As the name implies, the added tone is seven steps from the root (following the scale). These chords are especially common in blues.

Dominant 7 chords

  • How to play an e7 chord on guitar
    More C7 chords
  • How to play an e7 chord on guitar
    More D7 chords
  • How to play an e7 chord on guitar
    More E7 chords
  • How to play an e7 chord on guitar
    More F7 chords
  • How to play an e7 chord on guitar
    More G7 chords
  • How to play an e7 chord on guitar
    More A7 chords
  • How to play an e7 chord on guitar
    More B7 chords

Dominant 7 chords with sharp or flat root

C#7 / Db7

  • How to play an e7 chord on guitar

D#7 / Eb7

  • How to play an e7 chord on guitar

F#7 / Gb7

  • How to play an e7 chord on guitar

G#7 / Ab7

  • How to play an e7 chord on guitar

A#7 / Bb7

  • How to play an e7 chord on guitar

Comments

The chord names are on top of the pictures. The x letters and numbers indicate that the string shouldn’t be played or on which frets. This chord category is not to be confused with the major 7th and minor 7th.

Theory

The dominant seventh doesn’t fully correspond to the key of major with the last tone corresponding with the minor scale. This result in a slight dissonant sounding chord. For example C7 includes the notes C, E, G, Bb whereas the C major scale include the notes C, D, E, F, G, A, B and C minor scale C, D, Eb, F, G, Ab, Bb.

The dominant 7th chord can be found on the fifth degree in the major scale. In C major, this would be G7. That is the reason that G7 is common in progression based on the C major key whereas F7 is not. The table below shows how the C major can be harmonized into four-note chords with the dominant 7th appearing as the V chord:

I ii iii IV V iv iiv
Cmaj7 Dm7 Em7 Fmaj7 G7 Am Bm7b5

In chord progressions, the V chord often function as the second last chord, being instable and resolving to the “home chord” (I), as in the following progression: C – Am – G7 – C.

Chord formula

The dominant seventh is built with the formula 1-3-5-b7 (root, major 3rd, perfect 5th and minor 7th).

Chord construction

Notes in chord

Progressions

Suggestions of chord sequences that includes dominant sevenths:

A chord that resolves into the tonic

In chord progressions, the dominant seventh chord is often used just before the last chord, the tonic. This is because the seventh chord resolves well into the tonic. Some examples:

A7 – D
D7 – G
C7 – F

A few examples with full sequences (including one with D7sus4), using the seventh as a resolving chord, could be as follow:

D – Bm – G – A7 – D

G – Em – C – D7 – G

G – D/F# – Em – C – D7sus4 – D7 – G

And in a minor key:

Em – G – D – Am – B7 – Em

From major to dominant

A common method, especially in styles such as country, is to go from major to dominant with the same root: C – C7, D – D7, E – E7 and so on. A few examples of progressions using this idea:

Barre chord shapes

The seventh chord could of course be played as a barre chord. The main movable shapes for dominant 7th barre chords in pictures:

How to play an e7 chord on guitar

The diagram to the left depicts an E7-shape barre chord for dominant 7th and the diagram to the right depicts an A7-shape barre chord (the lowest string should not be played).

Movable shape with root on sixth string

Pictured below, is an alternative way to play the dominant seventh chord. The shape is movable with the root note on the lowest string. One way to play is by the thumb on the lowest string and when pluck the rest of the string with the fingers. Bass walks are of course possible and are useful in jazz.

How to play an e7 chord on guitar

Movable shape with root on fifth string

This is a way to play the dominant seventh chord with a movable shape and this time with the root note on the A-string.

How to play an e7 chord on guitar

Movable shapes with root on fourth string

And last, two movable alternatives. The first with the root on the D-string (the fourth).

How to play an e7 chord on guitar

This is also a popular choice, but notice that this is a voicing. The root note is on the G-string (third string).

How to play an e7 chord on guitar

7th chord in open position

Here are additional shapes in open position for this chord category:

7th chord alterations

Alterations means that a note in the chord is altered, for example, a flattened fifth. Here are some examples using C as root tone (the shapes are movable).

C7#5: X3X354
C7b5: X3435X
C7#9: X3234X
C7b9: X3232X

We can compare these alterations with the standard dominant seventh:

Chord construction

Notes in chord

In C7#5 (C7+5) and C7b5 (C7-5) the fifth are raised or flattened. And in C7#9 (C7+9) and C7b9 (C7-9) a sharp or a flat ninth are added. See the presentation of alterd chords.

In this Blues Chords For Guitar Lesson we will be learning how to play some typical blues chords on guitar.

Blues music has a particular feel and sound to it that no other genre of music has. Rock music for instance often has the same structure as blues and they use common scales when it comes to lead. But when you listen to the old blues classics, it has a different tone to it than just being an older, slower version of rock.

That tone is often created by using chords that have an unmistakable bluesy feel to them. In this post we will be learning some of these chords so that you can start enjoying playing some blues music.

Blues Guitar Chords For Beginners

We will first look at some chords that are suitable for beginners.

Beginners often struggle with barre chords, so if you haven’t mastered barre chords yet but still want to be able to play some blues chord progressions, try the easy blues guitar chords below.

Although these are quite simple open chords, you will recognise that great bluesy tone immediately.

Once you have got used to those open chords and feel like trying to progress onto barre chords. Try some of the barre chords below to change up your blues playing

Blues Barre Chords

There is absolutely nothing wrong with playing blues with open chords. But to give you some more weapons in your arsenal we will now look at some blues barre chords. These chord shapes are completely moveable, therefore once you have learnt to play them in one place, you can shify them around the neck to play any chord you want.

That is what is so great about barre chords, they take a while to learn but they really do open up your options when it comes to playing any style of music.

Sticking with the same chords we learnt in the open positions, we will now learn these as barre chords. (If you want to learn more barre chords, I have a separate post on them here)

So as I mentioned, that position is movable, so all we need to do is move that shape to whichever fret has the root note we want on the 6th string.

But as you can see, we might not want to play our D7 & E7 as high up as the 10th and 12th fret as it can sound a bit too high pitched.

So what we can do for these chords, is use a shape that has the root note on the 5th string. This brings the barre back down the neck

So there we have to movable positions that will allow you to play some blue chords for guitar. By moving these positions around, you can now play a simple blues progression.

But how do we put these progressions together?

Below I will put a quick example of a blues chord progression using the blues chords for guitar we learnt in this post. I will cover chord progressions in a more detailed post at another time. But the description below is enough to give you a basic understanding of a blues chord progression.

Blues Chord Progressions

A very popular Blues Chord Progression is the I – IV – V progression. This uses the 1st, 4th, and 5th chords from the relevant key.

For example if we wanted to create a I – IV – V blues chord progression in the key of A Major, we would first need to look at the notes of the A Major scale, which are A, B, C#, D, E, F#, G#.

So to create our I, IV, V progression in the key of A Major we would use the A, D & E chords. In a major progression the I, IV, V chords are all major chords. But if we want to make this a bit more of a blues chord progression, we can make them 7th Chords.

You can hear an example of this progression here.

If you want to learn some other bluesy chords that you can use, check out my Gmaj7 chord lesson.

Summary

In this post we have learn some great, simple blues chords for guitar. You should now be able to learn some open chords and some movable barre chords. You should also be able to put your own bluesy chord progression together and be on your way to making some of your own blues music.

I hope you found this lesson useful, feel free to give me a shout if you would like any further info,

7 chords

7th guitar chords are usually written as 7 chords. Sometimes you will see them written as dom7 which is a shortened form of dominant 7. However, the most commonly used is 7, e.g., G7, A7, B7 etc.

  • Unless stated otherwise, a ‘7‘ chord refers to a dominant 7th chord – a major triad plus a minor 7th (flattened 7th).
  • Consists of a root, a major third, a perfect fifth, and a minor 7th.
  • The chord formula for a 7 chord (dominant 7th) is 1 – 3 – 5 – ♭ 7.
  • The following is an example of how to calculate a C7 chord.

The featured practice song for this session is Come Together by the Beatles.

Chord (7) A A#/B♭ B C C#/D♭ D D#/E♭ E F F#/G♭ G G#/A♭
Root A A#/B♭ B C C#/D♭ D D#/E♭ E F F#/G♭ G G#/A♭
Major 3rd C# Cx/D D# E E#/F F# Fx/G G# A A#/B♭ B B#/C
Perfect 5th E E#/F F# G G#/A♭ A A#/B♭ B C C#/D♭ D D#/E♭
Dominant 7th G G#/A♭ A B♭ B/C♭ C C#/D♭ D E♭ E/F♭ F F#/G♭

7th Chords – Right Handers

How to play an e7 chord on guitar

How to play an e7 chord on guitar

Remember that empty circles are optional notes. If you do play them, you will have to alter your finger positions in most cases. The following example will illustrate this.

B7 (1st position) is commonly played without the finger on the 2nd fret bottom E (empty circle). If you leave your finger off, you will need to avoid playing that string, as E is not part of a B7 chord (B – D# – F# – A).

If you choose to play that note, you will be playing an F#, which is part of the B7 chord (F# is also being played on the 1st string, 2nd fret with the fourth finger).

If you do play the extra note, you will have to use your second finger to cover both strings (2nd fret, 5th & 6th strings) as you will have run out of fingers!

Where barring occurs with an optional note, e.g., C7 – 2nd position, simply barre the whole 3rd fret with the first finger.

How to play an e7 chord on guitar

Please note that the E7 chord – 1st position, can be played with fingers 1 and 2, however the 3 finger option 1, 2 and 4 gives the chord more presence. You can also add the optional note depending on your preference. Beginners tend to prefer the 1,2 finger option due to ease, but as you gain experience, the 1,2, 4 option definitely sets the chord apart . you are adding another D-note 1 octave above the open D-string which makes the chord a 7th (leading tone), giving the 7th an extra strong presence. If you find this a little too strong you can add the optional note (E) buffering the intensity of the added 7th.

Play an E chord then play the 1,2 finger E7
Play an E chord then play the 1,2,4 finger E7. notice the difference.

by Soon Il Higashino | Music

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About the course

Have you ever wanted to learn to play the guitar? “How to Play Guitar” is a series of guitar lessons that may help you with that! In Chords Lesson 4, I will be giving an introduction to a new type of chord, the 7th chord, and teach the E7 chord, A7 chord, and the G7 chord! We’ll revisit some songs we learned before, like Lean on Me by Bill Withers and I’m Yours by Jason Mraz, as well as learn how to play the Happy Birthday Song! Let’s learn these fun bluesy chords together! 🙂

  • Acoustic
  • Chords
  • Guitar
  • Instrument
  • Music

Instructor

How to play an e7 chord on guitar

Soon Il Higashino

Epic Guitarist and Princeton Graduate

I tutored students K-12 throughout high school in math and reading for 2 and a half years. I encouraged students to become self-learners and learn how to use tools they’ve been taught to solve any kind of problems they come across. I have taught small-group (1-3 college students) guitar lessons in college and have provided personalized advice and help to various individual guitar learners throughout high school and college.

Are you looking for new creative forms of self-expression through the arts and music? My courses focus on providing tools that can allow you to use music and art as your own creative outlets to express yourself with! I am currently focusing on teaching various music lessons, including guitar and singing, and hope to teach some lessons in drawing in the near future. I’m also passionate about the environment and studied civil and environmental engineering in college, and I hope to teach lessons about the environment in future courses as well.

I began tutoring students K-12 while in high school. I was very inspired to see the students learning how to become self-learners and beginning to use the tools they’d been taught to solve any kind of problems they came across. Over the past 12 years, I’ve taught myself how to play guitar and draw as ways of expressing myself creatively. I began giving personalized advice or support to my friends learning the guitar from high school and onwards. In college, I began offering small-group (1-3 people) guitar lessons to the student groups I performed guitar in. Teaching my peers the tools they needed to play guitar and watching them improve for themselves encouraged me to want to teach guitar to a wider audience. To me, music has been such an essential part of how I express myself and my emotions, and I want to help others in their journey of finding outlets for their own unique and wonderful creativity.

Through my courses, I strive to make learning a new creative activity, such as learning a musical instrument, more approachable by providing various exercises and multiple ways to practice the same technique to reinforce learning. I strive to teach with a positive and fun attitude to help engage Gooroo students in the challenging yet rewarding journey of learning!

By Total Guitar published 8 March 21

Essential shapes for every player

How to play an e7 chord on guitar

1. A7 (open)

How to play an e7 chord on guitar

To avoid sounding the idle sixth string when you play this chord, bring your thumb around the back of the neck so that the tip of it just touches the string.

2. A7 (moveable)

How to play an e7 chord on guitar

This is a useful blues shape that can easily be moved around the fretboard. Flatten your first finger across the top four strings and mute the idle fifth string.

3. C7 (open)

How to play an e7 chord on guitar

Thanks to the low 3rd interval on the fourth string this chord sounds a little more complex than the previous shapes.

4. C7 (moveable)

How to play an e7 chord on guitar

This extremely versatile five-string barre chord can be easily moved around the neck into other keys. Make sure you’ve got it down!

5. G7 (open)

How to play an e7 chord on guitar

This full-sounding chord is great for playing in the keys of G, C and D. Think of it as a spread out open C shape and you will have no problem remembering it.

6. G7 (moveable)

How to play an e7 chord on guitar

This indispensable six-string barre requires strong fingers, but it’s worth persevering because it’s an essential shape for playing a blues rhythm.

7. E7 (open)

How to play an e7 chord on guitar

If there’s a single chord here that screams ‘blues’ then this is it! The most resonant dominant chord you can play on the guitar and very easy to play.

8. E7 (moveable)

How to play an e7 chord on guitar

This is the moveable variant of the open C7 shape. It’s important to ensure the open sixth string is muted with your third finger.

9. D7 (open)

How to play an e7 chord on guitar

The absence of doubled notes in this chord gives it a tight, concise sound. Bring your thumb around the back of the neck to damp the open fifth and sixth strings.

10. D#dim (moveable)

How to play an e7 chord on guitar

The diminished chord sounds cool in blues so it is a handy chord to have in your vocabulary. Use it in passing, rather than staying on it.

11. B7 (open)

How to play an e7 chord on guitar

This is another chord that seems to have an extra helping of blues attitude! Use the side of your second finger to keep that open sixth string quiet.

12. B7 (moveable)

How to play an e7 chord on guitar

This is similar to the moveable G7 shape, but with the fourth finger added on the second string. This note is a ‘doubled 7th’ giving a sharper, more dissonant sound.

13. E9 (open)

How to play an e7 chord on guitar

Don’t be afraid to experiment with 9th chords; they can be readily substituted for 7th chords (E7 etc) and will add depth and sophistication to your playing.

14. E9 (moveable)

How to play an e7 chord on guitar

This cool, funky chord (think James Brown!) always sounds good when played as the IV chord in any blues progression.

15. E7#9

How to play an e7 chord on guitar

The ubiquitous ‘Hendrix chord (opens in new tab) ’ has an esteemed place in blues, jazz and rock. It can give a Stevie Ray Vaughan (opens in new tab) vibe and makes for a great turnaround on a V chord.

Check out these 10 next-level blues guitar chords

How to play an e7 chord on guitar

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The CAGED system is an excellent visualization tool that helps you break out of the open chords rooted on the first few frets of the guitar. If you know and play barre chords, then you are already using the CAGED system.

I cover point by point the practical applications and strengths of the CAGED system, while also mentioning the main problem of the system and how to avoid that pitfall.

CAGED System: Guitar chords, scales, arpeggios, …

At its most basic, the CAGED system enables you to play every kind of chord in every key along the entire fretboard. But there is way more to the system that just chords. Visualizing the 5 chords enables you to play scales in various positions, tie those positions together, move from position to position, and much more.

Below I cover the applications of the CAGED system: chords, intervals, chord partials, triad arpeggios, scales and modes, and how to tie all those things together.

The 5 chords of “CAGED”

The most common application of the CAGED system is the ability to play any open chord as a closed chord shape in different positions along the fretboard and in different keys. Actually, it’s the ability to play any chord, nit just open chords. Some chords can’t be played in open voicings.

But first, let’s define the various chord voicings:

Open chord : a guitar chord with at least one open string in the voicing.
Closed chord : a guitar chord that does not have ANY open strings in the voicing.
Barre chord : a specific type of a closed guitar chord where 1 or more fingers are used to fret 2 or more notes.

The letters in “CAGED” are for the 5 open major chords: C, A, G, E, and D major. I assume you know how to play those chords. The shapes of those 5 chords can be played as closed chords for two different purposes:

  1. To play the same chord but higher up the neck, e.g. open A major at the 2nd fret and A major at the 5th fret as an E barre chord shape.
  2. Or to play a major chord in any of the 12 keys.

And don’t think that CAGED is only for major chords. Here is a list of basic open A chords that you should know:

A, A6, A7, Amaj7, Am, Am7, Asus4, and Asus2

Those open chords are all in the “A” position/shape of the acronym CAGED. You could also play those chords as closed chords in the C, G, E and D positions/voicings, although, not of those chords are possible in the other positions.

The point is that you can turn any open chord into a closed chord in the same key, or different keys, anywhere along the fretboard. And the pattern of always moves in the order of C-A-G-E-D-C-A-G-E-D, etc. That is the CAGED system and it is excellent for beginners.

EVERYTHING IS MOVABLE!

Main points of CAGED

What is the main benefit of the CAGED system?
It breaks you out of the open chord position. Open chords lock you into the first few frets.

What is the main problem with the CAGED system?
It locks you into a new position – all the closed positions. There is an easy fix to breaking out of the CAGED position problem and that is by playing inversions of triad arpeggios.

What you gain is the ability to play more types of chords than you can in the open position. The word “cage” is interesting. The CAGED system frees you from only playing open chords, but can lock you up again into position playing. Or at least that is what happened to me.

There is a reason why the letters are CAGED and not in a different order, and that is because the chords move in that pattern. Though you can switch which letter starts that pattern like EDCAG or AGEDC.

After the open C chord (x-3-2-0-1-0) is a closed C major as an A shape, then as a G shape, then as an E shape, then as a D shape, and finally a repeat of the open C major as a closed C major at the 12th through 15th frets. For E major, the first closed chord shape after the open E shape is D, then C, then A, etc.

The CAGED system isn’t only for chords, but also for chord partials, intervals, scales, arpeggios, licks, bass lines, you name it. Here are the closed chord voicings for the 5 CAGED major triad shapes. Note where the root note is. Just move that root to any key you want to play. Always know where your root and tonic notes are!

Lesson ID: TB296

In this lesson, I will show you how to move basic blues turnarounds to any key on the guitar.

Playing the Classic Blues Turnaround in Any Key

Let’s start by having a look at one of the most iconic blues turnarounds.

This turnaround works great in the key of E in part because we land nicely into this E Major chord the end of the phrase. Then, the second measure makes a big statement with the B7, the dominant five chord. This turnaround structure is a fantastic blueprint for us to use though you will find countless variations of it.

Let’s have a closer look at the turnaround.

The chord we start with is an E7 though it doesn’t contain the root note, E. Still, we’re going to take the shape and move it down chromatically three times as we pick through the chord tones.

This resolves to the E Major chord.

In the second measure, we step chromatically into the V chord which is B7 in this case. This dominant sound has a strong pull back to the I chord. That pull to the I is what makes this work so well as a turnaround.

With that structure in mind, let’s move this into a different key. We could move this to any key as long as we maintain that structure we just covered.

For our example, let’s move this into C#.

Knowing that the E chord is our I chord, we simply need to move our I chord up to C#.

But the turnaround really starts with the falling chromatic move three frets higher.

We kind of checked all the boxes, we’ve got our chromatic move down on the 3rd string and we emphasize the V chord in the second measure. Now let’s bring in full chords so that this turnaround in C# sounds full like the example in E.

Now, let’s look at a very popular modification of that turnaround.

The Classic Turnaround with a Pedal Tone

This turnaround is very similar but we use the open 1st string as a pedal tone as we continue through the chromatic descent.

Just like before, we can move this turnaround into any key. Let’s have a look at this same turnaround played in C# as an example.

How to play an e7 chord on guitar

If we simply move this up the neck into C#, you will encounter a very difficult stretch as shown in the video. No worries, we can modify this to avoid the stretch. We’ll just need to move the C# pedal tone to the 2nd string like this:

Pro Tip: There’s always a workaround!

Now, let’s have a look at our last example.

Robert Johnson’s Turnaround in A

This one is very useful and is a tip of the hat to none other than blues king, Robert Johnson.

Let’s dive into the structure of this one.

Much like Example 2 above, we pedal our root note on the first string which in this case is an A note. Then we walk down chromatically for the rest of the measure, but this time on the 4th string. Like before, we will punctuate the second measure with our V chord in this case is E (or you could use an E7).

Now, let’s move this into our example key, C#.

We start with the C# on the 1st string and the 4th string starts on the same fret. Then, walk it down on the 4th string.

Follow up by strumming the I chord followed by the V chord. For each chord, you can use a simplified voicing of the chord that utilizes just a few tones like Example 3a. Or you can opt for the full chords like this example:

Next Steps

You can play these blues turnarounds in any key on the guitar. Just find your starting point, the key of the turnaround and build from there. Keep in mind, as you move things into different positions, you may need to alter things slightly to make the notes accessible just like we did in the 3rd example above.

Take your favorite turnaround and transpose it into a random key. Try to test yourself by making it a key you would rarely, if ever, use. How about D# for example?

With some practice, you’ll be able to do this on the fly with confidence. Nail your next jam session by being able to play great blues like these turnarounds in any key.

In this video guitar lesson I’m going to show you an E7(#9) chord. That’s “E Seven Sharp 9”. Or it’s also known as the Jimi Hendrix chord. He played it in the song “Purple Haze”.

The “Purple Haze Chord” – E7(#9)

(Video Guitar Lesson)

So here is the chord chart for E7(#9). If you just played the middle 4 strings, this becomes a moveable chord form. So for instance you could move this down 2 frets so that your 2nd finger was on the 5th fret of the 5th string (D). That would make this a D7(#9).

But with E7(#9) you can also play the open 6th string, which is E.

How to play an e7 chord on guitar How to play an e7 chord on guitar

Now this chord is not just used by Jimi Hendrix in “Purple Haze”. In fact it’s more often used in Jazz than in Rock music.

But to put your new chord to use and have a little fun, let’s take a look at the chords from Purple Haze. In addition to the E7(#9), Hendrix also played a G and A chord. But not the basic G and A chords that you might know, or even barre chords.

Jimi Hendrix often played moveable major chords by playing a note on the 6th string with his thumb. He had fairly large hands, so this was not a problem for him…and if you have small hands this might be a little difficult…but give it a try.

So for a G, play the 3rd fret on the 6th string with your thumb. You also want to mute the 5th string by lightly touching it with your thumb as well. You will want to mute the 1st string by lightly touching it with your 1st finger.

How to play an e7 chord on guitar How to play an e7 chord on guitar

For the A chord, just move the G chord form up 2 frets so that the note you are playing with your thumb on the 6th string is an A note.

How to play an e7 chord on guitar How to play an e7 chord on guitar

Purple Haze Chord Progression

So here are the chords and a basic strumming pattern you could play. If you want to learn more about strumming songs like this, be sure and check out my Rhythm Guitar Mastery course.

How to play an e7 chord on guitar

Have fun with your new Jimi Hendrix chords.

Written by Bobby June 2, 2022 2 Comments

QUICK HIT: Six guitar exercises for beginners that are based on chord shapes. These exercises will help you strengthen your fingers and train them in such a way that will make playing basic guitar chords easier and more intuitive.

When you first start playing the guitar you’re asking a lot of the muscles in your fingers and hands. Your flexor tendons – that bridge the functionality between your fingers and forearms – will feel stress and fatigue in those early stages of learning the guitar. As with any other physical activity, exercising can help to make this easier and make you a better guitar player.

I’ve always taught guitar exercises for beginners in the context of functionality, meaning I use exercises that mimic actual guitar chords and series of notes that you might play in an actual song.

You get far more benefit from teaching your fingers to move in ways that mimic actual chords and common fretboard movement.

In this article, I’ve built six exercises based on extremely common chord shapes that you may or may not have already learned. You don’t need to already know the chord to do the exercise.

These exercise will help you with several things:

  1. Learning some basic beginner chords
  2. Improved speed and finger strength
  3. Improved dexterity and ability to stretch fingers

While I would agree that any guitar exercise can be helpful, I think you get far more benefit from teaching your fingers to move in ways that mimic actual chords and common fretboard movement.

All guitar exercises, especially in the early learning stages, should start out this way, with a goal and based on a pattern. Let’s get started.

How to play an e7 chord on guitar

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How to play an e7 chord on guitar

Sweet Caroline By Neil Diamond – Sweet Caroline Chords (Capo 2)

How to play an e7 chord on guitar How to play an e7 chord on guitar How to play an e7 chord on guitarHow to play an e7 chord on guitar

How to play an e7 chord on guitar How to play an e7 chord on guitarHow to play an e7 chord on guitar

To play sweet caroline chords and strumming correctly so you can sing and play along with the song. We’ve included strumming pattern below as well as the audio playing both the chords and strumming patterns…

Verse

How to play an e7 chord on guitar How to play an e7 chord on guitarHow to play an e7 chord on guitarHow to play an e7 chord on guitarHow to play an e7 chord on guitarHow to play an e7 chord on guitarHow to play an e7 chord on guitarHow to play an e7 chord on guitar

Chorus

How to play an e7 chord on guitarHow to play an e7 chord on guitarHow to play an e7 chord on guitarHow to play an e7 chord on guitarHow to play an e7 chord on guitar

How to play an e7 chord on guitar

Sweet Caroline Chords/Lyrics/Verse

A D
Where it began, I can’t begin to know it
A E
But then I know it’s going strong
A D
Was it the spring, and spring became a summer?
A E E7
Who’d have believe you’d come along?

Sweet Caroline Chords/Lyrics/Pre-Chorus

A F#m
Hands, touching hands
E D E
Reaching out, touching me, touching you

Sweet Caroline Chords/Lyrics/Chorus

A D E
Sweet Caroline, good times never seemed so good
A D E
I’m inclined, to believe they never would
D C#m Bm
But now I’m

Sweet Caroline Chord/Lyrics/Verse 2

A D
Look at the night, and it don’t seem so lonely
A E
We fill it up with only two
A D
And when I hurt, hurting runs off my shoulder
A E E7
How can I hurt when holding you?

Sweet Caroline Chord/Lyrics/Pre-Chorus

A F#m
Warm, touching warm
E D E
Reaching out, touching me, touching you

Sweet Caroline Chord/Lyrics/Chorus

A D E
Sweet Caroline, good times never seemed so good
A D E
I’m inclined, to believe they never would
D C#m Bm
But now I’m

Interlude

| E7 | E7 | E | E | E7 | E | E7 | A |

A D E
Sweet Caroline, good times never seemed so good
A D E
I’m inclined, to believe they never would.

How to play an e7 chord on guitar

Neil Diamond

How to play an e7 chord on guitarNeil Leslie Diamond (born January 24, 1941) is an American singer-songwriter and actor. He has sold more than 100 million records worldwide, making him one of the best-selling musicians of all time. He has had ten No. 1 singles on the Hot 100 and Adult Contemporary charts: “Cracklin’ Rosie”, “Song Sung Blue”, “Longfellow Serenade”, “I’ve Been This Way Before”, “If You Know What I Mean”, “Desirée”, “You Don’t Bring Me Flowers”, “America”, “Yesterday’s Songs”, and “Heartlight”. 38 songs by Diamond have featured in the Top 10 on the Billboard Adult Contemporary charts.

Diamond was inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame in 1984 and into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2011, and he received the Sammy Cahn Lifetime Achievement Award in 2000. In 2011, he was an honoree at the Kennedy Center Honors, and he received the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 2018.

Guitar bar chords (also called ‘barre chords’) allow you to play chords all over the guitar neck. This means that you are not limited to playing solely in open position. Lesson 7 in Guitar Command’s ‘Learn To Play Guitar In Two Months‘ series introduces easy barre chords that can be played at different positions on the guitar neck.

How To Play Guitar Barre Chords

When playing a barre chord, the index finger is placed over the fretboard and used to play more than one note. The index finger is said to make a ‘bar’ over the fretboard, which is where bar chords get their name from. The ‘bar’ usually covers five or six strings, although it can be fewer. The other fingers of the fretting hand add additional notes as necessary.

Guitar Bar Chords – Easy Barre Chords

In all of the following guitar bar chords diagrams, the root note of the chord is shown in green. The root note is the note that the chord is named after, e.g. the ‘C’ in C Major.

This means that in order to play a G major, position one of the major bar chord shapes shown below so that the green notes are over G notes on the fretboard. You can refer to the Guitar Fretboard Notes Chart to find out where the notes are on the fretboard.

Major Guitar Bar Chords

The bar chord shape shown above is also referred to as the ‘E shape’. This is because if it is played in open position, without a barre, it would be an E chord. Other bar chord shapes are similarly named. See lesson 2 in this series for simple guitar chords.

How to play an e7 chord on guitarMajor Bar Chord Shape (‘A’ Shape)

Minor Bar Chords

Dominant 7th (7) Guitar Bar Chords

The guitar bar chords shown above are the basic barre chords, and the first you should learn. You will notice that they are essentially the same chords as their open position counterparts, but played with a bar.

Movable Chord Shapes

The main benefit of guitar bar chords is that they are ‘movable’. This means that by learning just one major bar chord shape you will be able to play major chords with any root note.

For example, the same barre chord shape used to play an A major chord at the fifth fret can also be used to play a G chord at the third fret. This is done by moving the whole hand two frets lower, whilst keeping the fingers in the same relative position.

By learning just one type of bar chord (e.g. for a minor chord), you will be able to move that same shape up and down the neck and play any minor chord.

However, to avoid playing chords very high up the fretboard, or having to make awkward position changes, it is a good idea to learn at least two movable chord shapes for the same kind of chord.

Bar Or Barre Chords?

Although traditionally ‘barre chords’ is the correct spelling, ‘bar chords’ can also be used. In this lesson the terms ‘bar chord’ and ‘barre chord’ are used interchangeably, and refer to the same thing.

Playing Guitar Bar Chords

Guitar bar chords can seem difficult to play at first, but you will soon get used to playing them. In fact, for many aspects of rhythm guitar playing, bar chords are more useful.

Bar chords offer more flexibility than open guitar chords, as you have more control over barre chords. This allows you to use advanced rhythm guitar techniques such as left hand damping to create complex strumming patterns.

Blues and the guitar go well together, guitar is one of the most often used blues instruments and as a guitarist it’s important to speak at least the basics of the blues language. In this tutorial we’ll have a look at those basics of how to play blues guitar.

Blues developed in the United States in the beginning of the 20th century and has a mixture of European and West & Central African elements.

Robert Johnson (1911-1938), one of the most famous Delta blues players, has had an enormous influence in the history of blues guitar. A lot of bands and musicians (Jimi Hendrix, The Rolling Stones, Bob Dylan, The White Stripes, Eric Clapton, Led Zeppelin, . ) name Robert Johnson as one of their biggest influences and call him one of the greatest blues guitar players that ever lived. He, amongst others, had a great influence on the standardization of the 12 bar blues.

Today (since the 1930s), the 12-bar blues is more or less the most played chord progression in the blues. Like the name says, the 12-bar blues has 12 bars with in its most basic form 3 chords. Let’s have a look at the basic chord progression of the blues:

|I |(IV) |I |I |
|IV |IV |I |I |
|V |IV |I |(V) |

The Roman numbers in the scheme above refer to a degree in a tonality. Let’s take for example a blues in the tonality of E.

Here are the notes of the E Mixolydian scale (a common blues scale, more about it later):

E F# G# A B C# D
I II III IV V VI VII

Each note in this blues scale correspondents with a Roman numeral. Let’s replace the Roman numbers with notes:

|E |(A) |E |E |
|A |A |E |E |
|B |A |E |(B) |

Most chords in blues music are dominant 7 chords. I’ll put them in the chord progression and I’ll omit those that are repeated:

|E7 |(A7) |E7 | |
|A7 | |E7 | |
|B7 |A7 |E7 |(B7) |

This is the most basic and the most often used blues chord progression. The chords between brackets on bar 2 and 12 are not necessary to play, but make this basic progression a little more interesting. The chord in the last bar is called a turnaround, it marks the transition back to the beginning of the chord progression when you are playing loops.

Try to play the chords on your guitar, each bar has 4 beats, take any rhythm or strumming you like, as long as you play it with a swing feel. The swing feel is a very important thing to master when you learn blues guitar and it is something you can’t read in tablature.

A swing feel has uneven eights (1/8 notes), but this probably doesn’t tell you a lot. To demonstrate the swing, listen to this basic drum groove (click the speaker icons), first played in a normal way (straight feel) and then with a swing feel:

Straight feel: How to play an e7 chord on guitar

Swing feel: How to play an e7 chord on guitar

When you have a hard time getting into a swing feel, it might work to sing ‘chunka chunka chunka chunka . ‘ in your head.

Here’s the guitar chord chart for the 12 bar blues chords in E. The E7 and A7 have 2 possible voicings:

How to play an e7 chord on guitar

Most guitarists start learning the blues by playing a shuffle. A shuffle is a kind of groove played on the bass strings of the guitar. Here are the guitar tabs for a shuffle blues in A:

How to play an e7 chord on guitar

Here’s a little variation on the basic groove (I wrote the guitar tablature for A7, you can find the groove for the 2 other chords of the blues yourself):

How to play an e7 chord on guitar

You can play this shuffle with a pick or with your fingers, depending on the sound you like the most. Other styles like Rock and Roll, Boogie or Rockabilly use the same shuffle groove, but in a different tempo. Blues is generally slower than those music styles.

The next step is adding more variation to this basic shuffle, by adding blues scale licks, different rhythms and chords, but that’s for the next blues lesson.

If you are looking for Hallelujah Chords by Jeff Buckley without the capo then go nowhere. In this lesson, I will show you its chords, its strumming pattern, and how to easily play it on an acoustic guitar from start to end. So, let’s look at the chords used in Hallelujah.

Hallelujah Chords No Capo

As you can see, the chords for Hallelujah without the capo are C, Am, F, G, and E7. You can also notice that these are all open chords that any guitarist can play. You can use these same chords to play both Leonard Cohan and Jeff Buckley versions of Hallelujah.

Note – This is a No Capo Version

Hallelujah Strumming Pattern

The strumming pattern is super easy for this song. It is in 6/8 timing and goes all down strums. However, you can also fingerpick the single notes of the chords instead of strumming. To get a visual demonstration, refer to the video mentioned at the end of this lesson.

Wonderwall Lyrics With Chords

Song – Hallelujah
Artist – Leonard Cohan ( Cover version by Jeff Buckley )
Chords – C, Am, F, G, and E7 ( No Capo )

[Verse 1]
I [C] heard there was a [Am] secret chord
That [C] David played, and it [Am] pleased the Lord
But [F] you don’t really [G] care for music, [C] do ya? [G]
Well it [C] goes like this, the [F] fourth, the [G] fifth
The [Am] minor fall, the [F] major lift
The [G] baffled king [E7] composing ” Halle [Am] lujah “

[Chorus]
Halle [F] lujah, Halle [Am] lujah
Halle [F] lujah, Halle [C] lu-u- [G] u-u- [C] jah

[Verse – 2]
Your [C] faith was strong but you [Am] needed proof
You [C] saw her bathing [Am] on the roof
Her [F] beauty in the [G] moonlight over [C] threw ya [G]
She [C] tied you to a [F] kitchen [G] chair
She [Am] broke your throne, and she [F] cut your hair
And [G] from your lips she [E7] drew the Halle [Am] lujah

[Chorus]
Halle[F]lujah, Halle[Am]lujah
Halle[F]lujah, Halle[C]lu-u-[G]u-u-[C]jah

[Verse – 3]
[C]Baby, I’ve been [Am]here before
I’ve [C]seen this room, I’ve [Am]walked this floor
I [F]used to live a[G]lone before I [C]knew you [G]
I’ve [C]seen your flag on the [F]marble [G]arch
But [Am]Love is not a vic[F]tory march
It’s a [G]cold and it’s a [E7]broken Halle[Am]lujah

[Chorus]
Halle[F]lujah, Halle[Am]lujah
Halle[F]lujah, Halle[C]lu-u-[G]u-u-[C]jah

[Verse – 4]
Well, there [C]was a time you [Am]let me know
What’s [C]really going [Am]on below
But [F]now you never [G]show it to me, [C]do you? [G]
But re[C]member when I [F]moved in [G]you
And the [Am]holy dove was [F]moving too
And [G]every breath we [E7]drew was Halle[Am]lujah

[Chorus]
Halle[F]lujah, Halle[Am]lujah
Halle[F]lujah, Halle[C]lu-u-[G]u-u-[C]jah

[Verse – 5]
Well, [C]maybe there’s a [Am]God above
But [C]all I’ve ever [Am]learned from love
Was [F]how to shoot some[G]body who out[C]drew ya [G]
And it’s [C]not a cry that you [F]hear at [G]night
It’s [Am]not somebody who’s [F]seen the light
It’s a [G]cold and it’s a [E7]broken Halle[Am]lujah

[Outro]
Halle[F]lujah, Halle[Am]lujah
Halle[F]lujah, Halle[C]lu-u-[G]u-u-[C]jah

Halle[F]lujah, Halle[Am]lujah
Halle[F]lujah, Halle[C]lu-u-[G]u-u-[C]jah

Halle[F]lujah, Halle[Am]lujah
Halle[F]lujah, Halle[C]lu-u-[G]u-u-[C]jah

About

PICK UP THE GUITAR is the home to guitar lessons, tutorials, articles on how to improve your guitar playing, exercises, chords, tabs, scales, tips, and much more.

Besame Mucho is a song written in 1940 by the Mexican songwriter Consuelo Velázquez. It must be the most famous song in the Spanish language and it’s easy to see why: it’s so very catchy (I can’t get this song’s melody out of my head, it’s been days now 🙂

I made an arrangement of Besame Mucho for guitar. It is meant for singers to accompany themselves, so I didn’t include the melody in the arrangement, only the chords and a bass line. I also tried to keep it as simple as possible so it would be easy to play and sing at the same time.

Here’s the mp3 of my Besame Mucho arrangement:

Here’s the guitar chord chart, not a lot of chords and all are fairly basic:

How to play an e7 chord on guitar

Some remarks about the chords:

  1. Bm7(b5): another name for this chord is B half-diminished.
  2. F: I play the bass note of this F chord with my thumb.
  3. F°7: this is an F diminished 7 chord (Fdim7). This chord is used on some places where E7 is originally played and sounds like an E7b9.
  4. Am6: 6-chords are good chords to end songs on.

Here are the guitar tabs for my arrangement of Besame Mucho:

How to play an e7 chord on guitar

How to play an e7 chord on guitar

Some trivia and faqs about Besame Mucho:

    Who wrote Besame Mucho? The song is written by the female songwriter and piano player from Mexico, Consuelo Velázquez (1916-2005). Here’s a video of her playing Besame Mucho on piano:

Who sang Besame Mucho? Originally the song was sung by Consuelo Velázquez, but over the year literally thousands of artists sang, played and recorded Besame Mucho. Here are some examples: Frank Sinatra, Walt Disney, Rita Hayworth, Andrea Bocelli, The Beatles, Elvis Presley, Nat King Cole, Jimmy Dorsey, Wes Montgomery, Smoky Robinson, Michael Buble and many more.

Hear the Beatles playing Besame Mucho in this Youtube video. It was one of the songs the Beatles played at a Decca audition in 1962. They were rejected:

  • Some believe Besame Mucho is the most recorded song of all time.
  • You can translate Besame Mucho as “Kiss me a lot“.
  • Consuelo Velázquez said that at the time she wrote Besame Mucho, she never had been kissed. She heard kissing was considered a sin.
  • Here are the lyrics and guitar chords of Besame Mucho.

    First the Original Spanish lyrics:

    And here’s a translation, Besame Mucho in English (as sung by the Beatles and Sinatra):

    Remember we said earlier that there are 72 different 7th chords. So far, we’ve got 12 of the 72 chords taken care of. What about the other 60? No problem.

    Take a look at the pattern in Figure 2. You can see that each time you move the pattern up the fretboard, you create a chord one-half step higher up the scale. C7 to C#7, then C#7 to D7, then D7 to Eb7. Well, what would happen if you kept on going? Move the Eb7 chord up one fret, and – voila! – you’ve got an E7 chord. It’s formed in a different way than the E7 chord in Figure 5, but it’s still an E7 chord: this is what is meant by a different “position” for a chord.

    Figure 6. The E7 chord in two different positions

    And you can keep going: move that pattern up one more fret and you’ll have an F7 chord, then an F#7 chord, then a G7 chord, and on and on until you eventually run out of frets on your ukulele. So you see that you can play a 7th chord in any key using this pattern, if you place the pattern at the correct fret.

    Just as you can create a 7th chord in any key using the pattern from Figure 2, you can also create a 7th chord in any key using any of the other patterns. For example, if you continue to move the pattern from Figure 3 up one more fret past the B7 chord, you’ll create a C7 chord.

    Figure 7. The C7 chord in two different positions

    Now, watch this: take this same pattern (the pattern from Figure 3) and keep going. Move it up four more frets: C#7, D7, Eb7, E7. We’ve now found a third way to play an E7 chord!
    Figure 8. The E7 chord in three different positions

    Okay, now grab the pattern from Figure 4, and move it up to the ninth fret. We now have a fourth position for our E7 chord.
    Figure 9. The E7 chord in four different positions
    IMPORTANT POINT: Any chord can be played using four different fingerings.

    Well, we’ve used all four patterns, so do you think we’ve formed all the E7 chords? No way! If your fretboard is long enough (if you have a tenor uke or a baritone uke), move the first pattern in the series up 12 frets (exactly one octave) and you’ve got a fifth position for the E7 chord. Move the second pattern in the series up 12 frets and you’ve got a sixth position.
    Figure 10. The E7 chord in six different positions

    If you had an infinitely long fretboard, we could keep doing this forever, with the set of four patterns repeating every twelve frets (every octave).

    So when you see an E7 chord on your sheet music, you can play any of the chords from Figure 10, or you can even move up and down the fretboard, playing all the different positions while everyone else is strumming the same old dull first position, staring in amazement at the virtuoso that you’ve become.

    Blues is one of my favorite musical genres, in part, because it is very easy to teach to beginners. Even a guitar newbie can learn and play basic blues at an early stage.

    You will need a lot of practice to play like BB King, but playing basic blues progressions are easy.

    If you learn a few open position 7th chords, you can play the blues. The 12 bar blues to be more exact.

    What is the 12 bar blues?

    The 12 bar blues is the most basic blues chord progression.

    As it’s name would suggest, it is made up of 12 bars (or measures), which are laid out in a very specific order:

    How to play an e7 chord on guitar

    The progression uses the I, IV and V chords of the major scale. This means that if you know the root note or chord, you can construct the rest of the 12 bar blues progression as well.

    By the way, if you are interested in learning blues guitar, there are great online blues guitar lesson courses out there. These courses offer a structured approach to learning to play blues guitar, which is very important.

    Quick change variation

    The 2nd most famous blues chord progression is the quick change, also called quick-four.

    It is very similar to the basic 12 bar blues, with the only difference being the “quick change” to the IV chord in the 2nd measure.

    How to play an e7 chord on guitar

    As you can see, all other parts of the progression are exactly the same as the basic 12 bar blues.

    To make things more interesting, we will be learning our chord progression with the quick-change variation of the 12 bar blues.

    7th chords

    You will need to learn 7th chords to be able to get that bluesy sound.

    What are 7th chords? They are your basic major triad, with an added
    minor seventh note.

    So to form a 7th chord, you need to include the following notes in your chord:

    Root + 3rd + 5th + Minor 7th

    This lesson will teach how to play easy 12 bar blues progressions with open chords. No barre chords needed.

    We’ll learn the 12 bar blues in several keys, and the chords you’ll need to learn are the following.






    The B7 is the most difficult chord out of all of them, but it is actually pretty easy once you practice it for a while. The seemingly complicated chord shape is a rather natural way to hold your fingers.

    12 bar blues in open A

    The chords you will need to learn to play the 12 bar blues in the key of A are:

    • A7
    • D7
    • E7

    These are easy open chords, which you will be able to learn in no time at all using the videos above.

    How to play an e7 chord on guitar

    12 bar blues in open E

    The chords you will need to play in the key of E are:

    • E7
    • A7
    • B7

    As I mentioned, the B7 will be the most difficult chord to master. Don’t worry if you can’t play it perfectly yet, it takes a while.

    Keep on practicing it, make sure you hold each chord correctly, and you’ll get it soon.

    How to play an e7 chord on guitar

    12 bar blues in open D

    The chord you will need to learn to play the 12 bar blues in the key of D are:

    • D7
    • G7
    • A7

    The G7 will seem like quite a sretch at first, but with enough practice, it will become 2nd nature.

    This goes for all aspects of guitar. A technique that seems impossible today will get easier and easier with practice. With time (and practice), it will become second nature.

    Beginners have a hard time believing this, but it’s true. Stick with it, and you shall be rewarded.

    How to play an e7 chord on guitar

    12 bar blues in open G

    The 12 bar blues in the key of G will require that you learn the following 7th chords:

    • G7
    • C7
    • D7

    The C7 chord is a very versatile chord shape. It is a movable shape, just like a barre chord. If you learn the shape, you can move it all over the fretboard to attain 7th chords in all pitches.

    How to play an e7 chord on guitar

    The shuffle rhythm

    The shuffle rhythm is one of the most popular ways to play the blues.

    What is the shuffle rhythm? The opposite of straigth rhythm.

    Eighth notes alternate a long note and a short note in the shuffle rhythm, as opposed to equal length notes in straight rhythm. The long note falls on the beat and the short one in-between on the upbeat.

    It is easier to understand by hearing it:

    And there you have it.

    Learning to play the blues

    The above paragraphs are meant to give you a blues guitar primer.

    The backbone of the blues is the 12 bar blues, but of course, the blues is so much more than that.

    If you are serious about learning to play blues guitar, here are some tips:

    1. Have a look at the courses I referred to at the beginning of the article
    2. Listen to a lot of blues music, both classic and contemporary
    3. Practice as much as you can

    Learning to play the blues will not be an overnight thing, but it can be done. You need to be diligent and find the time to practice.

    Keep in mind that the best blues guitarists were all beginners at first. Nobody was born with a guitar in their hands. They practiced a lot!

    Now go grab your guitar, and start practicing.

    Change the root and the type to get an instant visual representation of how the chord looks.

    How to play an e7 chord on guitar

    Select a Root
    Select a Type

    Information about this chord

    Alternative names

    E Dominant Seventh, E Dominant 7th, E7

    Tones

    Where should I start?

    As you can see above, there are lots of different chords you can learn. The good news is that if you learn just a handful of the most common ones, you can play most popular songs. These are often called “cowboy chords” – they’re the chords everyone needs to know when jamming around a campfire. Download our cheat sheet.

    If you’re a more experienced player, you can try learning whichever chords you need from the above library. While it’s interesting to simply choose new chords and learn them, the best approach is to learn chords you need when you come across them in songs. For example, learning E7#9 is handy, but you’ll learn it better if it’s in a song you’re playing (Jimi Hendrix is available on Yousician).

    How to play an e7 chord on guitar

    How should I practice?

    It can be tough learning chords: finding the ones you really need, getting your fingers to cooperate, memorizing different chords, building speed, and being able to play them in songs. Luckily, the interactive guitar-learning app Yousician is an excellent way to do this. Yousician has teacher-crafted lessons to help you learn new chords at your own pace. It also gives you popular songs that are right for your skill level, helps you build skills with mini-game chord workouts, and more.

    Once you’ve learned your basic cowboy chords, Yousician can help you tackle the much longer list of harder chords that comes next. From all the chords with imposing fancy names, like A7sus4, to all the hand-cramping barre shapes, Yousician can help you learn and master them in bite-size chunks so you don’t get overwhelmed.

    How to play an e7 chord on guitar

    Visit the Yousician Songs Library

    Watch preview videos of Yousician in-app gameplay and search for songs by song name, genre or instrument.

    Visit songs library for Guitar, Ukulele, Bass, Piano & Singing

    Extend your learning

    Once you’ve learned how to play a few simple chords on your own, you can take those learnings further by playing on the Yousician App. With Yousician, you can practice with mini games, learn to play popular songs and take teacher-crafted lessons.

    How to play an e7 chord on guitar

    Welcome to Guitar Chords 247! Here you will find more than 42,000 free guitar chords and chord variations all displayed in our popular standard guitar chord charts.

    Root Chords

    The root note is the first note in a chord. On guitar, this is usually the lowest sounding note in a chord.

    Click on the root note to browse different fingerings.

    C – C# – D – D# – E – F – F# – G – G# – A – A# -B

    Popular Beginner Guitar Chords

    Below are some of the most popular guitar chords that most beginners start with.

    Click on the image of the guitar chord to browse the different fingerings.

    How to play an e7 chord on guitar

    How to play an e7 chord on guitar

    How to play an e7 chord on guitar

    How to play an e7 chord on guitar

    How to play an e7 chord on guitar

    How to play an e7 chord on guitar

    How to play an e7 chord on guitar

    How to play an e7 chord on guitar

    How to Read Chord Charts

    The horizontal lines represent the frets on the guitar and the vertical lines represent the strings. The numbers listed let you know what fret number it is referring too. If there is an X it means don’t play that string and if there is a 0 it means to play that string but do not press down on it anywhere. The black circles show you where to press down.

    Mastering Common Guitar Chords

    Chords are the backbone of most guitar music. As a beginner, mastering the most common chords allows you to play along to popular songs and even start writing your own. Technically speaking, a chord is a group of three or more notes played in one smooth strumming motion. Chords are classified according to the overall effect they produce. Major and minor chords, which create happy and sad sounds, respectively, are the most basic chords you’ll need to play beginner-friendly songs.

    Understanding Chords

    Getting to grips with how chords are formed gives you a basic introduction to music theory and helps you understand the ways you can alter them to create more interesting sounds. All chords are built from certain notes in scales. The C major scale is the easiest, because it just runs C, D, E, F, G, A and B. These notes are numbered (usually using Roman numerals) in that order, from one (I) to seven (VII).

    A major chord is made from the I, III and V notes, so C major uses the notes C, E and G. To make a major chord into a minor, you flatten (lower the pitch by one fret, or a half-step) the III note. This means C minor is made up of C, Eb (flat) and G. So now, from the E major scale, E = I, F# (sharp) =II, G# = III, A = IV, B = V, C# = VI and D# = VII, you can work out both the major and minor chords. Sharps are just the opposite of flats, so you raise the pitch by one fret (or half-step). When you’re working out the E minor chord, you have to flatten the F#, which just makes it back into a natural (neither flat nor sharp) F.

    Common Open Major and Minor Chords

    “Open” chords get their name from the fact that they generally include strings played open. This means that the strings are played without being pushed down at a fret, which makes chords including them easier to play for beginners. When you start to learn chords, you have to focus on using the right fingers to press down each note and make sure you’re pressing the strings down firmly enough.

    Play each note of the chord one after another (known as playing an arpeggio) to check if any are being accidently muted or need pressing down harder. If you find that you’re accidently muting a string with one of your fingers, try lowering your thumb so the tip reaches around half way up the back of the guitar neck. This gives your fingers a better angle to approach the fretboard.

    Here are the most common open chords. In the descriptions, the strings are referred to as the first string, second string, and so on. The first string is the high-pitched, thin one and the sixth is the thick one that’s closest to you when you’re playing.

    • C major. Press your ring finger down on the third fret of the fifth string, your middle on the second fret of the fourth string and your index finger on the first fret of the second string. You strum every string apart from the sixth string.
    • F major. This is fairly similar to the C, but a little more difficult to play. Press the fourth string down at the third fret with your ring finger, the third string down at the second fret with your middle finger, and the first and second strings down at the first fret with your index. You just flatten your index finger down across the two strings; lower your thumb if you struggle. You don’t play the fifth or sixth strings in this chord.
    • G major. Push the sixth string down at the third fret with your middle finger, the first string down at the third fret with your ring finger and the fifth string at the second fret with your index finger. You play every string in this chord.
    • A minor. This one is easy; fret a C major. Now move your ring finger onto the second fret of the third string. Play the same strings as you do in C major. Play C major and then A minor and note the difference in sound.
    • E minor. Push down the fourth and fifth strings at the second fret. Use your index finger for the fifth string and your middle for the second. You strum every string in this chord. You can use your middle and ring fingers if you prefer.

    Chord Change

    The hardest thing about playing chords when you get started is changing between them. To effectively change between chords, you need to be economical with your movements. Spend a bit of time thinking about where your fingers need to be for each chord, and work out the most efficient way to move from one to the other. For example, from a C major, you can flatten your index finger so it covers the first string too and move your middle and ring fingers both down a string to switch to an F. Easy changes to start with are between C major and A minor and G major and E minor.

    Changing from C or F to G is pretty difficult, but you’ll get it with practice. If there’s just a small gap in your playing when you change between chords, you can normally get away continuing strumming anyway until your fingers catch up.

    Putting Chords into Use

    With just a little more music theory, you can learn to write simple songs with the chords you’ve just learned. The song would be in the key of C major (C, D, E, F, G, A and B). You can use the major chords for the I, IV and V notes and the minors for the II, III and VI notes. That means you can play a chord progression which uses all of the chords you’ve learnt, if you want to.

    Try one that starts with C, moves to F, then G and then back to C. This is the most basic progression, and uses the major chords you know. If you start with an A minor before going to C you can make a more interesting progression which incorporates both major and minor chords. Generally speaking, you want to focus on the chord with the same name as the key (the root), which in this case is C. Think of the other chords as either springing from it or leading back to it. Play around with the chords and see what you can come up with!

    Guitar chord inversions allow you to create different voicings for a given chord. These voicings can add a little flavor and variety to the typical chord sound. They also can be a bit easier to play and add some versatility to your playing. In this lesson we’ll take a look at what chord inversions are and how to identify them on the guitar fretboard.

    What are guitar chord inversions?

    While the concept of a chord inversion may sound complicated, it’s actually quite simple.

    Guitar chord inversions are what the name implies…chords that are inverted. What this means is that the arrangement of stacked notes is changed so the root note is no longer in the bass (lowest note) position. Before we get into the details of inversions, let’s first do a little review of chord construction.

    Triads

    Chords are built on triads, or three notes stacked in thirds. These triads are formed of the root, 3rd, and 5th intervals. As an example, let’s look at the G major chord, which consists of the notes G – B – D.

    How to play an e7 chord on guitar

    The B is a 3rd from the G note and the D is a 3rd away from the B. This example is of a major chord, but the formula remains the same for minor chords as well. However, minor chords will contain a minor 3rd instead of a major 3rd.

    To learn more about building chords, check out the following lessons:

    Chord Inversions

    Chords are in the root position when the root note of the chord is in the bass, or lowest, position. In terms of the G major chord above, the root position is when the G note is in the bass position. So the root position of the G major chord would be: G – B – D.

    The order of the other notes doesn’t matter. It can be arranged R-3-5, R-5-3 etc. The only thing that matters is the note in the bass position as this is what determines the inversion.

    This is universal to all chords, whether it’s G major, A minor chord inversions or any other.

    The examples shown here are for major chords, but the same concept applies to minor chords as well. Examples of minor chords are shown in the common inversion patterns section down below.

    Root Position

    How to play an e7 chord on guitar

    The root position places the root note in the bass position, or the lowest position.

    Keeping with the G major example, the note stack for the chord would be: G – B – D

    First Inversion

    How to play an e7 chord on guitar

    The first chord inversion places the 3rd in the bass position, creating a 3-5-1 stack. While it remains the same chord, this voicing gives it a bit different sound.

    The note stack for the first inversion of the G major chord would be: B – D – G

    Second Inversion

    How to play an e7 chord on guitar

    The second inversion puts the 5th in the bass position, creating a 5-1-3 stack. Again, it’s the same chord with a different voicing and sound.

    The note stack for the second inversion of the G major chord would be D – G – B

    Common Guitar Chord Inversion Patterns

    Below are common major and minor guitar chord inversion patterns for the 4th, 5th, and 6th strings. These patterns are the same for any root note of the same chord quality (major/minor).

    4th String – Major and Minor Chord Inversions

    How to play an e7 chord on guitar

    Major chord inversion patterns – 4th string bass note

    How to play an e7 chord on guitar

    Minor chord inversion patterns – 4th string bass note

    5th String – Major and Minor Chord Inversions

    How to play an e7 chord on guitar

    Major chord inversion patterns – 5th string bass note

    How to play an e7 chord on guitar

    Minor chord inversion patterns – 5th string bass note

    6th String – Major and Minor Chord Inversions

    How to play an e7 chord on guitar

    Major chord inversion patterns – 6th string bass note

    How to play an e7 chord on guitar

    Minor chord inversion patterns – 6th string bass note

    Additional Chord Inversions

    The number of inversions for a chord is dependent on the number of notes in the chord. The more notes there are, the more possible inversions you have.

    For example, a major 7th chord (maj7) will have the root position and three inversions.

    How to play an e7 chord on guitar

    This applies to 9, add9, sus2 chords etc. Again, the ordering of the notes outside of the bass position doesn’t matter.

    Wrap Up

    Guitar chord inversions are just a rearranging of the notes of a chord such that a note aside from the root is in the bass (lowest) position. Chord inversions allow you to play different voicings and add variety and flavor to your playing. You can start utilizing them in your own playing by incorporating them into chord progressions you already know.

    How to play an e7 chord on guitar

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