How to prevent urinary tract infections

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How to prevent urinary tract infections

The best natural remedies for a bladder infection include drinking plenty of water and cranberry juice. Water flushes out bacteria and other toxins that contribute to the bladder infection, and cranberry juice has anti-infective properties. Over-the-counter cranberry tablets can be taken for those who cannot tolerate drinking large amounts of juice. These supplements can cause the urine to turn pink, and should not be mistaken for bleeding of the urinary tract.

Other natural remedies include taking warm baths and applying a heating pad to the lower abdomen. Although these treatments will not eradicate the infection, they might help relieve symptoms. Typical symptoms of a bladder infection include burning and pain upon urination, bladder pressure, and frequently urinating small amounts of urine. In addition, blood in the urine, as well as cloudy urine, might also occur.

Drinking lemon juice that has been diluted in warm water is also one of the more popular natural remedies for a bladder infection. Although lemon juice can slightly irritate the urinary tract, it acts as a natural diuretic that promotes urination and can help flush out bacteria. Frequently, natural remedies are very effective in relieving symptoms, but antibiotics may be needed to eradicate the infection and prevent complications.

Typically, a urinary tract infection will respond well to sulfa-based antibiotics. These antibiotics can be hard on the stomach and cause significant symptoms such as a gnawing pain in the stomach, nausea, and diarrhea. A patient can increase his or her fluid intake to lessen the side effects of the antibiotics while helping clear the infection. If the antibiotics are not finished, the bladder infection can progress to a kidney infection. If not treated, this could result in permanent kidney damage or even kidney failure.

When fever, chills, and bloody urine are present, natural remedies for a bladder infection might not be the preferred method of treatment. In these cases, a health care provider needs to be notified so he or she can implement an effective plan to eliminate the infection before it gets worse. In certain resistant infections, hospitalization might be recommended and treatment may include intravenous fluid replacement and intravenous antibiotics.

Herbal preparations are sometimes used to treat a bladder infection, but patients should be cautious when using them. Some herbal supplements and teas can interact with prescription medications, causing them to become more or less potent. In addition, some anticoagulant medications can interact with herbal remedies, causing the blood to further thin. Unless recommended by a medical professional, herbal remedies should be used with extreme caution or avoided altogether.

How to prevent urinary tract infectionsA UTI or urine infection can be exceedingly unpleasant, not to mention, very painful. It is no wonder that anyone suffering from these infections wants to get rid of them fast. If you are wondering if there is a way to cure UTI within 24 hours, read on for important information.

Cure UTI within a day the conventional way

UTIs affect both men and women, though women seem to suffer more from them. UTI occurs when the body has an inherently poor immune system. The bacterium in the urine goes on into the urinary tract to reach the bladder, causing inflammation. The result of UTI is:intense pain or burning when urinating as well as the tendency to go more often to the bathroom but hardly producing a few drops each time. Women suffering from urine infections must naturally be aware of the fact that a UTI can get serious very quickly if ignored and can even turn into a kidney infection.

To cure UTI within a day, your best bet is antibiotics. Seek help from your family physician to start a course of antibiotics immediately. You will feel better within a day if you take the recommended dose. Even if you do feel better; make sure to complete the entire course of the drug-else the infection might come back.

How to cure UTI without antibiotics

Some people get recurrent UTIs and most of them do not want to take antibiotics frequently. Majority of the classes of antibiotics available today have few, if not several, side effects. Also, when we regularly take such drugs, we unknowingly kill off the healthy bacteria in the gut. This in turn, affects the PH of our urinary system leading to several complications like Candida, yeast and other fungal infections. So, to cure UTI in 24 hours without taking harmful antibiotics, you can follow the home remedies given here:

  1. Eat plenty of probiotic This will increase the percentage of good bacteria which will fight the infection-causing bacteria in the bladder. Take Khombucha drinks or milk kefir which is a natural probiotic drink. Eat sauerkraut, applekraut and also miso soups.
  2. Take cod liver oil This is known to increase the immunity.
  3. Take D-mannose powder every few hours to remove bacteria from the gut and also prevent it from sticking to the lining of the bladder. You need to take several doses for this powder/pill for the remedy to work within 24 hours. D-mannose is a natural sugar which does not get metabolized like other normal sugars and is even safe for diabetic patients suffering from UTIs.
  4. Drink plenty of Cranberry juice, water and green tea to flush out the bacteria.
  5. If the pain is extremely bad, pop in a few Ibuprofens to help with it.

Make sure you maintain the dose of D-Mannose in your body to clear all of the bacteria. If, despite these steps, your UTI is not cured within 24 hours, you must seek medical help promptly. Do watch out for signs such as extreme back pain, abdominal cramps, vomiting, fever and nausea. These could be signs of kidney infections or even kidney stones. In either case, you might need IV fluids with antibiotics and other prescription drugs for relief.

How can you prevent UTIs

Many of the remedies prescribed above can help cure UTI in 24 hours. However, most of them are also useful in preventing recurrent UTIs and are natural enough to be taken on a daily basis when you are asymptomatic. So continue these remedies even after you start feeling better. Here are the steps to prevent UTI:

  1. Take D- Mannose powder every 2 hours or after you pee. The ideal prescribed dose is 500mg (capsule or powder) taken in juice or water every 3 hours for 5-7 days.
  2. Take enzymes Interfase Plus from Klaire Labs and Biofilm Defense from Kirkman. Both these enzymes are very beneficial in removing the fibrin and dissolving the sugar of bacterial organisms to prevent recurrent UTI.
  3. In case of bacterium other than E.coli causing the UTI, supplements like Lauricidn are very useful. It contains anti bacterial, anti fungal and anti viral compounds and is known to combat many species of bacteria including Streptococcus and Staphylococcus.
  4. Drink 2 glasses of cranberry juice without soda or sugar in it. This is known to have preventive action against recurrent UTI. Alternatively, go for 500mg cranberry supplements daily. Talk to your doctor if cranberry is right for you particularly when you are on blood thinners.
  5. Drink a glass of water every one hour. The more you urinate, the more the bacterium is flushed out. Avoid holding urine for long periods of time.
  6. Take Echinacea and Goldenseal supplements that are known to improve immune system. You can even use herbal teas containing Echinacea, goldenseal and nettle leaves to provide anti-inflammatory action.
  7. Take 500 mg of vitamin C twice a day. This will make your body stronger and more resistant to bacterial infections.

When trying to cure UTI in 24 hours, avoid alcohol, nicotine, spicy and hot foods as well as caffeinated beverages since all of these are known to increase bladder irritation. Apart from these remedies and precautions, you must also ask your spouse/partner to follow hygienic practices particularly if your UTI is sex-related.Take plenty of rest as that is one of the most important remedies to cure UTI in 24 hours.If you are suffering very often, (more than 2 infections every 6 months), then see a specialist to determine the root cause of the problem.

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In this Article

  • Ideas to Talk to Your Doctor About
  • What About Cranberry Juice?

If you’ve ever had a urinary tract infection, you know how painful and frustrating they can be, especially if they keep coming back. While antibiotics generally clear up a UTI within a few days, there are also some simple measures you can take to help prevent getting one in the first place.

To say goodbye to burning, frequent urination, and other unpleasant symptoms, start with these changes today. The key is to keep bacteria out of your system.

  1. Drink plenty of water, and relieve yourself often. The simplest way to prevent a UTI is to flush bacteria out of the bladder and urinary tract before it can set in. If you’re well-hydrated, it will be tough to go too long without urinating.
  2. Wipe from front to back. Bacteria tend to hang around the anus. If you wipe from front to back, especially after a bowel movement, they’re less likely to make it to the urethra.
  3. Wash up before sex and urinate after it. Use soap and water before sex. This keeps bacteria away from the urethra. And urinating afterward pushes any bacteria that entered the urinary tract back out.
  4. Steer clear of irritating feminine products. Skip douches, deodorant sprays, scented powders, and other potentially irritating feminine products.
  5. Rethink your birth control. A diaphragm, spermicide, or spermicide-lubricated condom can make you more likely to get a UTI because they all can contribute to bacterial growth. If you often get UTIs and use one of these birth control methods, switch to a water-based lubricant for vaginal dryness, and consider trying another birth control method to see if it helps.

Some doctors also advise women who get a lot of UTIs to wear cotton underwear, take showers instead of baths, and avoid tight clothes that can trap bacteria near the urethra. While these are simple enough to do, none of them are supported by scientific data.

Ideas to Talk to Your Doctor About

If you get a lot of UTIs, your doctor may consider:

  • A daily low dose of antibiotics, taken for 6 months or longer
  • Having you test yourself for a UTI at home when you have symptoms
  • Taking a single dose of antibiotics after having sex

If you’ve gone through menopause, you could ask about estrogen vaginal cream. After menopause, women have less estrogen in their bodies, which can cause vaginal dryness and make the urinary tract more vulnerable to infection. The treatment can help balance the area’s pH factor and allow “good” bacteria to flourish again.

What About Cranberry Juice?

There’s no harm in trying it. But it’s not a proven fix.

Over the years, a lot of studies have focused on a substance found in cranberries that’s thought to prevent bacteria from sticking to the lining of the urinary tract. But none of these studies have shown how much of this substance it would take to help prevent UTIs.

If you still want to give it a try, drinking cranberry juice or taking cranberry pills is probably fine to do. But there are some exceptions, like if you take a blood-thinning medication, a medication that affects the liver, or aspirin. It’s always wise to talk to your doctor first, before you try any supplements.

Sources

Cleveland Clinic: “Urinary Tract Infections,” “Can Cranberry Juice Stop Your UTI?”

Urology Care Foundation: “Urinary Tract Infections in Adults: After Treatment,” “Urinary Tract Infections in Adults: How Are UTIs Treated?”

Mayo Clinic: “Urinary Tract Infection (UTIs).”

JAMA Internal Medicine: “Cranberry-Containing Products for Prevention of Urinary Tract Infections in Susceptible Populations: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.”

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: “Urinary Tract Infection in Adults.”

JAMA: “Effect of Cranberry Capsules on Bacteriuria Plus Pyuria Among Older Women in Nursing Homes: A Randomized Clinical Trial,” “Cranberry for Prevention of Urinary Tract Infection? Time to Move On.”

American Family Physician: “Are Cranberry Products Effective for the Prevention of Urinary Tract Infections?”

How to prevent urinary tract infections

When common bacteria such as E. coli enter the urinary system, they can cause a urinary tract infection (UTI). This condition is preventable despite the fact that it’s also easy to get. Read on to learn more about bacterial infection and things you can do to avoid it.

What Does a UTI Feel Like?

If you experience a strong urge to go to the bathroom, or a need to urinate more frequently probably, a Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) could be responsible. Other symptoms like abdominal pressure and discomfort while urinating often accompany a UTI. While the condition can affect anybody, including babies, it mainly occurs in women.

Here are a few precautions that you can take to prevent the occurrence and recurrence of UTIs:

1. Stay Well-Hydrated

Make water your friend throughout the day, as urinating helps to flush bacteria out of your urinary tract. Drinking a lot of water will force you to use the bathroom more frequently. If you’re unable to drink about eight glasses of water per day, try incorporating other beverages that will help keep you well hydrated. Some healthy options include decaf herbal tea, fruit juice, or smoothies. Don’t drink too much alcohol as it can irritate your bladder lining.

2. Estrogen Therapy

This is more of an issue as women age. Declining estrogen levels due to menopause can cause thinning and other anatomic changes in the urinary tract anatomy that increases the odds of getting a UTI. According to a study, post-menopausal women can reduce their chances of getting UTIs by applying low doses of topical estrogen creams.

3. Use the Lavatory as Often as Needed

If you feel the urge to use the bathroom, don’t hesitate to go. Keeping urine in your bladder for too long creates ideal conditions for bacterial growth. Using the lavatory every few hours can help minimize the risk. This works for women of all ages, including teenagers.

4. Wipe Front to Back

When you go to the restroom, avoid wiping UTI-causing bacteria into your urethra, where urine exits the bladder. These usually thrive in the rectum, and you can reduce the odds of getting them into the urinary system by wiping your genitals from front to back. People having diarrhea are much more vulnerable to getting bacteria into the urinary system. If you are having loose stools, it’s important to be cautious after a bowel movement.

5. Pre/Post Sex Hygiene

If you’re sexually active, you need to be careful not to let bacteria enter the urethra during sex. The best UTI protection for women, in this case, is to urinate after intercourse. Doing that may wash out the urinary tract of any bacteria that could cause an infection.

6. Use Safe Birth Control Solutions

If you often get UTIs and are on birth control, you may need to revisit the products you’re using, according to WebMD. Some of them contain chemicals that may cause a UTI when in contact with the vaginal environment. Be sure to discuss with your doctor safer options than diaphragms or spermicide-lubricated condoms. Oil-based lubricants can be a problem too. To address vaginal dryness, consider changing to a water-based alternative.

7. Avoid Irritating Feminine Products

Some of the feminine products you use may increase your UTI vulnerability by irritating your urethra. Most of them contain chemicals that may interfere with your vaginal health and pH level. This interference can lead to the overgrowth of UTI-causing microorganisms, including the E. coli bacterium.

Some irritants you may want to avoid include

  • Deodorants
  • Scented powders
  • Colognes and fragrances

8. Use Probiotics

Not all bacteria are bad for your health, including vaginal bacteria. Some of them are necessary, and that’s why they’re called good bacteria. If you experience an unhealthy decline of useful microbes in your system, you may be susceptible to UTIs and other bacterial infections. In that case, you may want to try probiotics to avoid infection.

9. Drink Pure Cranberry Juice

While this is an active area of research with mixed results, drinking pure cranberry juice may help avoid getting UTIs. Some studies suggest that the proanthocyanidin compounds in berries may make it difficult for bacteria to survive in the urinary tract.

10. Take Antibiotics

Antibiotics are drugs used to fight off bacterial infections, including UTIs. These aren’t usually the first line of defense, so your doctor will probably suggest other remedies first. However, you may need to use oral antibiotics if your condition fails to improve or keeps recurring. Keep in mind that extended use of these drugs may cause bacterial resistance in your body. It might also interfere with the balance of good bacteria in your system, exposing you to severe infections.

Urinary tract infections are often painful and can make everyday life a little more difficult. However, by implementing these healthy practices, you can keep UTIs away. As always, you can visit one of our urgent care centers if you are suffering from a UTI complications, visit our Urgent Care Center in Irvine, Urgent Care Clinic in Fountain Valley, or Urgent Care Center in Costa Mesa.

Jennifer Shoquist, MD

Dr. Jennifer Shoquist is board certified in Family Medicine. Her special interest is woman’s health and her practice accepts patients from 6 years old to seniors. She chose Family Practice for the varied opportunities for strong rapport it offers with patients. “I love having a chance to help people approach their health proactively, and it is satisfying to see their progress in this regard,” she says. She has also co­authored health nonfiction books, including Migraines For Dummies, Potty Training For Dummies, The Encyclopedia of STDs, and Parent’s Success Guide to Parenting.

Urinary tract infections, or UTIs, are the most common type of bacterial infection diagnosed today, with more than half of all women experiencing at least one UTI during their lifetime. However, there are many ways one can help prevent UTIs from occurring in the first place.

How to prevent urinary tract infections

How to prevent urinary tract infections

Taking precautions to avoid experiencing a urinary tract infection is always advisable, even if you are not prone to recurring UTIs. (1)

Proven At-Home Preventative Measures

Some strategies that have been proven effective include these:

  • Wipe from front to back. When either urinating or moving one’s bowels, it’s important to wipe from the front to the back. This helps to prevent spreading bacteria from the anal area to the vagina and urethra.
  • Urinate frequently. Fully empty your bladder roughly every two to three hours in order to flush bacteria from your urinary tract before an infection has a chance to begin. Do not attempt to hold your urine to the point when your bladder feels full. The longer urine remains in the bladder, the more likely bacteria will multiply. (2)
  • Promptly urinate after intercourse. Vaginal intercourse can introduce bacteria from the genital area and anus into the bladder. Urinating afterward can flush your system and reduce the risk that those bacteria multiply and cause a UTI . (3)
  • Drink plenty of liquids. Consuming fluids, especially water, helps to dilute urine and spur more frequent urination, which flushes bacteria from your urinary tract. Moreover, increasing water intake can halve one’s chance of experiencing a recurrent UTI. A 2017 study looked at women who drank less than 1 ½ liters of water daily (about 6 cups) who also had recurrent urinary tract infections (more than three annually). Fifty percent of the women added 1 ½ more liters of water to their daily routine, while the others did not alter their fluid consumption. A year later, women who upped their water intake reduced their UTI rates by nearly half, experiencing an average of 1.6 infections that year versus 3.1 urinary infections amongst the control group. (4)
  • Drink water after intercourse. In addition to drinking throughout the day, it’s important to drink a full glass of water after intercourse to help flush bacteria from your system.
  • Clean the genital area. This can diminish the presence of bacteria, thus reducing one’s chances of pulling bacteria into the urethra and into the bladder during intercourse. In addition to keeping the area clean regularly, be sure to also cleanse the area pre- and post-intercourse.
  • Avoid diaphragms or spermicides. If you are prone to recurrent UTIs, consider changing your birth control. D iaphragms, spermicides, and spermicide-containing types of contraception can contribute to bacterial growth and kill the good bacteria present in the genital area that work to protects from UTIs.
  • Use a personal lubricant. Friction during intercourse can sometimes irritate the urethra and introduce bacteria that cause urinary tract infections. U sing a small amount of water-based lubrication during sex can help reduce friction and the risk of infection. (5)
  • Avoid products that irritate the urethra. Feminine deodorant sprays, vaginal douches and powders, bubble bath liquids, and bath oils can irritate the urethra and vagina, increasing your odds of infection. Some may also alter vaginal flora and ultimately result in a urinary tract infection. (6)

Preventing UTIs With Drugs

At times, antibiotics are used as a preventative measure for those with frequent UTI recurrences. In addition, postmenopausal women can benefit from a different type of a medicinal prevention strategy.

  • Antimicrobial Prophylaxis In some cases of urinary tract infection recurrences, a physician may recommend antimicrobial prophylaxis, which is the use of antibiotics to prevent another infection. This has been shown to effectively reduce one’s risk of recurrent UTIs in women with two infections over the previous year. (The typical duration of an initial use of antimicrobial prophylaxis is six months.) (7)
  • Postcoital Prophylaxis For those whose UTI recurrences are related to sexual intercourse, taking antibiotics after intercourse (also called postcoital prophylaxis) may be preferable. Depending on the frequency of intercourse, postcoital prophylaxis likely results in less antibiotic use than antimicrobial prophylaxis. (8)
  • Estrogen for Postmenopausal Women The use of a vaginal estrogen cream or an estradiol-releasing vaginal ring have both been shown to be an effective strategy for reducing recurrent urinary tract infections in postmenopausal women. In fact, vaginal estrogen has been shown to reduce recurrent UTIs by 36 to 75 percent . (6)

Possible Preventive Strategies for UTIs

While the research is still out on the preventative strategies below, prospects are promising.

  • Probiotics The probiotic strain Lactobacillis, found in fermented milk products, has been shown to prevent urinary tract infections in laboratory testing. There’s also promising research that shows the strains L. rhamnosus gr-1 and L. fermentum rc-14 could prevent UTIs as well. (6)
  • Cranberry Juice Cranberries contain polyphenols called proanthocyanidins, which may help prevent E. coli from causing urinary tract infections in women, but data is conflicting about the effectiveness. While a meta-analysis published in July 2012 in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine showed a decrease in UTI rates in those who consumed daily cranberry tablets, a few months later, a review published in October 2012 in the Cochrane Database found insufficient evidence to recommend routine use of cranberry . (8,9,10) A study published in November 2016 in the Journal of the American Medical Association looked at the effectiveness of cranberry capsules with proanthocyanidin and concluded that the capsules had no significant effect on urinary tract infections . (11)
  • Diet Adjustment Research has shown that urine with higher pH (more alkaline) levels and higher levels of certain metabolites formed by gut microbes are better able to resist recurrent UTIs. It’s thought that one can improve these levels through diet. For instance, calcium supplements raise urinary pH levels. In addition, consuming foods rich in antioxidants, like tea and colorful berries, may encourage growth of metabolites. (12)

Who Should Pay Special Attention to UTI Preventative Measures

Some individuals are at a higher risk for urinary tract infections than others. Those individuals include:

  • Women who are sexually active
  • Women who are pregnant
  • Menopausal women
  • Those with diabetes
  • Those with kidney stones
  • Those who’ve recently had a catheter

COVID-19 Updates: Learn more| Flu Shot Available!

What Causes Urinary Tract Infections and How Can You Prevent Them?

How to prevent urinary tract infections

A study shows that 25-40% of women in the US aged 20-40 years have had a urinary tract infections (UTI) at some point in their lifetime. UTIs are more common in women, but they can occur in men, older adults, and children. In this article, we will discuss the causes and symptoms of UTIs and how to prevent them.

What are Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs)?

A urinary tract infection is a widespread infection that affects the urinary system. UTIs can affect any component of your urinary system, including the urethra (urethritis), ureters, bladder (cystitis), and kidneys (pyelonephritis). Common UTI symptoms include frequent urination, pain while urinating, and pain on your side or lower back. UTIs are usually treated with antibiotics.

What Causes Urinary Tract Infection?

Infections in the urinary system are caused by bacteria that enter the urethra and bladder, causing irritation and infection.

Causes and Risk Factors of a UTI

Several variables can raise your risk of acquiring a UTI, which include:

  • Age – UTIs are more common in older people.
  • Kidney stones
  • A prior UTI infection
  • Extended bed rest or restricted mobility after surgery.
  • Obstructions or blockages of the urinary tract, e.g., an enlarged prostate, kidney stones, and certain cancers
  • The use of urinary catheters for an extended period might increase the chances of a bacterial infection in your bladder.
  • Diabetes, especially if it is poorly controlled, might increase your chances of getting a urinary tract infection (UTI).
  • Pregnancy
  • Abnormally developed urinary structures since birth
  • Weak immune system

What are the key symptoms of urinary tract infections (UTI)?

The lining of the urinary tract becomes red and inflamed (inflammation) as a result of a urinary tract infection, which can cause some of the following symptoms:

  • Side, abdominal, or pelvic pain.
  • Pressure in the lower pelvis.
  • The urge to urinate frequently and urgently and incontinence (urine leakage).
  • Dysuria (painful urination) with blood in the urine.
  • Feeling an urge to urinate during the middle of the night.
  • Strong or foul-smelling and abnormally colored urine (cloudy urine).

A urinary tract infection might also cause the following symptoms:

  • Discomfort during sex
  • Painful penis (in males)
  • Lower backache
  • Fatigue.
  • Fever over 100°F and chills.
  • Vomiting.
  • Confusion or mental changes.

Prevention of UTI Infections

There are a few things you can do to lower your chances of getting a UTI. These include:

  • Keep yourself hydrated.
  • Urinate frequently.
  • Limit alcohol and caffeine intake.
  • Urinate after sex.
  • After urinating/ bowel movements, wipe from front to back.
  • Clean the genital area properly.
  • Take showers instead of baths and avoid using oils.
  • During your periods, use menstrual or cups sanitary pads instead of tampons.
  • Avoid using chemicals or scented products in your genital area.
  • To keep the area around the urethra dry, use cotton underwear and loose-fitting clothing.

If you find blood in your urine or are experiencing any of the symptoms of a UTI, then you should schedule a visit at MI Express Care. We offer excellent health services, and our team can efficiently treat all types of urinary tract infections. Book an appointment today!

COVID-19 Updates: Learn more| Flu Shot Available!

What Causes Urinary Tract Infections and How Can You Prevent Them?

How to prevent urinary tract infections

A study shows that 25-40% of women in the US aged 20-40 years have had a urinary tract infections (UTI) at some point in their lifetime. UTIs are more common in women, but they can occur in men, older adults, and children. In this article, we will discuss the causes and symptoms of UTIs and how to prevent them.

What are Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs)?

A urinary tract infection is a widespread infection that affects the urinary system. UTIs can affect any component of your urinary system, including the urethra (urethritis), ureters, bladder (cystitis), and kidneys (pyelonephritis). Common UTI symptoms include frequent urination, pain while urinating, and pain on your side or lower back. UTIs are usually treated with antibiotics.

What Causes Urinary Tract Infection?

Infections in the urinary system are caused by bacteria that enter the urethra and bladder, causing irritation and infection.

Causes and Risk Factors of a UTI

Several variables can raise your risk of acquiring a UTI, which include:

  • Age – UTIs are more common in older people.
  • Kidney stones
  • A prior UTI infection
  • Extended bed rest or restricted mobility after surgery.
  • Obstructions or blockages of the urinary tract, e.g., an enlarged prostate, kidney stones, and certain cancers
  • The use of urinary catheters for an extended period might increase the chances of a bacterial infection in your bladder.
  • Diabetes, especially if it is poorly controlled, might increase your chances of getting a urinary tract infection (UTI).
  • Pregnancy
  • Abnormally developed urinary structures since birth
  • Weak immune system

What are the key symptoms of urinary tract infections (UTI)?

The lining of the urinary tract becomes red and inflamed (inflammation) as a result of a urinary tract infection, which can cause some of the following symptoms:

  • Side, abdominal, or pelvic pain.
  • Pressure in the lower pelvis.
  • The urge to urinate frequently and urgently and incontinence (urine leakage).
  • Dysuria (painful urination) with blood in the urine.
  • Feeling an urge to urinate during the middle of the night.
  • Strong or foul-smelling and abnormally colored urine (cloudy urine).

A urinary tract infection might also cause the following symptoms:

  • Discomfort during sex
  • Painful penis (in males)
  • Lower backache
  • Fatigue.
  • Fever over 100°F and chills.
  • Vomiting.
  • Confusion or mental changes.

Prevention of UTI Infections

There are a few things you can do to lower your chances of getting a UTI. These include:

  • Keep yourself hydrated.
  • Urinate frequently.
  • Limit alcohol and caffeine intake.
  • Urinate after sex.
  • After urinating/ bowel movements, wipe from front to back.
  • Clean the genital area properly.
  • Take showers instead of baths and avoid using oils.
  • During your periods, use menstrual or cups sanitary pads instead of tampons.
  • Avoid using chemicals or scented products in your genital area.
  • To keep the area around the urethra dry, use cotton underwear and loose-fitting clothing.

If you find blood in your urine or are experiencing any of the symptoms of a UTI, then you should schedule a visit at MI Express Care. We offer excellent health services, and our team can efficiently treat all types of urinary tract infections. Book an appointment today!

Affiliations

  • 1 University of Pisa, Italy.
  • 2 University of Pisa, Italy. Electronic address: [email protected]
  • PMID: 28364867
  • DOI: 10.1016/j.maturitas.2017.02.004
  • Search in PubMed
  • Search in NLM Catalog
  • Add to Search

Authors

Affiliations

  • 1 University of Pisa, Italy.
  • 2 University of Pisa, Italy. Electronic address: [email protected]
  • PMID: 28364867
  • DOI: 10.1016/j.maturitas.2017.02.004

Abstract

Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are the most common bacterial infections in women, and increase in incidence after the menopause. It is important to uncover underlying abnormalities or modifiable risk factors. Several risk factors for recurrent UTIs have been identified, including the frequency of sexual intercourse, spermicide use and abnormal pelvic anatomy. In postmenopausal women UTIs often accompany the symptoms and signs of the genitourinary syndrome of menopause (GSM). Antimicrobial prophylaxis has been demonstrated to be effective in reducing the risk of recurrent UTIs in women, but this may lead to drug resistance of both the causative microorganisms and the indigenous flora. The increasing prevalence of Escherichia coli (the most prevalent uropathogen) that is resistant to antimicrobial agents has stimulated interest in novel non-antibiotic methods for the prevention of UTIs. Evidence shows that topical estrogens normalize vaginal flora and greatly reduce the risk of UTIs. The use of intravaginal estrogens may be reasonable in postmenopausal women not taking oral estrogens. A number of other strategies have been used to prevent recurrent UTIs: probiotics, cranberry juice and d-mannose have been studied. Oral immunostimulants, vaginal vaccines and bladder instillations with hyaluronic acid and chondroitin sulfate are newer strategies proposed to improve urinary symptoms and quality of life. This review provides an overview of UTIs’ prophylaxis without antibiotics, focusing on a practical clinical approach to women with UTIs.

Keywords: Postmenopausal women; Urinary tract infection.