How to respond to a job offer

Wondering how to respond to a job offer? In this post, we give you examples of how to accept, reject, and negotiate job offers easily and effectively. Read on below!

How to respond to a job offer

That moment you’ve waited weeks or months for has finally come: the hiring manager has sent you an offer for the job.

Congratulations to you! 🎉

Are you wondering now exactly how to respond to a job offer?

In this quick guide, we’ll show you how to accept a job offer correctly, along with examples of an offer acceptance email and physical letters, as well. On top of that, you’ll see a sample reply when you need to negotiate a bit more, whether it’s your salary, employment conditions, or start date. And finally, we’ll also show you how to reject a job offer, in case that’s how you want to respond.

💡 Before We Get Started:

What is a job offer, exactly? A job offer is a formal employment proposal from the company indicating they would like to hire you for the position. It will usually come in the form of an email these days, though you may get an informal job offer via word of mouth when speaking to them on the phone. A job offer is not your employment contract, but, if you accept the job offer, that will be the next official document you receive! For more job definitions, check out our career glossary.

How to respond to a job offer

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How to respond to a job offer

How to respond to a job offer

Now, let’s get to it!

Here’s how to respond to a job offer in three ways (acceptance, rejection, and negotiation):

How to Accept a Job Offer

Since a job offer is a formal affair, your employment acceptance letter should be formal, as well.

While you can accept their offer by phone or face-to-face, it’s good to also have a formal job acceptance letter, whether a typed, physical letter or as an email.

Here’s a sample letter of acceptance for a formal job offer:

Your First & Last Name
Your Address Line 1
Your Address Line 2

Name of Hiring Manager
Their Official Title
Name of Prospective Company
Prospective Company Address Line 1
Prospective Company Address Line 2

Thank you very much for offering me the web developer position at Magnanimous Corp, and I am thrilled to officially accept!

As we discussed earlier, I’m able to start working 30 days after sending my resignation letter to my current employer. So, this means that I should be able to start at the beginning of February and attend your onboarding and orientation week beginning February 8th.

Once again, thank you so much for helping me throughout this employment process. I am very excited to be joining, and I look forward to working with you as a colleague!

Your First & Last Name

For a job offer acceptance email sample, it’s quite easy, also. Just include the body of the letter above without the address header at the top and the handwritten signature at the end.

Try to respond to their letter as soon as possible. Before sending your job offer reply letter, proofread it for any typos or other errors.

How to Negotiate a Job Offer

What if you want to negotiate a bit before accepting or declining the job offer?

That’s quite easy, as well!

There could be any number of reasons why you’d want to negotiate, from a salary increase to more vacation days to a job title change and more.

Here’s an example of a job offer negotiation response:

Your First & Last Name
Your Address Line 1
Your Address Line 2

Name of Hiring Manager
Their Official Title
Name of Prospective Company
Prospective Company Address Line 1
Prospective Company Address Line 2

Thank you very much for offering me the web developer position at Magnanimous Corp! However, before accepting, I’d like to request a change in the details of the offer you put forward.

In the job offer you sent me, it says I’d start work on January 15th. However, I must give a 30-day notice upon my resignation from my current employer before I can begin with you. Would you be able to change my start date to the beginning of February? If so, I’ll be thrilled to officially accept.

Thank you once again for the offer of employment, and I look forward to your response!

Your First & Last Name

Not too difficult, right?

Again, to negotiate by email, just use the body of the letter above as a guide. Then, all you have to do is to wait for their reply, and hopefully you get the answer you’re looking for!

How to Reject a Job Offer

What if you want to reject a job offer, instead?

Perhaps you’ve learned something about the company that makes it not right for you, such as their company culture is incompatible with your values. In some cases, you might be given several offers at once, and, if so, way to go!

Rather than ignoring the job offers you don’t want, send them a professional note politely declining their offer.

Here’s an example of how to turn down a job offer in a letter format:

Your First & Last Name
Your Address Line 1
Your Address Line 2

Name of Hiring Manager
Their Official Title
Name of Prospective Company
Prospective Company Address Line 1
Prospective Company Address Line 2

Thank you very much for offering me the web developer position at Magnanimous Corp. However, I must respectfully decline your offer of employment due to having accepted an employment offer at another company.

I do appreciate your time and helpfulness over the past few weeks, and it was a pleasure meeting you. I wish you the best in your ongoing recruitment efforts, and I hope you have a pleasant week ahead!

Your First & Last Name

That’s all there is to it!

A job offer rejection letter should just be short and polite, and you aren’t obligated to go into further detail as to why you’re rejecting their offer.

And, as with our past examples, turning this into an email simply requires removing the address area above and the handwritten signature!

Well, that’s all for this post, and hopefully you’re fully briefed on how to accept a job offer, how to reject a job offer, and how to negotiate a job offer! Got any questions, feedback, or other points to add about employment offers? Let us know in the comments below, and thank you for reading!

How to respond to a job offer

How to respond to a job offer

The Balance/ Marina Li

Have you recently been offered a job? Whether it’s the job of your dreams or something you’ll likely turn down, you may be wondering how to proceed. After all, most industries are small worlds. Regardless of whether you intend to accept the job, you’ll want to conduct yourself in a way that won’t come back to haunt you later.

What to Do When You Get a Job Offer

When you receive a job offer, you typically don’t want to say “yes” and take the job on the spot. Even if you know you want the job, take the time to evaluate the job offer to be absolutely certain that the position is right for you. Then decide if the compensation package is reasonable.

If you don’t think you want the job, there may be a good reason to decline the offer. But, do take the time to evaluate it, and carefully consider what you should.

Learn how to handle job offers in the best way possible to get the job you want, and the salary and benefits you deserve.

Evaluate the Offer

When you are offered a job, first ask for some time to consider the offer. Be sure to emphasize your gratitude and your interest in the job, and then ask if there is a deadline by which you have to make your decision. If you think you need more time than they give you, it is okay to ask for a bit more time. However, do not put off the decision for so long that they rescind your offer.

During this decision-making time, evaluate the job offer:

  • Be sure to take into account the entire compensation package, not just the salary.
  • Consider the benefits and perks, the time you would spend traveling, the hours, and the company culture.

If the job offer is conditional (for example, if you have to undergo certain screenings or background checks before the offer is official), be sure you know exactly what you have to do for the offer to go into effect.

Does it ever make sense to take a job you don’t think you want? There isn’t really a right or wrong answer, but there are times when it may be in your best interests to accept. This is especially true if you need a job in a hurry, or if the job is a necessary step toward something better.

Make sure you have considered all of the alternatives and weighed your options prior to making a decision to accept or reject a position.

Consider a Counteroffer

If the offer is not what you were hoping for, you may want to think about a counteroffer, or you may decide that this isn’t the best job for you. Once you have decided whether to negotiate, accept, or reject the job offer, it’s time to notify the company of your decision.

How to Negotiate a Job Offer

If you have evaluated the job and are interested in the position but feel the offer could be stronger, consider negotiating.

There are a number of steps you can take to negotiate effectively. First, research salaries for the job to get a sense of what you’re worth. Think about what combination of salary and benefits would work for you – this will be your counteroffer. Then, send a counteroffer letter or email message to the employer to begin the conversation about the counteroffer.

Keep in mind that, while you should negotiate for a fair salary and benefits package, you have to know when to stop negotiating and either accept the job offer or walk away. If you push too hard, the employer can withdraw a job offer.

Accept a Job Offer

You have found a job that you like, and are happy with the compensation package. Congratulations!

Even if you accept the job over the phone or in person, you should still officially accept the job with a polite, formal job offer acceptance letter. This letter provides you with a chance to confirm the details of the offer (including the salary, benefits, job title, and start date of employment). It’s also a chance to demonstrate your professionalism.

Decline a Job Offer

Even if you’re desperately seeking employment, if you know a job isn’t going to be a good fit, it might make sense to decline the offer. There are many times when this might be the best course of action. Of course, a salary and benefits package that doesn’t offer what you need is a good reason to say no to a job (especially if you’ve already tried negotiating). Similarly, if you think you would have a hostile relationship with your boss, if the company seems financially unstable, or if the organization has a high rate of employee turnover, you should think twice about taking the job.

If you have evaluated a job offer and decided it is not right for you, you have to decline the offer. A polite letter declining a job offer will help you maintain a positive relationship with the employer, which will be important if you ever apply for another position at the same company. In the letter, be sure to express your appreciation for the offer, and clearly state that you cannot accept the position. You should not go into detail about why you are not taking the job, especially if it is for reasons that might offend the employer (for example, if you disliked the supervisor or feel the company is unstable financially).

If you have already accepted a job offer, and then decide you do not want it, you need to let the employer know you’ve changed your mind as quickly (and politely) as possible.

Withdrawing From Consideration

You might want to withdraw from consideration from a job before you have received an offer. Typically, you would do this after receiving an invitation for an interview but before you receive a job offer. You might withdraw from consideration if you decide the job (or the company) is absolutely not right for you, or if you receive and accept another job offer. Be sure to send a letter or email stating your withdrawal.

What if the Job Offer is Rescinded?

Unfortunately, sometimes job offers get either rescinded or put on hold. If a company withdraws an offer, there is little you can do about it legally. However, there are steps you can take to handle the situation, such as asking for your old job back if you had a good relationship with the employer. If the job offer is put on hold, there are ways that you can politely follow up while continuing on with your job search.

The Bottom Line

EVALUATE THE JOB OFFER: Consider the compensation package, including benefits and perks. Think about aspects of the job like travel, hours, and company culture.

NEGOTIATE, IF NECESSARY: If you like the job, but feel the compensation could be more competitive, consider negotiating the offer.

ACCEPT OR DECLINE WITH GRACE: Be sure to send a letter formally accepting or declining the offer. Express your appreciation and thanks for the opportunity.

By Indeed Editorial Team

Updated June 7, 2022 | Published May 17, 2021

Updated June 7, 2022

Published May 17, 2021

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Related: Salary Negotiation: Top Mistakes to Avoid

This video explains the 3 most common mistakes people make when discussing salary and provides strategies for avoiding them.

Low salary offers can sometimes frustrate candidates who are applying for different open positions. However, individuals can negotiate for a higher wage using the right set of skills and impressive tactics. If you’re hoping to negotiate a low salary offer, it’s important to understand why a company might be presenting it and how to approach the discussion of increasing it. In this article, we discuss what a low salary offer is and how to respond to one using a list of steps and helpful tips.

What is a low salary offer?

A low salary offer is when a company or organization presents a wage to a candidate that is less than what they need. Companies often present lower salaries to employees based on their budget, the candidate’s level of experience or the company’s market research, which tells them the average salary for similar positions in the same field or industry. When receiving a low salary offer, it’s possible that individuals can negotiate for a higher salary using impressive communication skills and performing influential research to reinforce their requests.

How to respond to a low salary offer

Here is a list of steps on how to respond to a low salary offer:

1. Ask for time

Whether the company presents the offer to you in person or through an email, it’s important to ask for some time to process it and get back to them. If they told you in person or over the phone, it’s also important to ask for the offer in written form so that you can see everything that’s presented with the salary, including health benefits, 401(k) options and vacation days.

When asking for more time, it’s beneficial to be polite and give the company a time frame for when you’ll respond to the offer. For example, if a company offers you a low salary, you can say, “Thank you so much for the offer. If possible, I would like a week to read through the details before giving you my final answer.”

2. Understand your minimum acceptable salary

Your minimum acceptable salary is the payment you require to make a comfortable living. When deciding on the minimum salary you need, it’s important to consider how much money it takes to pay for certain necessities, like rent, food, utilities, gas and more. If you’re looking for a job in a new location, it’s helpful to research the location online to find the average cost of living in that area.

When calculating your minimum acceptable salary, it’s also beneficial to give yourself a financial buffer in case of unpredictable or emergency payments. For example, if you know that your cost of living is around $3,000 a month, you could ask for a salary that pays $3,500 or $4,000 a month to ensure you’ll have enough money to live comfortably.

3. Conduct research

Conducting research on the company and current market can help you better prepare for salary negotiations. After receiving your salary offer, consider searching online to see if you can find what the company normally pays for the position you’re interested in. If you discover the company is offering you more than the average, you know the negotiations might be a little more challenging. If you see they’re paying you less, you have evidence to help you when discussing a higher wage.

Researching the market is also important because it can help you see what other companies and organizations pay employees for the same position. Understanding the average salary for the job you’re pursuing can help you know if the salary the company offered you is objectively low and provide you with additional support when negotiating.

4. Make a plan

Before contacting the company to negotiate for a higher salary, it’s helpful to make a plan of the lowest salary you can accept and any secondary offers that might still be worthwhile. Knowing your goals for negotiations can help you direct the conversation toward them or ask for them right away. If you know that you can’t make a comfortable living unless you have a $50,000 salary, for example, asking for that exact salary might be a good place to start.

If they can’t match it but offer you additional vacation days or benefits, it’s helpful to know ahead of time if that’s still an acceptable result for your negotiation objectives.

5. Practice negotiations

Practicing negotiations is a great way to prepare for a discussion with the company, and it can also help you understand the best way to approach them. When preparing, consider creating a script to help you craft exactly what you want to say and help you avoid making any mistakes during the actual negotiations.

It’s also beneficial to practice the script with family or friends and ask for their feedback. They can tell you if the approach is too inconsiderate, not direct enough or if it requires additional evidence. Knowing this information, you can make the necessary adjustments to help you negotiate more effectively.

Tips on handling a low salary offer

Here are some additional tips to help you reply to a low salary offer:

Show enthusiasm

While negotiating, showing enthusiasm for the position and company can help show the employers you’re excited to join their team. Knowing that you want to work with the company and help fulfill its major goals and objectives can motivate employers to meet your salary demands. As you’re discussing your salary, consider starting with what you like about the position and why you’re excited to work with the other employees.

Negotiate for early performance reviews

If a company cannot match your salary request, consider asking for an early performance review to quickly show the company how you can be a major asset and why you deserve the requested salary. Showing how your expertise benefits the company can help you negotiate for a raise shortly after earning the position. If they agree to perform an early salary review, it’s helpful to discuss ahead of time what objectives you can reach to earn the salary you requested.

Focus on your skills and expertise

Focusing on your skills and expertise while talking about your salary can help companies see how you can be a major asset to their productivity. It’s also possible that a company might not have realized the extent of your occupational knowledge before offering you the position and wage. Mentioning additional experience or skills that you didn’t get to discuss in the interview can help employers understand your value, which can encourage them to find a suitable salary for your needs.

How To Reply To A Job Offer Email. After you send this note, you’ll usually need to more formally accept the offer by signing a contract—so keep an eye on your inbox. But if they don’t, you may want to ask the employer when they’d like your answer—especially if you’re waiting on other possible offers.

How To Reply Email For Job Acceptance Job Retro from jobretro.blogspot.com

I hope you are in great spirits today. I am delighted to join [company name] and am writing this letter to formally accept your job offer for the position of [job title] and to confirm the beginning of my employment on [start date]. Wrap up with a question about next steps.

Now, you have to respond with a job acceptance email and make it official. No matter which way you send the letter, make sure to address the letter to the person who offered you the position.

Email templates to respond to your job offer. In the job offer you sent me, it says i’d start work on january 15th.

[name of person who made the offer] ’s. I’ve attached my resume for your review, and can be reached directly at [your email address and/or phone number] moving forward.

Follow up after counter offering 7. For your closing, say something like, “i look forward to hearing from you.

Give a brief, honest reason for declining. You can keep your message pretty short.

However, before accepting, i’d like to request a change in the details of the offer you put forward. Ask for time to consider a job offer 2.

Include relevant details in short paragraphs. Here’s an email template you can use to reply to your job offer letter while you write your salary negotiation email:

Example of a job offer reply when declining. For your closing, say something like, “i look forward to hearing from you.

[name] [designation of the person] [company name] [company address] dear mr. However, before accepting, i’d like to request a change in the details of the offer you put forward.

Thank you for offering me the position of [position name] at [company name]. You can keep your message pretty short.

Table of Contents

Here’s An Email Template You Can Use To Reply To Your Job Offer Letter While You Write Your Salary Negotiation Email:

Here’s a sample email that keeps the message clear and concise. [name] [designation of the person] [company name] [company address] dear mr. If you’re intrigued by this opportunity.

[Name], This Is To Acknowledge The Offer Letter Sent Today.

You can keep your message pretty short. If you’ve had a more promising offer from another company or simply decided this job isn’t for you, it’s time to send a quick email or thank you letter to confirm you’re declining the offer. The second part is likely in your preferred email client and contains all the details about the opportunities and expectations that come with the job.

For Example, You Could Write, “I Am Pleased.

For instance, you might say something like, “dear ms. It’s a pleasure having to hear from you really soon. Show your appreciation and thank them for the time and efforts spent on the interviewing and offers.

If A Recruiter Calls To Offer A Position.

Once again, thank you for this exciting job offer and for the trust you place in me. Then, move on to the next part of accepting, rejecting, negotiating, or requesting more time. Compose a brief introductory email.

Give A Brief, Honest Reason For Declining.

Include relevant details in short paragraphs. Now, you have to respond with a job acceptance email and make it official. But if they don’t, you may want to ask the employer when they’d like your answer—especially if you’re waiting on other possible offers.

How to write this letter:

1 Express your pleasure at receiving the offer.
2 Mention the condition(s) that you wish to modify, and how you wish to change it/them.
3 If appropriate, mention other conditions or details of the offer that you are able to accept.
4 Indicate how you will make your next contact.
5 Reaffirm your interest in the job or company and express your confidence that you will be able to contribute to the company.

Guides

Be sure that the conditions to be negotiated are important enough to you that you are willing to jeopardize the offer rather than accept it as it is written. Be positive and respectful, and make sure that the reader realizes that you would like to accept the offer.

Example Letter #1

Thank you for offering me the position of Director of Engineering for Doe. I would be delighted to affiliate myself with such a dynamic and innovative company.

When we discussed the position, you mentioned the opportunities for profit-sharing and stock options. Participating in these is very important to me but I did not see any mention of them in your offer. I need to know if these are available to me as a member of your management team.

I would appreciate hearing from you regarding this, but in any case I will call you early next week. I look forward to getting this resolved and joining your team.

Example Letter #2

I was pleased to receive your offer of a position at Doe. I have wanted to work for your company for some time.

I will be able to start work on August 1, as you requested in your letter, but my daughter will be undergoing major surgery in the middle of August, and I will need to take ten days off work. I can either start work on the first of September or, if you prefer, I could take ten days leave in August. I am happy to accept all the other conditions as outlined in your letter.

I will call on Friday to discuss my starting date. I am very much looking forward to seeing you again and to meeting my co-workers.

Example Letter #3

Thank you for offering me a position with Doe. I am excited to work for such an outstanding company and look forward to making my own contribution.

When I asked about tuition benefits at the interview, you offered to find out if I would be eligible to receive them. Since I am already two semesters into my degree, I am anxious to know whether I qualify. I am confident that my completing my MBA will be of real benefit to the company. Please let me know about this as soon as possible. I will try to call you on Friday, June 3.

Example Letter #4

I want to thank you for offering me the position of computer specialist with your company. I am eager to get started and learn the responsibilities of the work projects. With the qualifications I have to offer, I am confident I will be able to make a meaningful contribution.

Overall, I am pleased with the conditions we have already discussed. However, I feel that further negotiations are needed regarding certain conditions of my employment. If we come to the negotiating table prepared to listen to each other’s recommendations with open minds, I am confident that we can reach a mutual agreement in a short amount of time.

Once again, I want to thank you for offering me this position. I know that this will be a great career move for me, and I just want to make sure that I clearly understand the details of my responsibilities and duties before my employment begins. I believe that negotiating the conditions of my employment now will make my transition smoother into your company. I look forward to meeting with you in person soon, so that we may initiate this process without delay.

Write Your Letter Step-by-Step

Express your pleasure at receiving the offer.

By Indeed Editorial Team

Updated June 1, 2022 | Published April 17, 2020

Updated June 1, 2022

Published April 17, 2020

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Related: How To Negotiate Salary: Asking for More Money After a Job Offer

In this video, we analyze the salary negotiation process from start to finish, providing key tips at each stage. You’ll learn strategies for developing your target range, communicating pay expectations and demonstrating your value to a possible employer.

Once employers decide who to hire for a job position, it is typical for them to contact candidates with a verbal job offer. Before you act on the offer, it is important to understand what a verbal offer entails.

In this article, we discuss the concept of a verbal offer, how it differs from a written job offer and how best to respond.

What is a verbal offer?

A verbal job offer is an informal employment offer that occurs when hiring managers tell candidates in person or over the phone that they wish to hire them for a specific job position. The details of the job position including pay, benefits, work hours and start date may change according to the discussion that follows the verbal offer.

Verbal offer vs. written offer

The key difference between a verbal offer and a written offer is that verbal offers are spoken while written offers may take the form of an electronic or physical document. Written agreements commonly follow verbal agreements and outline the key details of your employment agreement.

How to respond to a verbal offer

Follow these steps after receiving a verbal offer:

Show your appreciation.

Negotiate the pay.

Request a written offer.

Continue the job search.

1. Show your appreciation

Once the hiring manager lets you know that you’ve been accepted for the job position, express your appreciation by responding in a positive, upbeat manner. Thank them for the opportunity, and if you’re speaking to them to in-person, smile and offer a handshake. This helps them understand your gratitude and makes them feel that they made the right choice in selecting you for the job. Here are phrases you may use to show your appreciation:

“Thank you for selecting me for this position.”

“I am so grateful for this opportunity.”

“Thank you so much.”

“Thank you for this opportunity.”

2. Think it over

After you’ve taken the time to express your gratitude, ask for time to think about the offer before you accept the position. Before you leave the building or end the call, bring up any additional questions you may have. Take a day or two to consider the details of the arrangement before following up with the hiring manager.

If you’re married or have a family, consider how the job may affect those closest to you. When thinking about pay, do some research to learn what other professionals in your field make.

Here are some examples of what you might say to the hiring manager as you ask for additional time to decide whether the job is right for you:

“I really appreciate this offer. May I take a day or two to think about this before I respond?”

“Thank you for choosing me for this role. I would like to discuss this with my spouse over the next day or two before I respond.”

“Thank you for the offer. I would like a day or two to think this over before I respond.”

“Because there are a lot of factors to consider, I want to make sure I proceed in a thoughtful manner. Can I get back to you on Thursday this week?”

Remember to keep your timeframe respectful. Companies need to fill the role as soon as possible and expect to hear back from candidates within a reasonable amount of time. If you decide to decline the position, let them know within five days of the verbal offer.

3. Negotiate the pay

Negotiation is an expected part of the hiring process. Once you’ve taken the time to consider the job offer, follow up with the hiring manager by requesting a conversation with them over the phone or in-person to discuss the details and benefits of your role.

Before you negotiate, consider all aspects of the offer. While the pay may be less than you were expecting, negotiating benefits

like insurance and paid time off

may make up for agreeing to a lower salary.

Here are some examples of how you might start the negotiation conversation:

“Are you the person I should speak with regarding the compensation package of this offer?”

“Are the details of my pay open for discussion?”

“Thank you for allowing me time to consider your offer. Would [company] consider increasing my salary by [amount]?”

Politely initiating the subject of pay helps the hiring manager be more receptive to your suggestions.

4. Request a written offer

If you haven’t received a written offer within 48 hours of the verbal offer, make a special request. Ask for a written offer that details the compensation and benefits

package. Before you sign the written offer, pay attention to the verbiage. If it includes the phrase “contract of employment,” your signature indicates that you must work for the company for the specified period of time. If it includes “at-will” verbiage, this indicates you may leave the position or be let go at any time.

Here is an example of how to request a written offer by email:

Dear Joy Andrus,

I wanted to thank you again for offering me the marketing manager position. I’m looking forward to joining your team and getting acquainted with everyone.

Would it be possible for you to send me the offer in writing? This will help me better understand the details of the offer and the timeline by which I must make my decision.

I appreciate your time and look forward to hearing from you soon.

Thank you again,

5. Continue the job search

Until you have received and accepted an offer letter

. This ensures you aren’t missing out on any other opportunities while waiting for confirmation. You may get a second job offer in the process that may be a better fit for your lifestyle.

How to respond to a job offer

How To Reply To A Job Offer Email. Response email to job offer letter. Here’s an email template you can use to reply to your job offer letter while you write your salary negotiation email:

How to respond to a job offerHow To Accept A Job Offer Template PDF Template from enterstarcrypticcity.blogspot.com

If you’d like to take some time to consider the offer, write. Thank you for offering me the position of [position name] at [company name]. You, therefore, have the offer in writing, and you can review it on your own time.

Wrap up with a question about next steps. [name] [designation of the person] [company name] [company address] dear mr.

Finally, sign your name at the end. In this section, again express your gratitude and excitement about the position and the team.

When you’re ready to respond in the affirmative, take the tip to write a letter or an email confirming your acceptance of the offer. Thank the employer again for the opportunity, and be sure to end the message with a closing salutation, such as “best regards” or “sincerely” to maintain the professional nature of the correspondence.

The following tips on how to reply to a job offer email to get more time are helpful: If the offer comes via email, quickly acknowledge it.

I’ve long admired [company name] and i’m more convinced than ever that my experience in [name the sector or role] make me a great match for [job title] role. Acceptance of offer letter for job by email reply template after a successful interview with the candidate, the company selects the candidate most suitable for the position and, accordingly, sends him an offer letter for the job position along with the details of job title, salary and other benefits, job location and information on any other.

Email templates to respond to your job offer. How to respond to a job offer via email?

How to reply a job offer email. Thank the employer again for the opportunity, and be sure to end the message with a closing salutation, such as “best regards” or “sincerely” to maintain the professional nature of the correspondence.

I want to thank you again for the offer you extended yesterday. Response email to job offer letter.

Finally, sign your name at the end. The first is the email where you get the job offer from them, this is typically a short paragraph with your new title and what you’ll be doing for that position.

If the deadline doesn’t seem like enough time, ask the hiring manager if it’s possible for the company to give you an extension. Otherwise, you could use just “sir/madam.”

Table of Contents

How To Respond To A Job Offer Via Email?

Thank you for the job offer. [your first and last name]: If an opportunity is offered with a phone call, thank the recruiter and ask them to follow up with an email.

Here’s An Email Template You Can Use To Reply To Your Job Offer Letter While You Write Your Salary Negotiation Email:

Before sending your job offer reply letter, proofread it for any typos or other errors. Try to respond to their letter as soon as possible. When responding to the job offer via email, it is important to format your response professionally, like any other professional email.

Thanks And Appreciation For The Opportunity

Rejecting a job offer is made easier when answering my email than in person. For instance, “re job offer.” use their name if you know it; [name], this is to acknowledge the offer letter sent today.

There Are Two Basic Parts To A Job Offer Email.

You should write a complete, clear & professional mail. Mention following things in your mail: Thank the employer again for the opportunity, and be sure to end the message with a closing salutation, such as “best regards” or “sincerely” to maintain the professional nature of the correspondence.

Hi Ayesha, I Would Like To Start By Saying Thank You For The Offer And The Time You Took To Speak With Me During My Interviews.

Sometimes, you’ll get the job offer via email and you can just respond to that email and ask for more time. For a job offer acceptance email sample, it’s quite easy, also. Just include the body of the letter above without the address header at the top and the handwritten signature at the end.

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Related

  • What to Do After a Job Offer
  • How to Write a Letter Stating That You Accept the Job
  • How to Acknowledge a Withdrawal of Job Offer
  • Formal Responses to Accept a Job at an Interview
  • How to Reject a Job Offer by Phone

Before accepting a job offer, it’s smart to ask questions of your future employer. You want to be confident going into a job that it’s the right fit. Accept a position only after you have a written job description and your questions are answered.

The Job Offer Letter

As explained by legal website UpCounsel, a written job offer is not legally binding until you accept it. When you get a job offer, whether it’s written or verbal, you are under no obligation to take it. You can still look for other jobs and you can decline the offer. If there are conditions to employment, such as reference checks or a physical exam, the offer is not binding.

Once you acknowledge a job offer response with an acceptance, you’ve entered into a contract with the employer. The time to ask questions, then, is before formally accepting the offer.

Components of a Typical Offer Letter

The employment website Indeed lists these items as typical of a written job offer:

  • Job title.
  • Description of responsibilities.
  • Name and title of supervisor or manager.
  • Workplace location and expected working hours.
  • Base salary, benefits and additional compensation potential.
  • Offer letter expiration date.

Acknowledging the Offer

The office of Career and Professional Development at Virginia Tech says that good manners dictate that you provide a job offer response, even if it’s to decline. You don’t want to burn any bridges. Just because you decline a current job offer, that doesn’t mean you won’t consider future employment if the offer, or your circumstances, change.

Accepting Job Offer Email With Questions

You may have questions that need to be answered before you can make an informed decision about taking a job. When accepting a job offer email with questions, outline your areas of concern and provide a timeline for your actions. Here’s an example:

This email acknowledges your letter offering me the position of assistant sales manager at the Acme Company. Thank you very much for the opportunity. I understand the terms of the offer, but I still have some questions. May I speak with you sometime during the next few days so I can let you know of my decision by your requested deadline of October 15?

I’d like to know more about education opportunities that can help me advance my career with Acme. Specifically, can you tell me about training that is offered and any tuition reimbursement plans?

Please let me know if there’s a certain day and time that’s best to phone you. If you prefer to reach out to me, please feel free to contact me at your convenience at 617-555-1234, and I will respond promptly.

Other Questions to Ask

Some questions may seem like small details, although they can have a big impact on your decision to accept or decline a job offer. For example, parking may be an issue for a job in the city. You’ll want to ask where to park, and whether there are designated spaces provided to employees or if you’ll have to pay garage expenses out of pocket.

The employment website Glass Door suggests other questions you might want to ask before making a commitment to a job offer. These include:

Turn Down an Opportunity Without Burning Bridges

How to respond to a job offer

How to respond to a job offer

Theresa Chiechi / The Balance

What’s the best way to decline a job offer? How should you turn down a job if you don’t want to take it? It always makes sense to be polite when you reject a job offer, even when the offer didn’t come close to what you were expecting.

There are times when you should turn down a job offer, but what you say or write when you decline depends on your reasons for rejecting it.

If the job wasn’t a good fit, for example, but you liked the company, state in your email or phone call that you were impressed with the organization but didn’t view the job as a good fit for you.

Your response might include a mention of the key skill sets that you would like to employ, the level of responsibility toward which you wish to aspire, or other elements of the prospective job that were missing.

For example, if the target job involved only inside sales, point out that you were interested in a position handling major accounts providing a clear pathway to sales management; the possible upside being that the employer thinks of you for another role currently available or one that might open up in the future.

Tips for Turning Down a Job Offer

Before sending a declination of offer letter, make sure you are positive you do not want the job. If a scenario exists wherein you might take the job (such as a pay increase or other changes in the benefits package), first try to negotiate a counteroffer. Once you send a rejection letter, there is almost no chance you will be offered the job again.

However, if you’ve considered the opportunity well and have decided not to accept it, sending a polite, grateful, and timely job rejection letter is ​a terrific way to maintain a good relationship with the employer.

You never know when, if or how your paths might cross again, so it’s always a good show of professionalism to exhibit gratitude and timeliness.

When You Don’t Like the Company

If the company is unappealing because of its culture, a prospective supervisor, or its products or services, “thanks for the opportunity” with a simple reference to the job not being a great fit at this point in your career is sufficient.

Candidates are generally better off not expressing specific dissatisfaction with the staff with whom they interacted or sharing any criticisms of the organization.

When the Job Doesn’t Pay Enough

If a job and organization are attractive but the offered salary is insufficient, you might address this issue in your communications. If all efforts to negotiate a higher salary fail to yield the results you require, send a communication expressing your thanks and reaffirming your excitement about the position, stating that you must decline due to the level of the salary.

Sometimes an employer will come back to you with a better offer once they see that you are truly willing to walk. Be prepared to discuss a counteroffer, if a higher salary would make a difference.

What to Include in a Job Rejection Letter

Your letter should include the following:

  • Expression of appreciation for the offer
  • Written rejection of the offer

Address the letter to the person who offered you the position. Include your contact information and phone number, even though it is on file with the employer.

There’s no need to give extensive details as to why you’re declining the job. Do not include any potentially offensive reasons, such as a poor work environment or feeling uncertain about the company’s long-term future and profitability.

However, it is appropriate to briefly mention a reason for turning the job down. For example, you might explain that you accepted another offer, decided it was best to stay at your current job, or felt that the position didn’t ultimately match your career goals. Whatever the case, keep your explanation brief.

As with any communication sent to an employer, it’s important to make sure that your letter is well written and does not contain typos or grammatical errors.

Even in declining a position, all correspondence should be professional.

Sample Letters Declining a Job Offer

Review the following sample job rejection letters and use them as templates for your own letter.

Job Rejection Letter Example #1

Contact Name
Street Address
City, State Zip Code

Dear Mr./Ms. Last Name,

Thank you very much for offering me the position of Marketing Manager with Hatfield Industries. It was a difficult decision to make, but I have accepted a position with another company.

I sincerely appreciate you taking the time to interview me and to share information on the opportunity and your company.

Again, thank you for your consideration.

Signature (hard copy letter)

Job Rejection Letter Example #2

Contact Name
Street Address
City, State Zip Code

Dear Mr./Ms. Last Name,

Thank you very much for offering me the opportunity to work at Bronson Associates. Unfortunately, I will not be accepting the position as it does not fit the path I am taking to achieve my career goals.

Once again, I’d like to express my gratitude for the offer and my regrets that it didn’t work out. You have my best wishes in finding someone suitable for the position.

Signature (hard copy letter)

Job Rejection Email Example

Job Rejection Email Example

Subject: Your Name – Unit Coordinator Position

Dear Mr./Ms. Last Name,

Thank you for offering me the position of Unit Coordinator at Acme Enterprises and for reviewing my counteroffer with management. I fully understand that budgets are tight, but must regretfully decline the position at the current compensation.

Once again, I want to thank you so much for your graciousness during the negotiation process. I wish you and Acme all the best.

Posted on Published: February 27, 2019

How to respond to a job offer

Being approached with a job offer is empowering. An approach, however, is only a potential opportunity that is dependent on you knowing how to respond to a recruiter.

Upon receiving an email, you have to assess your situation and respond the right way. With these 10 templates, you will have a variety of ways to establish a professional relationship that, when you’re ready, could help you make the most out of your opportunities.

Best email templates to respond to a recruiter

01 How to respond to a recruiter when you’re already content with your present job

Even if you are not interested in the job, you have to ‘keep doors’ open in your career.

Greetings, Mr. [name],

I appreciate you reaching out. The position and the responsibilities sound very interesting and I am flattered by your email. Currently, I enjoy my work at [your company] and am not looking for other opportunities. If I happen to start looking, I will surely contact you.

Thank you again!
[your name]

02 Respond to a recruiter’s email when you’ve already accepted another offer

How to respond to a recruiter when you’ve already made a transition? Let them know using this tactful template.

I am flattered by your offer, but I have just decided to make a transition to another company and will be transferring soon. Thank you for your consideration and for contacting me in regard to the aforementioned position.

Thank you and take care,
[your name]

How to respond to a job offer

Photo by StockSnap – under pixabay license

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03 When the job offer doesn’t fit your interests or career plans

There are times when you have to know how to respond to a recruiter when the job offer doesn’t match your interests.

I thank you for reaching out to me and I appreciate you considering me as a worthy candidate. While the offer is enticing, it is not a direction I was planning to go in my career. Therefore, I suggest you consider someone who is more of an expert in [name of field/niche].

Thank you once again,
[your name]

04 When you’re not interested in the job, but know a person who might be

If someone you know is looking for a job of the same description, you have to know how to respond to a recruiter.

I appreciate you reaching out and I thank you for you’re the wonderful offer. While I am not currently interested in a new opportunity, I have a close professional connection who is. Please contact [colleague/associate’s name] if you’re looking for a qualified person for the job.

Thank you once again,
[your name]

How to respond to a job offer

Photo by geralt under Pixabay License

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05 How to respond to a recruiter when the offer is not satisfactory

In a lot of cases, you will have to know how to respond to a recruiter when you want a better offer. It’s important to be subtle and polite.

I am deeply thankful for you contacting me about the position of [the offered position]. Given the fact that I am working as [name of current position], I am interested in a role with more responsibilities/better compensation/[any other specific condition]. Unfortunately, your offer doesn’t coincide with the direction I wish to take my career in. If you are willing to reconsider the terms of your offer, feel free to contact me.

Thank you,
[your name]

06 If you want to find out more and meet with them

How to respond to a recruiter when you want to find out the details right away? Request a meeting in a polite manner.

Thank you for getting in touch! While I am satisfied with my current role at [name of current company], I am always open about talking about an interesting new opportunity. [name of niche] is a field I excel in, so I would love to discuss all the details with you. Would it be possible for you to make time for such a chat, let’s say, next week?

Looking forward to speaking to you,

Best regards,
[your name]

How to respond to a job offer

Image from mentatdgt – under pexels license

How to respond to a job offer

If you aced your job interview, you will soon receive an offer letter, either in your mailbox or your inbox. This letter serves as a formal proposal for you to begin employment at the company and confirms verbal offers made to you during the interview.

Job offer letters include:

  • The job title or position
  • Salary or wage, as well as benefits and perks
  • An acceptance deadline
  • The desired start date
  • Training information
  • Instructions on how to accept or decline the job offer

Conditions

Some job offer letters are basic in nature while others are more specific, so examine the details carefully. The letter may contain contractual rights or amend conditions previously agreed to.

Employers often add clauses regarding work responsibilities, salary, and benefits including the following:

  • Signing Bonuses: It’s likely you discussed bonuses as part of your salary negotiations. Make sure the letter contains the agreed-upon bonuses and amounts.
  • Additional Bonuses: If bonuses are included in your employment package, check to see if they are guaranteed or discretionary and annual or more frequent than annual.
  • Salary: If your letter shows a salary increment structure, see if it meets your expectations.
  • Other Benefits: Make sure the list is accurate and outlines standard perks such as insurance, vacation time, and contributions to a retirement fund. If you secured other benefits during salary negotiations like stock options or extra vacation time instead of cash, make sure the letter reflects those agreements.
  • Job Responsibilities: These must correspond with the position. You also want to make sure the letter states the job title. If the company downgrades your job in the future, you can use the letter as evidence in any dispute resolution proceedings.
  • Work Hours: Job offer letters usually state official working hours but look for company policy on overtime and holiday pay.
  • Legalities: Watch out for other conditions that affect your rights and your career path. For example, mandatory arbitration limits your power if you have a dispute with your employer. Noncompete and nonsolicit clauses also limit your ability to secure other business.
  • Privacy: Watch out for conditions that affect your right to privacy in the workplace.

Extending the Acceptance Deadline

Sometimes, after receiving a job offer, you find you need more time to consider your options. It’s best to tell the employer as soon as possible, giving them a workable reason for the delay. Try to approach the topic in a candid and professional manner.

If you have other offers on the table, it’s best to be honest with the hiring manager unless you expect a negative reaction. The worst-case scenario is that they refuse your request and insist on an answer right away. Then you must accept or decline.

Beware of using potential or verbal offers as a bargaining chip because this could backfire. They aren’t real until they appear in print. And never bargain with verbal offers.

Accepting a Job

When you accept a job, a brief acceptance letter is expected. It serves as an added record of job requirements and expectations. Use a business letter format and include the following:

  • Your gratitude for the offer
  • A summary of the employment package as you understand it
  • Formal acceptance of the job
  • Confirmation of your start date

Send your letter, along with any signed documentation from the company. Address it to the person who made the offer when mailing it. If you send an email, use your name in the subject line. Keep your acceptance letter brief and professional to maintain the positive impression you made when interviewing.

Job offer letters sometimes act as job contracts. Once you sign it, the conditions are binding. Make sure you agree with the contents and raise matters with the employer for which you are not clear.

Declining a Job

If you think the job isn’t the right fit, you should let the recruiter know in writing. A letter removes any confusion, and the recruiter can move on to other candidates.

It’s likely that during the interview process, you developed a relationship with the recruiter. A polite letter is a good way to keep the relationship going. Who knows, you may run into them again as your career develops.

If you’re declining an offer because the package is not attractive, but you want to work at the company, try negotiating a better deal. If that doesn’t produce results and you must decline, express your disappointment. Show you were interested in working for the company, but the remuneration was a sticking point. The hiring manager may reconsider the proposal.

After attending an interview every one waits to receive a call from the company in which they were interviewed. Getting job offer in email inbox is definitely one of the happiest moment in our life.

Earlier people used to send a job offer acceptance letter to the employer but nowadays letters were replaced by emails. If you are looking for how to reply to a job offer via email then here you can find some best job offer acceptance email samples.

How To Accept A Job Offer Email:

The first thing after getting a job offer is, we need to read all the details carefully. Once we are satisfied with all the details then we can send an acceptance email to the employer.

But before sending a reply email for accepting the job offer we need to consider the following details.

  1. Study the offer letter carefully and if you have any doubts then just call the HR.
  2. The second one is if you are not satisfied with the benefits given by the company or if you already got a better opportunity then reject that job in a polite manner by replying to their mail.
  3. Third one if you are happy with all the benefits given by the employer then you just need to tell them when you are going to report to the duty.

Job Offer Acceptance Email Samples:

Dear Mr _____/ Mrs________,

With great pleasure, I am accepting your job offer as a ( job position ) and I am ready to join in ( name of the company ). I have enjoyed the interview process with you and I am looking forward to work with you and your team.

As per your instructions, I will report to the duty on ( date of joining ), in the meanwhile, you can contact me at ( your mobile number ).

Dear Mr ________,

I am delighted to accept your employment offer and thanks for having confidence in me. I promise that I will put my notable contribution to the growth of the organization and I will be always thankful for giving me this wonderful opportunity.

As per the discussion held in the interview and I am ready to report the work on (your joining date) and in the meantime, you can be in touch with me at ( your mobile number ).

Dear Ms _______,

It is really a great news for me that you have offered employment for me in your organization. I am eagerly waiting to work with you and your team. I am also pleased with the compensation package which you have offered.

As per our discussion held on telephone my starting day of work will be (_________) and kindly treat this mail as my formal acceptance.

Today is the luckiest day for me because today I got a job offer form my dream company, I am ready to join as ( your job position ) at ( name of the company ). Thanks for providing this wonderful opportunity for a fresher like me.

I couldn’t able to wait to work with your and your team and as per our discussion held on the interview I am going to report my work on ( your date of joining ) and please consider this mail as my formal acceptance.

Dear Mr _______/Ms______,

I am glad to get a job offer at( name of the company ) as ( name of your job position ). I hope this is the best chance to prove my self and I am treating this as one of the best opportunity in my life till now.

As we discussed earlier I am going to report my work on ( your date of joining ) and in the meantime, I will be available at ( your mobile number )

Dear Mr _________,

This is my formal acceptance of the job opportunity at ( name of the employer ) as ( name of the job position ). I would like to thank you for this great job offer and I am sure that my skills and experience will definitely suits the job.

I am reporting my work on (date of joining in work) and if you need any further information then please contact me at (your mobile number)

Dear Ms ___________,

I am happy to accept the job offer which you have offered to me as ( name of the job position ) at ( name of the organization ). I am fully satisfied with the compensation package offered by you.

I am looking forward to working with you and your team and I will start my work from ( date of joining ) and please consider this mail as my formal acceptance.

As per the discussion held with you on the telephone, I am glad to accept your job offer and I would like to thank you for this wonderful opportunity. I have read all the terms and conditions which you have mentioned in the offer letter and I agree for all those terms & conditions.

My employment with my present employer will end on (your last date with your previous employer), so I will start my work with you from (your date of joining)

Dear Mr _________,

I am excited to accept the job offer which you have offered me as (name of the job position) and I will report to my duties on (date of joining).

Thanks for having confidence in me and I will put my 100% efforts for the growth of the organization and please consider this mail as my formal acceptance.

Dear Ms _________,

I am delighted to hear the news that I was hired as ( name of the job position ) at an esteemed institution like ( name of the organization ). Thanks for having faith in me and I will put my notable efforts to fulfill my job requirements.

I am looking forward to work with you and your team and as per our earlier discussion I am going to report my duties on ( date of joining )

How to respond to a job offer

How To Reply To A Job Offer Email. [name] [designation of the person] [company name] [company address] dear mr. First and foremost, don’t leave the recruiter guessing.

How to respond to a job offerHow To Reply Email For Job Acceptance Job Retro from jobretro.blogspot.com

The following tips on how to reply to a job offer email to get more time are helpful: Also, mention the confirmation of the agreed job title and start date, and finish off with a question about the next steps. You can also respond with an email to a verbal offer made by the hiring manager or recruiter with an email.

[name] [designation of the person] [company name] [company address] dear mr. Before sending your job offer reply letter, proofread it for any typos or other errors.

I thank you for the chance, and i anticipate applying my aptitudes to the position. Lastly, sign off professionally and positively.

If sending an email, use a subject line with your name and a clear phrase such as “ job offer acceptance. Confirm date of joining with your new employer 3.

Below is an example of an email response to a job rejection notification. Compose a brief introductory email.

In this section, again express your gratitude and excitement about the position and the team. Wrap up with a question about next steps.

Show enthusiasm in your email. Compose a brief introductory email.

Ask for time to consider a job offer 2. Mention following things in your mail:

Hi ayesha, i would like to start by saying thank you for the offer and the time you took to speak with me during my interviews. Below is an example of an email response to a job rejection notification.

You can also respond with an email to a verbal offer made by the hiring manager or recruiter with an email. Example of a job offer reply when declining.

You, therefore, have the offer in writing, and you can review it on your own time. This helps ensure that your message will be opened and read.

Table of Contents

No Matter Which Way You Send The Letter, Make Sure To Address The Letter To The Person Who Offered You The Position.

Confirm that you are excited to read and discuss the offer, and with a. Counter offer a lowball offer 3. Appreciate the hr manager for the offer 2.

Thank You Again For The Opportunity To Deliver Value As Part Of The Team At [Company Name].

Once again, thank you for this exciting job offer and for the trust you place in me. So you want to be sure to send a mail on receiving the job offer stating the steps you are taking regarding the job offer and when can they expect you to revert with a reply. If possible, ask your partner, family, or close friend to read the offer letter and ask for their reviews.

Simple Job Offer Acceptance Email.

For instance, you might say something like, “dear ms. Response email to job offer letter sample 1. Mention following things in your mail:

The Following Tips On How To Reply To A Job Offer Email To Get More Time Are Helpful:

I am delighted to join [company name] and am writing this letter to formally accept your job offer for the position of [job title] and to confirm the beginning of my employment on [start date]. Email templates to respond to your job offer. Here’s an email template you can use to reply to your job offer letter while you write your salary negotiation email:

You Can Also Respond With An Email To A Verbal Offer Made By The Hiring Manager Or Recruiter With An Email.

Compose a brief introductory email. This helps ensure that your message will be opened and read. You, therefore, have the offer in writing, and you can review it on your own time.

Senior Reporter, Work/Life

How to respond to a job offer

If you just got a job offer, congratulations! Being recognized as the top candidate for a role after rounds of applications and job interviews is no small feat. But you still have to decide if the job is the right fit.

It’s an important decision, so you should feel empowered to ask for time.

“Any time you are switching jobs, you are completely changing your entire life and your entire future trajectory, and so it is important to be thoughtful about that and to make sure that you are confident that that is the right move for you,” said Phoebe Gavin, a career coach who specializes in supporting early- and mid-career professionals.

The question is: How much time can you reasonably take to make a decision about the offer? Here’s what you need to know, according to career experts.

Unfortunately, some companies create false urgency.

Don’t feel pressured to answer yes right away, even if it’s a job you like. If an employer is asking you to make a final decision within 48 hours about an initial offer you haven’t negotiated yet, they’re creating artificial urgency, Gavin said.

“That’s them just trying to put you on a tight deadline so that if you have other irons in the fire, you don’t have time to turn those into real offers that you can leverage against them,” Gavin said. “It’s in the employer’s best interest ― once they have decided that you’re the candidate they want to put in this position ― to secure you as quickly as possible.”

“If they’re not respecting you at the offer stage, they probably won’t be respecting you as an employee.”

If you’re wondering why an employer is acting like a pushy salesperson to secure your quick agreement, it may be because their talent acquisition team is rewarded for how quickly they close job offers.

“There are some organizations who actually measure their recruiters on ‘Hey, have you closed this offer in X number of days?’ So it’s tied back to recruiter performance,” said Jocelyn S. Lai, global head of talent acquisition at Duolingo.

Lai said that ideally both you and the employer can have transparency and a mutual agreement about what constitutes a good timeline for you to make a decision, as well as transparency about whether there are other job interviews in the works that are part of your decision. In fact, mentioning the other job interviews and offers you have in the mix shows that you are a strong candidate.

And if a company is not willing to budge on the timeline, that can give you insight into their company culture. “If they’re not respecting you at the offer stage, they probably won’t be respecting you as an employee,” Lai said.

A week is standard, but feel empowered to ask for the time you need to make a well-informed decision.

Lai said that there’s no exact number of days candidates have to think an offer over. “For some people, one week might be too short. For some people, one week is too long. We’ve had candidates who are like, ‘I don’t want to drag this out anymore. I’m accepting on the spot.’”

Gavins said anything up to a week is a reasonable timeframe to make a decision, citing caregiving responsibilities, relocation considerations, being married with children or having other job offers you want time to consider as factors that could prompt you to request a full week.

When you are making a request for time, don’t ask for permission. Be matter-of-fact about what date you will respond by. If an employer is pressing you to get back to them on a different timeframe, “Remind them that it’s a big decision and that you want to make sure to take the time necessary to consult with all the stakeholders involved,” Gavin said.

Of course, if the offer is your first choice and you want to accept, “you don’t need to draw it out just to draw it out,” Gavin said.

If you end up needing more time than you initially said, Lai believes it’s alright to ask for an extension as long as you give some insight into why you need more time. This will help alleviate the employer’s anxiety.

“I do think that sharing the details is important,” Lai said. “I always relay it back to dating. If someone is like, ‘Hey, I can’t make it to dinner tonight,’ if you don’t give a reason, the person is going to be like, ‘Are you really into me? . Are you about to ghost me?’”

“The way we look at it, we’re here to advocate for what the candidate needs, but we can’t do that if we don’t know what’s going on,” Lai said.

Table of Contents:

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You have been preparing for this opportunity for years. Your dream job is finally available, and the hiring manager accepted your application.

You jumped through all the hoops and completed numerous interviews. You passed the background check, the drug screen, and are finally presented with your highly-anticipated job offer!

Unfortunately, your excitement quickly vanishes as you realize the company gave you a low-ball job offer.

Not only was the job offer much less than you expected, but it may even be below the market norms for your particular position. What do you do now?

There are a few correct ways to deal with this punch to the gut and several wrong ways as well.

Exactly how you should respond to a low-ball job offer

Before you do anything, take a deep breath. The truth is, low-ball offers happen all the time, but that doesn’t mean the low-ball offer is the final offer. Use these tips to handle the situation correctly without burning bridges.

1. Thank them for the offer and ask for time to consider the proposal

Guard your words and actions. If you immediately are aghast and insulted, do everything in your power to hide these emotions. By asking for time and professionally acknowledging the offer, you can use this extra time to double-check your numbers.

2. Research your position to know the industry standard salary

Before you try to counter the offer, be sure you have realistic expectations. You may think you’re worth more than the position pays. Be sure you have solid numbers to know where industry standards are compared to the offer. If, after your research, the offer really is a low-ball offer, make sure you have evidence to back up the average salary.

3. Send an email expressing your concern

After asking for additional time, a great tactic is to allow the hiring manager to improve the offer on their own. Send a short email indicating you are disappointed in the offer and ask if they can improve the offer so you can consider it.

This email sends a powerful message while being respectful at the same time. It clearly communicates your disappointment and gives them an opportunity to reconsider. By using this tactic, it allows them the ability to improve the offer without you issuing a counteroffer at this point.

4. Evaluate their response

The response you receive to this email will tell you much more about their current position.

If they stick hard and fast to the offer, this is a strong indication the proposal is likely near as high as they will go.

If they are willing to improve the offer, this gives you more to work with and may get you to what you were expecting or at least closer to your counteroffer.

5. Formulate you counteroffer

During this phase, you need to have a firm number or benefits in mind that you must meet or you’re willing to turn down the offer.

You should have your secret “line in the sand” as you prepare to make your counteroffer. If their offer meets your minimum expectations, you have nothing to lose but everything to gain.

If you still need improvement, know your minimums and make sure your counter is more so there is room for negotiation.

6. Present your counteroffer

Again, throughout this process, the key is to remain respectful and gracious for the opportunity. Avoid any negative feelings showing through as you work to improve the low-ball offer. As you present your counteroffer, focus on four elements:

  • Express your desire to be part of the company
  • Make it clear that you feel their offer is below what you are willing to accept and you would like to propose an offer that will get you closer to where you need to be
  • State the specific details of your counteroffer and what you would like to receive
  • Thank them for their time and consideration
  1. Be prepared to walk away if necessary

More often than not, they will address your counter with their own counteroffer. This is why you aim for a reasonable amount more than your minimum. If the counteroffer meets your minimum or better, graciously accept the offer.

If the offer is lower than expected and doesn’t meet your minimum needed for the position, you have to be willing to walk away.

Presenting your best self

Most importantly, do not burn any bridges or offer any insults if you’re upset with the low-ball offer.

You never know what opportunities may arise in the future, and any bridges burned may result in missed job offers and fallout through dissolved network connections.

Even disappointing experiences can later lead to unexpected opportunities.

A good piece of job offer advice is to acknowledge the job offer, even if you are not yet sure about accepting it.

This can be done by writing a letter or sending an email. This letter buys you some time while making the decision on whether to accept the job offer or not.

How to respond to a job offer

Don’t miss out on a good opportunity while you consider the job offer, demonstrate your interest by sending an acknowledgement and thank you email and come across as professional and polite.

Adapt this letter to suit your situation and send it off when you get the offer.

Sample response letter to a job offer

Your Name
Your Address
Your City, State, Zip Code
Your Phone Number
Your Email

Mr John Jackson
Human Resources Director
Bright Waters Inc.
Address
City, State, Zip Code

Dear Mr. Jackson

I have received your letter offering me the Sales Representative position with Bright Waters, Incorporated. Thank you for offering me this exciting opportunity. I will contact you with a decision by the end of next week as requested.

I appreciate the time you have given me to consider your offer so that I can be sure my decision will be the right one in terms of both my career goals and the needs of your company.

Please do not hesitate to call me if I can provide you with any information you may need.

Can I acknowledge the job offer through an email?

It is quite acceptable to acknowledge and respond to the job offer via email. Simply adapt the example above and include a good subject line such as:

Subject line: Your Name – Thank you for the sales job offer

Subject line: Secretary Job Offer – Your Name

Including your name in the subject line ensures your email will be opened and read. Always address your email to the person who offered you the job.

Email to acknowledge the job offer

You can use this sample email to acknowledge the job offer and request a few days to consider the offer, particularly if there is no time frame provided for your response.

How to respond to a job offer

How to respond when you get a job offer

Use this job offer advice to stand out.

  • By formally acknowledging and thanking the employer for the job offer you make a great start if you do decide to accept the offer and go to work for the company.
  • If you decline the offer, you will be remembered as a professional and polite candidate.

How to respond to a job offer over the phone

An employer may call you to make the job offer. Find out what to say and do when you receive a job offer over the phone.

How to respond to a job offer with any questions you may have

If you have any questions regarding the job offer this is the time to ask them. You can acknowledge the job offer and then go on to ask your questions in your email. For example:

“I have a couple of questions that I would like answered so that I can fully consider the job offer with all the necessary information at my disposal. In this way I can make the best decision for both of us.”

and go on to list your questions.

Job offer advice – how to manage the job offer

Evaluating the job offer

Unsure about the job offer? Look closely at the position and consider these key criteria when making a final decision at evaluating a job offer

Negotiating the job offer

Is the job offer salary not what you expected? Use the job offer negotiation letter to get the salary you want.

How to respond to a job offer

Accepting the job offer

If you decide that this is the job for you then you will need to write a letter accepting the job offer. Use the sample job offer acceptance letter to demonstrate your professionalism and commitment to your new employer.

If you prefer to send an email, the sample email accepting the job offer at employment acceptance email will help you with this.

How to decline a job offer

Decided that this is not the right job for you? Always write a professional and polite letter declining the job offer. The sample letter at decline job offer letter will show you how.

How to respond to a job offer

Check that you have all the job offer details. This job offer letter template clearly outlines what should be included in an offer of employment letter.

How to write this letter:

1 Thank the reader for extending the job offer. Express confidence in the management, company or other aspects of the offer.
2 State that you want a better salary. Mention the salary you want if you feel it appropriate. Identify the factors that you feel warrant a higher salary, such as education or experience.
3 Confirm that you will make significant contributions to the success of the organization.
4 Reaffirm your strong interest in the job offer. Assure the reader that a resolution is possible and that you want to accept the challenges of the position.
5 Indicate how you will make your next contact.

Guides

Sometimes the salary offered does not meet your expectations. This letter will state your case clearly, preparing the way for further discussion. Keep the tone positive, confident, and respectful.

Example Letter #1

Thank you for extending me the offer of employment as the Director of Human Resources for the Doe Company. The opportunity to talk to you and the other executives has been enlightening and enjoyable. The company’s growth plans are exciting and challenging.

After considerable thought, I am concerned about the salary you offered. It is lower than I anticipated. Since I have had extensive experience in all aspects of the Human Resource functions (technical recruiting, compensation, employee relations, benefits administration, employment and organizational development), I feel I will be a great asset to you. My thorough knowledge of the numerous federal and state laws and regulations which affect the company will also aid you.

I do want to accept this position but feel that we need to discuss the salary further. I will call in a few days to set up an appointment with you.

Thank you again for the offer. I am sure we can reach an agreement.

Example Letter #2

I appreciate your offering me the position of Section Head of Shipping at Doe. I look forward to working with you.

Unfortunately the salary you offered me is lower than I feel I can accept. I have had eight years of experience in Shipping during which I completely redesigned my current employer’s shipping process. This saved over $200,000 in the past two years. I am confident that I can achieve significant savings for Doe with no loss of efficiency. Under these circumstances I feel that your salary offer should be increased by 10%.

I am sure that we can come to a mutually satisfactory arrangement. I will be in Springfield next Wednesday and would like to meet with you to discuss this. I will call to arrange a time for us to meet.

Example Letter #3

I was delighted to receive your offer of a position as office manager at Doe. I was very impressed by the friendly yet professional attitude of all the staff and I look forward to joining your team.

I regret to say that I was disappointed by the salary you offered. Although I have been out of the work force for some years, I feel I am worth more than an entry-level salary. I have worked extensively on a volunteer basis on the school and community level and have held several responsible positions during this time. These include City PTA President, School Carnival Chair for two years, and Fund-raising Chair for the new library. I feel that this experience should qualify me for a salary of $30,000 per year.

I work well with people and am able to motivate those who work under my direction. I am sure that these skills will be very valuable to Doe. I would like to discuss this with you further and will call to set up an appointment.

Example Letter #4

Thank you for extending me the position of sales representative. I am eager to become a part of your sales team and have the opportunity to work toward making a real contribution in this company. Armed with an array of qualifications, I am sure that I will be able to fulfill all required duties and obligations. Please know that I am ready to give my best efforts to this position.

As I stated in my application and in our interview, I am flexible in considering offers regarding the terms of my employment. I have evaluated your current offer, however, and feel that further negotiations are necessary. I propose that we take another look at the salary you offered me in order for you to better take into account my skills, education, and experience.

I am greatly interested in working for your company, as I believe this position will help me develop my current strengths and capabilities, as well as develop new ones. I look forward to developing a long-term relationship with your organization, but I require a salary that is in harmony with my credentials and sufficient to meet my personal needs. Let us get together and reconsider your offer. I am confident that we can reach a figure that is satisfactory to both of us.

Write Your Letter Step-by-Step

Thank the reader for extending the job offer. Express confidence in the management, company or other aspects of the offer.

You have made it this far through the interview process and finally got a job offer.

So you are selected for your hard-earned interview and, after a week, you get a call from the hiring manager congratulating you for your selection. You receive an email of their job offer letter with their terms and conditions mentioned, and it’s upon you to accept it.

A job offer letter is a formally written document between a candidate and the employer. After your interview, if the employer wants to move ahead with your selection, they first inform you informally through an informal email or phone call.

They further send you a formal document of a job offer stating salary, joining date, facilities and perks provided, terms and conditions of the company, and if any information of the candidate is required.

The answer to this mail of accepting the job offer verbally, through a letter or an email is job offer acceptance. It is a formality required to have the conversation between an employer and candidate recorded for future references.

This article will guide you through the procedures to write a job acceptance letter from scratch. It will help you understand the objectives and necessary pointers to keep in mind while drafting an acceptance letter.

Procedure Of How To Accept The Job Offer

How to respond to a job offer

Before accepting the job acceptance letter, read the offer letter very carefully. It is essential to know whether you are getting everything you expected out of this job offer.

There are five simple steps during the job acceptance process to avoid confusion on either end of you.

  • Start with Setting Expectations

It’s always best when you are timely in your response to the job offer. So you want to be sure to send a mail on receiving the job offer stating the steps you are taking regarding the job offer and when can they expect you to revert with a reply.

If possible, ask your partner, family, or close friend to read the offer letter and ask for their reviews. For an essential decision like this, it’s better to have a second opinion.

  • Carefully Review the Offer

Ensure to check all aspects of the request and consider how each section relates to your current role or the other competing offers you may have.

Highlight the crucial pointers in the offer letter. We are sure it will help to make your decision better! If you have time, create pros and cons list from their offerings.

  • Decide on How You Want to Respond

If the employer sends you the official offer letter through an email, it’s acceptable to send your acceptance back.

Likewise, if they send you a physical offer letter, consider sending your acceptance letter in a physical format back.

We would recommend you to first have a verbal discussion with your hiring manager and respond for acceptance.

How to respond to a job offer

  • Begin with Drafting a Reply

After carefully reviewing the offer terms or everything is ready for your acceptance, start drafting a reply. If you are wondering how to begin a response, look at the communication style from the

employer and follow the same tone.

In your job acceptance letter, you should always start by expressing your gratitude for the opportunity to the employer and restating the final offer details as you understand them.

It can include your expected title, salary summary, the additional benefits you agreed to, and the expected start day. Then, clearly state that you are officially accepting the company’s employment offer.

Conclude it with well wishes and regard. You can also write any questions if you have ahead for your start day.

If you send the job letter acceptance through an email, make the subject line clear and easy to find. For example, “job offer acceptance-Isha Goyal.”

  • Proofread the Response Before Sending

Be sure to review your response multiple times to spot any errors. It’s always helpful to again enlist a friend or a mentor to help you through this process.

Remember, you always need a second opinion, and drafting a response is helpful when you have another person’s eye view.

If you accept the job offer letter on the phone or in person, be sure to practice your response and prepare for any query or further negotiations.

What To Include In The Job Acceptance Letter Correctly

How to respond to a job offer

Please cover some of the crucial aspects in your offer letter acceptance:

1- Your excitement to join the company

2- Mention the job title.

3- Showing gratitude to the hiring manager for giving you the opportunity.

4- A formal acceptance statement to the offer.

5- Mentioning the salary and joining date to confirm as well as avoiding confusion.

6- Provide any details asked by the hiring manager in the job offer letter.

It is vital to write your acceptance letter formally and professionally. Your acceptance letter should be well constructed, making the employer think that he chose the right candidate.

Watch out for grammatical and spelling errors! You wouldn’t want the employer to take back his decision because of your sloppy and unprofessional letter.

If you have applied for an internship, it looks good if you send them a courtesy email thanking and accepting the training. You can follow the same template of job offer acceptance and use the word ‘internship’ instead of ‘job’.But before applying for your Job these steps might help you better: https://myfutureapp.in/blog/how-to-write-job-application-letter/

Examples Of How To Accept Job Offer Through Email

How to respond to a job offer

Subject Line: Job letter Acceptance – Kinjal Jain

Thank you for offering me a job position as SEO Consultant in your company. I am pleased to accept the offer and looking forward to working in your team.

I understand my starting salary will be “agreed starting salary”, with the additional benefit of health insurance. I agree to all the terms of the offer letter and attachments in addition to that.

I can confirm that I will be joining the firm on 1st December 2021. Kindly let me know if you require any additional information.

Once again, thank you for the opportunity.

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Related

  • How to Counter Offer a New Job Salary
  • How to Accept a Job Offer Through Email
  • Resigning to Work for a Competitor
  • Can You Accept a Job Offer Even if You Already Have a Job?
  • How to Ask an Employer How I’m Getting Paid

From time to time during your career, you might get an informal job offer, which means you haven’t been offered a legal contract, among other things. This usually indicates the recruiter and you have a few things to work out.

It can also mean you’ve been offered the job, but the company needs more time to get things ready to bring you on board. Reviewing how to respond to tentative job offers helps you avoid making mistakes that could cost you a desirable new position.

What Is an Informal Job Offer?

An informal, or tentative, job offer is often one that isn’t legally binding. You haven’t been given an offer with a start date, title, salary or wage, or benefits. This limits the legal liability of the business in the event you quit your current job and then don’t receive a formal offer. Don’t panic if you get something in writing with a line like “This is not intended as an offer of work.”

Companies give informal job offers to let you know they are interested in bringing you on board but still need to do more research. For example, you might meet a department head or business owner at a trade show or industry conference, and they are impressed with you, asking if you’d like to come to work with their company.

Before this person can make a formal offer, she needs to talk to one or more people at work, look at the budget, consider how the hire will affect a department or the whole company, and what type of formal offer (including compensation) the company can make.

In some cases, an informal job offer is a more detailed offer, but it lets you know the two of you will work out the details in a later discussion. According to recruitment software provider TalentLyft, an informal offer can be detailed, but the manner in which it’s communicated (such as a short email, text or phone call) is not formal.

Get More Facts

After an informal job offer, respond to the person you spoke with to get more information. Start your email or letter telling them you enjoyed speaking with them, are interested in talking more about coming to work for the company, and would like more information.

If you got an offer with details, confirm that you are good with the offer and want to come on board, and then ask for the next steps. An informal but solid job offer might come with a request that you sign some documents to continue the onboarding process, points out TurboHire.

If the situation is fluid and you need to do more research before accepting, don’t ask for proprietary information, such as “Can you tell me what your revenues were last year?”) or focus on pay. Make sure your questions confirm that you are a good fit.

For example, you might want to highlight one of your skills to continue the interview process while finding out if the job is right for you. You might ask, “I have extensive experience in XYZ. How does that factor into this role?”

Compare to What You Have

Assume you are likely to get a job offer if it hasn’t been offered yet, with compensation and start date details. How will this new job compare to what you have right now in terms of total compensation (salary and benefits), title, work-life balance, challenge, commute or remote work opportunity, hours per week, and effect on your career?

Get Ready To Submit

Don’t wait until you receive a formal offer to update your resume. Review your LinkedIn profile, decide who your references will be, and search and clean up your online presence. Assume you’re going to get the job and be prepared to respond the way that’s best for you – proactively, not reactively. Know your salary number and the benefits you want.

Make Your Counter/Acceptance

Before you receive a formal or even tentative job offer acceptance letter or email, be prepared to make your counteroffer or accept the offer. You might not want to get into too many details that make you sound pushy during the final conversations. For example, before you’ve been given a formal offer, you might want to ask for a specific job title or inquire about tuition reimbursement.

  • TalentLyft: Informal Job Offer Letter or Email – Letter Sample
  • TurboHire: Informal Job Offer Mail

Steve Milano is a journalist and business executive/consultant. He has helped dozens of for-profit companies and nonprofits with their marketing and operations. Steve has written more than 8,000 articles during his career, focusing on small business, careers, personal finance and health and fitness. Steve also turned his tennis hobby into a career, coaching, writing, running nonprofits and conducting workshops around the globe.

How To Respond To A Job Offer. You must go out to precisely mention the following points: Don’t lie on your resume.

How to respond to a job offerDubai Customer Service 101 Respond to the Complaint with a Job Offer from alexofarabia.com

Starting negotiations right away might lead you to make a quick decision. 5 simple steps to accept a job offer over the phone in a professional and confident manner. Give a brief, honest reason for declining.

Keep your letter short and sweet, but do include these elements: Thank the company for the offer.

After you send this note, you’ll usually need to more formally accept the offer by signing a contract—so keep an eye on your inbox. Ask for time to consider the decision.

Regardless of whether you accept the job offer or not the first thing you want to do is say thank you. You, therefore, have the offer in writing, and you can review it on your own time.

Hey guys good luck on your job hunting and i wish nothing but the best in the job that you get. They invested a lot of time during the interview process, and are putting trust in you by making you an offer, so be sure to thank them for the opportunity that they.

Before sending your job offer reply letter, proofread it for any typos or other errors. Be honest when answering interview questions;

Verbiage that says you accept the company’s offer of employment. Thank the caller immediately express gratitude for the opportunity and display enthusiasm for the position.

It is also important in giving you time to prepare a more detailed statement about why you can’t accept the offer just yet. Wrap up with a question about next steps.

Just include the body of the letter above without the address header at the top and the handwritten signature at the end. Simply agree to the job role and confirm your start date.

Affirm that you are pleased to accept their offer. These are the aspects that are absolutely within your control:

Simply agree to the job role and confirm your start date. Before sending your job offer reply letter, proofread it for any typos or other errors.

Your employers might call you in for a meeting and give you a counteroffer as soon as you notify them of your wish to leave the company. How to negotiate a better salary.

Should you send a follow up email? If you are entirely new to this kind of setup, here are the typical steps on how you can respond to a job offer professionally:

Here’s how to respond confidently to a job offer and negotiate your pay and other benefits. Starting negotiations right away might lead you to make a quick decision.

Communicate expectations as soon as you receive a job offer, it’s advised to communicate your expectations. For a job offer acceptance email sample, it’s quite easy, also.

These are the aspects that are absolutely within your control: How to negotiate a better salary.

Whether or not you understand the terms of the offer. If you are entirely new to this kind of setup, here are the typical steps on how you can respond to a job offer professionally:

Don’t lie on your resume. Communicate expectations as soon as you receive a job offer, it’s advised to communicate your expectations.

Make sure you provide an enthusiastic response to the employer and thank them for their job offer. Affirm that you are pleased to accept their offer.

Reducing the chances of offer withdrawal. A recap of the salary and benefits as.

Be honest when answering interview questions; Here’s how to respond confidently to a job offer and negotiate your pay and other benefits.

Table of Contents

Things You Should Mention While Responding To The Job Offer Mentioning Your Expectations And Requirements From The Job Makes The Company Clear About Your Stance Regarding The Job Offer.

You can keep your message pretty short. Here’s how to respond confidently to a job offer and negotiate your pay and other benefits. If you don’t, ask for clarification.

Communicate Expectations As Soon As You Receive A Job Offer, It’s Advised To Communicate Your Expectations.

Starting negotiations right away might lead you to make a quick decision. Don’t lie on your resume. Use the word ‘accept’ in the very first sentence of your letter.

Make Sure You Provide An Enthusiastic Response To The Employer And Thank Them For Their Job Offer.

Verbiage that says you accept the company’s offer of employment. Make sure you respond professionally and perform proper research so that you can justify your proposal. Example of a job offer reply asking for more time dear nadia, thank you so much for offering me cooper & co.’s financial analyst role.

Your Employers Might Call You In For A Meeting And Give You A Counteroffer As Soon As You Notify Them Of Your Wish To Leave The Company.

Thank you for offering me the position of [position name] at [company name]. Ask for time to consider the decision. Thank the company for the offer.

Here Are A Few Steps You Can Follow If Your Current Employer Presents You With A Counteroffer:

You must go out to precisely mention the following points: Feel free to respond verbally, or in writing, based on the method of communication you’ve had with the employer. Give a brief, honest reason for declining.

Going through the hiring process and receiving a job offer can be an exciting time to advance in your career. But what happens if you receive a job offer with a salary that is much lower than expected? While a lowball salary offer can certainly be frustrating, the good news is that there are a few things you can do to help you through this decision. Below are 6 ways to handle a lowball salary offer:

Ask for more time to think about the offer

Remember that you don’t have to accept or decline the job offer right away, especially if you didn’t get the offer you wanted. And if you received a low offer, you may need to recoup before continuing the conversation with the hiring manager. The best way to stay composed during this process is to politely ask for some time to think about the offer and share a timeframe for when you can give a final decision. Giving yourself some time to think about the offer will allow you to weigh the pros and cons.

Negotiate for a higher salary

If the salary you were offered is lower than expected, you shouldn’t always take it as face value. Many employers expect potential hires to negotiate a higher salary, so don’t sell yourself short. Make sure you do your research on your market value before you head into salary negotiations in order to confidently ask for what you want. Then, take it from there based on how the employer reacts.

Consider the company’s overall package

If you’ve already tried to negotiate for a higher salary but the employer doesn’t have the money to give you for the position, you shouldn’t feel defeated. Remember to look at the full package the employer can offer when making your decision. For example, you can ask your potential employer what their retirement packages and healthcare benefits look like. Do they have a high 401K match, low-cost health insurance or commuter reimbursements? If they have some of those options, you’ll need to do the math and see where your money is going. You may just find that their offer is better than expected.

Negotiate for more benefits

Another tactic you can utilize if the employer is unable to meet your salary requirements is to negotiate for certain benefits that may make the lower salary offer more worth accepting. Many times, salary is out of the hiring manager’s hands but other non-salary related options can be an important factor that they can control. When speaking to the employer, see if you’d be able to receive more paid time off, stock options, professional development investments, or a more flexible work schedule.

Create a plan for performance reviews

One way to combat a low salary is by setting yourself up for success if you do take the job. Talk to the hiring manager and see if it’s possible to have scheduled, structured performance reviews more frequently than yearly reviews. With a set schedule in place, you may find yourself earning promotions or bonuses that equal the salary you initially wanted.

Don’t be afraid to walk away

If you go through these negotiation steps and you still feel uncertain or unhappy about the overall offer the employer gives you, don’t be afraid to walk away. If you don’t feel comfortable with the offer, you won’t be able to fully concentrate on the job at hand, and you may find yourself job searching for a higher paying role sooner rather than later. Remember, in today’s candidate-driven market, you are in a good place to wait for the right job for you.

Job Interviews For Dummies

Congratulations! You’ve interviewed for a position with a great company and they’ve extended a job offer. How should you respond to the company’s offer? Hold off on an immediate response.

A few small things may curb your unbridled enthusiasm:

Your salary’s so low you have to rent your toothbrush.

Your hours are so late that even the cable channels are running test patterns when you get home.

Your health benefits leave much to be desired.

Otherwise, the job is great.

Don’t say yes right away

When you hear those sweet words, “We’re offering you the job,” anticipate your reaction. Why should you be enthusiastic when you’re not certain you want the job? Because it’s more fun to turn down than to be turned down. You need a little time to get over the excitement of being chosen and calmly consider whether accepting the offer is in your best interest.

The employer probably expects you to take a day or two to decide. After all, you’re making a choice that impacts many facets of your existence. An immediate response could be seen as impulsiveness or failure to take the job seriously.

Even when the job’s the only game in town and everyone wants it, your interests are best served by reflecting a bit before giving your answer. This is especially true when relocation is involved. Ask for overnight, a few days, or, at most, a week to think over a job offer.

Before saying yes, you may still be able to extract one last benefit that didn’t come with the original offer. Or the additional facts provided by the interview may have opened your eyes to aspects of the job you hadn’t considered — pro or con.

Stick to your career script?

Not so long ago, a key consideration in choosing a job was the opportunity to stay in your career field to follow your personal goals. Zigzagging from career field to career field rather than changing jobs within the same career field wasn’t a smart strategy. The situation has changed. Turning down a job today because it doesn’t “fit into your long-term career goals” is still a desirable policy but not always a practical choice.

Analyzing who you are and what you want to do will always be relevant. Staying within the boundaries of the work you love and are prepared to do is always more satisfying — and always better for your career.

Economic realities may sometimes mean that to earn a living, you have to do what you can do rather than what you love to do. Should you find yourself in this situation, try to identify new skills and knowledge you will gain that enhance your original career direction if you return to it.

What’s most important to you is that any job you take must allow you to develop and tweak portable skills that you can use in your next job.

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How to respond to a job offer

Related

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  • How to Write a Letter of Appreciation for a Job Offer
  • How to Express Gratitude for a Job Offer
  • How to Quit a Temp Job
  • Job Offer Etiquette

Congratulations! You have made it through the interview and completed your pre-employment background check. Right there in front of you sits your job offer letter. Go ahead and savor the moment. You’ve earned it.

Before You Accept

The offer should state your title, which duties you will perform, what day you will start and your supervisor’s name and title. Make sure that matches any verbal offer you received during your interview. If not, do not accept the offer until you clarify everything. CEO Arnie Fertig, the founder Jobhuntercoach advises, “if it isn’t in the offer letter, it didn’t happen.”

Consider the details: Does the job require a training period? When and where do you report for training? Will you be paid for training? If your training period does not include pay, can you afford to take the job? If the unpaid training time exceeds your savings, you may want to reconsider working for this company.

Review the compensation: Make sure what you were offered in the interview matches what the letter states. Look at the benefits and make sure they fit your needs. If your interviewer promised a signing bonus, the offer letter should state the dollar amount and what date you will receive it. Getting this in writing now will protect your rights if the employer does not follow through.

Negotiate and resolve any discrepancies: Once you accept, the terms become a legal contract. Make sure you and your employer agree about your wages or salary, benefits, hours and duties.

What to Include in Your Acceptance

Restate the job title, duties and start date: Thank the letter writer and the interviewers. Many job seekers fail to say thank you, even though nearly 80 percent of HR managers surveyed by Accounttemps in 2017 reported that a thank you note helps them decide who to hire. If you forgot to send a thank you after the interview, include one when you accept your job offer.

Clarification Request

Use this format when you see something missing from the job offer letter. Resolve these details before you accept, especially if you have other job offers pending.

Example:

Thank you for offering me the position of Donor Outreach Coordinator. I look forward to working with you, and with the Sales and Marketing manager, Joanne Beiderman. Working from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. provides a welcome change from second shift.

I noticed two items missing in the offer letter, though. When we spoke at the interview, you stated that there was a signing bonus, and Joanne mentioned paid training. I believe signing bonus was $1,500 to be paid after 90 days. I would also like clarification about the training wage before I accept.

Acceptance Letter With Negotiation

This format allows you to make a conditional acceptance and open negotiations without offending the person offering you the position.

Example:

I am proud to join the solar team this Monday as a sales agent. I appreciate the opportunity to expand my product knowledge and hone my skills in this emerging field. The $13 per hour training wage with the transition to full pay after the third week sound just fine. I prefer stock options instead of the annual two-percent bonus. Let me know whether or not that option works for you.

Refusal Letter

Sometimes a job’s requirements have hidden costs that lower the value of your salary offer. What sounds acceptable on the surface might be several thousand dollars lower than you thought it would be. When writing your refusal, state that you are open to negotiation. State what circumstances would allow you to accept so that your recruiter or HR manager knows where to begin.

Example:

I regretfully decline the offer to serve as the Intake Coordinator for the Kentuckiana Family Service Center. I consulted with my insurance company about the requirement to transport clients. They quoted $2,000 more per year than I currently pay. That effectively cuts your salary offer to $21,000 per year. If your budget permits, I am open to negotiation.

How to respond to a job offer

How do you respond to a low salary offer when you’re stuck?

So this article assumes that you’ve tried to negotiate for more money or benefits. But for some reason, the company said they couldn’t do anything else.

I know, it’s not a fun situation. It sucks.

But when that happens, you’re not all the way out of luck because you still have a few options.

Here are three different roads you can take.

Option 1: Get A Future Raise Agreed To In Writing

When the company sticks to their offer and says that’s all they can afford to pay you at this point, you’re not out of negotiation moves. One last move you can make is to bring up a future raise.

Say something along the lines of, “Since we’re not in exact agreement, if I take this offer and perform extremely well, could we set a time in the next 6 to 12 months to discuss a raise?” If the hiring manager says yes to that, you have to set a specific time to discuss this again and get this agreement in writing.

(Then be a top performer at your position. Show up early to the office and leave late. Because if you’re a valuable contributor then you’ll have a better chance of receiving the raise you agreed to.)

Option 2: Take The Job And Make Due

If you love the work and it’s worth taking a pay cut for, then take the job without any regrets.

Just realize that your monthly budget will probably be tight and you’ll have to sacrifice in other areas. That might mean you can’t take a fancy vacation, travel as much as you like, or stay in a super nice place.

If that’s good with you, then go for it. You’ll spend far more time at work then you do at home or on vacation. And maybe you can get a promotion or raise in this role since you love it so you will be more likely to succeed.

If you don’t love the job and it’s paying below market value, then I’d go with Option 3.

Option 3: Decline The Job And Get Paid What You’re Worth

Maybe the offer is below your market value and makes it hard to live in an expensive city. If that’s the case, then it might be best to reject their offer and seek employment elsewhere.

The good news is that this isn’t the only job and company in the world. There are plenty of companies who would love to have your skills and experiences, and pay you fairly for them.

And when you go through the negotiation process this time, you’ll be a pro to get what you’re worth.

Making A Decision

If you can get a sizable raise agreed upon for six months or 12 months down the road, that settles it and it’s obvious to take the job. It gets tricky deciding between taking the job without the raise or declining the job.

Having self-awareness about who you are and your future vision is super helpful when it comes to making this decision. So if your self-awareness is solid, use that to decide.

For those of you still uncertain, here’s my closing advice.

Assuming their offer isn’t way off what you need, if the salary offer is the only thing you don’t love about the company and you can still afford to pay the bills, I’d trust your gut and take this job.

Because most often, finding a job that gives you the opportunity to grow, provides some personal autonomy, has a strong company culture, and involves a cause you believe in, leads to more happiness than a job where you only appreciate the income. And just remember, there are always creative solutions (like taking a side job or making a savings budget) to end up with more money.

However, if work is all about the money for you and you’re going to resent taking this lower than expected offer, it’s best you look for a higher-paying position. There’s nothing wrong in demanding that you get paid what you’re worth.

Ultimately this career decision is up to you and your unique situation. Best of luck!