How to play hand and foot

Hand and Foot is a variation of Canasta that became popular in the United States in the 1950s.

  • Comments(0)
  • Share –>
  • Game Type: Other
  • Age: 13+
  • Players: 5+

The Pack

Hand and Foot uses five to six decks of cards with Jokers.

Object of the Game

Be the first to get rid of all your cards, ‘hand’ first, and then ‘foot’.

Card Values/Scoring

Jokers (Wild Cards) – 50 points

Deuces (Wild Cards) – 20 Points

Aces – 20 Points

Eights through Kings – 10 Points

Threes through Sevens – 5 Points

Rounds

A game consists of four rounds. Each round has a minimum meld requirement that increases with each round.

You must put down cards whose individual face values add up to at least the minimum requirement before your team is “in the game”. You can put down several melds at once to achieve this. If you are picking up the pile, you can meld additional cards from you hand along with the top discard and the two that match to help you make up the minimum count, including wild cards. However, you cannot count any of the other six cards you are pick up towards the minimum.

Round 1, cards points must total at least 50 to start play
Round 2, cards points must total at least 90 to start play
Round 3, cards points must total at least 120 to start play
Round 4, cards points must total at least 150 to start play

The Deal

Shuffle the decks of cards thoroughly. Each player is dealt 11 cards. This first set of 11 cards is called a ‘Hand’. The ‘Hand’ can be picked up and examined by each player.

Each player is then dealt a second set of 11 cards. This second set of dealt cards is called the ‘Foot’, which is played when the ‘Hand’ has been used up, and is kept face-down.

Now, each player has two sets of cards, one set that he has seen, and another set that is kept face-down.

The remainder of the cards are to be kept in the center of the table and are called the ‘Stock’.

The topmost card of the Stock pile is turned face-up as a discard pile. If it turns out to be a red Three, a Deuce, or a Joker, then this card goes back into the pile, and another card is drawn for the top.

The Play

The objective is to get rid of all the cards from your ‘Hand’, and then ‘Foot’ by melding them. A Meld is a set of 3 – 7 cards of the same rank, that are placed face-up. It cannot have less than three cards or more than seven cards. A Meld belongs to the team, and not any individual player. After a Meld of three or more cards starts, more cards can be added to it until there are seven cards in the pile. It then becomes a ‘Closed Pile’ or ‘Book’. Deuces and Jokers can be used in melds along with at least four natural cards, but not the red and black Threes.

Types of Melds

‘Clean’ or natural meld – Seven real cards of the same rank (‘Red’ Book).

‘Dirty’ or wild meld – A minimum of four cards of the same rank, and at least one wild card. Example: 5 Nines and two Wild Cards (‘Black’ Book).

The melds should not consist of all Wild Cards. When a Book is complete, it is identified as Red (Clean) or Black (Dirty). The Black must have a Wild Card turned to show that it is a Dirty Meld.

Red Book – All natural cards, no Wild cards (500 Points).

Black Books – At least 4 natural cards and Wild Cards (300 Points).

Each player picks up their ‘hand’, and play begins with the player on the left side of the dealer. The player is supposed to draw two cards from the Stock on each turn, and then discard one card on each turn. If a red Three is drawn, it is put down immediately and replaced with a new card from the deck.

The player also has the option of ‘picking up the pile’, which means that he can take the top seven cards from the discard pile. However, ensure that the top of the discard pile is not a black Three. The player must hold two cards of the same rank as the top card. These three cards (the two he is holding and the top discard) must be immediately laid out, possibly along with the other cards he is holding. Also keep in mind that, the player’s team must have melded till then, or he is melding while picking up the pile.

Only the top card of the discard pile can be used towards the points needed for melding: the 6 other cards cannot be used towards points needed for the meld.

To meld, all the cards that are played must equal the number of points that are required for that round. Wild cards have bonus points.

If the player chooses to pick up the pile, they must make a meld of the top card of the pile. As you go on making melds, the number of cards in ‘Hand’ keep reducing, and you then eventually go on to the ‘Foot’. You need to announce that you are playing your ‘Foot’, and then continue playing. If you happen to lay out all other cards except one, then you can discard it. This marks the end of your turn.

When the ‘Book’ of seven is completed, the player has to place them in a single stack, with the topmost card being a Red for ‘Clean’ and Black for ‘Dirty’.

To ‘Go Out’, the player must get a Clean and Dirty, and get completely rid of the cards. Players must discard the final card, and not ‘simply run out of cards’.

How to Keep Score

When a player goes out, it marks the end of the round. The players are then supposed to calculate their scores, recording the ‘meld count’ first. The players then calculate their second point count, which is calculated from each card’s value that is played. If any card is left in the player’s hand, it will count against the score for that round.

The person or team with the highest score wins.

How to play hand and foot

Hand and Foot is a fun rummy style card game. Score points by melding similar ranking cards. Find the video tutorial and written explanation for how to play hand and foot below. Be sure to keep the hand and foot quick guide close while playing for a quick reference to help you learn as you play.

Hand and Foot Tutorial


“>

Needed

Five 52 card decks; Ten Jokers; Four Players (divided into two teams)

All five decks are shuffled together. Each player is dealt a total of 22 cards, one card at a time. The first 11 cards dealt to each player is known as the player’s hand stack and are kept together. The next 11 cards dealt to each player is known as the player’s foot stack. These cards are kept together and remain face down to begin the game.

The remaining deck is placed in the middle. The top card of the deck is flipped up to start a discard pile.

Objective

The object of the game is to score the most points. Points are scored by melding cards of the same rank together as a team. Three cards of the same rank are needed to start a meld, and a meld can have up to seven total cards.

The jokers and the 2s are wild cards. These cards can be added to any meld, but a meld can never have more wild cards than cards of the actual number. There are two types of melds, clean and dirty. A clean meld is a meld of seven cards all in the same rank. A dirty meld is a meld of seven cards where some of the cards are wild cards.

Once a player melds all the cards from their hand, they will pick up their foot cards. Once a player melds all the cards in their foot, the round is over. The game is played over four rounds.

Game Play

The player left of the dealer is first to play. If a player is dealt a red 3, or if a red three is ever drawn, it is immediately played on the table, and a card is drawn to replace it.

The Draw

Each turn begins with a draw. A player is allowed to draw from the discard pile if the top card is used to create a meld.

If the top card of the discard pile is successfully melded, the player will draw the top seven cards in the discard pile. If a player cannot draw the top discard, the player must draw two cards from the deck. The player can also choose to draw the top two cards of the deck, even if it is possible to draw the top discard.

Melding

After the draw, a player can choose to create melds, if possible. Three cards of similar rank are needed to start a meld. Wildcards (jokers and 2s) can be used in any meld, but a meld can never have more wildcards than natural cards.

Each card has a value:

Jokers = 50 points

Aces/2s = 20 points

Kings to 8s = 10 points

7s to 4s = 5 points

Black 3s = 5 points

In the first round, the first melds laid by a team need to have a combined card value of 50 points when starting the game. In round two, the first melds must be at least 90 points. In round 3, the first melds must be at least 120 points. And in round 4, the first melds must be at least 150 points.

When a meld has seven cards, it is complete. If the meld has no wild cards, it is called a clean meld. Melds are stacked to the side with a red card on top for a clean meld. If the completed meld includes one or more wild cards, it is called a dirty meld. A completed dirty meld is stacked to the side with a black card on top.

The Discard

A player’s turn ends with a discard. If a black 3 is discarded, the discard pile is blocked. A player cannot draw from a blocked pile.

Going Out

A player can only end the round by getting rid of all cards if their team has a completed clean meld, a completed dirty meld, and their teammate has picked up their foot stack.

A player is allowed to ask their partner if they should go out. Depending on what is left in the partner’s hand, the partner may want the round to continue.

Scoring

There are four areas where points are scored.

Card Values: Using the card values from above, teams score the points from the cards in their melds (including completed melds), minus the points from the cards left in their hands.

Completed melds: A team gets 500 points for each clean meld and 300 points for each dirty melds. If the completed meld does not include a wild card, it is considered a clean meld. If the completed meld does include a wild card, it is considered a dirty meld.

Red 3s: A team gets 100 points for each red 3.

Going Out: The team of the player who ended the round gets 100 points.

Winning

The team with the most points after four rounds wins the game!

Rules

If the opponent’s end a round before getting to your foot, and there is a red three in your foot, your team loses 100 points for it.

If the first card flipped up is a red 3 or a wild card, the card is buried into the draw deck, and the next top card is flipped up.

A team cannot have two incomplete melds in the same rank.

A meld cannot have more wildcards than natural cards at any time.

Once a wildcard is melded, it cannot be moved.

A meld cannot have more than seven cards.

Black 3s cannot be melded and are only used to block the discard pile.

How to play Hand & Foot Remastered – Team Play

There are no agreed upon “official” rules of Hand & Foot but we believe these instructions are the most fun and competitive version.

Note: If you are still playing Hand & Foot with old fashioned playing cards these rules can be applied but 2s will replace the 20 point wild cards and Jokers will replace the 50 point wild cards.

The Basics:

4 – 8 Players – With teams of 2 players or 3 – 6 players with teams of 3 players.

Play with one more deck of cards than the number of players. The backs of each deck are color coded to help you quickly adjust the number of decks you are playing with.

Each game consists of 4 rounds with the highest score winning.

Place one or two draw piles on the table with a discard pile between them with one card face up. The first card on the discard pile cannot be a wild or a three.

The Goal:

The object of the game is to accumulate the most points by laying down melds with the goal of creating books.

What are melds and books?

A meld is 3+ cards of the same value from 4 through Ace. A meld of seven cards or more is a book. Books cannot be made with 3’s.

Clean book – Seven identical cards is a clean book and is worth 700 points. For example, seven 8’s is a clean book.

Dirty book – A book that includes up to two wild cards is a dirty book and is worth 300 points. For example, a book of five 8s and two wilds is a dirty book while four 8s and three wilds would not be valid.

Wild book – A book of 7 wild cards. Cannot be used in a team’s inital meld.

The Game Play:

Tip: Shuffle thoroughly! Shuffling with the cards face up and spread out on the table will help you spot groups of like cards to be separated. Poor shuffling creates a poor game experience.

To begin form teams and ensure teammates are not sitting next to each other.

Each player then takes a small portion of a draw pile and, without looking at them, counts out two stacks of 11 cards each. A 100-point bonus is awarded if a player picks up exactly 22 cards. The first stack is the player’s “Hand”. The second stack is passed to the player on the left and becomes that player’s “Foot”.

Each player begins with their Hand and sets their Foot aside face down in a location visible to the other players.

To determine the order of play each player selects one card from the draw pile. The player with the highest card, Aces are high, begins the first round with playing continuing clock-wise.

On each turn the player must pick up two cards and discard one. The only exception is to “go out” (end the round) you must play your final card.

The top three cards in the discard pile can be picked up as long the top card can immediately be played with two natural cards from your hand.

A player cannot pick from the discard pile if he/she has already picked a card from one of the draw piles.

Red threes are worth 100 points and should be immediately laid down, face-up at the top of the individual’s play area and replaced with a card from the draw pile.

Black threes are -100 points and should be discarded before all other cards.

Your team can “be in the game” by laying cards down when one teammate holds a meld, or melds, that total at least the minimum point values as shown below. All team members will now play on these melds and hand additional melds to the opening player.

First round: 60 points

Second round: 90 points

Third round: 120 points

Fourth round: 150 points

If you lay your cards down to meld and discover you do not have enough points you must pick them up and it will cost your team 500 points.

When laying down cards you must leave them visible to your opponents. Melds are placed in front of you, in ascending order, in a vertical row clearly showing how many cards of each value you have.

Clean books are neatly piled and placed horizontally above the melds next to the red threes, if any.

Dirty books must have a wild card placed vertically on top.

Natural cards can be added to complete books, wild cards cannot. This will not increase the value of the book but it will add the point value of the natural card.

A player must play their hand completely before they can play their foot. If, to clear their hand, a player must discard, they must wait until their next turn to start playing their foot. If no discard is needed to clear their hand, they can immediately begin playing their foot.

The first team to have one team member go out by playing all cards from their hand and foot, plus having the team complete at least two Clean books and at least three Dirty books, receives a 100-point bonus for ending the round.

Once a player goes out all cards left in the other players’ hand and/or foot are to be counted as negative points. Cards they have laid on the table are positive points.

The scoring:

At the end of the round the score keeper will first record the points each player has in books and red threes.

Example: 3 red Threes and one clean book is worth 1000 points.

Example: 1 red Three and one dirty book is worth 400 points.

All red Threes are then discarded.

The individual card values are now added, if they were laid down, or subtracted if they are still in the player’s hand and/or foot.

Tip: Match, and discard, a positive card equal to any negative cards. With the remaining positive cards count out piles of 100 points each. This is the fastest and easiest way to calculate scores.

Provide your total to the scorekeeper and start helping to shuffle for the next round.

The review:

To Lay Down (Meld):

Round 1: 60 Points
Round 2: 90 Points
Round 3: 120 Points
Round 4: 150 Points

Red 3: 100 Points (If laid down, -100 if caught in your hand)
Black 3: (-100) Points
4 – 7: 5 Points
8 – K: 10 Points
Ace: 20 Points
Wild: 20 or 50 Points

Clean: 700 Points
Dirty: 300 Point
Wild: 1,500 Points

Picking 22 Cards: 100 Points
Going Out: 100 Points

How to play Hand & Foot Remastered – Individual Play

There are no agreed upon “official” rules of Hand & Foot but we believe these instructions are the most fun and competitive version.

Note: If you are still playing Hand & Foot with old fashioned playing cards these rules can be applied but 2s will replace the 20 point wild cards and Jokers will replace the 50 point wild cards.

The Basics:

3 – 8 Players – You can play with 2 but it would be a really lame game.

Play with one more deck of cards than the number of players. The backs of each deck are color coded to help you quickly adjust the number of decks you are playing with.

Each game consists of 4 rounds with the highest score winning.

Place one or two draw piles on the table with a discard pile between them with one card face up. The first card on the discard pile cannot be a wild or a three.

The Goal:

The object of the game is to accumulate the most points by laying down melds with the goal of creating books.

What are melds and books?

A meld is 3+ cards of the same value from 4 through Ace. A meld of seven cards or more is a book. Books cannot be made with 3’s and no completely wild books are allowed.

A meld or book must always have one more natural card than wild. Two wilds and two Aces, or two wilds and one Ace, would not be legal melds.

A meld cannot be played on by other players.

Clean book – Seven identical cards is a clean book and is worth 700 points. For example, seven 8’s is a clean book.

Dirty book – A book that includes wild cards is a dirty book and is worth 300 points. For example, a book of four 8s and three wilds is a dirty book.

The Game Play:

Tip: Shuffle thoroughly! Shuffling with the cards face up and spread out on the table will help you spot groups of like cards to be separated. Poor shuffling creates a poor game experience.

To begin, each player takes a small portion of a draw pile and, without looking at them, counts out two stacks of 11 cards each. A 100-point bonus is awarded if a player picks up exactly 22 cards. The first stack is the player’s “Hand”. The second stack is passed to the player on the left and becomes that player’s “Foot”.

Each player begins with their Hand and sets their Foot aside face down in a location visible to the other players.

To determine the order of play each player selects one card from the draw pile. The player with the highest card, Aces are high, begins the first round with playing continuing clock-wise.

On each turn the player must pick up two cards and MUST discard one. You cannot “go out” (end the round) without discarding. You can continue to play with no cards in your hand but cannot go out without completing your books.

The first card in the discard pile can be picked up as long that card does not complete a book. For example, if you have 6 eights laid down you cannot pick from the discard pile if the top card is an eight.

A player cannot pick from the discard pile if he/she has already picked a card from one of the draw piles.

Red threes are worth 100 points and should be immediately laid down, face-up at the top of the individual’s play area and replaced with a card from the draw pile.

Black threes are -100 points and should be discarded before all other cards.

You can begin laying cards down when you hold a meld, or melds, that total at least the minimum point values as shown below.

First round: 60 points

Second round: 90 points

Third round: 120 points

Fourth round: 150 points

Tip: Laying down too early only helps your opponents, hold your cards until your hand hurts. Of course, waiting too long to lay down could leave you a lot of negative points at the end of the round.

Total point value is determined by the card’s individual value which is the smaller number printed in the top left corner and shown below.

Four thru seven: 5 points

Eight thru King: 10 points

Wild: 20 or 50 points

A meld of 7 eights, for example, would be worth 70 points when laying down

The additional value of complete books or red threes cannot be included when laying down for the first time each round.

When laying down cards you must leave them visible to your opponents.

Melds are placed in front of you, in ascending order, in a vertical row clearly showing how many cards of each value you have.

Clean books are neatly piled and placed horizontally above the melds next to the red threes, if any.

Dirty books must have a wild card placed vertically on top.

Natural cards can be added to complete books, wild cards cannot. This will not increase the value of the book but it will add the point value of the natural card.

A player must play their hand completely before they can play their foot. If, to clear their hand, a player must discard, they must wait until their next turn to start playing their foot. If no discard is needed to clear their hand, they can immediately begin playing their foot.

Tip: There is no obligation to announce that you are playing your foot. It is up to the other players to be aware of the game.

The first player to go out by laying down or discarding all cards from their hand and foot, plus completing at least one Clean book and at least one Dirty book, receives a 100-point bonus for ending the round. Players can accumulate more than one Clean and/or Dirty books each round.

Once a player goes out all cards left in the other players’ hand and/or foot are to be counted as negative points. Cards they have laid on the table are positive points.

Tip: Going out doesn’t guarantee that you have the most points, you may want to wait. But, if your main rival is not yet playing their foot drop the hammer and lay all those negative points on them.

The scoring:

At the end of the round the score keeper will first record the points each player has in books and red threes.

Example: 3 red Threes and one clean book is worth 1000 points.

Example: 1 red Three and one dirty book is worth 400 points.

All red Threes are then discarded.

The individual card values are now added, if they were laid down, or subtracted if they are still in the player’s hand and/or foot.

Tip: Match, and discard, a positive card equal to any negative cards. With the remaining positive cards count out piles of 100 points each. This is the fastest and easiest way to calculate scores.

Provide your total to the scorekeeper and start helping to shuffle for the next round.

The review:

To Lay Down (Meld):

Round 1: 60 Points
Round 2: 90 Points
Round 3: 120 Points
Round 4: 150 Points

Red 3: 100 Points (If laid down, -100 if caught in your hand)
Black 3: (-100) Points
4 – 7: 5 Points
8 – K: 10 Points
Ace: 20 Points
Wild: 20 or 50 Points

Clean: 700 Points
Dirty: 300

Picking 22 Cards: 100 Points
Going Out: 100 Points

Hand and Foot Card Game Rules and How to Play

We all love a good card game, and Rummy-type games are a common favorite. There are plenty of games that fall under this category, and one of our favorites is Hand and Foot. In this piece, we’ll be looking at the Hand and Foot card game rules, and you need to know.

What is The Hand and Foot Game?

Hand and Foot is a variant of Canasta, one of the main card games in the Rummy family. Its exact origins are unknown, but we know that game was quite popular in the 80s, which is likely when it originated.

Making it quite young compared to some other Canasta variants. Hand and Foot is also a team-based game best played with two teams of two players. However, the game can be played with more than two teams. The game is, in many ways, a simpler version of classic Canasta.

But it does have its unique gameplay elements as well. Hand and Foot can seem quite intimidating to new players as they’ll often be many cards in play. But it’s simpler than you might think. Players can play canasta with up to 7 decks of cards.

However, you can use less. Under standard Hand and Foot card game rules, the number of decks used should be one more than the number of players. However, many players do use the maximum number of decks as well.

What You’ll Need?

To play Hand and Foot, you’ll need playing cards and plenty of them. Buying in bulk is probably your best option, like these playing cards. You might also want to get some Hand and Foot score sheets.

These will likely be especially beneficial to new players. Who may otherwise struggle to keep track of their score as the game goes on. An automatic card shuffler isn’t essential but could be helpful due to all the cards in play. We’ll talk a little more about how the cards are used below.

Cards

Unlike some games, all the playing cards are used under Hand and Foot card game rules. Cards will have different values, though. If you follow traditional Hand and Foot card game rules, then both Jokers and 2s are wild. This makes them especially valuable during gameplay. This nicely brings us to the next section.

How to Play Hand and Foot: Rules and Gameplay

The Aim of The Game

The game aims to be the first team to use all their cards. But you’ll also need to be sure you have scored the most points as well. While Hand and Foot is designed to be a simpler version of Canasta, it could still be a little intimidating for new players. But our in-depth guide below will help you learn everything you need to know.

Setting Up

The first thing you should do is select a dealer. To do this, every player should be given a single card from a pre-shuffled deck. The player with the highest card wins and becomes the dealer. If there is a draw, then repeat the process till a dealer is chosen.

The dealer will then shuffle the deck and cut it. Teams sit facing each other, and each player should be given two sets of 11 cards. The first 11 cards are the hand, and the second is the foot.

Any remaining cards are then placed face down in the center. The top card should then be turned up and sat across from the pile. This will form the base of the discard pile. The other pile of cards is called the stock.

Under traditional Hand and Foot card game rules, the role of the dealer should swap each round. Normally it will be the player to the current dealer’s right, who takes up the role.

Playing Hand and Foot

Players should work together to build up melds. Matching cards make melds of the same rank; there must be 3 cards in a meld. The game begins in a clockwise motion, the player nearest to the dealer should go first.

A player can take a card from either the stock or discard pile. However, cards from the discard pile can only be taken if used in a meld. You must also take all the cards from the discard pile, so it might be best to stick with the stockpile at first.

Players can also only use the 11 cards from their hand pile. After they have all been used, you can move across to your foot pile. Building up melds should be your priority, but you need to build two books to win the Hand and Foot card game.

Books are sets of 7 cards. A red book is made up of non-wild cards. While a black book can have wild cards in it. Once the books are made, a matching colored card should be placed on top of them.

As we said earlier, Jokers and 2s are wild, which means they can be used in books and melds without needing to match. After you have made a red book and a black book and used all your cards, you can go out.

This will end the round, and then all that’s left is totally up the remaining scores. Any team with cards remaining will have their total deducted from their score. To help make scoring easier, use our chart below.

Also, be sure to remember that the team that goes out first receives a 100 point bonus. You can play Hand and Foot with just one round or multiple.

Card/s Value
Red Book 500 points
Black Book 300 points
Jokers 50 points
2s 20 points
Aces 20 points
8, 9, 10s 10 points
4, 5, 6, 7s 5 points
Jacks, Queens, Kings 10 points
Black 3s 5 points
Red 3s 100 points

The Wild Book Addition

The opinion is split on whether the wild book is part of standard Hand and Foot card game rules. Some players say it is, while others don’t. A wild book is a book of 7 cards made out of just wild cards.

This will score players 2500 points but isn’t needed to go out. If a team starts to make one but doesn’t finish, then 2500 points will be deducted from their score. Because the wild book’s value is so high, some players don’t include it.

Hand and Foot – A Fun Twist on Canasta

Hand and Foot is the perfect card game for a more relaxed gaming session. Games like Canasta are fun but have a learning curve to them. But Hand and Foot is a great way to learn the fundamentals and an enjoyable game in its own right. If you’re looking for a new card game to try, why not give it a go?

About Bar Games 101

Bar Games 101 is a website devoted to helping you learn about the best games to play with your friends. We review the games, research the rules, and uncover helpful tips and strategies.

Hand and Foot is a much easier variation of the rummy-type card game Canasta. It requires 5-6 decks of standard playing cards and is suitable for ages 12 and up. Hand and Foot can be played by 2-6 people. It is most commonly played in teams of two.

Like regular Canasta, the objective of Hand and Foot is to make the most melds and to be the first team to go out.

Set Up

To set up a game of Hand and Foot, players need to form a circle around a stable playing area. Teammates should sit across from each other.

Before gameplay can begin, every player draws a card from the deck. Make sure it’s shuffled well. Whomever draws the highest card gets the honor of being the first dealer. If you have a tie, simply redraw.

The dealer then shuffles the decks and passes out twenty-two cards, one by one, clockwise to each player. The first eleven cards are known as the Hand and the second set is known as the Foot.

Players should separate the Hand and Foot into two decks. The remaining cards form the stock. The top card of the stock is then flipped over and placed to the side to form the discard pile.

Melds

Points are awarded when teams meld their cards. A meld is a group cards of the same ranks. Melds must begin with at least three cards. After a meld is formed, teammates can build upon their own melds until a meld has seven cards.

Wildcards

In Hand and Foot, 2s and Jokers are wildcards. They can be used in place of any card. A meld must, however, have more natural cards than wildcards.

Card Values

In Hand and Foot:

  • 2s are worth 20 points
  • Jokers are worth 50 points
  • Black 3s are worth -100 points
  • Red 3s are worth -300 points
  • Aces are worth 20 points
  • 4s, 5s, 6s, 7s, 8s, and 9s are worth 5 points
  • 10s, Jacks, Queens, and Kings are worth 10 points

How to Play Hand and Foot

Gameplay moves clockwise, starting with the player left of the dealer. Players start with their Hand deck and then, after they’ve played all of their cards, begin playing their Foot deck.

To begin their turn, a player first draws two cards from the stock pile. The first meld of any round must at least be worth 60 points.

After a player makes all of the moves they can, they end their turn by discarding one card.

Books

When a meld reaches seven cards, it is called a book and it is flipped over to prevent more cards from being built on it. A clean book is a book made of all naturals. A Dirty book is a book made with naturals and wildcards. A Wild book is a book made of all Wildcards.

Going Out

Once a team has completed a Clean and Dirty book and once one of the players in that team has played all of the cards in their Foot, they may go out and end the round.

Scoring

To calculate a team’s score, subtract the point value of un-melded cards to the point value of melded cards

The value of completed books are as follows:

  • A Clean book is worth 500 points.
  • A Dirty book is worth 300 points.
  • A Wild book is worth 2,500 points.

If a team starts to and then fails to complete a Wild book before the round ends, 2,500 points are subtracted from their score.

The team that goes out is also awarded 100 points.

Resources:

Want to learn more about how to play Hand and Foot, check out some of these resources:

About Bar Games 101

Bar Games 101 is a website devoted to helping you learn about the best games to play with your friends. We review the games, research the rules, and uncover helpful tips and strategies.

The best Hand & Foot Canasta

Web2mil.com

Designed for iPad

    • 4.3 • 3.2K Ratings
    • Free
    • Offers In-App Purchases

Screenshots

Description

Play the best Hand and Foot Canasta now!

Hand and Foot is a Canasta variant involving three to six decks. The number of decks used is typically one more than the number of players. You need to pick up the Foot and have one natural and one mixed Canasta to go out. Red threes are valued 500 points, always against you.
When you pick up the pile, you only pick up the top 7 cards. Play and enjoy the best Hand and Foot Canasta!

What’s New

This version fixes some crashes, an update is recommended.

Ratings and Reviews

Best old fashioned card game EVER!

My friends and I used to stay up 1/2 the night playing Hand and Foot. The rules were a little different but we loved it. Over time they moved, I moved and we all lost touch or did see each other for years at a time. I really missed playing this game.

One day I found it and have been addicted all over again. I play daily. The rules are very similar to the game we played. The graphics in this app are very good. I only have a couple of negative critiques: coins – 1. you are assuredly going to buy coins as you cannot earn them and watching adds only gives you 50 but the minimum buy in is 500, 2. Sometimes it feels like the draws are not random, like the algorithm is designed to make the hands go longer.

All in all, this app has put an old favorite right on my tablet and I couldn’t be happier. Thank you.

One Sided

Love the game but hate the one sided thing that goes on all the time and that’s when you can get on to play, too many times when I try to log in I get the “log in through Facebook” then when you try that it just keeps circling then starts the process all over again, then it’s connection issues, you all have a lot of bugs to fix in this App, please make it fun to play. Thank you

Terrible card randomization

Overall the game is great except one huge issue – randomness of cards. The dealing of cards is obviously not being done in a manner that simulates an actual card deck. The result is that the majority of games are extremely one sided and stay that way the entire game. It is common to win games of four hands by several thousand points. I have personally been in a game where we won with close to 14,000 while the other team could only manage 4,000 – over four rounds! And that is not uncommon.

Another complaint is pulling from the discard pile. Rather then giving the last 7 cards from the discard it gives the top card and 6 random cards from the discard. This mean that if you take from the discard you will always have a chance to get a hand full of red 3’s.

One star but I still play it because I like the UI and if you pay attention and match with people with good win rates you will do well.

App Privacy

The developer, Web2mil.com , indicated that the app’s privacy practices may include handling of data as described below. For more information, see the developer’s privacy policy.

Data Used to Track You

The following data may be used to track you across apps and websites owned by other companies:

Data Linked to You

The following data may be collected and linked to your identity:

Data Not Linked to You

The following data may be collected but it is not linked to your identity:

Privacy practices may vary, for example, based on the features you use or your age. Learn More

How to play hand and foot

Hand and Foot Card Game

What is the Hand and Foot Card Game?

Hand and Foot is a fun card game typically played in a rummy style. The game is closely related to the Canasta and Pennies From Heaven games and also seems to be a mix of Jack Change It and Solitaire. The hand and foot game involves the melding of cards but has no standard rules; therefore, there are several variations in rules that can accommodate many players.

The most common version of this game is played in partnership between four players but can also be played by six players in two teams or more players. If you have never played this game before, and it sounds like an exciting game, you might as well include the game in your next game night must-plays. Don’t know how to play hand and foot? Fret Not! Take a quick peek into the gameplay and simple rules and pretend like you always knew how to play this fun card game.

How do you play the Hand and Foot Game?

Objective

The object of the game is to get rid of all cards in hand. The players are dealt two sets of cards; the first set played is called the Hand, and the set played after is called Foot.

Dealing

The game is played using five to six decks of cards, including Jokers. The cards are shuffled, and one person takes the deck. The dealer deals 11 cards, face down, to each player, clockwise, until each player has a hand. The players can pick the hand and examine the cards. After that, each player is dealt the second set of 11 cards, face down, called the foot. Cards in the foot are played when all the cards in hand have been played.

After all the cards are dealt, the players have two sets of cards, one set that they have seen – the hand, and the other set that is placed face-down – the foot.

The remaining cards are placed at the center of the table in a stock pile. The top card of the stockpile is flipped face-up to form the discard pile. The card that forms a discard pile can be any card other than a Joker, a Three, and a Deuce. If any of these three cards are at the top of the stock pile, they are placed back into the pile, and another card is drawn to form the discard pile.

Rounds

A game includes four rounds with a minimum meld requirement increasing after every round. Before your team is in the game, you should put down the cards with individual face values whose sum is at least the minimum requirement. You can also put down more than one meld to achieve the minimum requirement.

  • In Round 1, the play begins when the card points total at least 50
  • In Round 2, the play begins when the card points total at least 90
  • In Round 3, the play begins when the card points total at least 120
  • In Round 4, the play begins when the card points total at least 150

The Gameplay

The turn begins with a draw, and each player can draw from the discard pile if the topmost card is used to create a meld. If the player successfully melds the top card of the discard pile, they draw the top seven cards in the discard pile. If the player fails, they must draw two cards from the stockpile.

Melding

The players attempt to meld cards and get rid of the cards first from the Hand and then the Foot. To meld the cards, you can form a set of 3-7 cards of the same rank and place them face-up. The meld must not have less than three or over seven cards. Moreover, a meld doesn’t belong to an individual but collectively belongs to a team. When the players form a meld of up to seven cards, it becomes a Book or a Closed Pile. You can also use Jokers and Deuces to form melds along with four natural cards, excluding the red and black 3s.

Types of Melds:

Natural or Clean Meld: A meld of seven cards of the same rank (red book) is called a clean or natural meld.

Dirty or Wild Meld: A meld containing a minimum of four same rank cards and at least one wild card is called a dirty meld or a wild meld. For instance, five 9s and two wild cards (black book).

Red Book: All the natural cards are red books that don’t include wild cards.

Black Book: At least four natural cards and wild cards are called black books.

Discard

The turn ends with a discard by a player. The discard pile is blocked if a player discards a black 3, and no player can draw from the blocked pile.

Going Out

Any player can end the round by getting rid of all cards and after the team has made a clean meld, a dirty meld, and picked the foot stack. The player can ask the partner for permission to go out. Depending on what is in their hand, the partner can decide whether to let the player go out or continue the round.

End Game

The game ends in two circumstances – when a player successfully goes out or when the stockpile is over and the players don’t wish to draw cards from the discard pile. If a player doesn’t permit their team partner to go out, the player must-have two cards left after melding – one to continue playing with and one to discard.

In the end, players evaluate their scores of books and melds, including any bonuses. The team with the highest points after four deals is declared the winner.

Scoring

The round ends after a player goes out and the score is then evaluated. The card values in the game of hand and foot are as follows:

  • Wild card books made from jokers and 2s carry 1500 points
  • Red books carry 500 points
  • Black books carry 300 points
  • Jokers (wild cards) are worth 50 points
  • Aces are worth 20 points
  • Deuces (wild cards) are worth 20 points
  • Eights through Kings carry 10 points
  • Fours through Sevens carry 5 points
  • Black Threes carry 5 points
  • Red Threes carry 100 points
  • Going out is worth 100 points

The points from the team’s remaining cards in hand are deducted from the points of the cards played by the team to arrive at the score.

Hand and Foot Card Game Rules

  • A team must not have two incomplete melds of the same rank.
  • A meld should have more natural cards than wildcards at any time.
  • A wildcard cannot be moved once melded.
  • A meld should have a minimum of three and not more than seven cards.
  • Black 3s are used to block the discard pile; therefore, they cannot be melded.
  • If the opponent team ends the round before your team picks the foot stack and your foot includes a red three, your team will lose 100 points.
  • If the first card turned face up in the draw pile is a wild card or red 3, that card is placed back into the pile, and the next card is flipped.

Is hand and foot the same as Canasta?

Hand and foot is a card game variation of Canasta that got popular in the United States in the 1950s. The game is a simpler version of Canasta which is excellent for beginners.

How to play hand and foot

Check out this fun twist on hopscotch! Turn a classic favorite into a new game that develops concentration and coordination in a laugh out loud hopscotch game guaranteed to start the giggles.

You will need print outs of left and right footprints and print outs of right and left hands, or if printouts aren’t available of course you can use squares with handprints and footprints traced on them from your own hands and feet!

After you have your squares, (about the size of half sheet of paper for younger children and a full-size piece of paper for older children) and blue painters’ tape, duct tape, or packaging tape, you’re ready to get started.

How to Play:

  • You can set up any number of rows, but each row should have 3 squares.
  • Each square will have one hand or foot (either drawn or a print out).
  • Place the sheets of paper out in rows of footprints and two hand prints using tape to stick them to the floor.
  • Mix up the order of hands and feet in each row. For little children keep two feet in each row. But if your kids are older, it’s fun to have one foot and two hands in the three-box row. Also, the younger the group of children the shorter you will need to make the game.
  • Players take turns jumping through the rows matching their hand and foot to the pictures in the row. Right hand on right hand picture, left foot on left foot picture, etc.

Variations to up the giggling factor:

  • Make two playing courses and divide into teams to see which team finishes first.
  • Time each player to see who is the fastest.
  • Just like regular hopscotch use a beanbag or other small object to toss onto the course and skip that square on the way up the course.
  • If you have a surface outside, try making this course with sidewalk chalk.

Links to Youtube videos of people playing this version of hopscotch: (online everyone seems to refer to this hopscotch game as “Gioco Coop” or “Hand and Foot Challenge Game”)

Photos from one of our wonderful children’s librarians giving this Hand and Foot Hopscotch a try:

How to play Blackjack & Game Rules: Hand and Foot is a popular variation from the rummy type game of Canasta. It can be described as a simpler, easier version of Canasta for beginners. Hand and Foot uses about 5 or 6 decks of standard playing cards and is played with 2-6 players. The objective of Hand and Foot is to be the first to

OBJECTIVE OF HAND AND FOOT: Play the hand and foot while making the needed melds. NUMBER OF PLAYERS: 2-7 players NUMBER OF CARDS: Five 54-card decks (52 cards + 2 Jokers) RANK OF CARDS: A,K,Q,J,10,9,8,7,6,5,4,3,2 TYPE OF GAME: Canasta/Rummy AUDIENCE: Adult

Hand & Foot is played with five or six decks of cards, including Jokers. The number of players typically determines how many cards are dealt in the hand and foot for each player: 2-player games: 15 cards each in the hand and foot. 3-player games: 13 cards each in the hand and foot. 4-player and 6-player games: 11 cards each in the hand and foot.

2. The playersfoot” cards are placed faced down and set aside – players are not allowed to look at them until they have played all the cards in their hands. 3. Each player picks up their “handand play begins with the player on the left of the one who “dealt” the round. 4.

Hand and Foot can be played by 2-6 people. It is most commonly played in teams of two. Like regular Canasta, the objective of Hand and Foot is to make the most melds and to be the first team to go out. Set Up. To set up a game of Hand and Foot, players need to form a circle around a stable playing area. Teammates should sit across from each other.

Hand and Foot card games is played with 4 to 6 standard decks, and was ideally designed for 2 players but four to six players can also play it forming a team of two or three. Usually, number of decks is one more than the player but it is not standard.

To play Hand and Foot, you’ll need 5 standard card decks with the jokers included. Shuffle all of the cards together and deal 11 cards to each player. These cards are referred to as the “hand,” and players should pick them up and look at them. Deal a second set of 11 cards to each player.

Play online+ Add to favorites Remove from favorites. This is an implementation of the Canasta variant called Hand and Foot, in which players receive two sets of cards, played according to variations of standard Canasta rules, in which cards are played into melded sets. It supports from 3 to 7 players playing as individuals, with team play

This first set of 11 cards is called a ‘Hand‘. The ‘Handcan be picked up and examined by each player. Each player is then dealt a second set of 11 cards. This second set of dealt cards is called the ‘Foot‘, which is played when the ‘Hand’ has been used up, and is kept face-down. Now, each player has two sets of cards, one set that he has …

himself two hands of eleven cards. One hand becomes the “handand the other becomes the “foot”. For Round #1, one player is chosen to play first. For subsequent rounds, the privilege to play first rotates clockwise. For Round #1, each player passes one hand to the left. For Round #2, each player passes one hand to the right.

Hand and Foot Tips and Strategies. Playing this card game can be a lot of fun, but it can also be surprisingly challenging to master. Thankfully, there are a number of helpful tips and strategies that you can employ whenever you play Hand and Foot to beat the odds and best the other players. Here are a few useful ones to remember for your next …

What is Hand, Knee, and Foot card game? Similar to a card game named ‘Canasta’ the main difference is the number of cards that players need in order to start playing. Number of Players Required: 4 teams of pairs so about 8 players. Who Can Play It: All ages but may be tricky for younger players to grasp. Requires patience.

If you lay out all but one card from your hand, you can discard it, ending your turn, announce that you are discarding in, pick up your foot and continue play with it on your next turn. Red threes in your foot should be laid out on the first turn in which you play your foot. Going Out. The play is ended by the first player who “goes out”.

Triple Play, also known as Hand, Knee, and Foot, is a variation on Canasta for four players in partnerships. Like Hand and Foot, Triple Play gives each player extra hands of cards they must play through before going out. However, while Hand and Foot requires a player to play out their hand and one extra hand, in Triple Play, you have two extra …

THE GIST OF THE GAME. The goal of Hand And Foot is to win the most points by creating “books” of cards. The player to get rid of their first cards is the winner of that round, with the game consisting of 4 rounds. Each player is dealt two sets of cards – the hand, which is played first, and the foot, which is played when the hand has been used up.

Hand and Foot Canasta. Hand and Foot is a Canasta variant involving three to six decks. The number of decks used is typically one more than the number of players. You need to pick up the Foot and have one natural and one mixed Canasta to go out. Red threes are valued 500 points, always against you.

A player can finish the deal if all the cards in their hand are placed somewhere face up on the table; either melded or on the discard pile. But first they need a Canasta . As said before, this title thing is when there are at least 7 cards in any of the sets that you or your partner has melded.

Hand and Foot Rules

Hand and Foot is a version of Canasta in which each player is dealt two sets of cards, known as the “hand” and the “foot”. Hand and Foot is closely related to Pennies From Heaven. The normal Canasta rules apply except for the following:

The game is typically played by four players in two partnerships of two players each, although it can also be played with numbers of players ranging from two to eight, individually or in partnerships.

Use one deck more than the number of players, so for a four-handed game you’d use five 52-card decks plus ten jokers (270 cards).

Each player is dealt two separate thirteen-card hands. The first is called the “hand”, and the second is called the “foot”. Initially, each player plays from their “hand”, while leaving the “foot” face-down on the table. The “Foot” is not used until the “hand” is empty.

When drawing from the stock, draw two cards at a time.

The discard pile may only be taken by a player having a natural pair matching the upcard, or if they’re able to add the upcard to an existing meld.

In Hand and Foot, a canasta (a meld of seven cards) is called a book, and will take one of the following forms:

A red book contains only natural cards (no wildcards). When you make a red book, square up the cards into a pile and top it with a red card. (Some rules refer to this as a clean meld; it is analogous to a “natural canasta” in Canasta.)

A black book contains a mixture of natural and wild cards. When you make a black book, square up the cards into a pile and top it with a black card. (Some rules refer to this as a dirty meld; it is analogous to a “mixed canasta” in Canasta.)

A wild book contains only wild cards (deuces and jokers in any combination). When you make a wild book, square up the cards into a pile and top it with a wild card. (Some rules refer to this as a wild meld.)

Wild cards may be melded as a set of their own (three or more).

There is no distinction between jokers and twos; both are wild, and may be mixed freely.

A mixed meld must always contain more natural than wild cards.

A 7-card meld (a book) cannot be extended. (However, some versions of the rules do allow books larger than 7 cards.)

A game is played as four hands. The initial meld requirements are based on the hand number, and not the team’s score:

Hand Number Minimum Count
1 50
2 90
3 120
4 150

If you meld the last card in you hand, you may pick up your foot and use it immediately. If you discard the last card of your hand, you may pick up you foot, but not use it until your next turn.

To go out, a player must get rid of the last card from their foot, either by melding it or discarding it. However, a player cannot go out until his side has made at least one wild book. Also, a player cannot go out by melding black threes. Also, before going out, a player must as and receive permission from his partner.

Each red book is worth 500 points, each black book is worth 300 points, and each wild book is worth 1500 points.

Any black threes left in your hand incur a 5-point penalty each. Any red threes left in your hand incur a 500-point penalty each.

To go out, a side must have completed, at a minimum, a red book, a black book, and a wild book.

Game is 20000 points.

Note: Hand and Foot is a game that hasn’t made it into most standardized rulebooks, and there is a good deal of variety in the rules available on the web. The preceding is a good consensus of the rules from various sources. Check out some of the following links for other versions of the game.

Etsy предоставляет возможность прямой связи покупателей и продавцов со всего мира. Когда вы используете сервисы Etsy (мы будем называть etsy.com, Pattern by Etsy, наши мобильные приложения и другие сервисы нашими «Сервисами»), вы несете ответственность за соблюдение этой политики, независимо от вашего местоположения.

Эта политика является частью наших Условий использования. Используя любые наши Сервисы, вы соглашаетесь с этой политикой и нашими Условиями использования.

Как транснациональная компания из США, ведущая деятельность в других странах, Etsy должна соблюдать экономические санкции и торговые ограничения, включая введенные Управлением по контролю за иностранными активами (OFAC) Министерства финансов США. Это означает, что Etsy или кто-либо, пользующийся нашими Сервисами, не может участвовать в транзакциях, в которые вовлечены определенные люди, места или изделия из этих мест, указанные государственными органами, такими как OFAC, в дополнение к торговым санкциям, предусмотренным соответствующими законами и нормами.

Эта политика действует в отношении всех, кто использует наши Сервисы, независимо от их местоположения. Решение об ознакомлении с такими ограничениями остается за вами.

Например, эти ограничения в целом запрещают, кроме прочего, транзакции, в которых участвуют следующие стороны:

  1. определенные географические регионы, такие как Иран, Крым, Куба, Северная Корея, Сирия, Россия, Беларусь, Донецкая Народная Республика («ДНР»), Луганская Народная Республика («ЛНР»), а также любые физические или юридические лица, ведущие деятельность или находящиеся на этих территориях;
  2. физические или юридические лица, состоящие в санкционных списках, таких как Список лиц особых категорий и запрещенных лиц (SDN) или Список иностранных лиц, уклоняющихся от санкций (FSE) организации OFAC;
  3. граждане Кубы независимо от их местоположения, не имеющие гражданства или вида на жительство за пределами Кубы; и
  4. изделия, из Ирана, Крыма, Кубы и Северной Кореи, за исключением информационных материалов, таких как публикации, фильмы, постеры, грампластинки, фотографии, кассеты, компакт-диски и определенные произведения искусства.
  5. Любые товары, услуги и технологические решения из ЛНР и ДНР за исключением информационных материалов и сельскохозяйственной продукции, в том числе продуктов питания для людей, семян сельскохозяйственных культур или удобрений.
  6. Импорт в США следующей продукции российского происхождения: рыба, морепродукты, алмазы непромышленного назначения и любая другая продукция, согласно периодическим указаниям министра торговли США.
  7. Экспорт из США либо гражданами США предметов роскоши и любых других товаров, согласно указаниям министра торговли США, любому лицу, находящемуся в России или Беларуси. Список и определение «предметов роскоши» приведены в «Дополнение № 5 к Разделу 746», опубликованном Федеральным реестром США.
  8. Изделия, изготовленные за пределами США и попадающие под действие Закона о тарифах США и связанных с ним законов о запрещении принудительного труда.

Для защиты нашего сообщества и торговой площадки Etsy предпринимает меры для соблюдения режимов санкций. Например, Etsy запрещает участникам пользоваться своими аккаунтами в определенных географических регионах. Если у нас есть основания полагать, что вы управляете своей аккаунтом из места, находящегося под санкциями, например, любого из перечисленных выше санкционных мест, или иным образом нарушаете какие-либо экономические санкции или торговые ограничения, мы можем приостановить или прекратить использование вами наших Сервисов. Как правило, участникам не разрешается выставлять на продажу, покупать или продавать изделия из регионов, находящихся под санкциями. Сюда входят изделия, появившиеся ранее санкций, поскольку у нас нет возможности проверить, были ли они вывезены из запрещенного места. Etsy оставляет за собой право обращаться к продавцам с запросом предоставить дополнительную информацию, раскрыть страну происхождения изделия на странице товара или предпринять другие шаги для соблюдения обязательств. Мы можем отключить товары или отменить транзакции, представляющие опасность нарушения этой политики.

Кроме соблюдения требований OFAC и применимых местных законов, участникам Etsy следует иметь в виду, что другие страны могут вводить собственные торговые ограничения и что определенные изделия могут не допускаться к экспорту или импорту согласно международным законам. Когда в транзакции участвуют лица из разных стран, вам следует изучить законы любых соответствующих стран.

Наконец, участникам Etsy следует иметь в виду, что сторонние платежные системы, например PayPal, могут самостоятельно отслеживать транзакции на предмет соблюдения санкционных требований и могут блокировать транзакции в рамках собственных программ, обеспечивающих соблюдение требований. Etsy не имеет власти или контроля над процедурами независимого принятия решения в таких системах.

Экономические санкции и торговые ограничения могут применяться к порядку использования вами Сервисов и могут изменяться, поэтому участникам следует регулярно проверять источники информации о санкциях. За юридической консультацией обращайтесь к квалифицированному специалисту.

Вы можете прочитать эту политику на вашем языке, но помните, что версия этого документа на английском имеет преимущественную силу в отношении использования вами сервисов Etsy. Язык можно изменить в настройках аккаунта.

How to play hand and foot

What is hand, foot, and mouth?

Hand, foot, and mouth is a common childhood virus often caused by coxsackie virus which occurs in spring, summer, and fall. It most often affects infants and children up to 5 years of age. Adults can also develop hand, foot, and mouth disease also, but this happens much less frequently. The virus is spread through saliva, nasal secretions, and contact with stool. Children commonly pass it to each other through sharing drinks or utensils, sneezing or coughing close to others, and playing with toys touched by unclean hands.

Signs and Symptoms

A child will not develop symptoms of hand, foot, and mouth virus until around 3-6 days after they were exposed to the illness. The first symptoms to develop are similar to a common cold: fever, sore throat, and runny nose. After these symptoms begin, a rash with small blisters may appear in the mouth, on palms of the hands, on the soles of feet, and on the buttocks. The rash and blisters may appear in all these areas or in only 1 area. The rash is worst at the beginning and fades over 1 week.

How is the diagnosis made?

Your provider can tell if your child has hand, foot, and mouth disease from the description of symptoms and by evaluating the rash and mouth sores.

Treatment

A virus can be frustrating for parents because there is no treatment that helps to resolve the virus more quickly; however, there are treatments that can help alleviate symptoms until the virus resolves. Taking pain relievers such as Ibuprofen (Motrin or Advil) or acetaminophen is often very helpful for mouth discomfort. Sometimes we will recommend making a solution of Maalox liquid and Benadryl liquid that can be swished in the mouth to help with discomfort. You can call our office to determine if this is the best thing for your child. It is common to have a decreased appetite due to blisters in the mouth; this is okay if the child is continuing to drink clear liquids and is not dehydrated.

Prevention

It is difficult to prevent the spread of hand, foot, and mouth disease because those with the virus can pass the virus to others before they have developed the rash and for weeks or months after the virus began, through contact with stool. The best ways to prevent the spread of illness are to:

  • Make sure that tissues used to blow the nose are thrown directly into the trash and not left on a counter where germs can be picked up by others and disinfect counter surfaces often.
  • Encourage your child to cover his/her mouth with coughing or sneezing.
  • Wash hands after coughing, sneezing, blowing nose, using tissues, and changing diapers.
  • Clean toys that have been in contact with children’s saliva.
  • Remind children not to share food, drinks, utensils, or towel, and not to kiss or hug siblings during illness.

Hand, foot, and mouth disease can occur in the same person more than once, so using the precautions each time your child is exposed to this illness is important. It is not transmitted to and from pets and other animals.

Return to School

Your child can return to school when he/she has been fever-free for 24 hours. It is also important to wait until they feel well enough to participate in class.

How to play hand and foot

Details

Hand and Foot is a version of Canasta in which each player is dealt two sets of cards, known as the “hand” and the “foot”. It is a fun easy game for all ages. Join a partner and collect cards to create ‘books’ to wipe out your competition.

Can’t find anyone to play with? Just sit and play with robots!

Come see Hand and Foot Canasta at Brock games:
http://maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Bunyip/196/122/56

Contents

Features

  • Robots
  • Insta-HUD (Just sit and play)
  • Full Mesh

Reviews (XX)

DON’T BUY.

Posted May 07, 2022 by Jada Akina 1 star

This is just plan greedy! I understand that creators think that they have to have no copy items so if things are lost through SL (which is quite often), or god forbid you lose it in another unfortunate manner, you will be forced to buy another item. The creator has an awesome product, however, customer service is close to non-existence. BUT. for the price of THIS item or ANY item that cost THIS MUCH should be copyable !! No if’s, and’s or but’s !! So. with all of this being said, ask yourself. Can I afford to lose L$2,471 . I will NEVER buy another product with there name on it again. There are other ones out there that are No Copy, but cost a HECK of a lot less than this. DON’T WASTE YOUR MONEY.

Love it. but

Posted April 06, 2022 by ladyhawk45 1 star

I lost the table while moving houses. It never came back to me and I only had it for 2 months. I asked the creator to redeliver it but I never took an answer back. I need a new table or my money back.

Web Minesweeper – Play Free Minesweeper online

Hand and Foot constitutes one of the more unusual variants to the typical rummy-style card game. According to Rummy-Games.com, this is a variation on Canasta in which each player receives two sets of cards, respectively known as the “hand” and the “foot”. Four people typically play as partners.

Decks And Number Of Cards

According to Rummy-Games.com, Hand and Foot requires one more deck than the number of players. For example, if you have a four-player game, then you must have five decks. Each player receives two sets of thirteen cards. The first set is called the hand, while the second set is referred to as the foot. The foot remains face down until the player empties the hand.

Canasta

According to Rummy-Games.com, a Canasta consists of a meld of seven cards of the same rank. In Hand and Foot, this is referred to as a “book,” and must occur in one of three combinations. A red book is a Canasta that completes the book with no wild cards (deuces or jacks). When you finish a red book, stack the cards face up, with a red card on top. A black book completes the book with wild cards included. When you get a black book, stack the cards face up, with a black card on top. A wild book contains only wild cards. In this case you would stack the cards face up with one of the wild cards on top.

Playing The Foot

You can pick up your foot if you either meld or discard the final card in your hand. If you meld that card, you may continue playing your foot on the same turn. If you discard the final card, then you begin playing the foot on your next hand.

Scoring

Each completed red book earns 500 points, while a black book earns 300 and a wild book awards 1,500. Once the hand ends, any black threes in your hand incur a five-point penalty. Red threes receive a 500-point penalty. To win the hand, a team must complete at least one red book, one black book and one wild book. The game ends when someone reaches 20,000 points.

  • Rummy-Games.com: Hand and Foot Rules
  • Rummy-Games.com: Canasta Rules

Keith Owings began writing professionally in 2010, with his work published on various websites. He worked for several years in the financial and travel agency industries. He has trained and coached employees in the art of customer service. Owings has a Bachelor of Arts in psychology from Dallas Baptist University and holds several financial licenses.

A card game to Begin now

Enjoy for a lifetime!

Are you looking for a new card game? Why not try something different and unique? American Hand-N-Foot is a card game with a new twist on an old favorite. It is fun for the entire family, and can be played as individual players, or as partners. Fun for all ages, from teens to 100’s. Our players say, “To play it is to love it!”

How to play hand and foot

About Us

American Hand-N-Foot was created in 2005, by twin sisters Dot and Norma, from Minnesota. The twins and their husbands wintered in Arizona, and they played the original game of hand and foot with many friends. They noticed that the “rules” changed with every couple who played the game. Dot and Norma grew frustrated with this, and set out on a quest to create a game with new twists, new specialty cards, and a set of rules.

When the twins returned to Minnesota, they enlisted the help of a few family members to help bring to life the new game that they envisioned. The family worked and played together for a couple of years to determine all of the fun twists, an original card design, and to bring American Hand-N-Foot to life. Now, more than a decade later, American Hand-N-Foot is being played from coast to coast across the United States and Canada.

The game is called American Hand-N-Foot because Dot and Norma loved our country! They wanted to emphasize its heritage. This is why on our unique card set, you will see George Washington, the Statute of Liberty, and other great American icons.

Our Game

Our game consists of 6 specialty card decks of 56 Cards each which use “red hands” and “black feet.” The decks contain additional cards which allow changing a book from “black” to “red” and a card which provides an additional way to gain points. These features provide interest to make this a very unique, catchy, and habit- forming game.

In addition to the 6 specialty card decks, our game includes 6 quality chips, a score sheet master (to use for copies), and an easy to follow instruction sheet. American Hand-N-Foot is packed solidly in a brown recycled kraft box with the game label affixed to it. To help stabilize the package during shipping we have added beige tissue sheets. Finally, the entire game is wrapped in a clear plastic bag which makes it an attractive gift set.

How to play hand and foot

The hand and card game is Canasta’s variation. This Game is played using 4 / 6 standard Card decks . The Game can be played among four to six players by forming teams. Every player plays with dealing with two sets of cards. The first card set is called the Hand, while the second set of cards called the Foot.

Hand and Foot Card Game Rules for four players

In a four-player game, Two teams are formed of 2 players each. The Game is played using five decks of 54 cards each, which contains jokers. So in total, there are 270 cards .

One teammate deals the cards with 13 cards to each player. The first stack of cards is called Hand . Then Another teammate distributes deck with 13 cards to every player in the clockwise order. The second stack is called the Foot.

The remaining cards are kept in the center, facing down and form a stock. The topmost card in the Stock is kept facing up, and it should not be three red or a Joker.

The Foot stack of the card cannot be used until all the Hand cards have been used.

Meld Cards Objective

Melding is getting rid of all the hands of a team. 3-7 cards set is MeldMeld. Melds can have maximum of seven cards and minimum three cards. Any card can be MeldMeld, for example, Ace, Queen, King, and so on. Jokers , Deuces cards cannot be melded.

There are three types of MeldMeld:

  1. Dirty Meld Meld is when players have two or more(when there are six or more melds) wild cards.
  2. Natural Meld is having Clean Melds without any wild card.
  3. Wild Meld Meld is a meld of only wild cards.

A seven cards meld is called a Pile . Red top card pile is a natural pile, a joker for a wild pile. The blacktop card is for a dirty pile . Players earn points for their melds, and players lose points on the left cards.

When a player has to get rid of all the cards he needs to :

  • A teammate needs to have picked “Foot.”
  • A team needs to have accomplished Natural Melds, that’s is two dirty melds and two wild melds (each MeldMeld should have seven cards or more)
  • All the team members need to agree for melding all of the cards.

The Empty Nest Years – Cricut Tutorials, Farm Life, Recipes, Crafts & Tips,

Pages

  • Cricut Index
  • Free SVGS
  • Free Fonts
  • Project Tutorials

Printable Hand & Foot Rules, Cheat Sheets, & Score Sheets

The Hand & Foot Card Game is a variant of Canasta. It is typically played with 4 players, two teams. But up to 6 can play, using one deck of cards per a player.

Download a pdf file of rules, cheat sheets for the players to keep track of the rules, and scoring sheets, here: https://drive.google.com/file/d/19LVdLgJxNRD_F8x8abO5Cn7BDHsVPA8X/view?usp=sharing

2-6 players is possible, 4 is ideal. One deck of cards is needed for each player. Play for 4 or 6 is in teams. You can play on your partners melds in teams.

Shuffle all cards, pull your “stack” from the top. If you pull exactly 22 cards, receive 100pts. If not, discard or pull more to equal 22, then the next person pulls.

Without looking at the cards, divide in half. Set 11 aside in one pile as your “foot”. The other 11 are your hand, you may now look at those.

How many cards you pick up increases each round. One is discarded each round. If a red Three is drawn, it is put down immediately and replaced with a new card from the deck.

To pick up from the discard pile, you have to pick up the last 7 cards, the top card cannot be a black 3, and you MUST be able to immediately lay the top card into a meld.

A meld is a group of 3 of the same value card. (3 kings make a meld, 3 4s make a meld, etc). Continue to add to your meld until it has 7 cards—then it is a “book”. Books are the goal.

A game consists of four rounds. Each round has a minimum meld requirement that increases with each round. You must put down cards whose individual face values add up to at least the minimum requirement before your team is “in the game”.

You can put down several melds at once to achieve this. If you are picking up the pile, you can meld additional cards from you hand along with the top discard and the two that match to help you make up the minimum count, including wild cards. However, you cannot count any of the other six cards you are pick up towards the minimum.

To meld, all the cards that are played must equal the number of points that are required for that round. Wild cards have bonus points.

Wilds are Jokers & 2s. If you use a wild card in your book, it is a ‘dirty’ book. Books (groups of 7) that do not have a wild are ‘clean’ books. Only one wild can be used in a meld. A book can never have more than 2 wilds.

When the ‘Book’ of seven is completed, the player has to place them in a single stack, with the topmost card being a Red for ‘Clean’ and Black for ‘Dirty’.

PICKING UP YOUR FEET – When you have been able to play all the cards in your hand, by either melding or discarding them, you then pick up your foot and play from that.

To ‘Go Out’, the player must get a Clean and Dirty, and get completely rid of their cards.

Once a player goes out, the remaining players must count the cards left in their hand, those points are subtracted from their total points.

How to play hand and foot

How to play hand and foot

I’m not much of a card player because most of the time it seems like card games require some kind of strategy. When I play games, I think it’s more fun to just relax.

One exception is a game called Hand & Foot, a game my family has played for years. Though there are many versions of the rules, I thought I’d share the rules I prefer to play by here. By sharing these, I’m exposing readers to a fantastically fun family game, but also establishing “house rules” on the Internet. (At least one family member declares his rules are the real rules because he found them on the Internet. That means my rules can now be the real rules…HA!)

You need:

  • A deck of cards per player plus one. (Example: If you have four players, you need five decks.) Combine and shuffle all the decks of cards together
  • I would recommend an auto-shuffler
  • Writing instrument and paper to keep score

Objective:

The person with the most points at the end wins…profound, I know. A person wins a round by collecting “books” of 7 cards that are of the same number. To “go out” (win the round), a player must collect a “clean” and a “dirty” book. A clean is one that is made up entirely of 7 cards with the same number (can be of any suite). A dirty is a book made up of 7 cards combining wild cards and the numbered cards (must have at least one more numbered card than wild cards).

How to play Hand & Foot:

  1. Separate the cards into two piles, and each player picks a small group of cards off the top of one of the larger piles. These “piles” are stacked neatly and usually divided into two just to make them easier to handle.
  2. Each player counts their small pile into two stacks of 11. If a player gets exactly 22 cards, they get a bonus 100 points. Any remaining cards are added back onto draw pile.
  3. The first stack of 11 becomes the player’s “hand”.
  4. The second pile, or “foot”, is placed to the player’s side for later play.
  5. To determine who starts the game, each player randomly picks a card from the middle of the draw pile and whoever has the highest value card (Aces are high) gets to start first. In subsequent rounds, the person to start the round is the next player in a clockwise motion.
  6. When a player has a turn, he or she must pick two cards from the two draw piles (either one card from each pile or two cards from one pile) and when they are done playing that round, they must discard a card into the discard pile.
  7. A player starts to create the books by starting with a set of three: Either all three of the same number or 2 of one number and a wild card. (Example: 3 Queens or 2 Queens and a wild card.) To “lay down” (start their first book), the point values of the first three cards must equal a “meld.” The first book usually requires that the player meld 50 points before laying down (more on this later). Subsequent books created must start with three cards of any total value.
  8. The players take their turns, each drawing two cards and then playing what cards in their books that they can before discarding one hand.
  9. When the first hand runs out, the player can then “get into their foot” to play those cards as well. If the hand runs out before the player discards, the player must declare “I’m just playing my foot” or “I’m still playing”…or something to that effect. They can then seamlessly continue playing until they have no other options to lay a card down and then must discard a single card.
  10. When a book of seven is achieved, the player places them in a single stack with the top card being a red card for a clean and a black card for a dirty. Again, to “go out” a player must get a clean and a dirty and be completely out of cards to go out. To go out, a player must discard a final card, not simply run out of cards. Players can accumulate more than one clean and one dirty through the course of the round.
  11. When a player goes out, thus signifying the end of the round, all the players must count their point totals for the round. The score keeper records the “meld count” first, meaning how many points in completed books each player has earned. The players then get their second point count by counting the point total from each played card’s value. This includes individual cards in the completed books as well as cards that have already been laid down into a partial book. Any card left in the player’s hand counts against the net total for that round.
  12. To start a new round, the same 22 cards must be counted for each player and the process starts over again with the first player in the round being the person next to the first player from the first round in a clockwise order (to the first player’s left).

Counting points in Hand & Foot:

  • Each card and each book has its own assigned value.
  • For the most part, cards numbered 3-7 are worth five points (see below for exception)
  • Cards numbered 8-10, J, Q and K all count 10 each
  • Jokers and Deuces (2s) count as wild cards and are 50 points each.
  • Aces count as 20.
  • Major exception: All red 3s count as 300 points (yes, three hundred) against the player, even if played. This would mean that red 3s are of top priority to get out of the hand and are to never be played.
  • A player that “goes out” in a round earns an additional 100 points for going out. People consider it worth more points to hold off on going out and attempt to earn more books.
  • Clean books are worth 500 points.
  • Dirty books are worth 300 points.

A few more playing points:

  • Smith house rules say that a player cannot pick up the discard from the previous player’s discarded card. This allows the next player to go ahead and draw their two cards while the player before them is still playing their hand, making the game move faster.
  • Once a book has been established, if a player draws a card that fits that book, they can add that card to the book, thus creating a book of more than seven cards. A player cannot change a dirty to a clean if seven cards of the same number are eventually achieved. Some players believe that a new book must be started when the same numbers are drawn.
  • There are different ways to change the meld required to lay down an initial book on a round. A way to make the game shorter is to decide there will be four rounds with the first round requiring a lay down meld of 50, 90 for round 2; 120 for round 3; and 150 for round 4.
  • You can also play to 10,000 points, meaning you play rounds until a player earns 10,000 points to win the entire game. This can take a very long time! If this method is used, then the melds go by total points. Up to 1250 points a player must meld 50. After that, each time a player achieves another 1250 points, the meld requirement increases from 50 to 90 to 120 to 150.

To read other rule variations, check out this site.

My wife and I play Hand and Foot from time to time. We have toyed with the idea of allowing a book of 3’s to count positive, with the caveat that they are only positive if the book is closed and clean. If the book is not closed and clean then each of the 3’s has their usual negative score.

We have not found this particularly effective because if a player attempts it then the state of that book determines the winner of the game.

My question is if anyone else has tried a book of 3’s in Hand and Foot and if they have found a way to make it work.

How to play hand and foot

4 Answers 4

Assuming you’re playing with the Red (100) Black (5) variation (there are not official rules for hand and foot), then the purpose of the 3’s is to add a bit of randomness to the game to offset player ability. If your goal is to remove this randomness, then you can simply treat all 3’s as normal cards and the game will ‘work’ just fine. I have played that particular variation.

I’m not sure by which rules you’re playing, but if you’re allowing threes to hit the table singly, and also allowing the bonus for making a book of them, it’s a bit of an unfair advantage to that random chance.

I’ve played a variant where you are allowed to go out if in your foot by laying down 4 or more black 3’s without a discard. This counts as 400 extra points.

You wouldn’t be able to use them while in your hand, so you’d still have to discard them to get to your foot first.

In our games, typically the first person to reach the foot wants to pick up the pile as soon as possible and usually has a bunch of black 3’s. We play simple requirements where you can pick up the whole pile if you can use the top card anywhere, which is usually always. If the partnership makes the book requirements quickly, before this player has discarded them all, then it’s an extra bonus.

We play a version where black threes can be melded under certain conditions. Everyone needs to play all their cards in their hand before they can pick up their foot. Because you cannot meld black threes, you must discard the black threes in your hand one at a time before you can pick up your foot. Because of this difficulty in getting rid of black threes, it becomes very dangerous to pick up the discard pile (it may have black threes in it). This problem of getting rid of your black threes needs to remain as a part of the game. However, if you can meld your black threes in the process of going out, it relieves some of the problems. It must be understood that only the person going out can meld black threes. If someone else goes out, the black threes still in your hand count against you. Because there are so many variations, it may be necessary to play variants where the problem has already been worked out. I have written down the rules we use and posted it here: http://gameofhandandfoot.blogspot.com

You can lay down a book or Canasta of 3s if you have seven cards to lay down. This is worth 2000 points.

Upgrade the old-fashioned hopscotch game by playing the hopscotch with hands and feet. The Hopscotch Hands and Feet Game is a great party game that can be played by all ages. And the more players have, the better! Print out the hopscotch game with hands and feet printable, tape it to the floor, and start hopping.

How to play hand and foot

Make sure you’re landing on the right foot pattern or hand pattern but what makes this game actually fun is when a player actually gets the foot and hand pattern all wrong. Make sure to get the phone ready to take videos as this hopscotch game using your hands and feet is really hilarious!

HOW TO PLAY THE GAME

To play the Hopscotch Hands and Feet Game, simply print the printable hands and feet outline. Each row of hopscotch will have a combination of 3 landing spaces. The landing space can be a combination of 2 feet with 1 hand or 2 hands with 1 foot. You can then make as many rows but I do recommend 8 rows.

Once you’ve laid out the sheets of hopscotch with hands and feet, tape them to the floor and gather the players around. It can be all kids, all adults, or the whole family playing this hopscotch game.

To start playing, pick a player to start hopping. The hands and feet hopscotch game mechanics are pretty simple. The player must be able to land their hand or feet on the corresponding hand and feet pattern on the floor and make it all the way to the end row without missing a skip. If they land their hand or feet on the wrong hopscotch pattern, they are out and can try again later after everyone has taken their turn playing the game.

GAME FOR ANY OCCASION

The hopscotch hands and feet game can be played at any party or occasion or even just a fun activity for the kids.

Add the hopscotch game to your Easter party and play it as Bunny Hopscotch Hands and Feet game by letting the kids wear bunny masks as they hop.

You can also add this party game to a Superhero Party and dress the kids in superhero masks as they hop through the hands and feet hopscotch game to make it more fun.

MATERIALS NEEDED

  • Hopscotch game with hands and feet printable
  • Tape or washi tape – use different pattern washi tapes to match the occasion. Ex. cobweb washi tape for Halloween, glittery ones for unicorn parties, etc.

Hopscotch Hands and Feet Printable

The hands and feet hopscotch pdf is available in 3 sizes – small hands and footprint for toddlers and pre-schoolers, medium for young kids or grade-schoolers, and large full-size hands and feet for teenagers and adults.

The first page of the 8 pages of printable includes the hands and feet hopscotch rules and the hopscotch suggested layout but you can invent different hopscotch patterns. Make it an easier pattern for toddlers and a more confusing pattern for adults.

If toddlers and pre-schoolers are playing, print page 2 of the printable to play the Hopscotch Hand Foot Game for toddlers & preschoolers. The 8.5” X 11“ sheet includes 2 hands and 2 feet so you can save on printing paper when playing this game. You just need to print 8 pages to make 8 rows of hopscotch hands and feet game.

If young kids or grade school kids are playing the hopscotch hands and feet game, print pages 3 and 4. They are medium hands & feet outline. 1 8.5” X 11“ sheet containing 2 hands, the other sheet containing 2 feet. To play 8 rows of hopscotch, print 5 of the hands’ sheet & 8 of the feet sheet.

If teens or adults are playing the hopscotch hands and feet game or the whole family starting from toddlers to the grandparents, print pages 5-8. Each 8.5” X 11“ sheet contains a full-size hand or feet. If you follow the pattern provided on the instructions in the printable, print out 7 of the left foot sheet, 8 right foot sheets, 4 left hand sheets, and 5 right hand sheets.

If you want fewer rows or if you want to adjust the suggested sequence layout, you can print less. Make sure to do this game on a leveled floor versus a sloping floor to avoid players from falling over.

Note: For those who wish to re-use these sheets, I would recommend laminating them so more kids can play them over and over again. Example: at Daycares or Pre-schools.

4. Once all sheets are ready, let the fun begin with each kid or adult taking their turn. The ones who get the whole sequence correctly – wins! Enjoy!

Setting up the Game


  1. Spread the mat faceup on a flat surface, indoors or outdoors.
  2. Players take off their shoes and set them aside. If you’re playing outdoors, you may want to anchor the mat corners with your shoes.
  3. Designate an extra person as the referee. The referee is not considered a player; during the game, the referee will spin the spinner, call out the moves, and monitor the game play.
  4. Position yourselves on the mat according to the number of players, as explained below.

For a 2-player game: Players face each other from opposite ends of the mat, near the word Twister . Place one foot on the yellow circle and the other foot on the blue circle closest to your end of the mat. Your opponent does the same on his or her end.

For a 3-player game: Two players face each other on opposite ends of the mat, near the word Twister . Each player places one foot on the yellow circle and the other foot on the blue circle closest to his or her end of the mat. The third player faces the center from the red-circle side of the mat, placing one foot each on the two middle red circles.

How to Play

The referee spins the spinner, then calls out the body part and the color that the arrow points to. For example, the referee may call out: “Right hand, red.” All players, at the same time, must then try to follow the referee’s directions as explained below.

  • Each player must try to place the called-out body part on a vacant circle of the called-out color. For [example, if the referee calls out “Right hand, red,” each player must try to place a right hand on any vacant red circle.
  • If your called-out hand or foot is already on a circle of the called-out color, you must try to move it to another circle of the same color.
  • There can never be more than one hand or foot on any one circle. If two or more players reach for the same circle, the referee must decide which player got there first. The other player(s) must find another vacant circle of the same color.
  • Never remove your hand or foot from a circle unless you’re directed to by the referee after a spin. Exception: You may lift a hand or foot to allow another hand or foot to pass by, as long as you announce it to the referee beforehand , and replace it on its circle immediately afterward.
  • If all 6 circles of a color are already covered, the referee must spin again until a different color can be called out.

Strategy: Try moving toward an opponent’s portion of the mat, forcing the player to go over or under you to place a hand or foot!

Being Eliminated

Any player who falls, or touches the mat with an elbow or knee, is immediately out of the game. (If you feel that a new position is impossible, or will cause you to fall, you may elminiate yourself.)

In a 2-player game, the game ends and the remaining player wins. In a 3-player game, the remaining two players keep playing until one player is eliminated and the remaining player wins.

How to Win

The last player left in the game is the winner!

Team Play

For a 4-player game, form 2 teams of 2 players each. Teams face each other on opposite ends of the mat, standing side-by-side with each foot on a circle so that all 4 circles closest to the Twister name are covered.

Just as in a 2- or 3-player game, the referee spins the spinner and calls out a hand or foot and a color circle. Play as in the 2- or 3-player game, with this exception: members of the same team can cover the same circle with one hand or foot each.

As soon as a player falls or touches the mat with an elbow or knee, the player’s team is eliminated and the other team is the winner.

2-Player Game with No Referee

If there are only 2 players and no referee, you can play without using the spinner. One player calls out the body part; the other player calls out the circle color. Players alternate turns calling out the body part first. Otherwise, game play is the same, with the last remaining player the winner.

Party Games

Round Robin: Form several 2-player teams. Each team, in turn, plays every other team. Players keep track of wins and losses. The team with the most wins wins!

Elimination Game: Form several 2-player teams. Play against each other, with losing teams dropping out. Winning teams play each other until only one winning team is left!

Hand, foot and mouth disease is common among kids under 10 years old, and in most cases it is mild . The virus is contagious and is not the same as foot and mouth disease in animals .

How does the disease spread?

Your child can catch the disease by:

  • breathing in droplets from a person with the illness who is c oughing or sneezing
  • contact with mucus, saliva, blisters or the poo of an infected person
  • touching infected objects like toys , and then putting their hands or toys in their mouth.

Symptoms

  • Blisters in the mouth, tongue, the palms of the hands and soles of the feet ( blisters can be painful)
  • Fever
  • Loss of appetite
  • Tiredness
  • Sore throat

The symptoms are often confused with chickenpox. However, typically with chickenpox, the rash is all over the body and your child will be sicker. If you’re not sure what type of illness your child has, call PlunketLine.

How to play hand and foot

How to play hand and foot

How to play hand and foot

Prevention

T here are a few things you can do to prevent hand, foot and mouth disease:

  • t each your child proper hygiene
    • cough and sneeze into an elbow
    • wash hands properly before eating, after using the toilet and at other times too
  • keep your child at home if they have hand, foot and mouth disease so they don’t spread it to others.

Treatment

H and, foot and mouth disease is a viral illness so there is no specific treatment . Just k eep your little one comfortable by resting at home until they’re better, and all the blisters have dried.

Below are some other tips to help your child recover . Ensure that your little one:

  • avoid s sour, salty or spicy foods if their mouth is sore
  • drink s plenty of liqu ids to h elp their body feel better and avoid dehydration
  • suc k on ice or ice blocks to help with a sore mouth
  • frequently wash their hands to decrease the chance of spreading the infection to others
  • sneeze and cough into their elbow – and i f tissues are used, throw them in the rubbish right after.

Can hand, foot and mouth disease happen more than once?

Yes, hand, foot and mouth disease can occasionally happen more than once as there are different types of the virus that cause it.

When to visit a doctor

Call PlunketLine or your family doctor if your little one:

  • hasn’t been able to drink because of a painful mouth
  • has had fewer than four wet nappies in 24 hours
  • seems to be getting worse , or are not getting better after a few days.

It’s unlikely that you’ll get the illness if you are pregnant. If you do catch the disease , the risk of complications is also quite low. However, there are still risks so talk to your doctor or midwife if you think you may have hand, foot and mouth disease.

(Dyshidrotic Dermatitis)

, MD, PhD, Georg-August University of Göttingen, Germany

  • 3D Models (0)
  • Audios (0)
  • Calculators (0)
  • Images (1)
  • Lab Test (0)
  • Tables (0)
  • Videos (0)

How to play hand and foot

Pathophysiology

A hallmark histologic feature of dermatitis is edema between epidermal keratinocytes (spongiosis). When enough edema accumulates, cell-cell adhesions (desmosomes) rupture, forming microvesicles. The microvesicles become visible macroscopically only after they enlarge. In areas other than the hands and feet, these vesicles typically rupture quickly and are not noticed. However, on the hands and feet, because of their thicker stratum corneum, vesicles tend to persist longer and become visible. Visibility of these vesicles indicates dyshidrotic dermatitis (a misnomer because it has nothing to do with sweating or abnormal sweat glands). The most severe form of dyshidrotic dermatitis (pompholyx) is characterized by coalescence of vesicles, forming larger bullae (called cheiropompholyx when on the hands, podopompholyx when on the feet, and cheiropodopompholyx when on both hands and feet).

Symptoms and Signs

Erythema, scaling, and skin thickening may progress to pruritic vesicles or bullae on the palms, sides of the fingers, or soles (called dyshidrotic dermatitis), which can rupture, resulting in erosions and crusting. The vesicles may be the first symptom noticed. Depending on the etiology and exposures, symptoms can be intermittent. Frequent or prolonged water contact (eg, frequent handwashing, work involving water or wet substances), particularly with detergents, is a common trigger, particularly in patients with atopy.

A player may go out by melding, laying off, or discarding the last card from in hand, provided that the partnership has made at least one canasta. Before going out, a player has the option of asking his partner’s permission. If permission is asked, the player must abide by the response (which must be a simple yes or no answer). A player cannot go out if, after the draw, he holds two black 3s and nothing else. With just one black 3, he could go out by discarding it. With three or four black 3s, he could go out by melding them; wild cards may not be included in such a meld. If a player holds just one card in hand and the discard deck also consists of just one card, he cannot go out by taking the deck. There is a bonus for going out “concealed”—that is, by going out (with or without a discard) without having previously made any melds or layoffs other than red 3s; the hand must consist entirely of melds, of which at least one must be a canasta.

The stock rarely ends before anyone goes out. If the last card drawn is a red 3, it automatically ends the game, although the player drawing it may first meld and lay off. (That player may not discard.) If it is not a red 3, play continues without a stock. Each player in turn then takes the upcard if it can be melded or layed off and ends the turn by discarding or melding out. This continues until someone either goes out or cannot use the previous player’s discard, when all play ceases.

Scoring

Each side scores the total value of all its melded cards, plus bonus points for each natural canasta (500), each mixed canasta (300), going out (100, but 200 if concealed), and each red 3 declared (100, but 200 points for each if all four are declared by one side). Each partnership subtracts the point values of any cards still held from its meld score. If a side has failed to make any meld other than red 3s, then every red 3 counts for 100 against, or for 200 apiece if all four were melded. (In some variants wild-card canastas are allowed and count 1,000 points.)

The most-common penalties are the loss of 500 for each red 3 held in hand, 100 for trying to go out without permission, 100 for being unable to go out after receiving permission to do so, and 50 for taking the upcard when unable to use it legally. The adjusted scores are then carried forward to the next deal, and play ceases when one side reaches 5,000 points.

Variants

Canasta can be played by two players, with a few modifications to the rules. Each player is dealt 15 instead of 11 cards and at each turn draws two cards but discards only one. Finally, two canastas are required for going out.

Another popular variant is samba, played with three 52-card decks and six jokers. Samba allows suit sequences of three or more cards to be melded. A seven-card sequence, or samba, ranks as a canasta for the purpose of going out and scores a bonus of 1,500 points. No meld may contain more than two wild cards, and no wild card may be melded with a sequence. (In the bolivia variant, wild cards may be used in sequences.) Each player in turn draws either two cards from the stock or one card from the deck and in either case makes one discard. The top discard may never be taken without a natural matching pair. Game is 10,000 points, and the initial meld requirement for a side with 7,000 or more points is 150.

What Is Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease (HFM)?

Hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFM) is a common viral infection that causes painful red blisters in the mouth and throat, and on the hands, feet, and diaper area.

HFM is contagious and easily spreads to others through contact with unwashed hands, feces (poop), saliva (spit), mucus from the nose, or fluid from the blisters. Kids under age 5 are most at risk for HFM, as infections are common in childcare centers, preschools, and other places where kids are in close quarters.

Besides the blisters, kids often have a fever for a few days and can get dehydrated because it hurts to swallow liquids. Symptoms usually clear up within a week and kids recover completely.

There’s no cure for HFM and no vaccine to prevent it, but your doctor can recommend home care to make your child more comfortable during recovery.

What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease (HFM)?

The blisters caused by HFM are red with a small bubble of fluid on top. They often peel, leaving an ulcer, which is a sore with a reddish base. The soles of the feet and the palms of the hands may have a rash that can look like flat red spots or red blisters.

How to play hand and foot

Occasionally, a pink rash may be seen on other parts of the body, such as the buttocks and thighs. However, some kids will have no problems other than sores in the back of the throat.

It can be hard for parents to tell if a child (especially a very young one) has HFM if sores are only inside the mouth or throat. Very young kids might not be able to communicate that they have a sore throat, but if a child stops eating or drinking, or wants to eat or drink less often, it’s a sign that something is wrong.

A child with HFM also might:

  • have a fever, muscle aches, or other flu-like symptoms
  • become irritable or sleep more than usual
  • begin drooling (due to painful swallowing)
  • only want to drink cold fluids

How Is HFM Treated?

You can give acetaminophen or ibuprofen if your child is achy or irritable. Never give aspirin to children or teens, as it may cause a rare but serious illness called Reye syndrome.

Cold foods like ice cream, smoothies, and popsicles also help by numbing the area, and will be a welcome treat for kids who have trouble swallowing (and even those who don’t!). Avoid hot drinks, sodas, and acidic food (citrus juice, tomato sauce, etc.) because they can make the pain worse.

Kids with blisters on their hands or feet should keep the areas clean and uncovered. Wash the skin with lukewarm soap and water, and pat dry. If a blister pops, dab on a bit of antibiotic ointment to help prevent infection and cover it with a small bandage.

Make sure your child drinks plenty of fluids to stay hydrated. Call your doctor if your child remains very irritable, can’t be comforted, is sluggish, or seems to be getting worse. Also call if you see signs of dehydration, like a dry or sticky mouth, sunken eyes, or decreased urine output.

Can Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease (HFM) Be Prevented?

To prevent the spread of HFM, keep kids home from school and childcare while they have a fever or open blisters on the skin and in the mouth.

Hand washing is the best protection. Remind everyone in your family to wash their hands well and often, especially after using the toilet or changing a diaper, and before preparing or eating food. Shared toys in childcare centers should be cleaned often with a disinfectant because many viruses can live on objects for a few days.

How to play hand and foot

Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease, also known as HFMD, is most common in children under the age of 5. At this time there is no vaccine to prevent against contracting HFMD, but researchers are working on developing vaccinations. Because HFMD is very painful beginning with sores in the throat area, of course, you want to prevent getting this disease altogether. There are several precautions you and your children can take to prevent HFMD. Let’s take a closer look at a few ways children can prevent Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease.

What are signs of HFMD? Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease is a virus caused by the Enterovirus. It is contagious and symptoms include painful mouth sores or blisters, A small rash will then develop on the palms of the hands and soles of the feet. Other signs to look for are fever, low appetite and generally not feeling well.

4 ways to prevent Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease

Do any of your children’s school mates or playmates have HFMD? Staying aware of which children currently have the condition is the very first step in preventing your own child from contracting it. This can be challenging. Signs of HFMD appear in areas of the body not always visible: soles of feet, back of throat. This is why keeping an open line of communication among other parents, daycare staff, teachers and others in your child’s life is the key.

Ramp up routine hygiene practices

You likely already practice good hand washing and other forms of routine hygiene. If you learn that your child is being exposed to HFMD you will want to ramp up these efforts. Frequent handwashing is important. If your child is in daycare, pack extra hand sanitizer and go back over how to apply this independently or voice your concerns for more application to the teachers. If your child is still in the diaper stages, you will want to be extra sure to wash up with hot, soapy water after each changing and take extra care to dispose of the diapers out of the way.

Mythbusters: It’s a myth that HFMD is contracted from household

pets like dogs and cats.

Protect from coughs and sneezes

For young children, coughing and sneezing are common ways to spread HFMD. But in the busy day of play they can forget to cover their mouths until after the deed is done. Be sure to go over the important steps of covering their mouths during coughs and sneezing to prevent the spread of germs and also to protect them from inhaling germs during coughs and sneezes.

Disinfect all around

One last step in helping children prevent Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease is to disinfect your surroundings all around. Disinfect all toys, inside your cars, the furniture and especially any items your child comes in contact with daily – their bedroom furniture, wash sheets with a bleach solution, bedtime books and more.

If you suspect your child has Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease give us a call at OneSource Healthcare for a full assessment.

How to play hand and foot

Your child is cranky, running a fever and developing a rash. Once they start refusing to eat, you contact your pediatrician’s office — only to learn that this lack of appetite is due to mouth sores from a common but highly infectious childhood illness, hand, foot and mouth disease.

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy

“Like most viruses, it’s fairly contagious,” says pediatrician Dana Schmidt, MD. “So in a daycare or school setting, it can spread very quickly.”

Caused by a strain of the coxsackievirus, hand, foot and mouth disease is best known for the blister-like rash it causes on the hands, feet and mouth. However, this rash can appear all over the body. When someone only has blisters in their mouth, but not hands and feet, it’s called herpangina (and the advice below applies to this too).

Dr. Schmidt explains more about this common and highly contagious illness.

What are the first symptoms of hand, foot and mouth disease?

The first symptoms of hand, foot and mouth disease that show up include fever, lack of appetite, sore throat and a runny nose. A day or two later, a blister-like rash appears on the hands, feet or mouth.

“Typically, we see most cases in the warmer spring and summer months, but since it’s an infection that’s easily spread, it can be seen at any time of the year,” says Dr. Schmidt.

How is hand, foot and mouth disease spread?

Hand, foot and mouth disease spreads through direct contact with these blisters, as well as the droplets expelled when you sneeze or cough. The virus can also be passed along in poop, so be sure to wash your hands right away if you’re changing diapers, pull-ups or otherwise come in to contact at home or working at a daycare. But it’s important to note that it can also be passed via shared utensils, towels and clothing, as well as physical contact and by touching contaminated surfaces and toys.

How long is a person with hand, foot and mouth disease contagious?

You are most contagious during the first few days of being sick, often before the blisters appear. Once these blisters dry up, you are less likely to pass on the virus.

Can adults get hand, foot and mouth disease?

Yes. Hand, foot and mouth disease is very common and usually affects infants and children under the age of 5. But because it’s so infectious, it can spread among family members and also make older kids, teenagers and adults sick.

Can you get hand, food and mouth disease twice?

Yes. Because multiple viruses can cause hand, foot and mouth disease, it is possible to catch the virus multiple times.

Is this related to foot-and-mouth disease?

No. Hand, foot and mouth disease has nothing to do with foot-and-mouth disease, which affects cattle, sheep and swine. In fact, both diseases are caused by different viruses — and animals can’t even get hand, foot and mouth disease.

How to treat and prevent hand, foot and mouth disease

Hand, foot and mouth disease has no specific treatment, although the CDC reports that most people get better on their own within seven to 10 days. However, you can treat symptoms of the virus with over-the-counter pain medications.

It’s also important to stay hydrated, as dehydration is a common side effect. Avoid foods and drinks that are acidic, like orange juice, because they can irritate mouth sores. Stick to milder or cold foods. Older children and adults may also relieve some discomfort with salt water gargles, although this treatment isn’t recommended for infants, toddlers or younger children.

Be especially vigilant if hand, foot and mouth disease symptoms become severe, or if you or your child has a weak immune system or becomes dehydrated. If you or your child’s fever does not go away after three days — or if all symptoms don’t improve after 10 days — see a doctor.

Tips to reduce the spread of hand, foot and mouth disease

You can do several things to prevent or reduce the spread of hand, foot and mouth disease:

  • Wash your hands often, especially after changing diapers.
  • Disinfect any contaminated surfaces with a water and bleach or sanitizing wipes.
  • Wash your child’s clothing, bedding and any other soiled items.
  • Stay away from other people, especially during the first few days of the illness. If your child becomes infected, prevent spread by keeping them home from daycare, school or any other group activity. If you are infected, be sure to stay home from work or school.