How to save money on clothing

Do you struggle to afford an up to date wardrobe without buying new clothes on credit? You’re not alone. Whether you’re buying just for yourself or for your whole family, here are two dozen practical tips that show you how to save money on clothing and credit card interest charges.

Two Dozen Ways for Saving Money on Clothing

  1. Learn to make minor alterations, e.g. hemming, to get longer wear from an item
  2. Mend items promptly – you will get more wear out of them and you won’t forget you have them (then buy more); this goes for shoes too!
  3. If you have kids, spruce up a hand-me-down with new buttons or a new patch – then the item will look “new” again (works for your own clothes too!)
  4. Launder items promptly to avoid stains ruining themHow to save money on clothing
  5. Wash with cold or cool water (fabric lasts longer & saves on hydro costs too!)
  6. Use the right amount of detergent – most people use too much
  7. At the laundromat, use a warm dryer to decrease drying time (and thus cost)
  8. If you buy something that needs dry-cleaning, factor the cost of cleaning the item into the price – a lot of dry-cleaners will press items for you that you washed at home ahead of time
  9. Polish your shoes – they’ll look new again (and you might not need to buy any)
  10. Buy second hand – you never know what treasure you may find!
  11. Exchange items with friends or family – lets you have more for less!
  12. Update your hair and make-up and keep your look fresh that way
  13. Buy at a consignment store
  14. Take items you no longer wear to the consignment store
  15. Only buy items that fit now and that you really love
  16. Learn to accessorize – that white shirt will look very different with a chunky & coloured necklace rather than with a simple chain
  17. If you like name brands, buy one or two key pieces each season and then save on what you buy to wear with them
  18. Don’t buy key items that are too trendy – you’ll be able to wear them longer if you keep your basics more traditional
  19. Learn to coordinate your wardrobe so that you have more choices to mix & match
  20. Clean and pressed worn with confidence goes a long way, even if it isn’t the newest item that season!
  21. If you’re in the mood for something new but can’t afford to go shopping, check in the back of your closet or drawers – there may be something there you forgot you had
  22. Shopping with cash helps you stay within your budget
  23. If you use your credit card to buy something on sale, pay your card off that month (otherwise the cost of the interest can outweigh your savings!)
  24. If you have teens, set a limit as to what you can afford to spend on their clothes – they may need to top up with their own funds to get what they want (and they’ll appreciate it that much more!)
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The average household spends about 2% of their budget—around $1,600 every year—on clothes. While it’s not the biggest thing we spend our money on , it’s still over a hundred bucks a month that maybe we could trim back. Here are at least ten ways to save money and still have great clothes.

The Most Common Ways You Waste Money (and How to Save It)

All too often we focus on cutting out the little things (like a daily cappuccino), when we should…

Perhaps you’re thinking “just don’t buy any more clothes!” Clothing, unfortunately, quickly gets worn out or outdated, and work and other special occasions will require us to invest in our wardrobes. Gaining weight, losing weight, and/or trying to clothe children who grow like weeds are also challenges. We can, however, make our clothing budget count more by keeping the clothes we love last longer and also spending less on new clothing.

10. Buy Better Quality Clothing

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Wait, spend more money on clothes? Yes, in general, you’ll get more value (or cost per wear ) out of decent clothes that actually fit you and will last you longer rather than doing the “fast food” approach to new clothing every year. Feel free to disregard this advice for kids, though.

Money Saving Habits That Can Backfire and Wreck Your Finances

We all know living beyond your means and not having an emergency fund can wreck your finances.…

9. Buy Clothes at the Right Time

Time your clothing purchases right and you’ll save hundreds on your clothing expenses. January and August (for kids) seem to be the best months to invest in clothing, Thursday is the best day to shop for clothes , and there are certain days of the week that might be best for specific apparel types . In general, buying off season usually gets you better deals than buying what’s hot and trendy right now, price-wise.

The Best Time to Buy Anything During the Year

A bit of planning can save you a ton of money when it comes to buying throughout the year. Here’s…

8. Buy Clothes When They’re the Lowest Price They’re Likely to Be

Buying clothes during sales events is a popular tactic, but not all sales are equal. The same shirt or pair of pants you’re eyeing could be significantly less a week or so from now. How do you know if it’s the absolute lowest price it’ll go? The secret price codes .

Know the Secret Price Codes at Major Retailers to Save More Money

Several popular retailers use “secret” price codes that can clue you in on whether an item is the…

7. Don’t Wash Clothes as Often

This sounds bad. And smelly. But washing your clothes less often will help them last longer (and save you time and utility costs), which means you won’t have to replace them as oftem. Sturdier clothes, like jeans and sweaters, can be reworn a few times or simply aired out before needing to be washed. Wool in particular seems to be stink-proof, besides insulating.

6. Take Care of Your Clothes Better

It’s sad when you take your favorite sweater or shirt out of storage only to find it has been attacked by moths and now looks like Swiss cheese. Protect the clothes you love and have bought with vacuum storage bags or canvas storage containers and mothballs or cedar blocks. Also, know how to protect your sweaters , properly clean your “hand wash only clothes,” and wash your “dry clean” clothes at home . Preserve your favorite clothes nearly forever by knowing how to wash and fold them properly.

Vacuum Storage Bags Shrink Linens and Off-Season Clothing for Easy Storage

/16 Clothing and linens—comforters and pillows especially—take up a huge amount of room as they…

5. Make Your Jeans Last Longer

Convert Bootcut Jeans Into Skinny Jeans with Some Simple Alterations

Everybody likes a good-fitting pair of jeans, but styles change. A few cuts and some basic sewing…

4. Know Whether You Should Buy an Item of Clothing

It happens to the best of us. You see a piece of clothing in the store and it’s tempting. Before you make that impulse buy, consider whether that piece would work as part of at least three other outfits in your existing wardrobe. Otherwise, it’s probably not worth it. Also remember the “meat and potatoes” rule : 70 percent of the clothes you own should be the everyday clothes, the essentials you need from day to day. If your wardrobe is veering too far from the rule, you should probably put it back on the hanger.

3. Get Creative with Your Current Wardrobe

Even with a minimalist wardrobe, you can mix up your look every day. One scarf can be tied 25 ways and a tie can be tied over 100 ways . If you check out fashion inspiration to make the most of the clothing you already have, you could probably stretch your clothing budget farther.

25 Different Ways to Wear a Scarf, in One 5-Minute Video

Who knew there were so many ways to tie a scarf? If ever there was an epic scarf-wearing video,…

2. Tailor Clothes to Fit You

Finding clothes that fit you perfectly and look best for your body shape is the ideal, but even if an item is too long or too wide or just doesn’t fit quite right, it can still be of use. Instead of buying new, take it to a tailor . (If you find a great item on the clearance rack just a size up or down, it could also fit you after tailoring, depending on the garment.) It’s cheaper than buying new and will look better on you than the default size. In a similar vein, you can get a quality pair of secondhand shoes repaired for cheaper than buying new .

How to Shop for Clothes Online and Get a Perfect Fit

Shopping for clothes online, whether you buy them from a big box store or a custom clothier, can…

1. Buy the Clothes That Suit You Best

Buying clothes that fit you and look good on you will ultimately end up saving you the most money because you won’t need to buy clothes to replace the crappy clothes that don’t work for you. That sounds obvious, but with so many clothing options, it’s easy to accumulate a mismatched wardrobe of clothing that you don’t end up wearing. One of the best strategies to keep your clothing spending on track while also buying new clothes occasionally is to keep your closet full of clothes that match , and when you find a piece of clothing that you love and looks good on you, buy multiples of it . You can create a work-friendly wardrobe on a budget or any other kind of wardrobe by focusing on the essentials .

Downsize Your Wardrobe and Free Yourself from the Tyranny of Clothing

Most of us have clothes that we don’t even need, just taking up space and making it harder to…

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How to save your family money on clothes

How to save money on clothing

The author’s children wearing clothing found via marketplace. Photo credit: Alexandra Frost.

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This first time one of my sons asked me for a Nike outfit he was 3 years old. I have three sons under age 5, another child on the way, and decades of clothing them to get through. This weighed heavy on my mind as I dealt with sticker shock at the $50.00 price tag for boys gym shoes, times 3 kids, times 4 seasons, times 18 years. The USDA reports that as of 2017 the annual cost of raising EACH child is $13,000 which includes those Nike outfits and other costs to ensure they have well-fitting clothes each season. After just a few months of my first child’s life, I decided to find other ways. I knew my friends and relatives all had tubs of clothes for their children in their basements, and that buying new just wasn’t going to be an economical choice for long.

Here are some strategies that have worked for our growing family and for others with multiple children.

Save thousands a year by turning to Facebook Marketplace

This fall I’ve been looking for size 6 “skinny pants” for one son, size 4 “pants with no strings” for another son, and extra-long pajamas for my tall and skinny 2-year-old. With a ten second search for “Boys 6” on Facebook Marketplace, I instantly have 14 options for nearby parents selling their children’s clothes. This first post is a $10 lot of four pants, which breaks down to $2.50 each (cheaper than my favorite thrift store). The second post has six pairs of pajamas for $15, in contrast with the $18.00 I spent the last time I bought new pajamas for one son.

Some parents hesitate to use Facebook Marketplace as they worry about quality, safety, and cleanliness buying from a stranger. I can safely say in 6 years of doing this that I haven’t had a single issue. I wash the clothes when they enter my home, and since the pandemic began I do “porch pickups” meaning the seller leaves the item outside and I pick it up and leave money without having to see them. If I’m not happy with the quality upon checking it there, I don’t buy it or leave money.

I also earn back about 50-75% of the money I’ve spent by reselling most of the items back on Facebook after use. In this way, I’m basically renting clothes for a short period of time. I save my favorites for the next son and resell the rest. Less clutter in my house, and more free bins in the basement to store other items.

If money is tight, there’s an app for that

Many people would donate clothes to others in need in their communities (from the aforementioned bins taking up space in their basements) if they knew who needed what. Luckily, there’s an app for that, and a variety of services in each community for matching peoples’ needs to those who are willing to donate. An example is the app Purposity, a nonprofit that partners with school systems to fulfill the needs of distressed families and students. “Purposity is built on the simple truth that if you knew a kid down the street had holes in her shoes and couldn’t afford new ones, you’d buy her a pair. People want to help those in need—sometimes they just don’t know where to start,” CEO Blake Canterbury explains. This type of program is especially beneficial to those struggling to clothe their families as unemployment rates spike due to the pandemic.

In these types of programs, schools social workers upload the need, such as the clothing type and sizes, and a user can select the need and directly purchase the item for the individual. It is then delivered to them within two days. 100,000 users have tried it so far, and 1200 schools have partnered with the nonprofit. In my community, a similar program connects those who need clothing with those willing to donate, and your community may have a similar initiative.

Old-fashioned hand me downs, with a twist

If you aren’t asking relatives and friends to swap clothes, you are missing out. Baby clothes in particular seem to barely even be on for a few weeks before the baby is on to the next size. In my experience, I was gifted many newborn items, only to have my ten-pound babies start life in size 3-6 month outfits. The dilemma is often that family or friends don’t have the same aged child (or they have the opposite sex). This is where local community groups online can help you connect with parents of children who are in the size just above or below your own children.

After just a few weeks looking for a family like this, I found a family to follow that has boys both older and younger than mine, meaning we have the perfect situation set up for a swap. They give me their size 6-7 clothes for my oldest son, and when my youngest is finished with some items, I give ours to them. These mutually beneficial hand me down setups can offset costs.

Another mom I know is the third recipient in a line of hand me downs from cousins to friends, as she has the youngest child. She’s been surprised at the quality of the items she receives even though she’s last, especially in that baby clothes category.

If you are still buying full-priced items, explore options in your town and neighborhood to offset costs, and to help the environment through using second clothes. Some schools and churches even host free swap days, where you can bring the clothes you no longer use and pick up what you need (although they’ve been restricted more lately due to COVID-19). Best of luck looking for the perfect swap system for your family.

How to save money on clothing

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Alexandra Frost

Alexandra Frost is a Cincinnati-based freelance journalist and content marketing writer, focusing on health and wellness, parenting, education, and lifestyle. She has been published in Glamour, Today’s Parent, Reader’s Digest,

Alexandra Frost is a Cincinnati-based freelance journalist and content marketing writer, focusing on health and wellness, parenting, education, and lifestyle. She has been published in Glamour, Today’s Parent, Reader’s Digest, Parents, Women’s Health, and Business Insider. She is a journalism teacher, proud wife to an assistant principal, and mom of three rambunctious sons under age 5. To read more of her work or to connect, check out her website .

How to save money on clothing

How to Save Money on Clothes?

Americans usually spend thousands of dollars on clothing items. This amount might be a huge amount, especially in third-world countries. You will be amazed to know that there are a couple of methods by which you can save decent bucks on your next clothing purchase. In this blog, we are going to give you tips to save money on clothes.

Sell Your Old Clothes

We are pretty sure that you don’t wear every single item present in your wardrobe. You can easily sell your old clothes to get some decent bucks to buy new clothes.

Buy Out of Season

This might seem an odd idea, but in reality, it could give the best possible deals. In the of seasons, the sellers are usually conducting clearance sale to clear their remaining stocks of the year. This could be the best opportunity to get the best value out of your money.

Don’t Buy from the Factory Outlets

You might be having the wrong idea that buying from a factory outlet will give you better quality products. However, the truth is that the products are almost the same throughout the supply line. Instead, you can browse through other deals that sell a variety of brands to get better offers.

Try to Avoid the Fashion Trends

Some trends are temporary, while some are permanent. Do you see anyone wearing bootcut jeans these days? Well, it would be better it sticks to the basics to get better pricing options. Clothing items from a new fashion trend usually costs a bit more than the usual clothing items.

Spending real money on digital fashion may seem wasteful, but luxury and budget clothing brands alike are leaning into the trend, which has the opportunity to make fashion more inclusive and environmentally friendly.

A Gucci bag going for several thousand dollars is not news. But a Gucci bag that you can only wear in the metaverse going for more than its IRL counterpart is certainly eye-catching.

In May, Gucci welcomed spring in the virtual world when it opened the Gucci Garden on the Roblox gaming platform. Its bee-embroidered Dionysus bag was one of the shoppable items. Priced at 475 Robux (the world’s in-game currency), that came to $6, or considerably less than its $3,400 real-world price. But just as in real life, the virtual world’s resale market can be a seller’s game, and bids on the bag skyrocketed. One eventually sold for 350,000 Robux, or $4,115.

These online-only exclusives are a trend that fashion brands of all stripes are getting behind. The Gucci Garden, an immersive environment meant to mimic an actual installation in Florence, Italy, was just the latest virtual offering from the luxury brand. Under the reign of Designer Alessandro Michele, the brand has leveled up the accessory game of characters in The Sims 4 and Pokémon trainers, who can pick up items from The North Face x Gucci Collection at 100 PokéStops located at Gucci pins. And the Gucci Virtual 25 sneakers can be worn by avatars in Roblox and the social media platform VRChat.

The entire collection is also available in Gucci’s app for $11.99 for customers who want to wear them in photos and videos using augmented reality.

Michele is one of fashion’s most attention-grabbing designers today; he’s possibly only outranked by Virgil Abloh. Founder of luxury streetwear brand Off-White, Abloh is known in part for his Dadaist collabs, like the one he did for Ikea that featured clocks that said “Temporary” and bags that proclaimed themselves “Sculpture.” He has since brought his boldness and innovation to Louis Vuitton as the artistic director of its menswear collection—part of which is set to take place in the metaverse.

“[F]unny thing is, the real world is just the part-time metaverse,” Abloh wrote in a February Instagram post in which he talked about the intermingling of physical and digital things. “Now back to this Ready Player-esque One ‘think-tank’ of mine.”

Abloh later told venture capitalist Matthew Ball “I want to make virtual clothes to paint pictures physical clothes cannot, and let buyers access a new dimension of their personal style—no matter who they are, where they live, and the virtual worlds they love.”

“I’m helping [him] create exactly that kind of brand,” Ball wrote in a blog post.

In-App Purchases, But Make It Fashion

The road there has already been paved by companies like The Fabricant, which bills itself as “a digital fashion house leading the fashion industry towards a new sector of digital-only clothing.” Its garments are 3D-modeled so customers can wear them in VR environments. Appropriately, they can only be purchased in Ethereum.

How to save money on clothingThe Fabricant’s Atari-inspired digital NFT fashion line.

Michaela Larosse, who works on creative strategy and communications at The Fabricant, says that digital fashion is the evolution of video game skins. “Physical fashion brands are beginning to iterate in this space as global revenue for in-game purchases is already huge and digital fashion will form part of that,” she says.

Visit Tribute Brand’s site, and you’re greeted with a message from the future: “This is the platform for contactless & cyber fashion.” The digital-only brand sells limited-edition, ready-to-wear and custom garments for prices that are upmarket in the real world. Once an item is purchased, the customer sends a photo of themselves in for a digital fitting and in a few days they receive an image of themselves in their new outfit.

Digital fashion marketplace DressX works in a similar fashion, though customers upload a photo first, and then submit it along with their purchase of an item, like fashion student Sofia Vaiman’s birds of paradise/video game warrior pants and top.

Before hitting the buy button, shoppers will see a statement that includes the sentence, “The 100% digital collection did not require any material fabrics, water, or CO2 for shipping and deliveries, creating the blueprint for traditional fashion institutions and optimizing art education in the 21st Century.”

Fight Climate Change With a Digital Wardrobe

Sustainability is a large part of what DressX is selling. “Don’t shop less, shop digital fashion,” its vision statement says. This gets to one of the things fueling the expansion of digital fashion: The terrible reputation of fast fashion.

The rapid production of garments to meet the neverending fashion seasons that pass on the internet is an ecological and labor nightmare. Fast fashion contributes significantly to climate change and creates an immense amount of waste when its products are soon dumped as they go out of style or rapidly deteriorate. The working conditions and pay for garment workers are exploitative and sometimes fatal.

How to save money on clothing

How to save money on clothing

How to save money on clothing

How to save money on clothing

Your mother told you at one point that you should never buy something if it doesn’t go with anything else in your wardrobe. She was right. sort of. Linda Lee, group vice president of Macy’s by Appointment, the Macy’s personal shopping service, says that in her experience, if a blouse goes with only one other item, her clients are not going to get enough wear out of it to make the purchase worthwhile.

Enter the Rule of Three. Whenever you’re looking to buy an item, be it a pair of earmuffs or a pair of sandals, don’t just ask yourself, “Does it go with something I own?” Instead, Lee says to ask yourself, “Can I think of at least three things I am going to wear it with?” If so, snap that up.

How to save money on clothing

Nicole Chavez, stylist to celebrities such as Catherine Zeta-Jones, Rachel Bilson and Katherine Heigl, says the key to spending less money on clothes is to spend more time on wardrobe upkeep. How much? As many hours as you devote to shopping. So, whether you are at your go-to store every weekend or only buy things twice a year, cut your buying hours in half. Use your newly acquired nonshopping time to tend to the clothes you already have. Hem the pair of pants that you’ve been avoiding dealing with. Take the shoes that need new heel lifts to the cobbler. The repairs will cost you something, but it’ll likely be less than what you’d spend during a day at the mall. Plus, when you’re done, your leaner, cleaner, impeccably tailored wardrobe will feel fresh and new.

How to save money on clothing

Will your husband/boyfriend/best friend/mother look at that sweater and ask, “Don’t you already own a sweater just like that?” Bad news: You own a sweater just like that. More bad news: One is enough.

How to save money on clothing

A navy floor-length sequined skirt is exactly the right thing to throw on with a casual top for a cocktail party, and, of course, you’ll have one. soon. A silky blouse with an exquisite crossover neckline (that flops open oddly, but never mind) will be perfect for the board meeting. right? When you start telling yourself stories about where you’re going to wear certain clothes, you’re shopping for the life you want, or the one you think you’ll have someday. It’s great to dream about that life. It’s not great to spend today’s cash on it.

To save yourself an embarrassing incident during which that blouse does, in fact, gape at the neck and expose your bra during the aforementioned meeting, or the pain of having to give away that sequined skirt that you really love but have never worn, look out for your excuse words. When you hear yourself uttering hopeful things like “This might be the year!” or “Someday, I’ll. ” do not stop, do not pass go and do not spend $20, much less $200. Hang that item back on the rack.

How to save money on clothing

A closet full of solid, neutral clothes seems like the best way to keep costs down. Think of all the possible matches. Except that these outfits are, well, sort of boring. If you don’t own anything patterned or a single brightly colored piece, you’ll feel compelled to buy extra stuff to spice up your wardrobe, and then you’ll find yourself confused (and poorer) when another white blouse doesn’t do the trick.

The solution? Purchase one or two really vibrant items. Chavez recommends a pair of leopard-print ballet flats, which she says are the key to making even the simplest outfit look lively. A flowered scarf or a bag in a rich magenta will also do the trick. When paired with your basics, you’ll have so many combinations that you’ll never want to shop again. (At least, for now).

This article was co-authored by Joanne Gruber. Joanne Gruber is the owner of The Closet Stylist, a personal style service combining wardrobe editing with organization. She has worked in the fashion and style industries for over 10 years.

There are 11 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page.

This article has been viewed 36,573 times.

Going shopping is a fun activity, especially when you are doing it with friends. Buying new clothes can feel great and add a boost to confidence. Unfortunately, buying new clothes can be expensive. You don’t, however, have to go into debt when purchasing new clothes. Instead, buy at the right locations, choose what you buy carefully, and spend wisely.

How to save money on clothing

How to save money on clothing

How to save money on clothing

How to save money on clothing

How to save money on clothing

How to save money on clothing

How to save money on clothing

How to save money on clothing

How to save money on clothing

How to save money on clothing

Joanne Gruber
Professional Stylist Expert Interview. 30 July 2019. Don’t buy too much of one type of clothing. Instead, plan to buy one, two, or three pieces of every type of clothing. Think about your style, and base your wardrobe off of that. If you build a solid wardrobe, you won’t need to buy clothes as often because you can mix-and-match what you already have. [10] X Research source

  • Some staples of a wardrobe are black shirts, jeans, crewneck sweaters, white T-shirts, a button-down, black pants, a blazer, and a denim jacket. For women, a black dress, printed dress, and skirt for every season is good to add to your wardrobe. [11] X Research source

Spending real money on digital fashion may seem wasteful, but luxury and budget clothing brands alike are leaning into the trend, which has the opportunity to make fashion more inclusive and environmentally friendly.

A Gucci bag going for several thousand dollars is not news. But a Gucci bag that you can only wear in the metaverse going for more than its IRL counterpart is certainly eye-catching.

In May, Gucci welcomed spring in the virtual world when it opened the Gucci Garden on the Roblox gaming platform. Its bee-embroidered Dionysus bag was one of the shoppable items. Priced at 475 Robux (the world’s in-game currency), that came to $6, or considerably less than its $3,400 real-world price. But just as in real life, the virtual world’s resale market can be a seller’s game, and bids on the bag skyrocketed. One eventually sold for 350,000 Robux, or $4,115.

These online-only exclusives are a trend that fashion brands of all stripes are getting behind. The Gucci Garden, an immersive environment meant to mimic an actual installation in Florence, Italy, was just the latest virtual offering from the luxury brand. Under the reign of Designer Alessandro Michele, the brand has leveled up the accessory game of characters in The Sims 4 and Pokémon trainers, who can pick up items from The North Face x Gucci Collection at 100 PokéStops located at Gucci pins. And the Gucci Virtual 25 sneakers can be worn by avatars in Roblox and the social media platform VRChat.

The entire collection is also available in Gucci’s app for $11.99 for customers who want to wear them in photos and videos using augmented reality.

Michele is one of fashion’s most attention-grabbing designers today; he’s possibly only outranked by Virgil Abloh. Founder of luxury streetwear brand Off-White, Abloh is known in part for his Dadaist collabs, like the one he did for Ikea that featured clocks that said “Temporary” and bags that proclaimed themselves “Sculpture.” He has since brought his boldness and innovation to Louis Vuitton as the artistic director of its menswear collection—part of which is set to take place in the metaverse.

“[F]unny thing is, the real world is just the part-time metaverse,” Abloh wrote in a February Instagram post in which he talked about the intermingling of physical and digital things. “Now back to this Ready Player-esque One ‘think-tank’ of mine.”

Abloh later told venture capitalist Matthew Ball “I want to make virtual clothes to paint pictures physical clothes cannot, and let buyers access a new dimension of their personal style—no matter who they are, where they live, and the virtual worlds they love.”

“I’m helping [him] create exactly that kind of brand,” Ball wrote in a blog post.

In-App Purchases, But Make It Fashion

The road there has already been paved by companies like The Fabricant, which bills itself as “a digital fashion house leading the fashion industry towards a new sector of digital-only clothing.” Its garments are 3D-modeled so customers can wear them in VR environments. Appropriately, they can only be purchased in Ethereum.

How to save money on clothingThe Fabricant’s Atari-inspired digital NFT fashion line.

Michaela Larosse, who works on creative strategy and communications at The Fabricant, says that digital fashion is the evolution of video game skins. “Physical fashion brands are beginning to iterate in this space as global revenue for in-game purchases is already huge and digital fashion will form part of that,” she says.

Visit Tribute Brand’s site, and you’re greeted with a message from the future: “This is the platform for contactless & cyber fashion.” The digital-only brand sells limited-edition, ready-to-wear and custom garments for prices that are upmarket in the real world. Once an item is purchased, the customer sends a photo of themselves in for a digital fitting and in a few days they receive an image of themselves in their new outfit.

Digital fashion marketplace DressX works in a similar fashion, though customers upload a photo first, and then submit it along with their purchase of an item, like fashion student Sofia Vaiman’s birds of paradise/video game warrior pants and top.

Before hitting the buy button, shoppers will see a statement that includes the sentence, “The 100% digital collection did not require any material fabrics, water, or CO2 for shipping and deliveries, creating the blueprint for traditional fashion institutions and optimizing art education in the 21st Century.”

Fight Climate Change With a Digital Wardrobe

Sustainability is a large part of what DressX is selling. “Don’t shop less, shop digital fashion,” its vision statement says. This gets to one of the things fueling the expansion of digital fashion: The terrible reputation of fast fashion.

The rapid production of garments to meet the neverending fashion seasons that pass on the internet is an ecological and labor nightmare. Fast fashion contributes significantly to climate change and creates an immense amount of waste when its products are soon dumped as they go out of style or rapidly deteriorate. The working conditions and pay for garment workers are exploitative and sometimes fatal.