How to prevent secondhand smoke from entering your garage

Did you know that smoke damage to a home can drastically affect its overall value? In fact, smoking inside of a home can reduce its value by up to 29%. Let’s not forget that cigarette smoke is toxic, and even second-hand smoke can prove deadly. Even if you’re not a smoker, smoke can still find its way into your house via guests, neighbors, and even your own clothing should you be in a place with smokers.

How to prevent secondhand smoke from entering your garage

Here, we’ll cover six helpful tips for keeping second-hand smoke out of your home for good. Don’t let someone else’s habit ruin your health or affect the value of your home!

1. Just Say No

The easiest way to keep second-hand smoke out of your home? Just say no to smokers partaking in the habit within the walls of your home. It’s that easy. Yes, you’ll probably run into some drama or resistance, but it’s your home and guests should always be respectful of the boundaries you set.

You can always explain the situation to the smoker so they get a better understanding of where you’re coming from. There shouldn’t be any reason for them to get upset, but we often defend our beliefs and habits fervently, and saying, “you can’t smoke in here” might feel like a personal attack to the smoker.

It’s a good idea to set these boundaries long before someone visits your home. Knowing beforehand will prepare them for the inevitable, whereas springing the information on them last-second tends to cause a bit more of an issue.

2. Don’t Live Near Smokers

Even if you’re not a smoker or hosting guests who are smokers, your neighbors can still cause a second-hand smoke problem; especially in apartment complexes. Even in the case of a house, if the neighborhood houses are close together, second-hand smoke can still enter your home through windows, open doors, and vents.

The best remedy for this is to simply not live near smokers. If the apartment complex you’re applying for allows smoking, you’re better to avoid it and look elsewhere. If the neighbors smoke in your neighborhood close to the house you want to live in, keep that in mind during your search. Second-hand smoke is a health hazard, and you wouldn’t want to expose your body or your home to its effects.

3. Provide A Neutral Smoking Area

If most of the people you associate with are smokers, you can always provide a neutral smoking area for when they visit, such as a spot in the yard far from the house, a large shed, or some other place. The key is to keep the smoke away from the house as much as possible because even smoking just outside a home can allow the smoke to enter through a window or door.

By providing a smoking area, you’re not stepping on anyone’s toes or risking an argument over why they can’t smoke in the house.

4. Air Purifiers

Air purifiers are a wonderful tool for those that find themselves living near smokers or with family members that smoke. The purifier will filter out harmful toxins, making the air cleaner and more breathable. Keep in mind that while air purifiers are certainly helpful, they can’t possibly filter all of the chemicals and toxins from indoor smoking. Smoking in an enclosed space has the effect of concentrating the toxins and making them that much more harmful.

Luckily, smoking is on the decline in recent years, with products like tobacco free chew, vape pens, nicotine gum, and even CBD oil becoming preferred alternatives to the harmful effects of cigarettes. There are also these silicone pipes which are also safe to use when they are purchased from a reputable manufacturer.

5. Good Windows

Good windows are the key to keeping smoke out of your home if you live around smokers. A good window has a complete seal and doesn’t let in any drafts or create condensation. You’ll be able to keep the smell of cigarette smoke (as well as the chemicals in it) out of your home, even if you’re surrounded by smokers in an apartment complex.

6. Don’t Hang Around Smokers and Bring Second Hand Smoke Home

Second-hand smoke can follow you home on your clothing, car upholstery, and hair. Just because you don’t have smokers in your house doesn’t mean you can’t bring the smell with you. The best remedy? Don’t hang around smokers! You’ve likely got little in common if you’re not a smoker, and most bars and restaurants have banned smoking anyway.
That’s not to say you should give up all of your friends but are your values really aligned? Non-smokers tend to be more conscious of their health and the effects of a poor lifestyle, whereas smokers, even when they are aware, are addicted to something that’s slowly killing them. Maybe it’s time to get some new friends?

How to prevent secondhand smoke from entering your garage

I wouldn’t lump all smokers in the same group, don’t forget they are *people* first.. A lot of People are…

How to prevent secondhand smoke from entering your garageFor apartment and condo dwellers, having cigarette smoke drift in from a neighbour’s unit is an all too familiar hazard. For non-smokers, particularly if they are health conscious, a smoke problem can be worse than a noise problem; it can be heartbreaking when you own the space and weren’t thinking about moving. About a year ago, I started noticing that we had a lot of smoke coming in to our home, but it became worse in the past few months. Here’s how we’ve been tackling the problem.

In most jurisdictions, you can’t really solve a second-hand smoke issue by legally stopping your neighbour from smoking in their own home (if they’re smoking in a common area like a garden you may have a case, depending on your local bylaws). Certainly, asking them to not smoke because it is bothering you will probably sound rude even if you are polite when you approach them. Many smokers can be quite defensive these days because of the increasing restrictions on smoking in public places, and because of the way some non-smokers behave. Complaining to them, the landlord or the condo management is unlikely to accomplish anything more than alienating your neighbour. Until laws change, your answer will be found in your tool kit.

Step 1: Figure Out Where the Smoke is Coming From

Smoke can enter from outside in a number of ways:

  • Through an open window or fresh air intake duct, if the neighbour is “smoking responsibly” outside
  • Through openings between units (e.g. for shared plumbing or electrical systems)
  • Through shared HVAC (heating, ventilation and air conditioning) between units

If the smoke is coming through shared HVAC, your only option may be a high-powered air filter, or moving. You could also try consulting a professional HVAC company about better filtering of the air before it is recirculated – more enlightened condo boards may consider this if you do the legwork.

If the smoke is coming in through windows or gaps between the units, you have more options.

Step 2: Seal the Gaps

For smaller gaps, like those between pipes and walls, silicone caulk or expanding foam will do a good job, but a couple of applications may be needed for a perfect seal. If the gap is larger, like missing pieces of insulation or drywall, finishing the job the builder should have done may be necessary. Remember that there may be more than one point of entry: in our case blocking off one gap in the basement helped, but also forced the smoke up behind the drywall to the second floor, where it came in from the electrical outlets and the baseboards. Seal all the gaps as you find them; smoke can’t come through drywall or cinderblock itself. If you are on good terms with your neighbours, they may let you check their unit and make the seal on their end.

Keep the receipts from your work – you never know, you may be able to get compensation from your condo management or landlord (notifying them in advance increases the likelihood of this).

Step 3: Change Airflow Pathways

In cases where the smoke is coming in from outside, you can try:

  • Adding a fence or increasing the height of the fence between you and your neighbour to alter the airflow path, and allowing more time for smoke to dissipate
  • Positioning a large fan the blow air out a window that the smoke would otherwise come in
  • Moving fresh-air intake vents
  • Sealing around doors and windows

In one case that I read about, the smoke was entering a home through the bathroom steam vent; in that case the owner simply kept it running so the air was always exiting the room.

Step 4: Filter Your Air

As we had a variety of places the smoke was coming in, we sealed all the gaps we could find, but we also invested in an excellent high-powered air filter. To deal with the odour of cigarette smoke, a filter needs a means to trap VOCs (volatile organic compounds) – most commonly an activated carbon filter – and a HEPA filter to deal with particulate matter. Keep in mind that even the best filter won’t be able to pull air up or downstairs, so you may need one for every floor.

After experiencing the IQ Air filter in action, we decided not to trust our health to cheaper filters that don’t work: the air purifier market is saturated with ineffective crap (in the words of my husband, who did the research). The IQ Air was expensive but worth it: the air in our home doesn’t get that stale quality to it anymore, and we have not smelt any smoke for a few weeks (read about my product review policy here).

Florida Associations’ resource for news, legal updates, events & education!

Thursday, January, 2nd 2014 in Condo, Health, Safety by FAN

by rel=author”>William B. Campbell, III, VP of Sales and Marketing, Campbell Property Management

How to prevent secondhand smoke from entering your garageSecondhand smoke coming into your condo from neighboring units poses both a health risk and a significant nuisance. If your neighbors smoke, it is very easy for secondhand smoke to make its way into your unit, which can be very frustrating and can result in a reduced quality of living.

If your condo neighbor smokes, there are some steps you can take to avoid secondhand smoke seeping into your living space:

• First, try to locate the entry point(s) of the secondhand smoke. Typically, cigarette smoke is transferred from one unit to another through air vents, pipes, gaps in insulation, electrical outlets, ceiling fixtures, windows and doors.
• Once you find the entry points of the secondhand smoke, seal the gaps. Large gaps can be filled with insulating foam, while small gaps can be filled with silicone caulk.
• Install door draft excluders under doors that open into hallways and common areas.
• Seal around windows with caulk or weather stripping. This will prevent smoke from entering your unit and will increase your energy efficiency.
• Install extractive window fans. These help to draw smoke outside and increase ventilation.

Do you have neighbors who smoke? Have you ever dealt with secondhand smoke entering your condo unit? If so, how did you handle the situation? Let us know in the comment section below.

Als een van je buren op de oprit of op de tuin rookt, of als iemand die langskomt, aan het roken is, hebben garages verreweg de meeste kans om hun lucht vervuild te krijgen door tabaksrook. Waarom? Omdat ze opzettelijk onvoldoende zijn afgesloten om lucht van buiten te krijgen, zodat ze koel blijven, en een airconditioner is uitgesloten, tenzij je bereid bent veel te betalen. U kunt de luchtkwaliteit in uw garage met een of beide methoden beveiligen.

Methode één van de twee:
Sluit je garage af

Als het niet warm is waar u woont of als u het koel kunt houden, heeft uw garage mogelijk niet veel frisse lucht van buiten nodig.

  1. How to prevent secondhand smoke from entering your garage1 Identificeer alle luchtlekken. Meestal vind je scheuren in de hoeken van de onderkant van de garagedeur wanneer deze is gesloten, evenals een rechthoekig gat ergens anders langs de muur met niets anders dan een draad die het afsluit – dat gat is voor ventilatie, om “frisse” lucht van te krijgen buiten.
  2. How to prevent secondhand smoke from entering your garage2 Schuif het rechthoekige ventilatiegat omhoog. Leg er een groot stuk multiplex overheen en spijker dat net buiten het gat waar de muur het bord raakt. Doe dit alleen als het gaatje in de richting staat waarvan je denkt dat sommigen eraan komen.
  3. How to prevent secondhand smoke from entering your garage3 Dicht de onderkant van de garagedeur af. Krijg wat rubberen plekken en leg deze in grote gaten in de onderste hoeken. Nieten, smelten, lijmen of zelfs alleen maar tape om het rubber kussen boven de kloof.
  4. How to prevent secondhand smoke from entering your garage4 Zet een grote ventilator op een plek in de garage. Hoewel dit geen enkele van de chemicaliën of gassen in uitlaatgassen en tabaksrook zal verwijderen of het zuurstofgehalte zal verhogen, zal het zeker kleur en geuren minder opvallen.
  5. How to prevent secondhand smoke from entering your garage5 Pak een deur met een hond in de deur die je garage verbindt met je huis, als ze verbonden zijn. Open het een paar minuten voordat je de garage in gaat, zodat het wat frisse lucht uit je huis haalt.

Methode twee van twee:
Voorkom het

Het is waarschijnlijk dat slechts één van uw buren aan het roken is. Het is ook waarschijnlijk dat u niet de enige in de omgeving bent die de rook ruikt. Als ze roken op hun veranda of oprit, denkend dat ze alleen hun familie beschermen en het probleem elders niet verplaatsen, kunnen ze misschien leren. Maar als ze het al weten en het gewoon niet kunnen schelen, kun je dit beter niet eens proberen en alleen de methode Seal Your Garage gebruiken.

  1. How to prevent secondhand smoke from entering your garage1 Zoek uit wie er aan het roken is, als je dat nog niet weet. Misschien is het iemand die net hierheen is verhuisd als je opeens heel vaak rook begint te ruiken. Vraag rond om erachter te komen wie het is.
  2. How to prevent secondhand smoke from entering your garage2 Laat een anonieme brief achter op hun deur. Hier is een perfect voorbeeld van een, pas het enigszins aan zodat het past in de situatie;
    • Beste ________, Ik rook de laatste tijd in mijn garage en ik ben misschien niet de enige in deze straat die je rook ruikt. Ik respecteer je recht om te roken en begrijp waarom je niet rookt in je huis. Buiten roken verschuift het probleem elders, van uw kinderen en echtgenote naar uw buren en het publiek. Ik wil dat mijn recht als lid van de niet-rokende meerderheid gerespecteerd wordt net zoveel als je wilt dat je rechten als een roker gerespecteerd worden. Zoek naar een plek om te roken waar het geen onwillige mensen treft.
  3. How to prevent secondhand smoke from entering your garage3 Praat met ze als de notitie niet lijkt te werken. Onthouden; Zorg ervoor dat je alle punten die in de brief worden genoemd, doorneemt. Gebruik altijd goede manieren, ook als het duidelijk is dat je veelzeggende punten kunt hebben en in een ruzie kunt winnen; rokers zullen alles doen om roken te rechtvaardigen en het te verdedigen eenvoudigweg vanwege hun chemische verslaving.

Exposure to secondhand and thirdhand smoke exists whenever indoor tobacco smoking is taking place. Keeping yourself and your family away from those situations is the only way to reduce the risk of cancer and other health problems posed by secondhand and thirdhand smoke. There is no safe level of exposure to secondhand smoke (information about thirdhand smoke isn’t yet known).

To avoid secondhand and thirdhand smoke:

  • Don’t allow smoking in your home, car, or place of business. (With exceptions for certified smoke shops or certified cigar bars, all Oregon businesses should be smokefree, see Oregon’s Indoor Clean Air Act)
  • Choose restaurants, bars and other locations that are smokefree. (Per Oregon law, they should all be smokefree, see Oregon’s Indoor Clean Air Act)

If you’re inside where people are smoking, there isn’t anything you can do to protect yourself or others from secondhand or thirdhand smoke.

  • Limiting smoking to one part of the home, opening the windows or using a fan won’t protect you from secondhand and thirdhand smoke.
  • Similarly, rolling down the window while someone smokes in your car won’t keep you safe from secondhand smoke either.

Public health measures introduced over the past few decades have worked to curb indoor smoking and reduce or eliminate workplace exposure to secondhand smoke. Federal law prohibits smoking on public transportation and in federal buildings. Recently, smoking inside public housing was banned. State laws about smoking vary across the country, but about half of states have banned smoking from places such as hospitals, malls, movie theaters, restaurants and bars [per Oregon law, it is illegal to smoke in all of these places, see Going Smokefree Matters—In Your Home [PDF–539 KB]pdf icon]. Authorities have also started banning smoking in open spaces such as parks and beaches in some cities and states. Source: Secondhand and thirdhand smoke | CTCA (cancercenter.com)

What is Secondhand and Thirdhand Smoke?

Secondhand smoke is the tobacco smoke exhaled by a person who is smoking or from a burning tobacco product.

  • The is no risk-free level of exposure to secondhand smoke.
  • Even brief exposure to secondhand smoke causes damage that can lead to serious disease and death.
  • Secondhand smoke contains thousands of chemicals. At least 69 of these chemicals are known to cause cancer.
  • Children exposed to secondhand smoke are at a higher risk of health issues, including: Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), acute respiratory infections, ear problems, learning disabilities, behavioral problems and more severe asthma.
  • Pets breathe secondhand smoke and, as with humans, exposure is known to cause cancer and illness.

Thirdhand smoke is the tobacco smoke residue that remains after a tobacco product has been put out.

  • Thirdhand smoke clings to hair, skin, clothes, furniture, drapes, walls, carpets and other surfaces. It can build up over time and resist normal household cleaning.
  • Thirdhand smoke contains chemicals that are known to cause cancer.
  • Infants and children are particularly vulnerable to the effects of thirdhand smoke as crawl on the floor and put things that are contaminated in their mouth. Infants exposed to thirdhand smoke are more likely to die from Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), and those exposed are at an increased risk for asthma.

Josephine County TPEP does outreach and enforcement for Oregon’s Smoke-free Workplace Law. Learn more about smoke-free work sites here.

Outdoor Areas and Events

Across the state communities are passing policies that protect people from secondhand smoke and protect public places from cigarette and smokeless tobacco litter and damage.

Depending on the specific setting and jurisdiction, policies may be adopted by a city council or county commission, parks or fair board, or specific event organizers. This type of policy change may also be pursued as part of a local comprehensive smokefree workplaces and public places ordinance that exceeds the minimum requirements set by the Oregon Indoor Clean Air Act.

Smokefree Multi-Unit Housing
Many multi-unit housing residents are exposed to secondhand smoke, and many are from vulnerable populations, including young children, people with disabilities and the elderly. Secondhand smoke can infiltrate into other units through hallways and stairwells. Work on multi-unit housing is critical to reducing tobacco-related disparities. Don’t be shy when it comes to your health. Talk to your building manager about making your apartment smokefree. The information below will help you promote the adoption of no-smoking rules in multi-unit residential housing.

The primary site for LANDLORD information and tools is http://www.smokefreehousinginfo.com/
Information for RENTERS and the public is available at Smoke-free Housing Resources – Smokefree Oregon

U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)
The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) “Instituting Smoke-Free Public Housing Rule” is now effective. The use of all lit tobacco products and hookahs (or water pipes) inside all units, common areas, Public Housing Authority (PHA) administrative offices, and in all areas within 25 feet of building is prohibited. Get information about smoke-free multifamily housing from HUD (pdf).

Smokefree Policies in Multi-Unit Housing- American Lung Association
Find information on our online course on how to implement a smokefree policy in multi-unit housing such as apartments and condominiums, as well as other materials on this issue.

Let’s discuss the question: how to annoy smoking neighbors. We summarize all relevant answers in section Q&A of website Achievetampabay.org in category: Blog Finance. See more related questions in the comments below.

How to prevent secondhand smoke from entering your garageHow To Annoy Smoking Neighbors

Table of Contents

How can I stop my Neighbours smoking?

Use insulation padding and painter’s tape to block vents and large gaps. Smoke may also drift in through air vents or gaps around your heating or air conditioner. You may be able to block the smoke by covering the gaps with insulation padding or painter’s tape.

Can cigarette smoke travel through floors?

According to TobaccoFreeCA, smoke can travel through walls. However, even though cigarette smoke seeps into walls, floors and ceilings, when it travels it tends to act in a similar way to water – it takes the easiest and fastest route.

What to do if your neighbor keeps smoking \u0026 other tips

Images related to the topicWhat to do if your neighbor keeps smoking \u0026 other tips

Can you complain about Neighbours smoking UK?

If you are affected by smoke, smell or noise nuisance from neighbours or nearby industry, you can ask your local authority to take action – or you can take action yourself – under the Environmental Protection Act 1990 (EPA).

How do you get rid of secondhand smoke?

  1. Open the Windows. One of the easiest ways to control secondhand smoke in your home is to open up your windows and let in some fresh air. …
  2. Use an Air Purifier. …
  3. Getting Rid of the Smell.

How do you stop secondhand smoke from entering an apartment?

Close all points of entry where secondhand smoke may enter your apartment, such as openings in walls and doors and electrical outlets. Use a weather strip under and around the door to prevent smoke from drifting in. Discuss sealing cracks or gaps in the smoker’s apartment with your neighbor or building staff.

How do I stop secondhand smoke outside?

  1. If you smoke, quit. There are many resources to help you. …
  2. Do not smoke or allow people to smoke in your house or car. Ask people who smoke to step outside.
  3. Find smoke-free restaurants, hotels, and rental cars.
  4. Ask caregivers and relatives to stop smoking around you and your children.

How to Get Rid of an Annoying Neighbor With a Plant

Images related to the topicHow to Get Rid of an Annoying Neighbor With a Plant

Do air purifiers help with cigarette smoke?

If you’re looking for an air purifier that will eliminate cigarette smoke, you’re out of luck. Tobacco smoke is made up of gaseous pollutants and particulate matter. Most air purifiers, also called air cleaners, aren’t designed to remove gaseous pollutants.

Can you complain about Neighbours smoke?

If your neighbour is responsible for the air pollution (for example, through smoke from a garden bonfire or a barbecue) try to resolve the problem directly with the neighbour. If this fails, lodge a complaint with the environmental unit of your local council.

Does cigarette smoke drift up or down?

Smoke from the cigarette has a higher temperature than the surrounding, giving it lower density, which makes it rise. As it rises, it cools down, which also decrease the net force on the smoke parcel.

What is smoke nuisance?

For the smoke to count as a statutory nuisance it must do one of the following: unreasonably and substantially interfere with the use or enjoyment of a home or other premises. injure health or be likely to injure health.

Do air purifiers help with secondhand smoke?

An exhaustive study published by the U.S. National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health concluded that air purifiers in combination with education effectively reduce indoor fine PM (particulate matter) and a biomarker of secondhand smoke exposure in non-smoking adults.

Dealing With Annoying Neighbors

Images related to the topicDealing With Annoying Neighbors

How far can secondhand smoke travel?

Fact: Secondhand smoke can stay in the air for several hours and travel up to 20 feet. Fact: Pets that get exposed to secondhand smoke have a higher risk of some cancers and respiratory problems.

Is secondhand smoke worse than smoking?

Side-stream smoke is more toxic than mainstream smoke, as it has much higher concentrations of cancer-causing substances. There is no safe level of exposure to secondhand smoke. Just 30 minutes of exposure to secondhand smoke can cause heart damage similar to that of an everyday smoker.

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Policy & Advocacy

Secondhand smoke exposure in multi-unit dwellings such as apartments and condominiums is unfortunately both a common problem and also dangerous for you and your family. Exposure to secondhand smoke can lead to serious health problems including lung cancer, heart disease and stroke, and can make asthma worse in adults and children. It is especially dangerous for children as it can result in permanent damage to growing lungs, and cause respiratory illnesses like bronchitis and pneumonia, ear infections and sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). 1

Secondhand smoke can seep into multi-unit dwellings from many places, including vents and cracks in walls or floors.

You are not alone in being exposed to secondhand smoke in your multi-unit dwelling. Based on several studies, an estimated 44 percent to 53 percent of multi-unit housing residents that do not allow smoking in their home, have experienced secondhand smoke infiltration in their home from elsewhere in or around the building. 2 The steps below can help you if you find yourself facing this difficult situation.

Steps to Take to Protect You and Your Family from Secondhand Smoke Exposure

  1. Check your lease for your apartment or rules for your condominium to see if smoking is addressed or even allowed
  2. See if there are laws in your community that apply to secondhand smoke in multi-unit housing
    • In Maine and Oregon and some local jurisdictions in other states, owners/managers of apartments are required to disclose to renters where smoking is allowed or not before they rent an apartment to a tenant.
    • Some local communities in California prohibit smoking in all or a certain percentage of units of multi-unit housing.
  3. Talk with your neighbors about your exposure to secondhand smoke.
    • If you know where the smoke is coming from and feel comfortable talking with your neighbor about it, see if an agreement can be reached about where and when they smoke. Try to be calm, polite and offer solutions.
    • Engage and connect with other neighbors about how secondhand smoke may be affecting them and their families, and work together.
  4. Talk with your doctor if secondhand smoke is affecting your health and get a note from them that exposure to secondhand smoke is or may be contributing to your illness.
  5. Talk with your landlord/property manager about the secondhand smoke problem in your apartment.
    • An in person meeting or written communication is better, keep a record of all communications in case it is needed later.
    • Be calm, polite, stick to the issue, and ask what solutions might be available.
    • Bring with you or include your doctor’s note about exposure to secondhand smoke if applicable.
    • Ask other neighbors who are being affected by secondhand smoke to attend the meeting with you or send letters too.
    • If your building does not have an indoor smokefree policy, including in living units, ask them about adopting one.
    • Ask them to conduct a tenant survey to gauge the views of residents about a policy prohibiting smoking in all indoor areas. Generally, the majority of residents will be supportive of a voluntary smokefree housing policy.
  6. If and when the landlord/property manager gets back in contact with you, they may try to fix the problem by plugging underneath your door or sealing cracks in your walls. This may solve the problem temporarily, but most likely not permanently.
    • Eliminating secondhand smoke exposure indoors is the only permanent solution.
  7. You have additional options if the landlord/property manager can’t or won’t fix the problem.
    • The Federal Fair Housing Act could be used if secondhand smoke is causing breathing difficulties. Learn more.
    • There are also other legal options, although a lawsuit should be your last resort after other options have been tried. Learn more.
    • If possible, consider moving to another property. If it comes to that, you should ask your landlord/property manager to waive any penalties for breaking your lease.

Adopting a Building Wide Smokefree Policy is the Best Way to Protect All Residents from Exposure to Secondhand Smoke

It is perfectly legal for landlords/property owners to adopt policies prohibiting smoking in all indoor areas of their buildings, including in living units or even on their property. There is no legal or constitutional right to smoke.

You can learn more about how to help adopt a smokefree policy in your building through the American Lung Association’s free online course, Smokefree Policies in Multi-Unit Housing: Steps for Success.

  • Resources
  • References

Online listing of Fair Housing Enforcement Agencies

The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2014

Licht, A. S., King, B. A., Travers, M. J., Rivard, C., & Hyland, A. J. (2012). Attitudes, experiences, and acceptance of smokefree policies among U.S. multiunit housing residents. American Journal of Public Health, 102, 1868-1871.

Page last updated: December 10, 2020

Wenn einer Ihrer Nachbarn in der Einfahrt oder auf dem Hof ​​raucht oder jemand, der vorbeigeht, raucht, sind die Garagen bei weitem am wahrscheinlichsten, ihre Luft durch Tabakrauch verunreinigt zu bekommen. Warum? Weil sie absichtlich unzureichend versiegelt sind, um Luft von draußen zu bekommen, so bleiben sie kühl, und eine Klimaanlage kommt nicht in Frage, es sei denn, Sie sind bereit, viel zu bezahlen. Sie können die Luftqualität in Ihrer Garage mit einer oder beiden dieser Methoden schützen.

Methode eins von zwei:
Versiegele deine Garage

Wenn es an Ihrem Wohnort nicht heiß ist oder wenn Sie es kühl halten können, benötigt Ihre Garage möglicherweise nicht viel Frischluft von außen.

  1. How to prevent secondhand smoke from entering your garage1 Identifizieren Sie alle Luftlecks. Normalerweise finden Sie an den Ecken des Garagentors Risse, wenn er geschlossen ist, sowie ein rechteckiges Loch irgendwo anders an der Wand mit nichts als einem Draht, der ihn verschließt – dieses Loch dient der Belüftung, um “frische” Luft zu bekommen draußen.
  2. How to prevent secondhand smoke from entering your garage2 Das rechteckige Belüftungsloch aufrichten. Lege ein großes Stück Sperrholz darüber und nagele es direkt außerhalb des Lochs, wo die Wand das Brett berührt. Tun Sie dies nur dann, wenn das Loch in die Richtung zeigt, aus der Sie glauben, dass etwas davon kommt.
  3. How to prevent secondhand smoke from entering your garage3 Verschließen Sie die Unterseite des Garagentors. Besorgen Sie sich ein paar Gummipflaster und stecken Sie sie in große Lücken in den unteren Ecken. Heften, schmelzen, kleben oder kleben Sie sie einfach auf das Gummikissen über dem Spalt.
  4. How to prevent secondhand smoke from entering your garage4 Stellen Sie einen großen Ventilator an einer Stelle in der Garage auf. Während dies keine der Chemikalien oder Gase, die in Autoabgasen und Tabakrauch enthalten sind, entfernt oder den Sauerstoffgehalt erhöht, wird es sicherlich dazu führen, dass es Farbe und Gerüche weniger wahrnehmbar macht.
  5. How to prevent secondhand smoke from entering your garage5 Erhalten Sie eine Doggy Tür in der Tür, die Ihre Garage mit Ihrem Haus verbindet, wenn sie verbunden sind. Öffne es ein paar Minuten bevor du in die Garage gehst, damit es in deinem Haus kühle Luft bekommt.

Methode zwei von zwei:
Verhindere es

Es ist wahrscheinlich, dass nur einer Ihrer Nachbarn raucht. Es ist auch wahrscheinlich, dass Sie nicht der einzige in der Gegend sind, der den Rauch riecht. Wenn sie auf ihrer Veranda oder Auffahrt rauchen und denken, dass sie nur ihre Familie schützen und das Problem nicht anderswo verschieben, können sie vielleicht lernen. Aber wenn sie es bereits wissen und es nicht interessiert, dann ist es besser, wenn Sie das nicht einmal versuchen und nur die Seal Your Garage-Methode verwenden.

  1. How to prevent secondhand smoke from entering your garage1 Finde heraus, wer es ist, der raucht, wenn du es noch nicht weißt. Vielleicht, wenn du plötzlich plötzlich Rauch riechst, ist es jemand, der gerade hierher gezogen ist. Fragen Sie nach, um herauszufinden, wer es ist.
  2. How to prevent secondhand smoke from entering your garage2 Hinterlasse eine anonyme Notiz an ihrer Tür. Hier ist ein perfektes Beispiel von einem, modifiziere es ein wenig, um zu passen, was auch immer die Situation ist;
    • Lieber ________, Ich habe in letzter Zeit Rauch in meiner Garage gerochen, und vielleicht bin ich nicht der Einzige auf dieser Straße, der deinen Rauch riecht. Ich respektiere dein Recht zu rauchen und verstehe, warum du nicht in deinem Haus rauchst. Rauchen draußen verschiebt das Problem anderswo, von Ihren Kindern und Ehepartner zu Ihren Nachbarn und der Öffentlichkeit. Ich möchte mein Recht als Mitglied der Nichtrauchermehrheit respektieren genauso wie Sie Ihre Rechte als Raucher respektieren möchten. Bitte finden Sie irgendwo zu rauchen, wo es keine unwilligen Menschen betrifft.
  3. How to prevent secondhand smoke from entering your garage3 Sprich mit ihnen, wenn die Notiz nicht zu funktionieren scheint. Merken; Achten Sie darauf, alle in dem Brief genannten Punkte zu beachten. Benütze immer gute Manieren, auch wenn klar ist, dass du Punkte sagen und in einem Streit gewinnen kannst; Raucher werden alles tun, um das Rauchen zu rechtfertigen und es einfach wegen ihrer chemischen Abhängigkeit zu verteidigen.

Smoking harms both you and the ones you love. Quitting smoking will benefit you plus help you protect the people in your life.

How to prevent secondhand smoke from entering your garage

Quitting will make the people you care about happier and healthier. This may be one of your reasons for quitting.

Dangers of Secondhand Smoke

The main way smoking hurts non-smokers is through secondhand smoke. Secondhand smoke is the combination of smoke that comes from a cigarette and smoke breathed out by a smoker. When a non-smoker is around someone smoking, they breathe in secondhand smoke.

Secondhand smoke is dangerous to anyone who breathes it in. It can stay in the air for several hours after somebody smokes. Breathing secondhand smoke for even a short time can hurt your body.

Take this quiz to see how much you know about the dangers of secondhand smoke.

Health Effects of Secondhand Smoke

Over time, secondhand smoke has been associated with serious health problems in non-smokers:

  • Lung cancer in people who have never smoked.
  • More likely that someone will get heart disease‚ have a heart attack‚ and die early.
  • Breathing problems like coughing‚ extra phlegm‚ wheezing‚ and shortness of breath.

Secondhand smoke is especially dangerous for children, babies, and women who are pregnant:

  • Mothers who breathe secondhand smoke while pregnant are more likely to have babies with low birth weight.
  • Babies who breathe secondhand smoke after birth have more lung infections than other babies.
  • Secondhand smoke causes kids who already have asthma to have more frequent and severe attacks.
  • Children exposed to secondhand smoke are more likely to develop bronchitis, pneumonia, and ear infections and are at increased risk for sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).

The only way to fully protect non-smokers from the dangers of secondhand smoke is to not allow smoking indoors. Separating smokers from non-smokers (like “no smoking” sections in restaurants)‚ cleaning the air‚ and airing out buildings does not get rid of secondhand smoke.

Other Ways Smoking Affects Others

Smoking affects the people in your life in other ways, beyond their health. When you smoke, you may miss out on:

  • Spending time with family and friends.
  • Having more money to spend on the people you love.
  • Setting a good example for your children. Children who are raised by smokers are more likely to become smokers themselves.

Steps You Can Take to Protect Your Loved Ones

The best thing you can do to protect your family from secondhand smoke is to quit smoking. Right away, you get rid of their exposure to secondhand smoke in your home and car, and reduce it anywhere else you go together.

Make sure your house and car remain smokefree. Kids breathe in secondhand smoke at home more than any other place. The same goes for many adults. Don’t allow anyone to smoke in your home or car. Setting this rule will:

  • Reduce the amount of secondhand smoke your family breathes in.
  • Help you quit smoking and stay smokefree.
  • Lower the chance of your child becoming a smoker.

When you’re on the go, you can still protect your family from secondhand smoke:

  • Make sure caretakers like nannies, babysitters, and day care staff do not smoke.
  • Eat at smokefree restaurants.
  • Avoid indoor public places that allow smoking.
  • Teach your children to stay away from secondhand smoke.

Find out more about secondhand smoke:

  • From the National Cancer Institute, Secondhand Smoke: Questions and Answers
  • From the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention‚ Secondhand Smoke (SHS) Facts

Hvis en af ​​dine naboer ryger i deres indkørsel eller gård, eller hvis nogen går forbi, ryger, er garager langt ude mest sandsynligt at få deres luft forurenet af tobaksrøg. Hvorfor? Fordi de forsætligt er forseglet for at få luft udefra, så de forbliver kølige, og et klimaanlæg er udelukket, medmindre du er villig til at betale meget. Du kan beskytte luftkvaliteten i din garage ved hjælp af en eller begge af disse metoder.

Metode En af To:
Seal din garage

Hvis det ikke er varmt, hvor du bor, eller hvis du kan holde det køligt, må din garage måske ikke have meget frisk luft udefra.

  1. How to prevent secondhand smoke from entering your garage1 Identificer alle luftlækage. Du vil normalt finde revner i hjørnerne af bunden af ​​garagedøren, når den lukkes, samt et rektangulært hul et andet sted langs væggen med andet end tråd lukker det – det hul er til ventilation, for at få “frisk” luft fra uden for.
  2. How to prevent secondhand smoke from entering your garage2 Bestil det rektangulære ventilationshul. Sæt et stort stykke krydsfiner over det og spik det lige udenfor hullet, hvor væggen rører bordet. Gør kun dette hvis hullet vender mod den retning, du tror, ​​at nogle kommer fra.
  3. How to prevent secondhand smoke from entering your garage3 Tæt bunden af ​​garagedøren. Få nogle gummipatcher og læg dem i store huller i nederste hjørner. Hæftning, smeltning, limning eller bare tape dem til gummipuden over hullet.
  4. How to prevent secondhand smoke from entering your garage4 Opsæt en stor fan på et sted i garagen. Selvom dette ikke fjerner nogen af ​​de kemikalier eller gasser, der findes i biludstødning og tobaksrøg eller øger iltindholdet, vil det helt sikkert gøre det farvestrålende og lugt bliver mindre mærkbart.
  5. How to prevent secondhand smoke from entering your garage5 Få en doggy dør i døren, der forbinder din garage til dit hus, hvis de er tilsluttet. Åbn det et par minutter før du går i garagen, så det får noget køligt luft inde fra dit hus.

Metode To af to:
Forhindre det

Det er sandsynligt, at det kun er en af ​​dine naboer, der ryger. Det er også sandsynligt, at du ikke er den eneste i området for at lugte røgen. Hvis de ryger på deres veranda eller indkørslen tænker de kun deres familie og ikke skifter problemet andre steder, kan de måske lære. Men hvis de allerede ved og bare er ligeglad, så er det bedre, at du ikke engang prøver dette og bare bruger Seal Your Garage-metoden.

  1. How to prevent secondhand smoke from entering your garage1 Find ud af hvem det er, der ryger, hvis du ikke allerede ved det. Måske hvis du lige pludselig begyndte at lugte røg ofte, er det nogen der lige flyttede her. Spørg rundt for at finde ud af, hvem det er.
  2. How to prevent secondhand smoke from entering your garage2 Forlad en anonym note på deres dør. Her er et perfekt eksempel på en, ændre det lidt for at passe uanset situationen;
    • Kære ________, jeg har lugtende røg i min garage sidst, og jeg må ikke være den eneste på denne gade, der lugter din røg. Jeg respekterer din ret til at ryge, og forstå, hvorfor du ikke ryger i dit hus. Rygning udenfor skifter problemet andetsteds, fra dine børn og ægtefælle til dine naboer og offentligheden. Jeg vil have min ret som medlem af det ikke-ryger flertal respekteret lige så meget som du vil have dine rettigheder som ryger respekteret. Venligst find et sted at ryge, hvor det påvirker intet uønsket folk.
  3. How to prevent secondhand smoke from entering your garage3 Tal med dem, hvis notatet ikke syntes at fungere. Husk; Sørg for at gå over alle de punkter, der er nævnt i brevet. Brug altid gode manerer, selvom det er klart, at du kunne have fortalt point og vinde i et argument; rygere vil gøre alt for at retfærdiggøre rygning og forsvare det blot på grund af deres kemiske afhængighed.

Si l’un de vos voisins fume dans leur allée ou dans leur cour, ou si une personne de passage fume, les garages sont de loin les plus susceptibles d’être contaminés par la fumée du tabac. Pourquoi? Parce qu’ils sont intentionnellement mal scellés pour que l’air vienne de l’extérieur, ils restent donc au frais et un climatiseur est hors de question à moins que vous ne soyez prêt à payer beaucoup. Vous pouvez protéger la qualité de l’air dans votre garage en utilisant l’une ou l’autre de ces méthodes.

Méthode One of Two:
Scellez votre garage

S’il ne fait pas chaud là où vous habitez ou si vous pouvez le garder frais, votre garage n’aura peut-être pas besoin de beaucoup d’air frais de l’extérieur.

  1. How to prevent secondhand smoke from entering your garage1 Identifier toutes les fuites d’air. Vous trouverez généralement des fissures dans les coins du bas de la porte du garage quand il est fermé, ainsi qu’un trou rectangulaire quelque part le long du mur avec seulement du fil qui le ferme – ce trou est pour la ventilation, pour obtenir un air “frais”. à l’extérieur.
  2. How to prevent secondhand smoke from entering your garage2 Montez dans le trou de ventilation rectangulaire. Placez un gros morceau de contreplaqué par-dessus et clouez-le juste à l’extérieur du trou où le mur touche le panneau. Ne le faites que si le trou fait face à la direction que vous pensez que certains
  3. How to prevent secondhand smoke from entering your garage3 Scellez le bas de la porte du garage. Obtenez des pièces en caoutchouc et placez-les dans les grands espaces dans les coins inférieurs. Agrafer, fondre, coller ou même simplement les coller au coussin en caoutchouc au-dessus de l’écart.
  4. How to prevent secondhand smoke from entering your garage4 Mettre en place un grand ventilateur dans un endroit dans le garage. Bien que cela ne supprime aucun des produits chimiques ou gaz présents dans les gaz d’échappement des voitures et la fumée de tabac ou n’augmente pas la teneur en oxygène, cela en fera certainement une couleur et les odeurs seront moins visibles.
  5. How to prevent secondhand smoke from entering your garage5 Obtenez une porte pour chien dans la porte qui relie votre garage à votre maison, s’ils sont connectés. Ouvrez-le quelques minutes avant de rentrer dans le garage pour qu’il y ait de l’air frais de l’intérieur de votre maison.

Méthode deux sur deux:
La prévenir

Il est probable qu’un seul de vos voisins fume. Il est également probable que vous ne soyez pas le seul dans la région à sentir la fumée. S’ils fument sur leur porche ou dans leur entrée en pensant qu’ils ne protègent que leur famille et ne déplacent pas le problème ailleurs, ils pourront peut-être apprendre. Mais s’ils le savent déjà et ne s’en soucient pas, eh bien, il est préférable de ne même pas essayer cela et d’utiliser simplement la méthode Seal Your Garage.

  1. How to prevent secondhand smoke from entering your garage1 Découvrez qui est le tabagisme, si vous ne le savez pas déjà. Peut-être que si tu as soudainement commencé à sentir souvent la fumée, c’est quelqu’un qui vient d’emménager ici. Demandez autour de vous pour savoir qui c’est.
  2. How to prevent secondhand smoke from entering your garage2 Laissez une note anonyme sur leur porte. Voici un exemple parfait de l’un, modifiez-le un peu pour s’adapter à la situation;
    • Cher ________, j’ai senti la fumée dans mon garage ces derniers temps et je ne suis peut-être pas le seul dans cette rue à sentir votre fumée. Je respecte votre droit de fumer et je comprends pourquoi vous ne fumez pas à l’intérieur de votre maison. Fumer dehors déplace le problème ailleurs, de vos enfants et de votre conjoint à vos voisins et au public. Je veux que mon droit en tant que membre de la majorité non-fumeurs soit respecté tout autant que vous voulez que vos droits en tant que fumeur soient respectés. S’il vous plaît trouver un endroit pour fumer où cela n’affecte pas les personnes réticentes.
  3. How to prevent secondhand smoke from entering your garage3 Parlez-leur si la note ne semble pas fonctionner. Rappelles toi; Assurez-vous de passer en revue tous les points mentionnés dans la lettre. Utilisez toujours les bonnes manières, même s’il est clair que vous pourriez avoir des points de vue et gagner des arguments. les fumeurs feront tout pour justifier le tabagisme et le défendront simplement à cause de leur addiction chimique.

How to prevent secondhand smoke from entering your garage

Marley Hall is a writer and fact checker who is certified in clinical and translational research. Her work has been published in medical journals in the field of surgery, and she has received numerous awards for publication in education.

Avoiding secondhand smoke can be simple enough when you are in the comfort of your own home, but how can you avoid it when traveling? You are exposed to secondhand smoke when you breathe in pollutants in the air from cigarette smoke and other tobacco products.

For people with the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or ​COPD, secondhand smoke exposure can prompt an exacerbation of symptoms, which can lead to hospitalization.   Traveling can put people with COPD at particular risk for possible exposure. For those without COPD, you may want to avoid the 7000 chemicals and 70 known carcinogens in secondhand smoke.

How to prevent secondhand smoke from entering your garage

Avoiding Exposure to Secondhand Smoke While Traveling

Although many cities and communities have made great strides in banning smoking from public buildings, restaurants, and parks, there are still parts of the world where smoking is allowed everywhere—even on flights. The best way to prevent exposure to secondhand smoke is to plan ahead and to advocate for yourself. Here are suggested ways to avoid secondhand smoke and the COPD exacerbations that may come with it while traveling.

1. Request a Non-Smoking Room

When making a reservation in some parts of the world, non-smoking is the assumed preference unless you request a smoking room. By the same token, however, some places will automatically assume you want a smoking room if you do not explicitly request non-smoking accommodations. Don’t take a chance. Whether you are booking a hotel room or a cabin on a cruise ship, always request a non-smoking room.

In addition, make your sensitivity to cigarette smoke known at the time of your reservation and at check-in. The hotel or ship’s cleaning crew can use a high-powered air filter system to clean the air in your room prior to your arrival if smoking has previously been allowed in the room.

2. Use a Smoke Filter Mask

If you can’t avoid secondhand smoke in public places, avoid breathing it in by covering your mouth in smoky areas. A filter mask, such as the N95 respirator mask, which is shown to block 95% of air particles, is a handy and lightweight method to prevent exposure.

If you are fashion conscious, you can cover the mask with a lightweight scarf. Or, try one of the new fashionable high-filtration masks, such as the Vogmask, which comes in a variety of colors and patterns.

3. Keep Smoke Out of Your Clothing

If you can’t stay in a smoke-free hotel, keep your clothes stored in a garment bag or suitcase to keep them from absorbing cigarette smoke.

  • If the dresser in the hotel is older and smells of cigarette smoke, the best thing to do is to not use it and keep your clothes in your suitcase.
  • Likewise, if you spend time in smoke-filled areas, causing your clothes to smell, store them in a separate bag away from the rest of your clothes.

4. Take Care of Your Health

Don’t let your healthcare regimen take a vacation while you travel. Be sure to pack extra medicine and take it as prescribed. In addition, stay hydrated and don’t skimp on sleep.

Listen to your body. Don’t push yourself too hard, which can wear down your body and make you more susceptible to a COPD exacerbation.

Also, be sure to practice good hand washing hygiene and to use hand sanitizer whenever possible to avoid catching germs. This is especially important on airplanes, cruise ships, and other public transportation.

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  • Last Updated:
  • Jan 10th, 2015 10:29 am

Jan 7th, 2015 10:42 am

How to stop cigarette smoke smell from coming into my apartment?

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Jan 7th, 2015 11:25 am

You could try getting those odor eliminator/absorbing fresheners and putting it in your bathroom. There may be room to put one inside your vent, but that may not be safe.

Also, in time, you will get used to the smell and won’t notice it as much.

*****ty situation. I hate the smell of cigarette smoke.

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Jan 7th, 2015 2:28 pm

When was this condo constructed? Are you sure it’s coming from the vent? I assume this is a powered vent. Do you have another washroom where the smell is also present? Check under the sink to see if there is an access panel (sometimes requires a flat head screw to open and most of the time it’s located under the sink in a washroom). What you should see is a vent stack. Do you feel any drafts? Is it insulated?

The smell is probably coming from someone else on a lower floor.

If you have your bathroom fan on and you still notice a smell, close the bathroom door for half an hour with the fan on and see if the smell increases in strength. This will tell you that the smell is being drawn out from the stack. Essentially with a fan on, it creates negative pressure in the bathroom and air is drawn from other sources. Other places to check for air being drawn in to bathroom are vanity mirrors and around pipes where they enter/exit a wall – any place where someone made a cut.

A solution would be to turn on all your fans, keep your doors on the inside of your unit open and open your windows. You want to increase the partial pressure in your unit so that air flow is reversed. Then check to see if you still detect smoke in the bathroom. Mind you, keeping your windows open in the winter is not practical.

Have the fan on would only serve to amplify the issue if there is an air leak from a stack.

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Jan 8th, 2015 7:47 pm

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Jan 8th, 2015 9:29 pm

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Jan 8th, 2015 9:40 pm

I can relate to how you feel.

However what’s in my bathroom is not the smell of cigarette smoke, but the smell of food.

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Jan 9th, 2015 10:49 am

I taped off all the vents and any hones in the pipe chase behind the sinks. (Just used some painters tape to test as its easy to remove) I also cracked a window.

Last night and this morning there was no smell coming in. Not sure if the smoker wasn’t home but I will update the situation soon.

I understand the negative pressure theory. (sucking air from wherever it can to equalize pressure) Possibly a silly question but would the negative pressure have anything to do with the heaters running? My suite has a couple of in suite heater / air conditioning units.

I’m only there for a few months on a short term lease but I would hate to have to live with that smell for that long.

If the smell returns I will have to bring it up again with the landlord and management. Just trying not to be a pain for the short time I am there. Also was thinking the quickest way to fix it is just do it myself lol.

Thanks again for all your responses.

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Jan 9th, 2015 10:56 am

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Jan 9th, 2015 11:02 am

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Jan 9th, 2015 11:17 am

I taped off all the vents and any hones in the pipe chase behind the sinks. (Just used some painters tape to test as its easy to remove) I also cracked a window.

Last night and this morning there was no smell coming in. Not sure if the smoker wasn’t home but I will update the situation soon.

I understand the negative pressure theory. (sucking air from wherever it can to equalize pressure) Possibly a silly question but would the negative pressure have anything to do with the heaters running? My suite has a couple of in suite heater / air conditioning units.

I’m only there for a few months on a short term lease but I would hate to have to live with that smell for that long.

If the smell returns I will have to bring it up again with the landlord and management. Just trying not to be a pain for the short time I am there. Also was thinking the quickest way to fix it is just do it myself lol.

Thanks again for all your responses.

I believe all condos these days are designed so that there is negative pressure within the units. This should in theory prevent odours from escaping the unit and into the hall and prevent the spread of fires/smoke.

To be honest, unless you live on the first couple floors in a standard condo, you would have the smell of smoke regardless of whether a smoker was home – the stack smells of cigarette smoke 24/7.

This issue is not really present in the summer because: 1. People smoke outside. 2. People keep windows open which wreaks havoc on the pressurization of units.

How to prevent secondhand smoke from entering your garage

What’s on this Page

How to Prevent Exposure to Secondhand Smoke

Secondhand smoke is smoke that comes from burning tobacco. It includes smoke from cigarettes, pipes, or cigars. Being exposed to secondhand smoke is as dangerous as smoking.

Common places you may be exposed to secondhand smoke include:

  • Work.
  • Public places, like restaurants, shopping centers, and parks.
  • Home, especially if you live in an apartment building.

There is no safe level of secondhand smoke. Smoke from cigarettes contains thousands of chemicals, including chemicals that are known to cause cancer. Secondhand smoke can cause many health problems, such as:

  • Cancer.
  • Heart disease.
  • Stroke.
  • Pregnancy problems, such as pregnancy loss (miscarriage), low birth weight, and early birth (premature).
  • Do not smoke.
  • Keep your home smoke-free.
  • Do not allow smoking in your car.
  • Avoid public places where smoking is allowed.
  • Talk to your employer about your company’s policies on smoking.
    • Your workplace should have a policy separating smoking areas from nonsmoking areas.
    • Smoking areas should have a system for ventilating and cleaning the air.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC): https://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/

  • Secondhand smoke is smoke that comes from burning tobacco. Secondhand smoke exposes you to the dangers of smoking, even if you are not the one smoking.
  • There is no safe level of secondhand smoke. Several chemicals in secondhand smoke are known to cause cancer. Secondhand smoke can also cause many other health problems.
  • To prevent exposure to secondhand smoke, do not smoke, discourage others from smoking, keep your home and car smoke-free, and avoid places where smoking is allowed.

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What is secondhand smoke?

Secondhand smoke is smoke you don’t mean to breathe in. Exposure to secondhand smoke comes from side stream or mainstream smoke. Burning tobacco products, such as cigarettes, cigars or pipes, releases side stream smoke. A person actively smoking nearby exhales mainstream smoke. Both sources release harmful chemicals into the air that affect nonsmokers.

What makes secondhand smoke dangerous?

All smoke from burning nicotine products contains harmful chemicals (toxins). Even nonsmokers inhaling other people’s smoke breathe in these toxins. Side stream smoke from the end of a cigarette, cigar or pipe is unfiltered. It has more harmful toxins than mainstream smoke that someone breathes out.

How does secondhand smoke affect nonsmokers?

Secondhand smoke damages the body in many different ways. Adults exposed to secondhand smoke may experience:

  • Cardiovascular (heart, veins and arteries) disease like high blood pressure, atherosclerosis, heart attack or stroke.
  • Lung problems like chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder (COPD) and asthma.
  • Increased risks of lung cancer and cancers in the brain, bladder, stomach, breast and more.
  • Children exposed to secondhand smoke are more likely to experience:
  • Frequent coughing, sneezing, shortness of breath or other breathing problems.
  • Frequent ear infections.
  • Frequent and more severe asthma attacks.
  • Respiratory infections, such as bronchitis or pneumonia.
  • Damage to eyes (like cataracts) and teeth (like tooth decay).
  • Learning and behavior problems.
  • SIDS (sudden infant death syndrome).

When does secondhand smoke damage start?

Studies have shown that damage from secondhand smoke occurs in as little as five minutes:

  • After five minutes: Arteries becomes less flexible, just like they do in a person who is smoking a cigarette.
  • After 20-30 minutes: Blood starts clotting, and fat deposits in blood vessels increase the risk of heart attack and stroke.
  • After two hours: An irregular heartbeat (arrhythmia) can develop and trigger a heart attack or other serious cardiac problems.

Who is at greater risk of damage from secondhand smoke?

Secondhand smoke affects anyone near burned or exhaled tobacco, but some groups have more smoke exposure:

  • Service industry workers, such as restaurant servers and bartenders: Anyone who works near groups of smokers may be unable to avoid secondhand smoke.
  • Pregnant women: Secondhand smoke affects unborn children and their mothers. Lower amounts of oxygen available for the baby can increase fetal heart rates or lower the birth weight. Women may experience miscarriage, stillbirth, premature delivery or ectopic pregnancy.
  • Infants, children and pets: Young children and animals can’t always choose to leave a smoke-filled room. The constant exposure increases the harmful effects of secondhand smoke.

How is secondhand smoke exposure diagnosed?

Most people who inhale secondhand smoke are not tested for exposure. If you regularly breathe in someone else’s smoke, your doctor may test your saliva (spit), urine or blood for amounts of inhaled nicotine.

Your healthcare provider also may test your lung (pulmonary) function to measure damage. Pulmonary function tests can identify conditions related to secondhand smoke dangers, like asthma.

Can inhalation of secondhand smoke be treated?

There is no treatment for breathing in secondhand smoke. But there are ways to manage your exposure and treat conditions related to secondhand smoke inhalation.

If you are regularly near secondhand smoke, you can reduce the danger by:

  • Moving away from the smoker and finding a smoke-free place.
  • Making sure guests to your home know they cannot smoke inside.
  • Not letting passengers smoke in your car — even with the window down.

Your healthcare provider may treat specific symptoms or diseases caused by secondhand smoke exposure. For example, you may need medications to manage high blood pressure or inhalers to treat asthma or COPD.

Can I prevent secondhand smoke exposure?

The best way to avoid exposure is to stay away from areas where people smoke. This means avoiding restaurants and bars where smoking is still permitted.

Open windows and air filters don’t remove all secondhand smoke. But they may help a little by lowering some of the toxins found in burning tobacco. It’s okay to ask people not to smoke in your car or in your home.

What is the outlook for people exposed to secondhand smoke?

Regular exposure to secondhand smoke can damage your heart and lungs. The best way to stay healthy is to avoid secondhand smoke. Many cities and several states now ban smoking in public places. These bans lower but don’t remove your risk for secondhand smoke exposure.

When should I see a healthcare provider?

You may want to visit your provider if you inhale secondhand smoke regularly. You can ask about secondhand smoke dangers and ways to stay healthy. If you develop heart disease or trouble breathing because of constant secondhand smoke exposure, talk to your provider about management options.

What if someone in my family smokes?

Often, secondhand smoke exposure happens because someone in the family or a close friend smokes tobacco products. If this is the case, suggest they quit smoking for their health and yours.

A note from Cleveland Clinic

If you smoke, remember that your burning tobacco affects others around you. You could be making family members sick. If you are not ready to quit, find ways to reduce their exposure to secondhand smoke, such as smoking only outside.

Last reviewed by a Cleveland Clinic medical professional on 10/09/2020.

References

  • American Cancer Society. Health Risks of Secondhand Smoke. (https://www.cancer.org/cancer/cancer-causes/tobacco-and-cancer/secondhand-smoke.html) Accessed 10/9/2020.
  • American Heart Association. How Smoking and Nicotine Damage Your Body. (https://www.heart.org/en/healthy-living/healthy-lifestyle/quit-smoking-tobacco/how-smoking-and-nicotine-damage-your-body) Accessed 10/9/2020.
  • American Lung Association. Health Effects of Secondhand Smoke. (https://www.lung.org/quit-smoking/smoking-facts/health-effects/secondhand-smoke) Accessed 10/9/2020.
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Second-hand Smoke Facts. (https://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/data_statistics/fact_sheets/secondhand_smoke/general_facts/index.htm) Accessed 10/9/2020.
  • Office on Smoking and Health (US). The Health Consequences of Involuntary Exposure to Tobacco Smoke: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta (GA): Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (US); 2006. 2, Toxicology of Secondhand Smoke. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK44321/ (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK44321/)

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What is Secondhand Smoke?

Secondhand smoke is a mixture of the smoke given off by the burning of tobacco products, such as cigarettes, cigars or pipes and the smoke exhaled by smokers. Secondhand smoke is also called environmental tobacco smoke (ETS). Exposure to secondhand smoke is sometimes called involuntary or passive smoking. Secondhand smoke, classified by EPA as a Group A carcinogen, contains more than 7,000 substances. Secondhand smoke exposure commonly occurs indoors, particularly in homes and cars. Secondhand smoke can move between rooms of a home and between apartment units. Opening a window or increasing ventilation in a home or car is not protective from secondhand smoke.

What are the Health Effects of Secondhand Smoke?

The health effects of secondhand smoke on nonsmoking adults and children are harmful and numerous. Secondhand smoke causes cardiovascular disease (heart disease and stroke), lung cancer, sudden infant death syndrome, more frequent and severe asthma attacks, and other serious health problems. Several landmark health assessments regarding secondhand smoke have been conducted.

Key findings:

  • There is no risk-free level of exposure to secondhand smoke.
  • Since the 1964 Surgeon General’s Report, 2.5 million adults who were nonsmokers died because they breathed secondhand smoke.
  • Secondhand smoke causes nearly 34,000 premature deaths from heart disease each year in the United States among nonsmokers.
  • Nonsmokers who are exposed to secondhand smoke at home or work increase their risk of developing heart disease by 25-30%.
  • Secondhand smoke causes many lung cancer deaths among U.S. nonsmokers each year.
  • Nonsmokers who are exposed to secondhand smoke at home or at work increases their risk of developing lung cancer by 20-30%.
  • Secondhand smoke causes numerous health problems in infants and children, including more frequent and severe asthma attacks, respiratory infections, ear infections, and sudden infant death syndrome.

Learn more about the health effects of secondhand smoke from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Secondhand smoke poses particular health risks to children with asthma.

  • Secondhand smoke is a universal asthma trigger and can elicit an asthma attack or make asthma symptoms more severe.
    • Learn more about indoor asthma triggers.
    • Learn more about asthma from the CDC.
  • Asthma is a chronic disease that affects the airways of the lungs and can lead to coughing, trouble breathing, wheezing and tightness in the chest.
  • Asthma is the most common chronic childhood disease affecting, on average, 1 in 13 school aged children.
  • Exposure to secondhand smoke may cause new cases of asthma in children who have not previously shown symptoms.
  • More than half of US children with asthma are exposed to secondhand smoke (quinto, 2013).

What Can You Do to Reduce Exposure to Secondhand Smoke?

Eliminating secondhand smoke in the indoor environment will reduce its harmful health effects, improve the indoor air quality and the comfort or health of occupants. Secondhand smoke exposure can be reduced through mandated or voluntary smoke-free policy implementation. Some workplaces and enclosed public spaces such as bars and restaurants are smoke-free by law. People can establish and enforce smoke-free rules in their own homes and cars. For multifamily housing, smoke-free policy implementation could be mandatory or voluntary, depending on the type of property and location (e.g., ownership and jurisdiction).

  • The home is becoming the predominant location for the exposure of children and adults to secondhand smoke. (Surgeon General’s Report, 2006)
  • Households within buildings with smoke-free policies have lower PM2.5 compared to buildings without these policies. PM2.5 is a unit of measure for small particles in the air and is used as one indication of air quality. High levels of fine particles in the air can lead to negative health impacts. (Russo, 2014)
  • Prohibiting smoking indoors is the only way to eliminate secondhand smoke from the indoor environment. Ventilation and filtration techniques can reduce, but not eliminate, secondhand smoke. (Bohoc, 2010)

Many resources are available to assist you in implementing smoke-free policies and to quit smoking:

How Much Progress Has Been Made Nationally in Reducing Exposure to Secondhand Smoke?

January 2018 marked the 25 th anniversary of the landmark EPA health assessment, “Respiratory Health Effects of Passive Smoking: Lung Cancer and Other Disorders.” To learn about progress over the years, read:

Resources

The following links exit the site

  • Multi-media
    • Ad Council: The Breathe Easies, Don’t Smoke in the House
    • Making the Business Case for Prevention: Smoke-free Multiunit Housing
  • Podcasts
    • How Maine’s Public Housing Authorities Became 100% Smoke-free
  • Secondhand Smoke and Multi-unit housing *Coming soon
  • Resources from our Federal Partners
    • HUD Smoke-free Multifamily Housing
    • CDC Office of Smoking and Health
    • National Cancer Institute
    • Reports from the Surgeon General

HANDLING UNWANTED TOBACCO SMOKE IN APARTMENTS AND CONDOMINIUMS

Secondhand smoke seeping into apartments or condominiums from neighboring units poses both a health risk and a significant nuisance. The only fail-proof solution to this problem is for buildings to go entirely smokefree, either by a policy voluntarily adopted by building management or by local ordinance. Since personal dwellings are not considered public spaces, they are generally not covered under existing legislation regulating smoking in public places, but many states and municipalities prohibit smoking in common areas of multi-family housing. Additionally, some communities are now adopting ordinances to require no smoking in all or a certain percentage of the private units of multi-family housing.

While it is possible to file a lawsuit, the record of resolving drifting secondhand smoke conflicts in the courts is somewhat mixed. Nonsmokers have filed lawsuits against landlords or fellow tenants on the basis of nuisance, breach of statutory duty to keep the premises habitable, breach of the common law covenant of peaceful enjoyment, negligence, harassment, battery, and intentional infliction of emotional distress; courts have ruled for and against nonsmokers in individual cases.

Despite not always having a specific law to turn to, there are still a number of steps that you can take to protect yourself from secondhand smoke in your home. When weighing your options, keep in mind that air filtration and other ventilation systems do not eliminate the health hazards caused by secondhand smoke. Ventilation is not an effective alternative to creating safer and healthier smokefree living environments.

Breathe easy (and reduce your risk for illness) with these guidelines for improving indoor air quality.

How to prevent secondhand smoke from entering your garage

How dirty is the air in your home? Indoor air quality can be two to five times more polluted than outdoor air, and since the Environmental Protection Agency estimates that people spend 90% of their time indoors, this is a big deal.

Poor air quality can threaten your family’s health, so it’s important to keep things out of your home that cause pollution, and ensure that your house is well-ventilated. Follow these tips from the American Lung Association to get started on purifying the air you breathe every day.

Some indoor air pollutants can kill. Among the most dangerous is secondhand smoke. Thousands of children are hospitalized or sickened with respiratory tract infections each year, and smoke puts older adults with cardiovascular or lung illness at higher risk for health problems.

Since cigarettes are so harmful, never let anyone smoke inside your home. The Surgeon General states that there is no safe level of secondhand smoke. Ask smokers to take it outside.

How to prevent secondhand smoke from entering your garage

Carbon monoxide poisoning claims the lives of over 400 people each year and thousands of others become ill or seek medical attention after exposure to the odorless gas.

Early symptoms might resemble the flu, but look for these differences: If more than one family member has symptoms — even your pets — and you feel better away from home, you may have a carbon monoxide problem. Protect yourself by installing a carbon monoxide detector near your sleeping rooms. Also have all fuel-burning appliances inspected by a qualified technician once a year to keep the deadly gas away from your home.

Burning gas or other fuels indoors can produce dangerous levels of indoor air pollution and deadly carbon monoxide.

Fumes from cars or lawnmowers left running in enclosed spaces, like garages, can endanger your health. To that point, you should also only use gas stoves and heaters that vent directly to the outside. Never use charcoal grills indoors.

Radon gas: It’s silent. It’s odorless. It’s found in many American homes, and it is the second biggest cause of lung cancer, after cigarette smoke.

Radon is the leading cause of lung cancer in nonsmokers and the second-leading cause of lung cancer, period. Scientists estimate that radon causes thousands of deaths annually.

Radon is an odorless, invisible gas that occurs naturally in soil and rock and can only be detected through testing. Testing your home for radon is easy and inexpensive and getting rid of the gas may save your life.

Paints release trace amounts of gases for months after application — even though they appear to be fully dried and the smell is gone.

These gases are called VOCs, or volatile organic compounds, and can include highly toxic chemicals such as formaldehyde and acetaldehyde.Use “low-VOC” paints, varnishes, waxes and other chemicals, and open windows and use exhaust fans to remove gases when you paint. Do not store open paint containers indoors.

Rain and high humidity can bring moisture indoors, which can lead to mold and mildew. Dampness alone — even without mold — is associated with higher risk of wheezing, coughing and asthma symptoms.

Check your roof, foundation, and basement once a year to catch leaks or moisture problems and route water away from your home’s foundation.

Help keep asthma triggers away from your house by fixing leaks and drips as soon as they start. Standing water and high humidity encourage the growth of dust mites, mold and mildew — some of the most common triggers that can worsen asthma. Use a dehumidifier or air conditioner when needed, and clean both regularly.

Air cleaning devices can help reduce some of the tiniest airborne particles, and as part of a comprehensive strategy, may help reduce indoor air pollution. However, they have limits. For example, air purifiers aren’t effective against gases or humidity. Larger, heavier particles — including many allergens — fall too quickly out of the air to be effectively removed this way.

Pet allergies can come from an animal’s saliva, urine, feces and dead skin cells, so no pet is “hypoallergenic.”

If you’re sensitive to pet allergens, keep furry friends away from sleeping rooms. Clean floors and upholstered furniture frequently (two or more times a week) to reduce exposure. Washing you pets or using indoor air cleaning devices helps will not help much.

Carpet traps unhealthy particles — including chemicals, dust mites, pet dander, dirt and fungi — and vacuuming can make them airborne. If you do have carpets, use a HEPA (high efficiency particle air) vacuum cleaner to ensure better air quality. Hard surface flooring, like wood, tile or cork can be readily cleaned by damp mopping.

Dust allergies are actually allergies to dust mites — microscopic pests that need moisture to survive. Dust mites feed on human skin and live in bedding, pillows, mattresses, stuffed toys, upholstery, and carpets. To fight dust mites in your home try these steps: Vacuum and steam clean upholstered furniture regularly, keep humidity levels below 50% with a dehumidifier, use dust-mite resistant covers and wash bedding in very hot water.

Asbestos is a mineral fiber that can still be found in many older homes. Inhaling tiny asbestos fibers can increase the risk of lung cancer and other lung diseases. Pipe coverings, flooring, shingles and roofs are likely places to find it.

Check asbestos-containing materials regularly for damage. Don’t try to remove asbestos that is already in place; it is best left undisturbed. If the material is damaged, or you plan to remodel, always get professional help.

Proper ventilation is one of the best ways to protect and improve the air in your home. High levels of moisture increase dampness and the growth of mold, which can lead to wheezing, coughing and asthma attacks in people with allergies. Normal daily household activities — including cooking, washing, and even breathing — produce water vapor, so having adequate ventilation is essential.

Try these dehumidifying tricks to keep the humidity in your home below 50%: Install and run exhaust fans in bathrooms, make sure vents exhaust air outdoors and not into your home, and remove any mold damage or growth and fix all leaks.

Dry cleaning solvents can be toxic to breathe. Let dry-cleaned items air outdoors before bringing them inside to prevent chemicals from entering your home.

Lead-based paints can still be found in homes built before 1978. Any peeling, chipping or chalking of lead-based paint can increase the risk of unhealthy lead exposure.

Young children risk delays in mental development, lower IQ and behavioral problems from inhaling lead paint dust. Some of those damages can be permanent. Remodeling that requires sanding, scraping or removing walls will release paint dust into your living space.

However, you can reduce the risk if you take the proper steps: Leave lead-based paint undisturbed if it is in good condition and do not sand or burn off paint that may contain lead; do not remove lead paint yourself; and if your work or hobby involves lead, change clothes and use doormats before entering your home.

Are you suffering from secondhand smoke drifting into your apartment or condo?

You are not alone. Secondhand smoke from even one person smoking indoors can drift through the building and into other units, causing health problems and reduced quality of life for other residents.

Residents of multi-unit housing (apartments, condominiums, townhomes) suffer disproportionate levels of secondhand smoke exposure. The CDC’s 2015 Vital Signs report that found more than 1 in 3 nonsmokers who live in rental housing are exposed to secondhand smoke.

Most cities and states do not yet have laws that address smoking in multi-unit housing. However, many properties now have their own smokefree policies to protect the health of residents and the safety and cleanliness of the building. You can work with your property manager, building owner, or HOA, as well as your neighbors, to adopt a smokefree policy for your building, using the following steps:

First, look at your rental lease or condo rules.

See if it has language restricting where smoking is allowed. If it does, and neighbors are violating the policy, share enforcement tips with your housing provider. If it does not specifically address smoking, there might be terms and conditions about nuisance, noise, or other behaviors that can impact the quality of life and safe enjoyment of the premises, which might be used to make a case that your neighbors should not be smoking in a way that comes into your unit.

Second, remind your housing provider that it is legal to adopt a smokefree policy.

Some housing providers are hesitant to adopt a smokefree policy because they mistakenly think it is illegal or discriminatory to do so. However, they have the right to set reasonable rules that protect the property and its occupants. Typically, a smokefree policy can be adopted for all current and future residents in the same manner as other rules that regulate activities that present a risk to the building or impact other residents, like loud music or pets. Your housing provider may not know about the benefits of having a smokefree property, including cost savings and reduced risks.

Third, read the documents listed below to learn about what you can do to address secondhand smoke in your building. Keep a log for a few weeks about where and when you experience drifting smoke. Get a letter from your doctor if your health is impacted by the smoke exposure.

Fourth, write a letter to your property manager, building owner, or HOA to ask them to adopt a smokefree policy and include the resources below.

Communicating practical information to your housing provider that shows why it is easy and in their best interest to adopt a smokefree policy can be an effective way to convince him or her to support your desire to be free from unwanted secondhand smoke drifting into your home from elsewhere in or around the building.

Fifth, share your story with your local tobacco control program and City Council member. It’s helpful for them to hear from community members about who is still exposed to secondhand smoke. Your experiences can help inform and motivate communities to take action to expand the availability of smokefree multi-unit housing.

How to prevent secondhand smoke from entering your garage

How to prevent secondhand smoke from entering your garage

It’s a gorgeous, sunny Sunday afternoon, so you throw open the windows to let a breeze in. As you admire the view from your apartment, you hear a familiar clicking sound from below. *Thud* – you close your windows in a huff. The last thing you want right now is your neighbour’s cigarette smoke wafting into your bedroom!

According to our 2016 Community Survey on Cancer Prevention, 93% of Australians want to live in smoke-free homes. Clearly, many of us think second-hand smoke is a nuisance. But is it a health risk? How concerned should you be? And what can you do about it?

Is second-hand smoke a health risk?

In a word: Yes. There are more than seven thousand chemicals in tobacco smoke, of which at least 250 are known to be harmful and at least 69 are known to cause cancer. Second-hand smoke causes more than 1.2 million premature deaths each year worldwide.

How far can smoke travel in an apartment block?

If you live in an apartment block with neighbours who smoke, you’re particularly at risk of breathing in second-hand smoke. This is because smoke travels easily through homes and common areas via doorways, windows, cracks in walls, electrical lines, ventilation systems and plumbing.

This means that, even if you’re living in a larger apartment complex, you might still be breathing in second-hand smoke. In fact, living in an apartment means you’re twice as likely to be exposed to second-hand smoke than people living in detached houses. Cancer Council has found that 1 in 3 people living in apartments in NSW reported second-hand smoke exposure inside their homes. Of these people, 62% experience it weekly*.

What can you do about second-hand smoke?

Did you know that NSW strata committees have the authority to ban smoking by introducing a smoke-free by-law? Bear with us. This basically means that you, as an apartment owner or renter, can make your apartment building smoke-free.

How? We’re here to help. Download our ‘Achieving Smoke-Free Apartment Living’ toolkit. This will help you understand the health, financial and legal benefits of smoke-free apartment blocks, and how you can get a smoke-free by-law introduced in your building.

Trying to address smoke-drift in other settings? Check out our smoke-free environments page for information on smoke-free retirement villages, houses and prisons.

How to prevent secondhand smoke from entering your garage

Clean, fresh, indoor air is essential to your family’s health, energy and well being. Those with allergies or asthma often find relief when airborne irritants are removed from indoor air. Listed below are six air pollutants that can affect your home’s air quality and how you can limit your exposure.

1. Radon

Radon is a naturally occurring radioactive gas that can’t be seen, tasted, or smelled. It’s known to cause lung cancer. Radon sources include earth and rock beneath your home; well water and building materials. Steps should be taken to reduce radon levels if a test shows a measurement of 4 picocuries per liter (pCi/L) or higher.

It’s easy and inexpensive to test for radon. Low-cost, do-it-yourself test kits are available in hardware stores, home improvement stores, or by mail. Be sure to buy a test kit that has passed EPA’s testing program or is state-certified. The kit will have the words, “Meets EPA Requirements” on the box. If you are buying or selling a home you can hire a contractor to conduct the test for you. For more information on radon, visit the EPA website at sosradon.org.

2. Carbon Monoxide (CO)

Carbon monoxide is an odorless, colorless gas. Carbon monoxide can build up indoors and is dangerous to people and pets. At low concentrations it can cause fatigue in healthy people and chest pain in people with heart disease.

Source of carbon monoxide include: fumes from unvented kerosene and gas space heaters, leaking chimneys and furnaces, gas water heaters, woodstoves, lanterns, and fireplaces and gas ranges and automobile exhaust. To prevent carbon monoxide poisoning:

  • Keep gas appliances properly adjusted.
  • Buy only vented space heaters (space heaters that install on an outside wall and draw air in from the outside)
  • Use the manufacturer’s recommended fuel in kerosene space heaters.
  • Above gas stoves install and use an exhaust fan vented to the outdoors.
  • Remember to open the flue before lighting your fireplace
  • Choose properly sized woodstoves that are certified to meet EPA emission standards. Make certain that woodstove doors fit tightly.
  • Hire a trained professional to inspect, clean, and tune-up your gas central heating system annually. Repair any leaks promptly.
  • Do not idle your car inside the garage.

3. Nitrogen Dioxide (NO2)

Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is part of a group of gaseous air pollutants produced from auto exhaust and the combustion of fossil fuel. Nitrogen dioxide can cause eye, nose and throat irritation. It can also cause increased respiratory infections in young children.

Sources of nitrogen dioxide include: kerosene heaters, unvented gas cooking or heating appliances, and tobacco smoking. Hence, a useful source explains the ill-effects of smoking.

To prevent nitrogen dioxide poisoning:

  • Keep gas appliances properly adjusted.
  • Buy only vented space heaters (space heaters that install on an outside wall and draw air in from the outside)
  • Use the manufacturer’s recommended fuel in kerosene space heaters.
  • Above gas stoves install and use an exhaust fan vented to the outdoors.
  • Remember to open the flue before lighting your fireplace
  • Choose properly sized woodstoves that are certified to meet EPA emission standards. Make certain that woodstove doors fit tightly.
  • Hire a trained professional to inspect, clean, and tune-up your gas central heating system annually. Repair any leaks promptly.
  • Do not idle your car inside the garage.

4. Biological- Indoor Mold

Molds are a type of fungi that can be found both indoors and outdoors. Molds thrive in warm, damp, and humid places. Indoor mold can cause eye, nose, and throat irritation; shortness of breath; dizziness; lethargy; fever and digestive problems.

Sources of mold include: Wet or moist walls, ceilings, carpets, and furniture. Poorly maintained humidifiers, dehumidifiers and air conditioners

To prevent mold exposure:

  • Install and use fans vented to the outdoors in kitchens and bathrooms.
  • Vent clothes dryers to the outdoors.
  • Routinely clean cool mist and ultrasonic humidifiers according to the manufacturer’s instructions; refill with clean water daily.
  • Empty water trays in air conditioners, dehumidifiers, and refrigerators weekly.
  • Clean, dry or remove water-damaged carpets
  • Use basements as living areas only if they are leak proof and have adequate ventilation.
  • Use a home dehumidifier if necessary, to maintain a humidity level between 30-50 percent.

Get rid of indoor mold with Wet & Forget Indoor Mold+Mildew Disinfectant Cleaner. Wet & Forget Indoor is an easy, one-step spray and wipe formula that cleans, deodorizes and disinfects. Just spray the surface, wait 10 minutes and wipe dry with a clean cloth, or air dry.

How to prevent secondhand smoke from entering your garage

5. Secondhand Smoke

Smoke from tobacco use can cause eye, nose, and throat irritation; headaches; lung cancer and may contribute to heart disease. For children it can cause an increased risk of lower respiratory tract infections, such as bronchitis and pneumonia, and ear infections. Secondhand smoke contains more than 7,000 chemicals hundreds of which are toxic.

Sources of secondhand smoke include: lit cigarettes, pipes, and cigars

To prevent exposure to secondhand smoke:

  • Do not smoke inside or allow guests to smoke in your home
  • Do not smoke if children are present, particularly infants and toddlers.
  • If smoking indoors cannot be avoided, increase ventilation in the area where smoking occurs by opening windows or using exhaust fans.

How to prevent secondhand smoke from entering your garage

6. Lead

Lead-based paint and lead contaminated dust are especially hazardous to children. Low levels can cause adverse health effects including impaired mental and physical development. Lead-based paints were banned in 1978 so houses built earlier may contain some lead-based paint.

Sources of lead include: Lead-based paint, contaminated soil, dust, and lead in drinking water.

To prevent exposure:

  • Do not remove lead paint yourself. Leave lead-based paint undisturbed if it is in good condition; do not sand or burn off paint that may contain lead.
  • If your work or hobby involves lead, change clothes and use a doormat before entering your home. Do not track or bring lead dust inside.
  • Keep children’s play areas as dust-free and clean as possible.

How to prevent secondhand smoke from entering your garage

Real Estate & Corporate Litigator & Compliance Trainer

Not only can the offensive smell be stopped, but damages may be available to you as the neighbor who has had to endure the offensive smell throughout its existence. In fact, the law in New York is not so extreme that it requires odors to adversely impact your health in order for you to have rights. Instead, you have a claim so long as the odors are unpleasant and offensive. Odors that typically give rise to these types of disputes are caused by chemicals, farms, factories, restaurants and the like. To stop the smell, the claim that you should bring is called a private nuisance cause of action and to win on such a claim you will have to demonstrate that your enjoyment of life and property has been rendered objectively uncomfortable based upon unreasonable activities causing the smell.

Specifically, the courts explain that the following five (5) elements must be proven to prevail on this claim:

  1. 1. An interference substantial in nature
  2. 2. Intentional in origin
  3. 3. Unreasonable in character
  4. 4. With a person’s property right to use and enjoy land
  5. 5. Caused by another’s conduct in acting or failure to act

You should take note that you don’t even have to be forced from your home by the smell in order to win on your claim. Instead, and even if you stay in your home, as long as your property experienced a diminution in its rental value during the course of the existence of the smell, you can recover that diminution in addition to having the smell’s cause be stopped.

Shockingly though, secondhand smoke infiltration emanating from a neighbor’s own home is almost never considered a private nuisance and no action can likely be brought to stop the smoke. The only exception to this rule, where smoking can be stopped, is when there is an express prohibition against smoking in residences within the locality where the neighbors reside. Such a rule prohibiting smoking can come from either a local statute / code or from a private contractual right existing in the house rules of an apartment building, cooperative apartment or condominium building.

Apr. 30, 2016 12:17 pm

One comedian joked that ‘a survey has shown that smoking is one of the leading causes of statistics.’

While that is likely true, the reason it is studied so much is that smoking is a very costly habit. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says that smoking and secondhand smoke cost the United States $300 billion a year in health bills and lost productivity.

Studies have shown smokers have significantly greater absenteeism than non-smokers: smokers take an average of almost eight more sick days a year than non-smokers.

As with many other states, Iowa prohibits smoking in workplaces, but allows employers to designate smoking areas for their smoking employees. There still remains confusion about how far an employer can go to regulate smoking, however.

Here are some tips:

First, an employer can ban smoking entirely on its own property. An Iowa employer does not have to provide smoking breaks, smoking areas or any accommodations for smokers.

Second, it is legal for employers to charge employees more for health insurance because they are smokers. In fact, the Affordable Care Act, which eliminates discrimination against employees for many health conditions, still permits employers and insurers to increase health insurance premiums for smokers while reducing premiums for non-smokers.

Third, an Iowa employer also may legally decide to hire only non-smokers, and fire someone for smoking — even after work. While at least 18 states prohibit discrimination against tobacco users, Iowa is not one of them.

The American Civil Liberties Union has argued that refusing to hire a smoker constitutes ‘lifestyle discrimination,’ but it has not been a successful legal theory in Iowa. Rather, employers correctly have argued — and the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has agreed — that smoking is not a protected class under federal law.

The majority of state laws agree. Only eight states protect employees from discrimination if they use lawful consumable products off duty, which would include tobacco, and Iowa is not one of them.

Employers further argue they are not denying smokers the right to use tobacco products, just choosing not to hire them. Smokers have responded, ‘What’s next? Are employers not going to hire overly caffeinated people?’

In any event, many employers choose to show some tolerance and consideration toward their smoking employees. Employers know that many smokers really would rather quit, but they are addicted to nicotine.

In addition, employers do not want to lose good talent because of a smoking addiction.

Employers accordingly should avoid browbeating smoking employees and should focus more on following proper management techniques and planning. For example, smokers need to know that other non-smoking employees are watching them. If smoking employees are heading outside for a smoke every hour, it creates the perception of unfairness for other employees that are only allowed certain prescribed breaks.

An employer should consider permitting smoking only during other company recognized break periods. If smokers object, remind them of other smoke-free alternatives such as chewing gum.

Smoke and smokers’ breath may be offensive to non-smoking co-workers and customers. To prevent offensive smoke from entering the building, employers should discourage smoking within the immediate vicinity of entrances and exits. Rather, smoking should be permitted only in a designated area away from the main entrance or door to the building.

In addition, consider requiring smokers to use breath mints or brush their teeth after smoking a cigarette and to wash their hands. The company also should make arrangements to minimize cigarette litter around its building.

Despite all the studies done on tobacco use, the American Lung Association says there is no data proving nicotine-free hiring encourages people to quit smoking. Rather, it claims the best practice is to offer cessation programs to your smoking employees.

As any former smoker knows, quitting smoking is very easy. They have all done it a thousand times.

• Wilford H. Stone is with Lynch Dallas Attorneys at Law.

How to prevent secondhand smoke from entering your garage

Kelly Bacon is a licensed general contractor with over 40 years of experience in construction, home building and remodeling, and commercial building. He is a member of The Spruce Home Improvement Review Board.

How to prevent secondhand smoke from entering your garage

How to prevent secondhand smoke from entering your garage

Stockbyte / Getty Images

  • Working Time: 30 mins
  • Total Time: 30 mins
  • Skill Level: Beginner
  • Estimated Cost: $10 to $100

Fumes, odors, and gases from your attached garage can find their way into your living space and affect indoor air. Cars, mowers, paints, and lubricants contain or generate substances that can enter your home through open doors, gaps around closed doors, ducts, and other wall and ceiling penetrations. A Canadian study published in 2016 found measurable quantities of benzene (a gasoline-related pollutant) inside houses with attached garages, while finding little in those without a garage. Garage-generated carbon monoxide can even leak into your home and trigger carbon monoxide detectors. Fortunately, you can take a few steps to keep your indoor air quality free of these substances.

What Is Carbon Monoxide?

Carbon monoxide is a colorless, odorless, tasteless gas that forms when carbons in fuel don’t burn completely. This gas is highly toxic, poisonous, and deadly in large amounts. Since you can’t detect carbon monoxide on your own, it is vitally important to install carbon monoxide detectors in your home.

What You’ll Need

Equipment / Tools

  • Carbon monoxide detector
  • Chemical storage locker, plastic bin, or ice chest (optional)

Materials

  • Weatherstripping
  • Caulk
  • Spray foam
  • Self-closing door and installation supplies
  • Drywall finishing supplies
  • Exhaust fan

Instructions

Avoid Trapping Fumes in the Garage

Avoid running your car, motorcycle, chainsaw, lawnmower, or any other gasoline-powered engine any longer than absolutely necessary while in the garage. Never start your car or any other internal combustion engine when the garage door is closed. When you do start the engine after the door has been opened, move it outside as soon as possible, then shut the door to prevent exhaust fumes from floating back into the garage. Shut your car off as soon as possible when you pull it into the garage and leave the door open for a few minutes to allow fresh air in.

When possible, avoid placing mechanical systems such as gas-powered water heaters and furnaces in the garage.

Seal the Gaps

Fumes often find their way into your home through gaps. Assess where there may be gaps from your garage into your home and use inexpensive supplies such as weatherstripping, caulk, and spray foam to address them.

Make sure the door leading from the garage into the house closes tightly and proper weatherstripping is applied. If the weatherstripping is worn, replace it.

Seal all penetrations like ducts and wiring that lead into the house or the ceiling above the garage. Caulk and spray foam are good products for sealing these types of gaps.

Finish the Walls and Ceilings

In new homes, it’s not uncommon for the garage to be left with open walls or with drywall attached but the joints not finished. Both these conditions allow garage pollutants to easily find their way inside.

Garage walls and ceilings that are completely covered with drywall, with joints properly sealed with tape and compound, and with the surface primed and painted, are much less likely to allow pollutants into the home. While this will be a larger project, it will pay off in not only protecting your indoor air but also making your garage more attractive and adding to the value of your home.

Most newer homes are required to have a fire rating between garage and living areas. These walls and ceilings are supposed to be fire taped to prevent fire from entering living spaces for a certain amount of time—this taping can also help with insulation.

Employ a Self-Closing Door Into the House

You often find yourself with full arms when you’re entering the house from the garage. The result can be that the door remains open until you set the items down. Or maybe you or the kids simply forget to close the door or failed to close it all the way. This can allow nasty fumes from the garage to enter the house quickly and easily. You can avoid this problem by installing a self-closing door.

Store All Chemicals Properly

Make sure all containers of potentially dangerous substances are sealed. Don’t let cans of paint thinner, solvents, and other liquids sit uncovered. If you can smell any chemicals, it means there are fumes in the garage air. Not only are you breathing them in whenever you are in your garage, but they can also enter your home.

When storing a few items, think about getting a plastic bin with a sealable lid or a dedicated ice chest to use to store them. This will provide an additional layer of protection.

If you store many potentially volatile substances in your garage, consider buying a lockable chemical storage cabinet. This will help ensure kids and pets don’t access them.

Use an Exhaust Fan

If you spend a lot of time in the garage working with chemicals, paints, wood finishes, combustion engines, or other such items, consider installing an exhaust fan that sends the smells and fumes to the outdoors. A decent bathroom or kitchen fan will be sufficient.

Install Carbon Monoxide Detectors

Make sure your home has at least one carbon monoxide (CO) detector installed. If you’re curious about the CO levels in your garage, mount one out there, too, at least temporarily. It might be interesting to see if it goes off on a regular basis. If it goes off when you have not been running your vehicle in the garage, it could be a sign of a dangerous issue with your furnace or gas water heater.

Warning

When a carbon monoxide detector sounds the alarm, never ignore it. Immediately ventilate the area and shut off anything that is powered by gas. If you’re feeling symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning, including headache, nausea or vomiting, rapid heart rate, chest pain, confusion, dizziness, shortness of breath, or flu-like symptoms, call 911 or go to the hospital immediately.

Choose a Detached Garage

If you’re planning to build a new house or garage, give some thought to making the garage fully detached from the house. You will keep odors, fumes, noise, and fire hazards separate from your main residence.

Mallach, G. et al. Exhaust Ventilation in Attached Garages Improves Residential Indoor Air Quality. International Journal of Indoor Environment and Health, vol. 27, no. 2, 2016. doi:10.1111/ina.12321

Carbon Monoxide: The Silent Killer. UCONN Health, Connecticut Poison Control Center.

In people with COPD, secondhand smoke is extremely hazardous. Learn how to protect yourself from it while traveling. Avoiding secondhand smoke can be simple enough when you are in the comfort of your own home, but how can you avoid it when traveling? You are exposed to secondhand smoke when you breathe in pollutants in the air from cigarette smoke and

    Posted on 03rd Sep, 2021 11:09 AM 1486 Views

Avoiding secondhand smoke can be simple enough when you are in the comfort of your own home, but how can you avoid it when traveling? You are exposed to secondhand smoke when you breathe in pollutants in the air from cigarette smoke and other tobacco products.

For people with the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or ​COPD, secondhand smoke exposure can prompt an exacerbation of symptoms, which can lead to hospitalization.   Traveling can put people with COPD at particular risk for possible exposure. For those without COPD, you may want to avoid the 7000 chemicals and 70 known carcinogens in secondhand smoke.

Avoiding Exposure to Secondhand Smoke While Traveling

Although many cities and communities have made great strides in banning smoking from public buildings, restaurants, and parks, there are still parts of the world where smoking is allowed everywhere—even on flights. The best way to prevent exposure to secondhand smoke is to plan ahead and to advocate for yourself. Here are suggested ways to avoid secondhand smoke and the COPD exacerbations that may come with it while traveling.

1. Request a Non-Smoking Room

When making a reservation in some parts of the world, non-smoking is the assumed preference unless you request a smoking room. By the same token, however, some places will automatically assume you want a smoking room if you do not explicitly request non-smoking accommodations. Don’t take a chance. Whether you are booking a hotel room or a cabin on a cruise ship, always request a non-smoking room.

In addition, make your sensitivity to cigarette smoke known at the time of your reservation and at check-in. The hotel or ship’s cleaning crew can use a high-powered air filter system to clean the air in your room prior to your arrival if smoking has previously been allowed in the room.

2. Use a Smoke Filter Mask

If you can’t avoid secondhand smoke in public places, avoid breathing it in by covering your mouth in smoky areas. A filter mask, such as the N95 respirator mask, which is shown to block 95% of air particles,   is a handy and lightweight method to prevent exposure.

If you are fashion conscious, you can cover the mask with a lightweight scarf. Or, try one of the new fashionable high-filtration masks, such as the Vogmask, which comes in a variety of colors and patterns.

3. Keep Smoke Out of Your Clothing

If you can’t stay in a smoke-free hotel, keep your clothes stored in a garment bag or suitcase to keep them from absorbing cigarette smoke.

  • If the dresser in the hotel is older and smells of cigarette smoke, the best thing to do is to not use it and keep your clothes in your suitcase.
  • Likewise, if you spend time in smoke-filled areas, causing your clothes to smell, store them in a separate bag away from the rest of your clothes.

4. Take Care of Your Health

Don’t let your healthcare regimen take a vacation while you travel. Be sure to pack extra medicine and take it as prescribed. In addition, stay hydrated and don’t skimp on sleep.

Listen to your body. Don’t push yourself too hard, which can wear down your body and make you more susceptible to a COPD exacerbation.

Also, be sure to practice good hand washing hygiene and to use hand sanitizer whenever possible to avoid catching germs. This is especially important on airplanes, cruise ships, and other public transportation.