How to put artists’ work online

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Here are the answers from a spectrum of science-artists.

“Most of what I sell online is original watercolor paintings and collages. I think that makes it a little less risky for me, as far as having my images ripped off, because it’s very hard for someone to recreate the look and the texture of an original using an image from the web. But I know that someone could take one of my designs and put it on a t-shirt or a notebook.

On the other hand, I’ve been featured on lots of blogs and gotten show opportunities because people have seen my work online. The bottom line for me is that having lots of pictures of my work on the web has been worth the risk. So far, anyway!”

I place a value on the work I create, therefore I believe it’s worthwhile to do what I can to protect it from infringement. There are a few websites I use to promote my business, so it’s necessary for me to put samples of my work online. I make them relatively small and/or I place a watermark on them. I’m well aware that it’s not a perfect system, but in my mind doing nothing to protect my images might indicate that I do not value them and it would be a disservice to the clients who commissioned them. Some might perceive that trying to protect one’s work online is futile, but I wholeheartedly believe that just because an endeavor is perceived as futile doesn’t mean it isn’t worth the attempt.

By all means use my photographs! They don’t do anyone any good just sitting on my hard drives. But be respectful of the fact they take time and money to create. At least have the decency to inform people where they came from. And if you are using the photographs to make money, I deserve some of it. After all, these photographs would not exist, and could not exist, if I was unable to earn a basic living.

Every time an artist puts their work online, it’s a trade-off. Sure, it could be ripped off. However, in science-art, the audience-niche can be very small. I often paint fossilized winged trilobites on stone, and at the moment the audience who enjoys these paintings is not huge.

A niche audience has benefits. By blogging, tweeting and being a part of the science social media world, I gain community, friends, fans and clients. The benefit of community is that its members will also help to protect you and your artistic work.

Allowing artwork to be shared under Creative Commons is essential to community-building. It helps an artist gain recognition among people who enjoy the artwork, growing the community of people who respect your contributions.

I put my name and url on my artwork; I put my name in the image filenames. From my experience, the artists in the greatest danger are those who’s online presence is obscure. Engage, and the community grows along with your career, as well as being half the fun.

Definitely post your artwork on the web, as publicity is always a good thing. The only true theft to be worried about is a publisher sniping it in my opinion, but this is easy to prevent by simply uploading a lower resolution version of the piece requiring a real publication to approach you for a higher quality version. As for people cross-posting your work, I won’t worry as much about a lack of credit (though that is annoying), but rather the purposes and use of the work is often more of a problem in my opinion (in my case creationists). To make sure unwanted entities aren’t using your work it is definitely a good idea to use Tineye.

The benefits of sharing and promoting my work online far outweigh the potential losses of someone stealing an image off my web page for profit. Additionally, I don’t know of a way to protect your art online without seriously damaging the presentation. Watermarks, for example, prevent any real appreciation of the work. So my best advice is to upload images that look great in your online portfolio, but are not hi-res, with your url small and tastefully in the corner. In the very rare case that Big Company Inc. steals your image for their Big Marketing Campaign then I’m sure you can find a lawyer happy to help you both out.

If by “protecting artwork online” you mean preventing someone from gaining access to your web based images – you can’t.

All of the silly right-click defeating JavaScripts and clear GIF overlays in the world won’t deter a simple third party screen capture utility. A graphics professional such as myself can extract images from Zoomify boxes and Flash files and, to a large extent, even remove watermarking.

The only way watermarking can prevent image use is if it’s so onerous as to render your image unusable for anything, including promoting your art. Keeping images too small to reproduce elsewhere likewise makes them too small to be useful for showcasing your work. Invisible embedded watermarks, which add a layer of “noise”, can degrade image quality as well.

If your work is in print, anyone with access to a $50 scanner with a de-screening option can make a much higher resolution copy of your images than you are ever likely to put online.

It may also be worth adding your domain name to the filename of the image (people are lazy, and will likely just use your original image file, unless you force them into a screen capture), e.g. “dinosaurcartoons_com_600.gif” (extra dots “.” are not allowed in a web filename).

If you need to be absolutely certain your images are safe, put them in a drawer and don’t let anyone see them.

My thanks to everyone above who gave us their thoughts!

How do you protect your artwork online? Answer in the comments below!

The views expressed are those of the author(s) and are not necessarily those of Scientific American.

How to put artists' work online

Articles

  • How Not to Display Your Artwork on the Web
  • Part 1: Finding a web hosting provider
  • Part 2: Registering a domain name
  • Part 3: Building your web site
  • Part 4: Planning your web site
  • Part 5: Designing your web site
  • Part 6: Preparing images for the web

Introduction

Who this is for: This is intended as a rough guide for illustrators, gallery artists, cartoonists, comics artists, concept artists and other visual artists who want to present a professional representation of their work on the web. If you’re just putting up your stuff for the benefit of your friends, do what you want, it doesn’t matter. If, on the other hand, you’re trying to have your art seen by art directors, publishers, gallery owners, webcomics readers, reviewers and prospective buyers, how you present it can make a big difference in how it’s viewed and received.

Why did I write this? In the past several years, and particularly in the last few as I’ve worked on lines and colors, I have seen hundreds (if not thousands) of artist’s web sites. So many of them are so badly arranged, poorly designed, ill-conceived and horribly implemented that it has started to make me crazy. If you’re read much of this blog, you’ll know how much I love this stuff, and how much I would desparately like artists of all kinds to succeed in doing a good job of making their work visible on the web.

The original post that prompted this grew out of this frustration with the apparent desire on the part of artists to drive visitors away from their sites in droves. My repeated encounters with mind-numbingly bad artists’ web sites eventually resulted in my snarky, but well-received article, How Not to Display Your Artwork on the Web.

The response to the article was, and continues to be, emphatic, and frequently includes requests for more information. Those requests prompted this series of follow-up articles. If you haven’t read the original post, I reccomend that you read it first and then come back to this one .

Caveats

What do I know? This is simply the opinions (read that word carefully) of one person. However, I do have some qualifications to be knowledgeable about this topic. I’ve been on the web since 1994, several years before most people even knew the web existed. For most of that time (12 years) I’ve worked as a professional web site designer. (When I started doing web site design we actually had to put some effort into convincing companies that a web site was a worthwhile investment, and that the internet wasn’t just a fad for geeks that would fade out in a couple of years.) In 1995 I created Argon Zark!, the first long-form (comic book style) comic for the web, and one of the earliest webcomics of any kind.

I do not hold myself up as a paragon of design and usability. I’ve designed my share of bad sites, with navigation problems and usability issues and, due to the realities of graphic design (time, budget restraints, and the wishes, demands, desires and delusions of clients), I will continue to do so to some extent in the future; but I have tried to benefit from my mistakes and I have learned a thing or two (or three, or twenty) over the years.

This is a work in progress. I envision this as a series of eight to ten articles on individual topics, perhaps more. As time allows, I’ll continue to edit, revise and add to these pages in an attempt to make them more useful.

This series of articles is intended to he helpful. I don’t proffer it as definitive or set in stone. If you disagree, write a comment and give everyone the benefit of your own ideas or helpful suggestions.

The national community legal centre for the arts

As a creator, the great thing about the internet is that you can upload your work and share it with people around the world for very little cost. However, people can illegally download and copy your work without your permission. This is why it is very important to protect the words, images, music and films you put on the internet.

This information will be helpful if you use the internet in the following ways:

  • showing your artworks on websites
  • sharing your videos or films
  • using other people’s words, images and information in your own work
  • blogging or writing your thoughts, comments or ideas on websites
  • communicating with friends on social networking sites.

Other people need your permission or licence to do those things.

  • protects your work against use by others without your permission
  • allows you get money for your work.

Piracy

With digital technology, it is very easy for people to copy or use other people’s work without permission. This happens a lot with music or film on the internet.

Everyday, people use the internet to copy and share other people’s work for free, and without permission. This is called piracy.

Protecting your work

There are ways to protect material you upload on the internet from being used without your permission:

To protect your visual art, you can:

  • add a visible watermark to your images before uploading them
  • disable right-click
  • add invisible information to your images online
  • tell users that a high quality version is available to buy
  • upload low-resolution images only — no more than 72dpi
  • put the © notice with your name next to your work.
  • give people the possibility to contact you — for example, by showing your email address. It will be easier for someone to ask for your permission to use your work.

To protect your music, you can:

  • hide information into your music — this is called digital watermarking
  • upload low-quality recordings only — a compression rate less than 49 kilobits per second
  • tell users that a high quality version is available to buy
  • attach the © notice with your name next to your recordings
  • give people the possibility to contact you — for example, by showing your email address. It will be easier for someone to ask for your permission to use your work.

To protect your film, you can:

  • hide information to track your film — this is called digital fingerprinting
  • upload low quality versions only — a compression rate less than 151 kilobits per second for video and 49 kilobits per second for the sound
  • tell users that a high quality version is available to buy
  • put the © notice with your name into your film
  • give people the possibility to contact you — for example, by showing your email address. It will be easier for someone to ask for your permission to use your work.
  • The internet is a very public place for showing your work. Millions of people use the internet, and have access to anything that you put there.
  • Showing your work on the internet can increase the risk of someone copying your work without your permission.
  • Australian copyright law protects most things on the internet, including your work.
  • It is illegal to download or share copies of images, songs, movies, or TV shows without the copyright owner’s written permission.
  • Put the copyright notice, your name, and the year to anything you upload, for example: © Name Surname 2010.
  • Only put low-quality versions of images, sound recordings or video on the internet.
  • You can protect your work by:

Summary

  • providing your contact details and how to buy your work – email is usually best
  • adding a visible watermark to your images before uploading
  • disabling right clicking to make it harder to copy an image

Legal Tips

  • Work out what uses of your work you will allow before putting any material online: for example:
    • can people buy it online?
    • can people download it?
    • is it available for private use only, or can it be used in public?
  • Make sure that people know you are the copyright owner of your work and what they can do with your work.
  • Use a search engine to see if other people are using your material.
  • If your copyright is infringed get legal advice and take action. Learn more about how to take action on the following pages.

What is Raw Law?

Learn more about these resources developed with Arts Access Victoria.

Want big discounts on our legal resources?

Become a subscriber to get great discounts and access the full range of our legal services

How to put artists' work online

How to Protect Your Artwork Online

As an artist or photographer, you want your work to be seen. You may also be building a career and a business around your work. In pursuit of these goals, it is likely that you utilize some form of online distribution platform in order to get your work out there and garner clientele.

Unfortunately, visibility has its downside. The work you share online is vulnerable to copying and reproduction on various other mediums and platforms. This means that protecting your work may be as important as sharing it in the first place.

The good news: there are strategies to protect your work from potential infringers.

Why Registration Matters

In some instances, you can reach out to the infringing party and simply ask them to take it down. While this may stop them from using your work, it won’t provide you with compensation for any profit losses sustained from an infringer making your work available or using it for little-to-no cost.

Having a registered copyright provides many benefits.

These remedies could help cover any losses incurred from your work being used online without your permission.

The Copyright Office offers three options for registration of images:

Collection of unpublished images

Group of published images

The group registration option gives you the chance to register several works at a time, making the process of registration easier and less costly. When registering multiple works online, you must distinguish between unpublished and published works, as they can’t be registered together.

You can register your work online here.

Then, store your copyright documents along with your artwork on Artwork Archive, so you always have your work protected.

Thanks to guest contributors at the Volunteer Lawyers for the Arts of Massachusetts, a program of the Arts & Business Council of Greater Boston.

The national community legal centre for the arts

As a creator, the great thing about the internet is that you can upload your work and share it with people around the world for very little cost. However, people can illegally download and copy your work without your permission. This is why it is very important to protect the words, images, music and films you put on the internet.

This information will be helpful if you use the internet in the following ways:

  • showing your artworks on websites
  • sharing your videos or films
  • using other people’s words, images and information in your own work
  • blogging or writing your thoughts, comments or ideas on websites
  • communicating with friends on social networking sites.

Other people need your permission or licence to do those things.

  • protects your work against use by others without your permission
  • allows you get money for your work.

Piracy

With digital technology, it is very easy for people to copy or use other people’s work without permission. This happens a lot with music or film on the internet.

Everyday, people use the internet to copy and share other people’s work for free, and without permission. This is called piracy.

Protecting your work

There are ways to protect material you upload on the internet from being used without your permission:

To protect your visual art, you can:

  • add a visible watermark to your images before uploading them
  • disable right-click
  • add invisible information to your images online
  • tell users that a high quality version is available to buy
  • upload low-resolution images only — no more than 72dpi
  • put the © notice with your name next to your work.
  • give people the possibility to contact you — for example, by showing your email address. It will be easier for someone to ask for your permission to use your work.

To protect your music, you can:

  • hide information into your music — this is called digital watermarking
  • upload low-quality recordings only — a compression rate less than 49 kilobits per second
  • tell users that a high quality version is available to buy
  • attach the © notice with your name next to your recordings
  • give people the possibility to contact you — for example, by showing your email address. It will be easier for someone to ask for your permission to use your work.

To protect your film, you can:

  • hide information to track your film — this is called digital fingerprinting
  • upload low quality versions only — a compression rate less than 151 kilobits per second for video and 49 kilobits per second for the sound
  • tell users that a high quality version is available to buy
  • put the © notice with your name into your film
  • give people the possibility to contact you — for example, by showing your email address. It will be easier for someone to ask for your permission to use your work.
  • The internet is a very public place for showing your work. Millions of people use the internet, and have access to anything that you put there.
  • Showing your work on the internet can increase the risk of someone copying your work without your permission.
  • Australian copyright law protects most things on the internet, including your work.
  • It is illegal to download or share copies of images, songs, movies, or TV shows without the copyright owner’s written permission.
  • Put the copyright notice, your name, and the year to anything you upload, for example: © Name Surname 2010.
  • Only put low-quality versions of images, sound recordings or video on the internet.
  • You can protect your work by:

Summary

  • providing your contact details and how to buy your work – email is usually best
  • adding a visible watermark to your images before uploading
  • disabling right clicking to make it harder to copy an image

Legal Tips

  • Work out what uses of your work you will allow before putting any material online: for example:
    • can people buy it online?
    • can people download it?
    • is it available for private use only, or can it be used in public?
  • Make sure that people know you are the copyright owner of your work and what they can do with your work.
  • Use a search engine to see if other people are using your material.
  • If your copyright is infringed get legal advice and take action. Learn more about how to take action on the following pages.

What is Raw Law?

Learn more about these resources developed with Arts Access Victoria.

Want big discounts on our legal resources?

Become a subscriber to get great discounts and access the full range of our legal services

How to put artists' work online

Do you want to make money by selling your art projects? Today, we’re exploring the best places to sell art online so you can earn money from your passion!

Many people want to become artists but aren’t sure how to earn a living selling art. Maybe you already consider yourself an artist, but you are having trouble making money with your art.

I’m sure you’ve heard the term starving artist, am I right? Well, it doesn’t have to be that way. In this post, we’ll show you how to sell art online and make money, so you can be free to pursue your passion as well as pay the bills.

How to put artists' work online

As more and more people are selling products online these days, there are a plethora of websites dedicated to helping you do the same with your art.

Where you sell your art online depends on what type of art you are selling. There are a wide variety of mediums that art encompasses. From drawing and painting to crafting and woodworking, chances are if you’re doing it, you can sell it and make money online.

Here are some of the best websites we’ve found to help sell your art online.

1. Etsy

Most of us know the power of Etsy. Since its launch, Etsy has helped many people go full-time with their art business. Yes, there are listing fees and a lot of competition, but there is also a massive, engaged audience on their platform. If you haven’t considered selling your art on Etsy, you should check them out.

Of course, with any online platform, you’ll want to put your best foot forward by including high-quality images of your creations. If you’re not sure how to set up your home photography studio — this post covers what you need to know so you can get stunning photos of your art projects.

2. Artfinder

Artfinder is an online marketplace for independent artists to sell their original work—be it painting, photography, sculpture, and more! This platform is marketed toward high-end art collectors. On the plus side, it means that buyers are often more willing to pay a better price for quality work. However, it also means Artfinder’s qualifications for sellers are a little more exclusive. You must apply to be a seller on Artfinder, and your application will be reviewed for quality and originality. Ideally, you will be self-represented and produce primarily limited-edition work, though it seems like there is some room for agent- and gallery-represented artists.

Artfinder charges a base monthly fee of free to $12 AND a commission on all sales that range from 33-40%. Check out their seller subscription plans here.

3. Big Cartel

Big Cartel’s pricing ranges from free to $29.99 per month. The cool thing is that it’s a flat fee, and they don’t take a percentage of your sales. This one is definitely worth checking out if you’re looking to make money from your art.

4. Storeenvy

Storeenvy is all about discovering and connecting amazing brands, people, and products. And the best part is, you can sell your art for free using their platform. It’s pretty simple to set up. My middle daughter started her website, The Crafty Crafter when she was only 12 years old.

5. ArtPal

You can sell your art for no upfront cost on ArtPal and keep 95% of the profits (when selling your artwork. Different terms apply for their on-demand service).

6. Artmajeur

Artmajeur is an online marketplace based out of Paris, France, but it sells artwork all over the world. You can list paintings, sculptures, photography, drawings, multimedia, and more! Their payment plans include a free Basic Account, which takes a 20% commission, or a $5 per month Platinum Account that takes a 15% commission.

7. Zatista

Zatista is one of the more popular platforms for selling original fine art. It’s been featured in tons of big-name publications like The New York Times, Apartment Therapy, and Architectural Digest. This makes it great for both sales and exposure, but it is also more exclusive in the artists it accepts—its current acceptance rate is only 5%. You must apply, and your artwork will be reviewed for quality, marketability, and the balance it brings to the site’s overall collection. It is free to join and list on the site, but Zatista takes a hefty 45% commission.

8. Zibbet

Get your custom website plus access to the Zibbet Marketplace. There are no listing fees to sell your art, and their monthly plans are super affordable, anywhere from $4-$16 per month.

You can also put your artwork on a t-shirt, coffee mug, or many other varieties of merchandise. There are a variety of websites that make it very easy to do this. Learn more about making money designing t-shirts.

Looking for more ways to sell your art online and possibly make money selling other stuff too? Check out this post!

You might be wondering if there are ways to sell art online and make money without using one of the sites mentioned above. Having a platform to sell your art is recommended, but there are also other ways you can bring in the cash.

How to put artists' work online

Other Places to Sell Art Online

9. Instagram

My daughter sells art directly to her followers on Instagram. All that’s needed is a way to collect payments such as PayPal or Stripe. She posts pictures of already completed digital art and people message her when they want to buy.

10. Facebook

Groups are still popular on Facebook, and as an artist, you can create a community of art lovers that you can get your newest creations in front of any time. Again, a payment processor is all you need here. You can also sell on the Facebook Marketplace which is usually local sales. You can meet up in person and accept cash or checks if you choose. Lastly, if you already have a Facebook Business Page, setting up a shop that allows you to sell directly on Facebook is a breeze.

11. Patreon

Artists can make money from their art on Patreon through a subscription-based model. Fans pay for exclusive experiences and behind-the-scenes content. Create art on your terms and keep 90% of the profits. Patreon keeps 5%, and transaction fees are around 5% as well. There are a variety of ways you can earn on this platform. I would recommend visiting their site and looking at the examples of how people are earning money with Patreon.

12. Shopify

With most of the sites listed above, you’re likely to notice a particular trade-off: either a high barrier to entry or a fair amount of work to market yourself. If you’re already doing much of the heavy lifting to market yourself (SEO, social media, advertising, etc.), consider setting up an eCommerce website and selling directly to your customers. Shopify is easy to use, and monthly plans start at $29 per month.

Conclusion

I hope this post has given you some fresh new ideas about how to sell your art online and make money that can help you transition from hobby artist to business owner. Please consider sharing if you found it helpful and leave your additional ideas in the comments; we’d love to hear them!

Originally published November 7, 2018. Content updated April 28, 2021.

Solitaire – 100% Free to Play Online

Creating a professional art gallery does not require any advanced technical skill, excessive upfront cash or the headaches of constantly changing your stock. It is very simple and anybody can do it. Become an independent dealer by having your gallery on-line and providing a service in the world of art.

Things You’ll Need:

  • Valid Ssl
  • Artworks On Consignment
  • Domain
  • Web Developer Provider
  • Bank Account
  • Pci Compliance

Start by seeking out artists who will allow you to display their work on your site. This is known as consignment. Plan to include a brief bio for each artist and at least 5 pieces of their work in a JPEG format photo.

Choose and purchase a domain name for your site that will be easy to remember. Look at other websites (non-gallery or gallery related) for design ideas. Portions of a particular style you like can be incorporated into your own. The providers and developers used are normally listed by name or web address. You can them contact them for information and fees.

Look for features that meet your needs. See that the provider includes or can develop them into your site. To have a successful gallery, you must consider both development and support of your website, whether by you or a third party source.

Your art gallery website should allow you to maintain separate displays of works. Break up the site by artist portfolio, on-line catalogue, web art show, commercial art gallery or private art community.

Promote your site on Google, Yahoo! and other search engines. Strategically add keywords so others can find you. Advertise your gallery on free on-line classifieds and local papers. As you become more successful, advertise in high-profile areas.

Configure your on-line gallery to accept PayPal and Google Checkout. It is easy and safe and you are protected.

Open a bank account exclusively for the on-line gallery. The monies received from your clients can then be deposited to the account. It will make it easier when tax time comes to keep all financial records in a separate account.

Decide who ships out the art work. You may be representing an artist who is long distance; and in that case they will have to ship the package directly to your customer. Have them package, weigh and measure the item and then reimburse them. Buyers feel much more comfortable purchasing items if they know the shipping charges. Look for an e-commerce provider that can supply a shipping cost calculator for UPS, FedEx and USPS.

Be an independent gallery owner and have your gallery completely directed by you. With your own website, the gallery will have a unique address, search and browse techniques in place and opens up new artists in the world of art. The versatility of your gallery will obtain a personality of its own and you will be considered an art gallery owner.

Observe all details of your on-line traffic and your visitor statistics inside your account. Set up a feedback prompt, email and on-line frequent questions and answers. Exhibit the artwork on your site helps an artist have highest exposure ever, It would be doubtful that any would object. Send out newsletters by email.

Where, How, and Why to Add a Signature to a Painting

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How to put artists' work online

Why Sign a Painting

While it’s not a legal requirement, if you don’t add your name to a painting, it will be difficult for a viewer to identify you as the artist. You may argue that you have a very familiar style that people will recognize, but unless you are already famous, you may not get the credit you deserve.

If a piece of art is hanging in a gallery, it’ll have a label with your name on it, but if it’s in someone’s home, the owner may forget you are the artist. Or those who purchased it might know, but their heirs might not, especially if it’s not identified in their will.

Signature Styles

The most important thing is that people must be able to read your signature. An illegible signature isn’t a sign that you’re incredibly creative, and it doesn’t add a level of intrigue to the painting. You’re the artist, so let it be known. That said, try to avoid making it look like you’re using a stamp—ideally, it will not detract from the painting.

You don’t have to sign your full name on the front of the painting, and you can opt to put your initials instead. If you take this approach, it’s helpful to put your full name on the back of the painting. The same applies if you use a symbol or an artist’s monograph—people need to have some way of knowing who the marks represent.

Adding a Date

In most cases, adding the date you finished a painting is helpful, though it needn’t be next to your signature on the front. When you first start as an artist, you’ll probably be able to remember what year you painted a particular piece. But after you’ve been painting for several years, you may be less confident as to when you created the work.

Serious collectors and galleries like to be able to see how a painter’s work developed over the years, so it’s advisable to get into the habit now of dating your work. You can opt to write the date on the back of your canvas or frame. Some artists choose to put only the year on the front and the month and year you completed it on the back.

Putting a date on a painting does not limit your potential to sell it. Art isn’t like food—it has no sell-by date. If buyers wanted only the newest and latest works, then there wouldn’t be an auction market for older paintings.

Signature Location

Where you sign your painting is up to you, though traditionally, a signature is put toward one of the bottom corners. Be consistent about where you put your name so that when people next encounter a painting they think is by you, they will know exactly where to check.

Signing Tools and Mediums

Often artists choose to apply the same medium used in the artwork to create their signatures, whether it’s pastel, watercolor, acrylic, etc. You can sign the work before you clean your brushes and palette for the last time so you’ve got a suitable color on hand that will blend in with the work. A thin rigger brush is a good size and shape for signatures.

Having your signature “match” the painting, rather than having it look like a later addition, also makes it less likely that someone will question the authenticity of the work at a future date. Avoid adding your signature on top of a layer of varnish, as it can stand out and look like you forgot to sign it in time.

Maiden Name vs. Married Name

It’s a matter of individual preference if you choose to use your maiden name or married name to sign your painting. If you’re already known professionally by a maiden name, it would be easier to keep it, because changing your name will require you to remarket yourself. Or if both partners are artists, then sometimes people prefer to have different names to avoid comparison.

If you feel strongly about using your married name, switching is possible; it will just require more effort. In some cases, your new name may be catchier or easier to remember, so the work to rebrand yourself may be worth it in the long run.

Limited Editions

When you create a limited edition print, it’s helpful to indicate how many prints were made and the number of that particular print. For example, you would include 3/25 (the third print of a total of 25) along with your signature. Some buyers will be attracted to the idea that there are only a few replicas, potentially making the work more valuable in the future.