How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots

It’s less obvious than it sounds.

How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots

For the past few years, various carmakers have been offering blind-spot detection systems for their cars’ side mirrors. Often complex, these systems employ cameras or radar to scan the adjoining lanes for vehicles that may have disappeared from view.

The Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) published a paper in 1995 suggesting how outside mirrors could be adjusted to eliminate blind spots. The paper advocates adjusting the mirrors so far outward that the viewing angle of the side mirrors just overlaps that of the cabin’s rearview mirror. This can be disorienting for drivers used to seeing the flanks of their own car in the side mirrors. But when correctly positioned, the mirrors negate a car’s blind spots. This obviates the need to glance over your shoulder to safely change lanes as well as the need for an expensive blind-spot warning system.

The only problem is getting used to the SAE-recommended mirror positions. The cabin’s rearview mirror is used to keep an eye on what is coming up from behind, while the outside mirrors reflect the area outside the view of the inside rearview mirror.

Those who have switched to the SAE’s approach swear by it, however, some drivers can’t adjust to not using the outside mirrors to see directly behind the car and miss being able to see their own car in the side mirrors. To them we say, “Have fun filling out those accident reports.”

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Selasa, 03 Agustus 2010

How To Set Rear-View Mirrors To Eliminate Blind Spots

How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots
How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots
How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots
How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots
It may be surprising to learn that there is a better way of setting the rearview mirrors on the car. A quick test is that if one looks in your side mirrors and the side of the car is seen, it means that the mirror’s capacity is not being used. Many people notably have a huge overlap between the side and center rear view mirrors, this is important. When the side mirrors are spread, no information is lost about what is present behind. Although valuable insight must be gained regarding what is present beside. Many driving schools recommend this new method; it also includes the BMW Performance Center in South Carolina.

What are Blind Spots?

Blind spots are the areas in which a vehicle cannot be seen from either the driver’s secondary vision, inside mirror or the side mirrors. Many drivers set their side mirrors in a way that they can just barely see the side of their car in the mirrors. By setting the side mirrors in a proper way and also using the rearview mirror can reduce the blind spots. However the size of these blind spots is still capable of hiding a vehicle.

How is Blind spot caused?

Perhaps one needs to change lanes or merge into traffic every time when while driving. These maneuvers of routine nature can cause dangerous situations because every vehicle has blind spots. According to a survey, there is an estimate of 630,000 lane change and merge crashes every year causing nearly 225 fatalities. Although not needed to say but the simple act of changing lanes or merging requires precautions and practice. Blind spots are also called blind zones.

How to eliminate blind spots

Following are some of the useful ways to remove blind spots;
-‘? One should lean his head over in a way that it almost touches the driver’s window. Then the side mirror should be positioned on the car’s left side so one can just see the rear or the car or the quarter panel in the mirror. It must be noted that this will have the mirror positioned farther out than one did not possibly had it before.

-‘? The center rearview mirror can be adjusted in a position that it faces the rear window’s center.

-‘? The head can be leaned to the right for aligning it with the center of the car. An example can be just between the two front seats at a considerable normal height. The right side mirror can be positioned from there so the rear quarter panel of the passenger side in can be seen in the mirror.

“Oh, come on,” you’re saying to yourself as you read this headline. “Who doesn’t know how to adjust their rear-view mirrors?” You sit in the driver’s seat, twist a little knobby thing in the arm rest, and bam! Done.

If that’s how you’ve been adjusting your mirrors — if you bother to adjust them at all — then you’ve also experienced that heart-stopping moment on the freeway when you try to move into the left lane only to find someone’s already there. And they don’t want to share. They seem to think there’s some kind of physical principal about two objects occupying the same space that you’re about to violate. What a bunch of chickens.

That hiding place near your fenders, in case you aren’t familiar with the term, is the pesky space known as the blind spot. It’s the place at the rear flank of your car that you often just can’t see in your mirrors. You can see a car coming up behind you in the center mirror mounted inside, and you can see that same car next to you as it passes through your window, but for a few seconds it slips into another dimension where you can’t see a lick of it. Some cars have bigger blind spots than others, but you’d be surprised at how large a vehicle can be and still hide in that blind spot if your mirrors aren’t adjusted correctly.

The technological wizards of the 21st century have developed systems to help detect cars hanging out in your blind spot and alert you to their presence. But the best defense is the old-fashioned proper mirror adjustment.

Tips for Adjusting Your Vehicle’s Mirrors

Luckily, getting your mirrors just right requires no special tools or skills, and you’ll only look a teeny bit silly for a few seconds at most. Don’t worry. After all, there are pictures of you immortalized on Facebook doing far sillier things than this — and this silliness is in the name of safety. Here’s how you do it:

Lean to the Left: To adjust the driver’s side mirror, lean until your forehead touches the window glass. Then adjust the mirror until you can just barely see the slightest sliver of the side of your car. When you sit up straight in the driver’s seat, you shouldn’t be able to see your own car at all. Why would you want to? When has the rear fender of your own car ever snuck up on you?

Lean to the Right: Now lean until your head is hovering over the center console and adjust the passenger’s side mirror the same way. You should just barely be able to see a sliver of your own car.

Note that this adjustment routine only works if your mirrors can be adjusted electronically. If you have to move the mirror glass around with your hands rather than with a switch, then you have to have the window open or walk around to the other side of the car. Give the head position your best guess in that case, or enlist a friend to move the mirrors while you lean.

A quick word about the center mirror: Sit normally before you make the adjustment. Don’t suddenly develop Marine Corps posture if you’re a sloucher, and don’t try to show the mirror your good side. Also realize that some days you’re a sloucher, and some days you’re a ballerina. Simply adjust the mirror for that day, which means when you glance up while driving, you can see as much of the back window as possible.

That’s all there is to it. No more swerving wildly into and out of lanes because someone is hiding out in your blind spot.

No one ever gives a second thought to adjusting their mirrors, or that there might be a right way, or a better way, to do it. I didn’t — until I nearly swerved into a state trooper who was cruising along in my blind spot on a lonely highway. (Don’t you hate those people? No, not cops — I mean the people whose speed nearly matches yours, so they hover in your blind spot for miles. Just pass me already!)

Anyway, I nearly met the trooper’s front fender with my rear quarter panel, then swerved back into my lane. I over-corrected and ended up spraying a little of the gravel on the shoulder of the road into the trees that lined the highway. No harm, no foul, luckily for me, but I did take the time to learn where to put my mirrors after that. I’m also an obsessive over-the-shoulder blind-spot checker, which they tell me isn’t necessary if you do the mirrors right, but now I’m spooked. I mean, it was a state trooper.

High-tech cameras help, but drivers should also use their own observations

by Wendy Helfenbaum, AARP, March 29, 2022

How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots

Today’s vehicles are equipped with lots of technology to help keep drivers safe. That includes backup cameras, side-view video feeds and lane-assist alerts.

But all that technological support can mean that some drivers rely too heavily on technology instead of their own observations. Those bad habits can create potentially dangerous situations, including blind spots — the area of the road outside a driver’s field of vision.

Blind spots cover close to half of the space around your vehicle, according to National Highway Safety Administration statistics. Too often, when drivers pull out of a parking spot or change lanes, they don’t see oncoming vehicles or pedestrians in their path because of a blind spot. This can result in a collision or serious injury.

You may have stopped turning your head to look behind you when you put your car in reverse, assuming the rearview camera provides an adequate portrait. Or perhaps, before switching lanes, you wait to hear the beep from your car’s lane-assist feature instead of peeking over your left shoulder. If so, it’s time to relearn the basics. Here’s how and why to adjust and check your car mirrors before hitting the road.

Position mirrors properly

Advanced driver-assistance systems (ADAS) provide an additional layer of safety when you’re behind the wheel, but your mirrors should always be your first and last line of defense, says Lynn Fuchs, founder and president of A Woman’s Way Driving School, based in Valley Stream and Glens Falls, New York.

“There could be a mechanical glitch with the technology, and it could fail, so you always want to use your own eyes to know how to safely navigate changing your road position,” Fuchs says.

That means consistently using all three mirrors — the inside rearview, outside driver-side and passenger-side mirrors — while you’re driving.

“The idea is to create a seamless visual view around as much of your vehicle as possible, especially to the rear, where it’s harder to see,” says William Van Tassel, manager of driver training programs for the American Automobile Association’s (AAA) national office.

Believe it or not, some drivers point their side mirrors inward — so they see only their own cars — instead of rotating them outward, he notes.

“We teach what’s commonly called the Blindzone Glare Elimination Technique of setting your mirrors — canting the side mirrors outward 15 degrees or so. The benefit is you have a wider view all around the car behind you,” he says.

To properly set your driver-side mirror, sit behind the wheel and touch your head to the driver’s window. Look at your mirror and adjust it outward until you can see the lane next to you with just a small portion of the back end of your car as a reference point, advises Fuchs. For the passenger-side mirror, lean to the right until your head is above your car’s center console, then look into your right-side mirror and adjust it until you can see part of your vehicle.

“Center your rearview mirror so you’re not looking into the backseat, at your face or up at the ceiling — you’re centering it through the back window,” she says.

For enhanced visibility, you can purchase a wide-angle mirror that clips onto your existing rearview one, says Fuchs.

Take the AARP Smart Driver course online or find a course near you

Get familiar with unfamiliar vehicles

Whether you’re renting a car or borrowing a friend’s, AAA recommends getting to know the vehicle, because the blind spots will be different. Before heading out, have someone walk around the car while you’re in the driver’s seat. Watching them will give you an idea of what you can and can’t see.

“This bit of practice helps you get used to it before driving it among other road users,” Van Tassel says.

If you share a car with others in your household, double-check your settings before you drive, notes Fuchs.

“Always recheck your mirrors, because they might need to be readjusted because of your different sizes and heights,” she explains.

Even if all your mirrors are perfectly positioned, you’ll never be able to see everything if you don’t physically turn your head and body to look directly into the space you want to move into, warns Van Tassel.

“Mirrors are great, but they don’t give you the same width and breadth of view as looking into an area. The direct line of sight is the best,” he says. “Trust and verify: Trust your eyes by looking directly into your intended path but use the mirrors and rearview cameras to verify that.”

How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots

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You can’t eliminate every blind spot

It’s also a good idea to clean your side mirrors and rear camera with a microfiber cloth when filling up with gas, Van Tassel says. Even one drop of water on your camera can obstruct your visibility. To further protect your mirrors, fold them in when you park so another vehicle doesn’t accidentally damage them.

“It would be wonderful if your rear camera keeps circulating around your car, but it doesn’t. There’s always going to be a blind spot somewhere,” Fuchs says. “You can make your decisions in your mirror — especially when you have a wide-angle mirror — but you must twist yourself to look over your shoulder out the back portion of your window in that last half a second, and a lot of people don’t.”

Because people may lose flexibility as they age, Fuchs suggests practicing that twisting movement at home.

“You can do exercises while sitting in a chair to stretch those muscles to be able to turn and look behind you,” she explains. “You can help loosen those muscles up so you can get that view when you need it. In the car, that last-second check should always be over your shoulder.”

All My Prayers, My Deeds, My Life, and My Death Is In The Name Of Allah The Almighty.

How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots

Chi Mi Sono.

Wednesday, 9 June 2010

121 – How To Set Rear-View Mirrors To Eliminate Blind Spots

It may be surprising to learn that there is a better way of setting the rearview mirrors on the car. A quick test is that if one looks in your side mirrors and the side of the car is seen, it means that the mirror’s capacity is not being used. Many people notably have a huge overlap between the side and center rear view mirrors, this is important. When the side mirrors are spread, no information is lost about what is present behind. Although valuable insight must be gained regarding what is present beside. Many driving schools recommend this new method; it also includes the BMW Performance Center in South Carolina.

What are Blind Spots?

Blind spots are the areas in which a vehicle cannot be seen from either the driver’s secondary vision, inside mirror or the side mirrors. Many drivers set their side mirrors in a way that they can just barely see the side of their car in the mirrors. By setting the side mirrors in a proper way and also using the rearview mirror can reduce the blind spots. However the size of these blind spots is still capable of hiding a vehicle.

How is Blind spot caused?

Perhaps one needs to change lanes or merge into traffic every time when while driving. These maneuvers of routine nature can cause dangerous situations because every vehicle has blind spots. According to a survey, there is an estimate of 630,000 lane change and merge crashes every year causing nearly 225 fatalities. Although not needed to say but the simple act of changing lanes or merging requires precautions and practice. Blind spots are also called blind zones.

How to eliminate blind spots

Following are some of the useful ways to remove blind spots;
-‘? One should lean his head over in a way that it almost touches the driver’s window. Then the side mirror should be positioned on the car’s left side so one can just see the rear or the car or the quarter panel in the mirror. It must be noted that this will have the mirror positioned farther out than one did not possibly had it before.

-‘? The center rearview mirror can be adjusted in a position that it faces the rear window’s center.

-‘? The head can be leaned to the right for aligning it with the center of the car. An example can be just between the two front seats at a considerable normal height. The right side mirror can be positioned from there so the rear quarter panel of the passenger side in can be seen in the mirror.

-‘? It can be noted while driving that a car passing by begins in the center of the rearview mirror. As it approaches, it moves to the side of the center rear view mirror. It appears on the side mirror at the same time. Because the mirrors are overlapped, this would mean that that there is no rear blind spot.

-‘? It can also be noted that the side mirrors will now capture a great extra amount of view that is in the lanes quickly next to the car. Turning the head for needed before for ensure if there was nothing in the lanes next to the car prior to changing lanes. But now, the side mirrors have much better productivity and better job of covering this blind spot on the sides.
Useful tips

Following are some useful tips;

-‘? At least one week should be given the new mirrors this way. It will initially seem strange in the beginning but soon one will get adjusted.

-‘? It should be noted that parallel parking becomes more difficult as one can see his car what is next to it in the side mirrors without moving the head.

-‘? Scanning the mirrors constantly instead of only checking them is helpful; particularly when one wants to change the lanes or pass the other will generally prevent someone from sneaking up. This mirror setting method of pairing with continuous scanning will help the driver to be aware every time of all those around.

Following are some warning which one needs to give attention;
-‘? The mirrors must never be adjusted while driving.

-‘? Extra important information can be received about the traffic’s behavior through looking over one’s shoulders. One can never get this view even looking at the mirrors no matter how well they are positioned.

-‘? One must make a habit to always look over the shoulders before changing lanes.

-‘? Although this mirror technique is very beneficial in reducing the problem of blind spots but one cannot totally depend on it for eliminating blind spots. There may be other moving objects like even bicycles, motorcycles and smaller cars that can possibly hide in unexpected areas around one’s car.

How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots

Properly setting car mirrors isn’t exactly the biggest topic they talk about in drivers ed classes. Yet, thousands of accidents are caused when drivers change lanes or merge into other vehicles due to improperly set side and rearview mirrors. Luckily, there’s a little-known trick to eliminating all blind spots in your car.

Before I get into the details on proper mirror adjustment, here’s a quick video which gives a great visual on how to do it:

Properly Setting The Drivers Side Mirror

For the driver’s side mirror, you’ll want to lean over towards the driver’s side window. Lean over as far as you can (with the window closed, of course!). At that point, move the mirror away from you right up to the point you can’t see the car in your mirror anymore.

Properly Setting The Passenger Side Mirror

Once your driver’s side is set, lean towards the center counsel in the car. Just lean on over to the right until your head is about centered between the driver’s seat and passenger seat. Now, move the passenger side mirror away from you until you can’t see any part of your car anymore.

Properly Setting The Rearview Mirror

This is pretty straightforward and there’s no secret trick here. Just sit in your normal driving position and adjust the rearview so you can see as much out the back window as possible.

Why The Weird Mirror Settings?

As you begin driving with this new mirror setting, you’ll notice something very cool.

Let’s say you’re in the right lane, and a car is passing you on the left ( driver’s side). What you’ll notice is that the passing vehicle is visible in your rearview mirror and just as it’s exiting the field of vision for that mirror, the passing car will magically appear in your driver’s side mirror.

As soon as the vehicle leaves the vision field of your side mirror, that passing vehicle will be next to your driver’s side window and easily seen. No blind spots!!

Give it a try – It really works!! This same scenario will ring true if somebody is passing on your right.

Fine Tune And Adjust

How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots

You might need to make a couple of mino r tweaks before you get it just perfect. If you use the “lean” method, your mirrors should only require very minor adjusting.

I like to use parked cars as a “base” after setting my mirrors. As I pass a parked car along the road, I watch my mirrors as I go by. If at any point I lose sight of the car, I know I need to fine-tune it a bit.

If you use this method correctly, you should have absolutely no blind spots at all!

It’s going to feel a little weird at first. After all, you’ve been driving with incorrect mirror settings for how many years?

This will take some getting used to. But if you try this with an open mind, and if you really pay attention, you’ll notice that you no longer have blind spots. It really is that easy!

Take Advantage of Technology

If you’re a bit impatient and you’re not interested enough to learn about these manual mirror settings, you can take advantage of technological devices.

For example, blind-spot monitoring systems are now commonly integrated into the latest car models. These electronic detection devices, mounted near your rear bumper and side mirrors send radar wavelengths to alert drivers when another car enters your blind spot.

Devices such as the Delphi Rear and Side Detection System or RSDS also allow more time for drivers to react to any obstacle. But it’s not just that. There have been recent updates to blind-spot monitoring systems as well. I know you’re already familiar with this – these devices can now actively help drivers avoid a potential collision. It’s not just a passive warning anymore.

But I get it. You’re worried about the price. Yes, features such as these can cost a lot, and usually, you’ll find them on luxury vehicles. But actually, the cost of this technology in the past few years has significantly gone down. You’ll find that it’s widely available across the market, even for your average car.

A word of caution though, blind-spot monitoring systems can definitely improve your overall safety when driving. It keeps your car away from potential damages as well, no matter how small they are. But in the wrong run, devices are still devices, and there will be times when they can malfunction. Complete reliance on them may end up working against you, so make sure you don’t forget to still remain as a reliable watchful driver. Eyes on the road, but keep shifty eyes to avoid target fixation!

Double Check Anyway

Now that you understand how to properly set your car mirrors to eliminate blind spots, you can have much more confidence that your mirrors are giving you a wide view you can rely on. However, you can’t be too safe when changing lanes. Very serious accidents can occur during lane changes because generally, lane changes occur at higher speeds. Contacting another vehicle at higher speeds could easily send your vehicle out of control. Therefore, we still recommend you manually glance and check your blind spots. The best way to do this is to move your head only as far as you need to for your peripheral vision to detect whether a vehicle is present or not. Do not keep your eyes off the road for more than a split second while doing this. It should be a very quick, fluid motion, and your peripheral vision should be able to see out the front windshield as well as out your back window.

Give Plenty Of Warning

Most drivers do not use turn signals properly. Most drivers will activate their turn signal at the same time they are making a lane change. However, you should activate your signal for a minimum of 3 seconds before you change lanes. Let other drivers know your intent. At the end of 3 seconds, check your blind spots again and slowly change lanes. Do not make quick lane changes or use jerky movements. If you change lanes slowly, you give any vehicles around you the opportunity to warn you by honking.

Well, I h ope this helps and as always, drive safely! If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to use the commenting area below.

How to Get Rid of Blind Spots

  1. Adjust the rear-view mirror so that it best covers your view straight out the rear window.
  2. Set your side mirrors out fifteen degrees on either side.
  3. Lean your head over to the center of the car and adjust the right side mirror so that you can barely see the side of your car from this position.
  4. Lean your head over to the left so that it is even with the window and adjust the mirror so that you can barely see the sides of your car from this position.
  5. You now have full coverage of everything behind and to the side.

When you set your side mirrors out fifteen degrees they become an extension of your rear view mirror. This expands your view into your blind spot and you actually can see more. If you don’t do this you are only duplicating what your rear view mirror already shows you. With mirrors set this way the driver has full coverage of everything behind and to the side. This gives the driver seamless contact with vehicles approaching from behind, first in the rearview mirror, then in the side mirrors, and then in the drivers peripheral vision.

It may take about two weeks to get use to this new mirror set up and to let your eyes and brain adapt to the new perspectives. Setting your mirrors like this is one more way to help you stay alert and better scan the roadway.

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How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots

Ivan Leon

Executive Member
  • Sep 18, 2015
  • #1
  • While we are driving down the road, the side of our car isn’t going to magically disappear.

    Despite supposedly developing object permanence at age 2, most of us are constantly terrified that the sides of our cars are going to disappear if not constantly monitored.

    To help assuage this fear, we set our side-view mirrors to help us watch and make sure our cars haven’t magically opened up into sideless wonders at some point.

    Then again, maybe it is the name of the mirrors that confuses people. After all, they are called side-view mirrors.

    Perhaps drivers hear the name and believe they are intended to help them view the sides of their cars.

    Nobody believes that rear-view mirrors are intended for viewing the rear of their car — that would be silly and useless — but then again, using your side-view mirrors to view the sides of your car is equally ridiculous.

    Side-view mirrors are on the side of your car, yes, but they are actually intended for viewing what is beside your vehicle, not the sides of your vehicle itself.

    If you set up your mirrors properly, a passing car will appear in your rear-view mirror, transition into your side-view mirror, and then transition into your peripheral vision.

    It will do so seamlessly, and it will do so without ever fully disappearing from one of your mirrors until it is clearly visible in your peripheral vision.

    Those blind spots you are constantly worried about just disappear. The human peripheral vision extends up to 200 – 210 degrees.

    How exactly does one go about obtaining this miraculous arrangement? It is simple, really.

    First, you sit in the driver’s seat and lean your head against the driver’s side window.

    Adjust that mirror until you can just barely see the edge of your car, then sit back up. Lean approximately the same distance toward the passenger side, and do the same thing to the passenger side mirror.

    Once you sit back up straight, you’re done. You should not be able to see any part of your car in the ORVMs without tilting your head to one side.

    How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots

    Read the full article & see additional graphics here:

    For most passenger cars and trucks, the blind spot mirror is not necessary if you’re able to correctly adjust your side view mirrors. However, many drivers do find it simpler to add these aftermarket accessories (and some larger vehicles come with them as standard equipment). How do you use blind spot mirrors, though? What’s the best blind spot mirror safety information?

    What is a blind spot?

    No matter how well you position your side view mirrors, there is going to be a blind spot on either side. A great deal of this will depend on your car’s design and construction, but there will always be areas that you cannot see. Blind spot mirrors are designed to alleviate this problem.

    Using blind spot mirrors

    Blind spot mirrors are actually very simple. They’re generally curved mirrors that attach to your vehicle’s stock side view mirrors. The curved surface allows the mirror to reflect objects from a wider range of angles than is possible with conventional side view mirrors.

    To use a blind spot mirror correctly, it should be installed so that it provides a view of the blind spots to your right and left when sitting in the driver’s seat. Make sure your side view mirror itself is positioned correctly (you shouldn’t be able to see the side of your car), and then adjust the blind spot mirror so that you can see what the other mirror misses.

    For most vehicles, the optimal location for installation is the upper corner on the outside of the mirror. However, this doesn’t apply to all vehicles, so you might have to experiment with placement in order to get optimal coverage of your specific blind spots. Note that many vehicles do not benefit from a blind spot mirror on the passenger side view mirror. The size of the mirror limits visibility of the reflection for the driver, and passenger side view mirrors are naturally convex to cover the blind spot.

    “The objective of proper mirror adjustment is to give you a 360-degree view of other vehicles near your car.”

    By Dean B. Wisecarver

    Standard, private passenger automobiles typically have an inside rearview mirror and two outside mirrors. By adjusting these mirrors correctly, you can virtually eliminate the blind spots around your car, especially that tough one just off the left rear of your car where a passing vehicle might disappear from view.

    The objective of proper mirror adjustment is to give you a 360-degree view of other vehicles near your car. The outside mirrors are the key, here, and most people don’t position them correctly.

    Most people make the mistake of adjusting the outside mirrors to look directly behind the car. The inside mirror should be adjusted to see directly behind you, but the outside mirrors should expand that field of vision to the left and right of what you can see with only the inside mirror. As a vehicle behind you approaches to pass, it should appear in one of your outside mirrors just before it disappears in your inside mirror. As that other vehicle overtakes you, it should be visible directly in your peripheral vision before it completely disappears from view in the side mirror.

    How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spotsFor example, imagine another car is moving up to pass you on your left (as on an Interstate highway). When the right rear side of that car is starting to disappear from your inside mirror, you should be able to see the entire front end of that car in your outside left mirror. As it advances, you should be able to directly see the front of that car out your side window before the right rear of that car disappears from view in your outside mirror. The same should be true of a car passing you on your right side.

    So, if you adjust the mirrors correctly, you can see at all times that vehicle as it approaches and passes you from behind. There are no blind spots. The Society of Automotive Engineers recommends that you follow this procedure to adjust your outside mirrors:

    With your car safely parked, and while sitting behind the wheel as normal, lean your head against the driver’s side door window. Adjust the left outside mirror so you can just barely see the side of your car with your head in that position.

    For the passenger side mirror, move your head over into the middle of the front seating area until you can just see the headrest on the driver’s seat in the inside mirror. Now, with your head in this spot, adjust the outside mirror on the passenger’s side until just see the side of your car.

    That’s it. Now, test the view in traffic. You will notice you can see all the way around your vehicle – no blind spots as long as you check all your properly adjusted mirrors before changing lanes or turning.

    The Society of Automotive Engineers [SAE] published a paper in 1995 that suggested ways to eliminate blind-spots in your vehicle. However, many people have never heard of this of refuse to change the way that they are comfortable having their outside mirrors adjusted. If you are willing to be uncomfortable for a short amount of time, the change is worth it. You will no longer have to wrench your neck to check your blind-spots.

    HERE’S HOW IT WORKS

    1. INTERNAL REAR-VIEW MIRROR – Adjust your mirror so that you can see straight back behind your car.

    2. LEFT SIDE MIRROR – Lean your head and shoulders to the left until your forehead nearly touches the driver side window. Adjust the mirror so that you can see just a sliver of your vehicle.

    3. RIGHT SIDE MIRROR – Lean your head and shoulders to the right [about in the middle of your vehicle]. Adjust the passenger side mirror so that you can, again, see just a sliver of your car.

    You will not see the sides of your vehicle when you are sitting in your normal driving position, but don’t worry you won’t run into yourself:0)

    HOW TO CHECK IF IT WORKS

    While driving in the right lane, watch for a vehicle traveling in the left lane to approach you in your rear-view mirror. Without moving your head, watch in your rear-view mirror and as the vehicle approaches your car in the left lane. Before it disappears from your view in the rear-view mirror, glance to your left side mirror. The vehicle in the left lane will be in your side mirror. Watch the vehicle in the side mirror as it begins to pass you. Just before it disappears from your side mirror, you should see it with your peripheral vision. Notice that without even turning your head, you never had a blind-spot. Next try it with the right side mirror. Watch, as you pass a vehicle traveling in the right lane, go from your peripheral vision, to your right side mirror, to your rear-view mirror. Again, no blind-spot! If, at any time, there is a blind-spot, your side mirror needs some further adjusting.

    The change will take a little getting used to, but in a short amount of time you will enjoy being blind-spot free!

    How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots

    Good visibility while driving is paramount to roadway safety. Are your car mirrors adjusted correctly, or do you unknowingly create larger blind spots by following poor rules of thumb? Use this guide to help create nearly seamless visual contact all the way around your vehicle.

    How to Adjust Your Car Mirrors

    Carmakers have recently started offering blind-spot detection systems employing cameras and/or radar to scan behind the vehicle while backing up and the adjacent lanes while driving to improve safety. Unfortunately, only the newest car models come with these expensive features. For the rest of us, good old rear and side view mirrors are the only options.

    Adjust the Rear View Mirror

    This mirror is intended to provide a clear view of the lane behind you. Adjust it so the entire rear window is visible from the driver’s seat without needing to move your head.

    If you stand 6 feet or taller, you may want to reposition the rear view mirror upside down. This raises the bottom of the mirror 1 to 2 inches and can substantially reduce a major blind spot that many taller drivers experience.

    Adjust Side View Mirrors

    Common misconception: The proper way to adjust side view mirrors is to hold your head still and align the edge of the mirror with the side of your car.

    Problem: This merely reflects some of what is already shown in the rear view mirror while leaving a wider blind spot to the side of the car.

    To properly adjust your side view mirrors:

    • Lean to the left and rest your head on the window. Adjust the driver’s side view mirror so only a sliver of your car’s side is visible from this position.
    • Lean to the right toward the center console and set the passenger’s side view mirror so you can barely see the side of your car from this position. If your vehicle lacks remote mirror adjustment controls, you may need assistance to properly position the passenger’s side view mirror.

    Other Safety Measures

    Along with adjusting the mirrors in your car or truck for the best possible visibility, don’t forget to:

    • Familiarize yourself with this new mirror setting. If you’re accustomed to seeing a sliver of your car in each side view mirror while sitting straight, a more outward viewing angle may be disorienting at first. Park on the side of the road and watch how passing vehicles move through your rear and side view mirrors. When you’re ready, head out into traffic and put your new mirror settings to the test.
    • Look over your shoulder to check blind spots before changing lanes. After all, even properly adjusted mirrors can’t eliminate all blind spots. This safety precaution further reduces the chance of getting in an accident.
    • Set the rear view mirror for nighttime driving. Manual mirrors have a tab at the bottom you can flip to dim the lights of the cars charging up behind you. Power mirrors enter nighttime mode automatically to help prevent headlights from blinding you while you drive.

    Driving Someone Else’s Car

    When you get behind the wheel of your friend’s car, don’t forget to:

    • Sit straight and adjust the rear view mirror.
    • Lean left to adjust the driver’s side mirror.
    • Lean right to adjust the passenger’s side mirror.

    These mirror adjustments are important, no matter how short of a distance you’re driving.

    If your friend’s car mirrors are adjusted based on poor rules of thumb, this is your chance to explain how to properly adjust car mirrors. Spread the word and make the road safer for all! Want to take a road trip? Aire Serv, a fellow Neighborly company, has five trips where you won’t need AC!

    This is an experiment with what I can learn from interactive diagrams. There are several diagrams showing how to adjust your car mirrors to minimize blind spots [1] . It turns out there’s also some disagreement over this; see this [2] and this [3] and this [4] page arguing for the “new” way. All the diagrams I found were static; I wanted an interactive diagram that let me try out different mirror types and positions to compare the “old” and “new” ways.

    Adjust the mirror angles and the driver position by dragging the circles: (doesn’t work properly on some touch devices)

    Things to notice:

    1. The farther back your seat, the larger the blind spots. Move the seat to see the effect.
    2. Moving your seat requires changing the mirror positions (this is done automatically in the demo). Move the seat and watch the mirrors.
    3. The right side mirror has a narrower view area than the left side mirror. This is because you’re sitting farther away. To compensate, auto makers use a curved mirror, which distorts the image. “Objects in mirror are closer than they appear” notice. The curvature in this demo is very slight (5 degrees), but you can also buy mirrors with a larger curvature. Toggle the curved mirror to see the difference.
    4. Some people get larger mirrors. This helps the middle mirror, but the right side mirror is helped more by a slight curvature. Toggle the large mirror checkbox to see the difference.

    The sticker warning that “objects in mirror are closer than they appear” is only useful when you can actually see other vehicles behind you. If you can’t, you may have aligned your side-view mirrors incorrectly and could be at a higher risk for collisions (hundreds of thousands of auto crashes annually are attributed to blind spots). It is a common mistake and easy to make but fortunately just as simple to rectify. The Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) published a paper years ago coming to this same conclusion and advocating an alternative approach.

    First, though: setting the inside (middle) mirror properly is a straightforward task — its should be centered to your view (positioned so you can see across your rear windshield while driving). This seems obvious, but it foreshadows an issue in setting side-view mirrors.

    How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots Diagram showing how mirror coverage overlap can create or worsen blind spots

    Side mirrors leave room for interpretation — there is no center point to guide their placement. Many people feel inclined to tilt them too far inward, allowing drivers to see the side of their own vehicle but exacerbating blind spots in the process. This overcompensation is entirely unnecessary and creates overlap between mirrors — a slightly different arrangement leads to more seamless rear-view panorama.

    The following simple method to align your mirrors in a more optimal way involves shifting your head in order to view each mirror from a specific position during the setup process (as demonstrated above). For the passenger-side mirror (on the right for those in the United States): move your head over to the center of the vehicle and adjust the mirror so that side of your vehicle is just barely in view. Then, for the driver’s side: move your head so it is directly next to the window and adjust the mirror so that side of your vehicle is barely visible from that position. When you move back to your your normal seated position, the sides of your own car should be just barely out of view.

    How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots Side-view mirror placement diagram via Car and Driver

    Like any customizable design allowing adjustment, proper execution is a combined effort of a designer and end user. The real key (for the driver) is getting over the notion that you need to see your own car in your side view mirrors. You know what your car looks like and where it is — there is no need to have it for reference in a reflection. Instead, you should aim to reduce overlap between central and side mirror range, capturing as wide of a view as possible between them.

    How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots

    How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots
    AMS™ Model 1750

    How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots
    Smart-Clip™
    ALLVIEW™ Mirror

    How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots
    Racers ALLVIEW ™ Mirror (RAM™)

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    1-866-200-8740

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    ALLVIEW ™ Mirror System (AMS ™ )

    THE PATENTED AMS™ WITH 55 CLAIMS IN BREAKTHOUGH VISION TECHNOLOGY
    CREATES TODAY’S COMPLETE DRIVING VISION SOLUTION

    Standard Rearview Mirrors Shut Down the Driver’s Full Driving Awareness
    In Standard Rearview Mirrors, the plane mirror provides correct distance perception, but cannot meet the driver’s field of view requirements, whereas the convex mirror achieves greater field of view, but cannot give precise distance perception. Blind spots left by the plane mirror and visual distortion created by the convex mirror have become permanent vision impairments to drivers since Standard Rearview Mirrors were promulgated in 1967, which shuts down the gateway to providing full awareness of your driving environment.

    ALLVIEW™ Mirror System (AMS™) Creates the Driver’s Full Driving Awareness
    AMS™ comprising the patented seamless full rear traffic view display, the ALLVIEW™ Mirror and patented automatic and natural safety indicator, the ALLVIEW Windows Program™ (AWP™) helps eliminate blind spots left by the plane mirror and offsets visual distortion created by the convex mirror to provide constant full awareness of your driving environment allowing you to see dangers properly and timely from one quick glance without turning your head, ensuring safe and accurate driving maneuvers without guesswork and overall helps prevent car accidents:

    • How AMS™ Helps Effectively Eliminate the Plane Mirror Blind Spots
    The patented ALLVIEW™ Mirror is a proprietary seamless one-piece full rear traffic view auto safety rearview mirror design, which enables you to see all lanes of complete and uninterrupted rear roadway traffic without turning your head. With its sharp and clear seamless live traffic picture, drivers viewing through the ALLVIEW™ Mirror experience no difference when compared to viewing with the naked eye.

    • How AMS™ Helps Correctly Offset the Convex Mirror Distortion
    The patented AWP™ distortion-offset technology correctly shows you when and where it is safe to change lanes, merge and exit freeways, join traffic-flow, start road-departures and how to complete such maneuvers safely, timely and accurately without turning your head and guesswork, regardless of the image size, closing distance and traveling speed of rear approaching vehicles reflected in the ALLVIEW™ Mirror.

    The Complete Driving Vision Solution:
    The seamless ALLVIEW™ Mirror full view feature with the ALLVIEW Windows Program™
    form AMS™ to create a complete driving vision solution for drivers.

    Three AMS™ Models to Choose From for Vehicle Compatibility:
    • AMS™ Model 1750 with standard windshield mounting kit. (17-1/2″ X 2″)
    • Smart-Clip™ ALLVIEW™ Mirror with clip-on design for interior mirror. (15-1/2″ X 2-1/4″)
    • Racers ALLVIEW™ Mirror with adjustable mountings design for roll bar. (17-1/2″ X 2″)

    Gone forever are:
    Blind Spots • Visual Distortion • Guesswork • Visual Misjudgments • Peripheral Vision Impairments • Rearview Mirrors Glance Duration • Difficulty With Correlating Multiple Images • Head Turns That Take Your Eyes Off Of The Road • Disorientation • Getting Lost In Tunnel Vision • Night-Glare Received From Exterior Mirrors • Dewdrops, Raindrops, Snow, Ice And Dust Blurred Exterior Mirrors Produced By The Standard Rearview Mirrors And Blind Spot Mirrors That Stick-On To The Exterior Mirrors Alignment And Operation

    How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots
    Highways Magazine
    The Official Publication of Good Sam Club

    How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots
    AutoTrim & Restyling News Magazine
    2003 Product Innovation Award

    How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots
    Professional NASCAR Garage Magazine
    “Reflecting on Safety” Fall 2000
    with the RACERS ALLVIEW™ MIRROR

    Reprinted from the Fall, 2000, issue of Professional NASCAR Garage Magazine, a supplement to Babcox publications.

    How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots
    Petersen’s 4 Wheel & Off-Road Magazine
    “Wide Load Mirror” January 2005

    How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots
    San Gabriel Valley Tribune Newspaper, California
    “Equipment can help disabled drivers conquer road” June 8, 2002

    As a driver, it’s super important for you to know where the blind spots are on your own vehicle as well as other drivers’ vehicles. Knowing this will help protect you and those around you from an easily-avoidable accident (no one wants to get sideswiped, really). Do you know where your blind spots are? Could you point them out on another car? Hint: just using your peripheral vision isn’t good enough. You’ll experience a large number of circumstances every time you drive where you’ll need to know this information, so listen up and we’ll teach you a thing or two about blind-spot monitoring when driving and changing lanes.

    Blind spots are the areas to the sides of your car that can’t be seen in your rear mirror or side mirrors- to make sure these spots are clear before changing lanes, you’ll have to physically turn around and look to see what kind of crazy stuff is going on out there. All it takes is a shoulder check and a mirror check to make sure you’re safe to move over. A quick glance is simple enough, right? You don’t have to be an advanced driver to master this skill.

    Anytime you’re changing lanes or merging, you’ll want to check for any car blind spots in your driver view first. Flip on your turn signal to let other cars know you’ll be moving over, and check your rear mirrors and sidecar mirrors. Finally, you’ll want to do a quick shoulder check one last time. If you don’t see any cars currently in these spaces, or any cars quickly approaching these areas around you, you’re safe to flip on that turn signal and change lanes. Be sure to hold your steering wheel steady anytime you’re doing one of these checks so you don’t veer out of your lane accidentally while making sure the coast is clear. You’ll also want to make sure you keep your rear windows clear from any obstructions in your visual field whenever you’re driving so you don’t create more blind spots for yourself. Keep anything you have loaded in the back of your car away from the windows if possible. If you’re driving with passengers, you can always ask for driver assistance from them if they have a better view of your blind spots.

    If you happen to have a car with a blind spot detection system and/or an audible alert system (these are sometimes called lane departure warning systems too), this can be a super helpful tool as well. This blind-spot warning system should alert you any time your car is moving too close to another object. Even with this gadget, we still recommend doing a quick glance over the shoulder after checking the blind spot monitor just to be thorough. It’s mind-blowing how quickly a car can come up beside you and be out of the driver visibility range, so doing a shoulder check is always your safest option.

    If you’re coming up next to someone on a highway, don’t linger in another driver’s side blind spots hidden from their visual field- especially if they have their turn signal on to switch lanes. ‘Cause if they can’t see ya, they’ll hitcha. Remember that not everyone on the road is an Aceable driver, so you can’t always count on a turn signal to know if someone else is going to change lanes. Use your defensive driving skills and trust no one. Keeping a comfortable distance and staying out of other drivers’ blind spots is always the safest course of action.

    So there you have it, the basics to making sure you have clear driver visibility while on the road. Keep in mind, an over-the-shoulder glance could save you from a serious accident and potential personal injury. Just checking your rear-view mirror and side-view mirrors or peripheral vision isn’t always enough. Remember to drive safe, and drive smart!

    If you want to learn more about mastering blind spots take a look at our driver education courses:

    Otherwise, check out the rest of our safe driving videos for more tips to keep you in control on the road!

    How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots

    Convex mirrors are used by professional drivers to increase driving safety and avoid collisions. Truck drivers use them and most police car have them. The biggest advantage to having a convex or wide angle mirror is they eliminate the blind spot on the left side of the car perpendicular to the rear tire. This is why they are sometimes called blind-spot mirrors. Convex mirrors on trucks are clamped onto the mirror bracket; but there are convex mirrors made for automobiles which do not require clamps and will not alter the lines of the car. These can be purchased for under $10 at most local parts stores and department stores (as well as online).

    Step 1

    How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots

    Measure your driver side mirror.

    Step 2

    How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots

    Go to your local automobile parts store or department store and select a stick-on convex mirror which will fit onto your existing mirror. These mirrors are designed to be installed easily and removed if you so desire. Look through several mirrors and imagine the view you will have when one is installed on your car. If you go to a smaller parts store, the clerk may allow you to take several mirrors out to your car to test them. You may want to select the largest mirror you can fit on your existing mirror because they are easier to adjust to and they provide a better view of your blind spot.

    Step 3

    How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots

    Clean your side mirror thoroughly with window cleaner, making sure your remove all dust and any road film. Clean the mirror again with a clean paper towel and rubbing alcohol to remove any remaining residue. Many convex mirrors fall off because the mirror was not cleaned well before installation.

    Step 4

    How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots

    Remove the mirror from the package and install the double-sided tape onto the mirror (if required) but leave the backing paper on the tape.

    Step 5

    How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots

    Sit in the driver seat with the window rolled down. Adjust your side mirror so you can see correctly. Hold the convex mirror against your side mirror and move it around until you have achieved the optimal location; make a note of that location. You may need to adjust your mirror later so be sure the convex mirror does not touch the mirror housing and interfere with the movement of your side mirror.

    How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots

    Remove the backing from the double-sided tape on the convex mirror and place the mirror on your side view mirror. Press it firmly in place and hold it there for about 60 seconds to ensure a good bond.

    Simplify lane changing and say goodbye to dangerous blind spots with this versatile, durable blind spot camera. Simply mount to any side mirror, and eliminate dangerous blind spots while changing lanes.

    Blind spots can be a recipe for disaster, and there are always places your rearview and sideview mirrors just can’t reach. This versatile blind spot camera is fully self-adhesive, making it a cinch to install. Stop worrying about unseen obstacles, and gain a clearer view of your surroundings than ever before.

    Mount under side view mirrors for lane change assistance. The cameras can be triggered on by turn signals, making lane changing safer, no twisting and turning required. The angle of the camera is specifically designed to eliminate the side blind spots, but not display too much information that can be seen with your peripheral vision, which could cause vertigo.

    The mounting style delivers endless possibilities. Use for on and off road vehicles, or boats.

    Key Features:

    • Sensor Type: 1/4″ CMOS
    • Min. illumination (LUX): 0.1
    • Viewing Angle: 80°
    • Water/debris-proof Rating: IP67
    • Parking Lines: Selectable
    • Image (Mirrored/Non-mirrored): Selectable

    How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots

    Professional installation by an authorized EchoMaster dealer recommended.

    How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots

    A 14-year-old from West Grove, Pennsylvania, won a US$25,000 prize for creating a prototype designed to eliminate a car’s blind spots. (Paul Gassler)

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    A 14-year-old from West Grove, Pennsylvania, won a US$25,000 prize for creating a prototype designed to eliminate a car’s blind spots.

    Alaina Gassler told CNN she first noticed the problem when she realized her mom didn’t like driving their family’s Jeep Grand Cherokee because its A-pillars caused blind spots.

    The A-pillar design in a car supports the windshield and provides protection in case of a crash. However, their size and angle also create blind spots, the area of the road not visible to drivers from their usual sitting position or rear-view and side mirrors.

    “There are so many car accidents and injuries and deaths that could’ve been prevented from a pillar not being there,” Gassler said in her Society for Science video. “And since we can’t take it off cars, I decided to get rid of it without getting rid of it.”

    Gassler’s project uses a webcam, projector, 3D printed adapter and retroreflective fabric to make a car’s A-pillars invisible by displaying the image of the blind spot behind them onto the pillar.

    First, a webcam is attached to the car onto the A-pillar. Then, a projector mounted on the roof inside the car is used to display the images from the webcam.

    Gassler also 3D printed a special piece to allow the projector to focus at close range. The teen used retroreflective fabric to cover the A-pillar to allow light from the projector to reflect back onto the light source, rather than bounce in different directions.

    This, she says, allows the driver to see the image more clearly. The fabric also helps other passengers in the car avoid headaches and disruptions from the projector light.

    The young prizewinner said she was motivated to work on the design after finding out how dangerous blind spots are to drivers. After her own brother started driving, she knew it was a “big issue” she had to look into.

    “When I did research, I found out that there are more than 840,000 blind spot related car accidents per year just in the US, which made this project significantly more important to me” she told CNN.

    Gassler won the US$25,000 Samueli Foundation Prize for her design. According to the Society for Science & the Public, the prize is “the top award in the Broadcom MASTERS, the nation’s premier science and engineering competition for middle school students.”

    Gassler competed against 29 other middle school students at the Broadcom MASTERS. When she won, she said she was “genuinely” taken by surprise.

    “I had confidence that I might win one of the STEM category prizes, because I felt like I did well in the engineering category, but once they reached the announcement for the top prize, I was out of hope,” Gassler said.

    “When my name was called, I started shaking so much because I was so excited.”

    Gassler, who is now a high school freshman at Avon Grove Charter School, submitted the project when she was in eighth grade. The student said she hopes to make her prototype more unique, patent the design, and submit the idea to automotive companies like Tesla.

    Why HGV Camera Systems?

    The size of commercial vehicles and machines mean vehicle blind spots are a major factor in collisions across all industries. Operator positions, bodywork, absent rear windows, and bulkheads create further restrictions and can greatly limit driver visibility, making collisions even more likely. The significant financial cost of vehicle and property damage is magnified by associated costs such as downtime, but even greater are the corporate and emotional costs when there is personal injury.

    Brigade’s camera monitor systems enable drivers and operators to manoeuvre and drive safely. HGV camera systems can help the driver to see blind spots and offer a reversing aid by delivering a live feed on the monitor of everything in the camera view, including people or obstacles.

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    • How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots
    • How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots
    • How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots
    • How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots
    • How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots
    • How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots
    • How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots
    • How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots
    • How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots
    • How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots
    • How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots
    • How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots
    • How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots
    • How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots
    • How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots
    • How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots
    • How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots
    • How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots

    The Benefits of Using HGV Camera Monitor Systems

    Why Install a Camera Monitor System in Place of Mirrors?

    HGV camera systems are a vast improvement on the many mirrors needed to view vehicle blind spots. Mirrors themselves create further blind spots and ‘information overload’ for drivers who don’t know where to look first, with knocked or broken mirrors creating further visibility issues. Backeye® monitors allow multiple camera images to be viewed on a single monitor with dedicated views triggered by, for example, reverse gear. Cameras provide a wider angle of view than mirrors and are less likely to be damaged, whilst built-in LED’s offer superior visibility in low light conditions.

    Vehicle CCTV systems are used in a wide range of on- and off-road applications to meet a host of health and safety and legislative requirements, including R46. They can eliminate blind spots to prevent costly vehicle damage and, more importantly, save lives.

    We’re Trusted by

    The Camera Monitor Systems Range

    Backeye®360

    Backeye®360 is an intelligent vehicle CCTV system designed to assist low-speed manoeuvring by providing the driver with a complete surround view of the vehicle in real-time.

    Ultrawide-angle cameras mounted on the front, sides, and rear of the vehicle capture the surrounding areas including all blind spots. Simultaneous images from these cameras are then processed and ‘video stitched’ resulting in a 360º bird’s-eye view within a single image. The software also instantly eliminates any fisheye camera distortion on the surround view, delivering a clear, real-time picture on the driver’s monitor.

    Backeye®

    Connecting a rear-view camera system to a large vehicle or machine can be timely and awkward due to the amount of cable to install. Brigade’s new wireless system eliminates excess cabling, saving up to two hours’ fitment time and removes the need for an additional suzie cable.

    New digital wireless technology gives almost instant pictures (camera to monitor in less than 200 milliseconds) and is not affected by electrical interference from other vehicle or machine equipment. The camera image is sent to the monitor via a transmitter and receiver, and once connected, the wireless link is secure. The system also features an easy re-pairing function, allowing the receiver to be linked to a different transmitter making interchanging trailers possible.

    Benefits:

    • Eliminates the need for additional suzie cables
    • Vastly reduces installation time
    • Allows for interchangeable trailers

    Backeye®

    A large range of extension and adapter cables is available to suit every camera monitor system application. Whether you want to add additional cameras, reach the full length of your vehicle or have a tractor-trailer combination, Brigade has a solution for you.

    Brigade’s range of OEM adapter cables allows for an easy retro fit of cameras to existing in-cab monitors for makes such as DAF, Volvo, Scania, MAN, Fendt, Iveco to name a few.

    Technical Support

    Need technical support with a Brigade product or service? Visit the Product Support Area for product data, software downloads, and FAQs or visit the links below for camera monitor systems specific information:

    Do you require further technical support? Send an email via the contact technical support form.

    Make an Enquiry

    Would you like to make an enquiry for camera monitor systems? Please use one of the following options below.

    • Telephone: +44 (0)1322 420300
    • Send an email via the online contact us form

    Ensure smart, safe driving with these blind-spot mirrors for your car or truck.

    How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots

    How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots

    Having a car lurking in your blind spot can spell disaster at a moment’s notice. Stay safe and avoid collisions with these aftermarket blind-spot mirrors for your car or truck.

    How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots

    Starting with the very basic, these simple and functional round convex blind-spot mirrors provide a fisheye view of what’s hiding in your blind spot. These glass mirrors aren’t the cheapest on the list, however they are less likely to distort or fall apart compared to other plastic options.

    How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots

    The nicest thing about this blind-spot mirror is the fact that it can be removed in situations where it isn’t needed. We’re sometimes skeptical of suction-cup-mounted anything, but Feca specializes in suction-cup technology — so if anyone’s going to get it right, it’s them.

    How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots

    When mounting to your exterior mirrors isn’t an option, these little affordable mirrors can provide a simple solution to your blind-spot problem. We aren’t quite sure what they’re referring to as “touch closure strips” as means of fastening them to your rearview, but we suspect that installation should be fairly simple and straightforward.

    How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots

    Designed for the racing world, yet somewhat practical for daily driving, this four-panel mirror gives its driver a wide field of view without having to use their car’s wing mirrors. Thanks to the use of four flat-mirror panels, drivers won’t have to deal with the loss of depth of field either, which is always a plus.

    How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots

    These K Source mirrors are about as cheap and simple as we could find. At $2 a piece, we make no guarantees to clarity or longevity, but for the price of a cup of coffee, it would be worth giving them a try.

    How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots

    For cars with somewhat compact side-view mirrors, sometimes sticking on an additional blind-spot mirror just isn’t a good choice. These clip-on units provide the blind spot protection drivers need without cluttering your standard side view.

    How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots

    Depending on your vehicle’s design, sometimes a plain mirror stuck onto your current wing mirror won’t quite cut it. These affordable rectangular mirrors from HR have a ball-bearing joint installed to allow a healthy range of adjustment, making sure your blind spots really are a thing of the past.

    How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots

    Another way to make blind spots go away is the use of this extra-wide convex rearview mirror. Spring-loaded retaining clips allow it to latch onto your car’s standard rear view mirror, and its broad 330-millimeter surface will give you a much wider field of view than a standard mirror.

    How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots

    As an interesting alternate to the cheap mirrors, this sensor system replicates the built-in blind-spot detection systems available in most new cars today. Mount the warning lights in the general vicinity of your wing mirrors, and avoid ever having an unexpected visitor in your blind spot when trying to change lanes.

    How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots

    These slim blind-spot offerings are great for tiny sports car mirrors. Their ½-inch-thick design also ensure that they don’t stand out as a piece of aftermarket equipment.

    How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots

    Tech geeks will love this camera-based blind-spot monitoring system. Comprised of a seven inch LCD display and a high-quality camera with infrared capability, this system allows the driver to monitor their right- or left-side blind spot by only having to glance at the center console. This is a feature that Honda started using on the new Fit hatchback, and we hope to see it become more prevalently used industry-wide in the not-too-distant future.

    Know what your partner is reacting to when you argue.

    Posted May 13, 2018

    When we argue with our partners, we know well how they look and sound; we could write a book about it, or at least a pamphlet or blog post. But we never think about how we look and sound when our partners are resentful, angry, anxious, or withdrawn. We don’t think of how likely it is that they perceive us at that moment to be rejecting, condescending, manipulative, controlling, or selfish. In short, we have major blind spots when it comes to emotional interactions.

    There’s no shame in having blind spots; everyone has them. Only a tiny proportion of brain cells goes to objective analysis of our own demeanor and behavior, and that part receives practically no synaptic activation during emotional arousal. Our brains are simply not wired for accurate self-evaluation during emotional arousal, which keeps us hyper-focused on possible threats in the environment. That is how the people we love can seem like saber tooth tigers or selfish jerks when we’re angry or resentful.

    It’s absolutely imperative to identify blind spots, own them without being defensive, and adjust behavior to compensate for them. For example, a troublesome blind spot of mine is thinking about what I’ve written that day, or looking ahead to what I’m going to say in my next workshop, while my wife is talking. I used to be defensive when she accused me of not listening, because it seemed like an unfair accusation; I could faithfully repeat everything she said. But hearing is not the same as listening. I have learned to acknowledge that mind-wandering is something I do completely without realizing it. She’s important to me and I want her to feel heard. So I try to focus exclusively on her when she’s talking. When my mind wanders, I appreciate that she points out my blind spot because it reminds me to refocus and give her the attention she deserves.

    Adjusting the Mirrors

    The best strategy for reducing your blind spots is to use the reactions of your partner as an aid, like rear- and side-view mirrors.

    If you believe that your partner is acting selfishly, ask yourself if you are coming off the same way to your partner.

    If you believe that your partner is condescending or disrespectful, ask yourself if you are being respectful and open to his or her perspective.

    If you believe that your partner is devoid of compassion and caring, ask yourself if you are compassionate and caring at that moment.

    If you believe that your partner is attacking, ask yourself if you’re devaluing him or her, at least in your head. (Your partner can read your mind when your mind is negative. More accurately, your partner will read your body—devaluing thoughts transform emotional demeanor, which in turn changes facial expressions and body language.)

    The questions above are especially important if you think you partner is acting like a jerk. If you react to a jerk like a jerk, what does that make you? If you react to toddler brain behavior with more toddler brain behavior, where does that leave you?

    Adjusting blind spots in emotional interactions has to be intentional, just as you intentionally adjust the rear- and side-view mirrors of your vehicle. If you drive on autopilot, on the road or in your relationships, failure to check your blind spots will lead to disaster. Putting a little care and effort into adjusting for your blind spots will get you where you want to go safely and efficiently.

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  • How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots

    By John R. Quain

    • Feb. 4, 2016

    BEFORE engineers dreamed of eliminating drivers in cars, they imagined eliminating the side mirrors. The protuberances are ugly, create aerodynamic drag, and their associated blind spots are the bane of parking-challenged drivers everywhere.

    But now, a long-sought solution looks closer to finally stripping cars of their Mickey Mouse ears, as many automakers demonstrate video systems that replace side mirrors with cameras.

    Continental, a major parts and systems supplier to automakers, calls them digital mirrors.

    “There’s significant noise reduction, and there’s potential for CO 2 reduction because of reduced drag and improved fuel economy,” said Dean McConnell, director of customer programs for advanced driver assistance systems at Continental. “There’s also the increased field of view.”

    In a customized Mercedes-Benz CLS, Continental demonstrated how its system would work. Thumb-size video cameras on the exterior of the car replace the side-mounted mirrors and use interior screens on the left and right side of the dashboard to deliver views of what is next to and behind the car.

    The screens are near where a driver would normally look to check a mirror, and the camera views are wider than what a physical mirror can provide, eliminating blind spots along the side of the car. The cameras, which can automatically adjust to reduce glare from sunlight or increase brightness at night, are also helpful in tight parking spots.

    “No matter where someone stands behind you, you can see them,” said Philipp Hoffmann, BMW’s project manager for camera monitor systems, as we backed up in a crowded parking lot during the International CES consumer electronics show in Las Vegas last month.

    We were in an exotic-looking BMW i8 sports car with tiny cameras on stalks instead of side mirrors. Together with a camera just above the rear window, the three views can be displayed on a high-resolution monitor that replaces the rearview mirror. A glance up gives the driver a picture of what is beside and behind the vehicle.

    Mr. Hoffmann pushed a button and the rearview monitor image transformed into a virtual panoramic rear view that electronically stitched all three camera pictures into a seamless image. The resulting live image made it appear as if nothing was behind the driver to obscure the view.

    Mr. Hoffmann also demonstrated how the video cameras, which can recognize and gauge the speed of objects around the car, can be tied into automatic braking, parking and collision systems to protect the driver and the i8’s glossy finish.

    Because of the potential benefits, other technology suppliers, like Valeo and Visteon, are also keen on mirrorless systems and hope that regulations requiring old-fashioned physical mirrors will be amended.

    Almost two years ago, the Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers and Tesla Motors petitioned the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration to allow video cameras to replace side mirrors. The Auto Alliance estimates that external mirrors, depending on their profile, account for 2 percent to 7 percent of a car’s aerodynamic drag.

    Mr. Hoffmann said he expected to begin road testing of the mirrorless systems in Europe this year, quickly followed by additional testing in Asia. He remained hopeful that the United States would follow suit soon.

    He may have good reason to be optimistic. Daimler AG, parent company of Mercedes-Benz, is already testing a couple of autonomous tractor-trailers in Nevada that use large high-definition screens instead of side mirrors. And BMW recently received an exemption from the Transportation Department to allow it to deploy an automatic parking feature that enables a BMW 7 Series car to park itself, while the driver stands on the curb. It is a feature the company demonstrated only a year ago.

    Rearview cameras provide a precedent. Those that eliminate the blind spots directly behind vehicles are already deemed a significant safety improvement and will be mandatory in cars and light trucks in the United States by 2018.

    “But there aren’t any definitive studies of side cameras,” said David Zuby, chief research officer at the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety.

    Mr. Zuby said the closest example of how effective such systems might be is a survey by the institute of Honda’s LaneWatch feature available on models like the 2016 Odyssey.

    LaneWatch uses a camera on the passenger side to give the driver a video view in the dashboard screen of the right side lane whenever the turn signal is activated. Mr. Zuby said there was a correlation between the LaneWatch system and a reduction in accident insurance claims, although further study was needed.

    Using cameras instead of physical mirrors could also end dangling damaged mirrors. To replace a typical mirror, which features built-in defrost, turn signal and blind spot sensors, can be expensive, as much as $946 on a 2015 Acura RLX, according to the insurance institute. Mr. McConnell at Continental noted potential savings in building cars that no longer need the structural support for side-mounted mirrors.

    Still, the mirrorless demonstrations from Daimler, BMW and Continental show that the systems will present a challenge to drivers. Unlike other safety systems that are installed and applied without the drivers’ knowledge or input, like electronic stability control and airbags, digital mirrors require training and practice to use.

    Looking up into the rearview mirror, for example, to see what is beside you in the BMW i8 is not instinctive for a driver trained to perform shoulder checks.

    “Yes, it may require some driver training,” Mr. Hoffmann acknowledged. Further refinements need to be worked out, too. The BMW’s panoramic video mode has a slight fun-house mirror effect, for example. .

    On the other hand, having a single panoramic video view may be an improvement over the combination of old and new technology now deployed in cars that use a rearview camera and traditional side mirrors.

    Demonstrating the problem, in one of the first Chevrolet Volt cars, a General Motors employee backing up the car in a Manhattan garage during a test drive tore off a side mirror. The employee had been focusing solely on the rearview camera screen and forgot to check the side mirrors.

    Stay safe with a little extra help from these top sensor kits.

    With decades of combined experience covering the latest news, reviewing the greatest gear, and advising you on your next car purchase, The Drive is the leading authority on all things automotive.

    The Drive and its partners may earn a commission if you purchase a product through one of our links. Read more.

    All vehicle mirrors, including older ones, are essential driving aids. Their purpose is to depict items, people, places behind, around, and adjacent to vehicles. Modern-day cars are much more high-tech, making even further alterations to improve vehicle safety and technology features. Automotive makers use new technological developments to offer preventative safety tools for drivers to keep passengers safe. Yet, not all vehicles, especially older ones, come with the latest technology. Some car owners need to determine and install newer systems that are right for their vehicle.

    Drivers can use systems like the blind spot detection system to notify them of any potential hazards that may exist outside their eye view. Many items and people can be undetectable or invisible to those in the driver’s seat, especially in certain areas. Dealing with a blind spot(s) is a significant issue most struggle with regularly. To boost traveling safety and the driving experience, you need to know which blind spot monitoring system is the best one for you, and we’ve narrowed down some of the top picks available on the market.

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    How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots

    From the very first minute I used the VR-140 I was converted. It opens up a whole new world of sight from the drivers seat. Before now, I have been using 2 separate mirrors on my boat at the same time to try and eliminate blind spots, but the both of them don’t do near as good a job as the VR-140.

    How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots

    The biggest thing I like is the fact that I can see the rider when they go to cut out, and I can see their whole progression all the way through their trick. this is definitely the best option on the market.

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    It [the mirror] has revolutionized the way we coach. I’m able to keep my vision down the lake, but I can still see the skier go through all 6 buoys of the course without ever turning my vision away from my path.

    How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots

    The image stays clear when I’m watching my rider. It’s not jiggly or blurry, it just really clear and I can my rider the whole time they are on the water.

    How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots

    You’ve been driving for many years. You know how to adjust your mirrors. Who do I take you for, some idiot?

    Ok, so you may not be an idiot, but chances are, you don’t have your side mirrors adjusted properly.

    Lets take a look. Sitting in the driver’s seat, looking at my passenger side mirror, this is what I see:

    How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots

    This is probably close to what you see/how you have your mirrors adjusted. About 1/3rd of the mirror looks down the side of the car, the other 2/3rds shows you what is beside you.

    Now, lets take a look in your rear-view mirror:

    How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots

    Finally, lets take a look out your side window:

    How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots

    What’s wrong with this picture? Let me show you.

    How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots

    Take a look at the pink squares. What your side mirrors is showing you is NOT what’s beside you – it’s what’s behind you! It’s information that is COMPLETELY DUPLICATED by your rear view mirror!

    How to adjust your mirrors PROPERLY

    To adjust your mirrors properly, put your head against the left side door glass, then adjust your left mirror OUT until you just barely can (or barely can not) see the side of your car. THEN, move your head to the center of your car and adjust your right mirror out until you can barely (or barely can not) see the side of your car. The goal is to set it up so that once a car leaves your REAR view mirror, it appears in your SIDE view mirror – and once it leaves your SIDE view mirror, it appears in your side window/peripheral vision. Unfortunately, some American cars don’t let you adjust the mirrors out far enough to completely accomplish this. I recommend experimenting in a parking lot until you get the ideal angle.

    Lets take a look at the results of adjusting the right mirror correctly:

    How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots

    A car! This car was completely invisible to me prior, unless I looked over my shoulder and through the rear quarter window. In Fara’s Honda S2000 with the top up, this car would have been completely invisible.

    Now, to further illistrate my point, I will drive forwards about 10 feet until the car appears in my rear view mirror:

    How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots

    Here, you’ll see that it’s visible from approximately the rear of the car to the front of the front doors. Now, lets take a look in my side mirror:

    How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots

    Here, you can see the entire front of the car, including down most of the quarter panel. Essentially, very little (to no) part of the car is invisible.

    Now, I will drive backwards 20 feet (10 feet behind my original position) and take a look in my side mirror:

    How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots

    Here, the rear 1/3rd of the car is visible. When you look out the side window, this is what you see:

    How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots

    You can see the car. At this point it will be visible in your peripheral vision without even turning your head.

    Every driver is familiar with the dreaded blind spot problem. However, it is more than just an annoyance. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, over 840,000 car accidents occur due to the blind spot. Those zones which cannot be directly observed by the driver often causes incidents that result in serious property damage and in some cases even fatalities. While drivers can take precautions such as adjusting the driver’s seat and side mirrors properly, installing backup cameras and so on, they won’t eliminate the invisible spots completely. Therefore, the driver will always have to carry the responsibility of being constantly aware of blinds spots as failing to do that can lead to accidents.

    How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots 0) < description = $('meta[property=\'og:description\']').attr('content'); >window.open(‘https://www.facebook.com/dialog/feed?display=popup&\ app_id=’+BoredPanda.Config.fbAppId+’\ &link=’+encodeURIComponent(‘https://www.boredpanda.com/blind-spot-removal-invention-alaina-gassler/?media_id=blind-spot-removal-invention-alaina-gassler-5dbc55ce68a30__880’)+’\ &picture=’+encodeURIComponent(‘https://static.boredpanda.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/blind-spot-removal-invention-alaina-gassler-5dbc55ce68a30__880.jpg’) +’\ &name=’+encodeURIComponent(’14-Year-Old Girl Finds A Way To Solve The Blind Spot Problem In Cars’)+’\ &description=’+encodeURIComponent(description)+’\ &redirect_uri=’ + encodeURIComponent(BoredPanda.Config.pandaBaseUrl+’/close.html’), ‘facebook-share-dialog’, ‘width=626,height=436’); BoredPanda.Tracking.trackImageShares(‘Facebook’, ‘1918456’, ‘https://static.boredpanda.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/blind-spot-removal-invention-alaina-gassler-5dbc55ce68a30__880.jpg’, ”); return false;”>

    Luckily, now there’s a solution for that and it comes from a 14-year-old girl, who doesn’t even have a driver’s license yet.

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    However, not being able to drive didn’t prevent Alaina Gassler from understanding the important issue of traffic accidents resulting from blind spots.

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    In fact, she knows the problem so well, that she actually solved it for us. And the way she did it is nothing but genius.

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    New, larger automobiles often come standard with LCD screens and cameras to eliminate blind spots. Unfortunately, older models — the very vehicles that revealed the need for these tools — usually lack this technology. That doesn’t mean you have to keep driving blind or upgrade to a new vehicle, however. An aftermarket rearview mirror screen can bring your current vehicle up to date.

    Rearview mirror screens are LCD monitors you attach to your existing rearview mirror fixture. They display real-time video relayed from cameras you mount at the vehicle’s rear and dash. Many can also record video, provide alerts if you leave your lane, and display information like the time and temperature.

    Most rearview mirror screens aren’t cheap, but they cost less than a single month’s car payment — and accident repairs.

    How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spotsHow to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots

    Key considerations

    When you’re looking at rearview mirror screens, you need to know what you’re getting. Some packages include an LCD screen as well as both dash and rear cameras. A handful of them offer only the screen and a rear camera. Others may include just a high-quality screen and require you to find a compatible camera. This screen-only option lets you customize, but this is usually more costly in the end.

    Resolution

    Screen quality is important, but it can only display the image transmitted by the camera. Resolution is a big factor if you’re getting a screen that includes a camera. Some sets transmit full HD video (1080p) from both dash and rear cameras; others relay full HD from the front and 720p from the rear. Budget-priced rearview cameras may only take VGA-quality video. Most experts advise, though, that high resolution is more important in a dash camera than in a rear camera. In an accident, dash camera video can provide evidence that helps determine fault and can provide important details such as the make, model, and license plate number of a car.

    Screen size

    Some rearview mirror screens display an image as large as your factory mirror, and they often give you an unobstructed view that is clearer than a reflection. Other screens project a smaller image, which allows you to use the uncovered portion as a traditional rearview mirror. Smaller screens are less expensive and allow you to use the mirror to supervise young children in rear seats. Both screen sizes display the same wide viewing angle, but the image itself varies.

    Attachment

    Many mirrors securely screw into your existing mirror post. Others strap onto the factory mirror using heavy-duty plastic straps. Strap-on models are usually less expensive, but the straps may fail over time, especially if you live in a warm climate. Either way, check the measurements of your mirror to make sure the screen you choose is a good fit.

    Video cable

    Dash cameras are often integrated with the screen fixture, but rear camera videos must be transmitted through a cable. Standard cables usually measure 18 to 20 feet, so if your vehicle is longer, the cable may not reach all the way to the back. Many manufacturers offer longer cables upon request.

    How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spotsHow to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots

    Features

    While the distinguishing features of some screens are integrated into the screen itself, others are more of a function of your camera or cameras.

    Backup features

    Parking lines: Many covet rear cameras because they simplify parking a large vehicle. On-screen parking lines can help you park with confidence, but lines on aftermarket vehicles may not match the width of your vehicle. Some screen sets include adjustable parking lines — a great feature for wider vehicles.

  • Angle switching: Many screen sets automatically switch viewing angles when you put your car in reverse. This feature switches from a traditional rear view to a lower angle that reflects your tires and pavement. To use this feature, you will need a camera capable of capturing multiple angles, and you will need to wire the camera directly into your vehicle — or pay a professional to do it.
  • Recording features

    Loop recording: Dash camera recording is another key feature that customers crave. And it’s no wonder — recordings can exonerate you in an accident investigation. But storing months’ worth of video isn’t practical. Instead, many cameras save recordings in increments of 1, 2, 5, or 10 minutes. When storage is full, the device simply loops and deletes the oldest videos, preventing you from having to dig through several days’ worth of footage to find the clip you need.

    SD expansion: If your screen and corresponding camera don’t offer enough storage for your liking, look for models with SD card slots. This will help you increase your data space and decrease overwriting.

  • Collision lock: A video proving your innocence does no good if it’s deleted. Many cameras are designed to lock and save videos in case of a collision. If the camera registers an impact, it will lock the video to prevent overwriting — often saving it to a different storage sector.
  • Security features

    Some higher-end models feature motion detection alerts — even when your vehicle is turned off. In some cases, motion within three feet of the vehicle will trigger video to record; others will trigger flashing lights or sounds.

    These security features can give you peace of mind, but they can also quickly drain your vehicle battery when plugged into the auxiliary power outlet.

    Screen features

    Touchscreen: As with many modern electronics, touchscreens have replaced manual buttons in most rearview mirror screens. A touchscreen gives your mirror a sleek, sophisticated look as well as a clearer view of the road uncluttered by manual controls.

    Image improvements: Many mirror screens have anti-glare technology to help you see clearly during the day. Additionally, some have night vision settings that improve image quality in low light. Some screens respond to brightness and low light automatically; others must be adjusted manually.

    Different models include a variety of other features, including:

    Time and outdoor temperature readings

    Traditional rearview mirror functionality when powered off

    The affordable camera-based system won’t be offered on most, if not all, future models.

    How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots

    • Honda is discontinuing LaneWatch in favor of blind-spot monitoring.
    • LaneWatch is a camera-based assist that projects a live feed of the vehicle’s right-side blind spot on the car’s infotainment screen.
    • First introduced in 2012, the feature is still on six Honda models, including the new 2019 Insight hybrid.

    Seven years ago, mounting a pair of radar sensors in a car’s rear bumper was significantly costlier than it is today. So Honda designed a clever alternative to blind-spot monitoring by mounting a second backup camera on the right-side mirror and overlaying the video feed on the infotainment screen whenever the driver flicked the right-hand turn signal. LaneWatch was and is an affordable aid to check your six. But even Honda isn’t so sure anymore.

    At a meeting with the New England Motor Press Association, senior product manager Gary Robinson said Honda will be focusing on “traditional” blind-spot monitoring systems and shifting away from LaneWatch on future models. Honda had been quiet about removing LaneWatch from the current Accord—it debuted when the previous Accord launched for 2013—and from the refreshed 2019 Pilot. Nearly every new Honda introduced within the past two years has dropped LaneWatch. Currently, just six models offer it: Civic, Clarity, Fit, HR-V, Insight, and Ridgeline. And when these models see a redesign, LaneWatch likely won’t exist anymore.

    Robinson said buyers have accepted the flashing alerts of blind-spot monitoring now that the feature has proliferated throughout the market. In 2016, of more than 350 new vehicles on sale, we found 59 percent offered the feature. By late 2018, according to Consumer Reports, that increased to 85 percent. The cost is still an obstacle—only about 15 percent of new vehicles make blind-spot monitoring standard, and they’re typically luxury cars. Getting it can add several hundred dollars per vehicle.

    How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots

    Honda’s LaneWatch system, by comparison, uses a color video camera and no expensive sensors or additional modifications aside from a unique mirror housing and a button atop the turn-signal stalk to activate or deactivate the feature. Some in the media have complained that LaneWatch blocks the stereo and nav controls, and it does. But since when are you switching radio stations while switching lanes? If you’re sitting at a light with the blinker on, you can simply turn off the LaneWatch camera by hitting a button on the turn-signal stalk.

    How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots

    The bigger picture is that radar sensors continue to drop in cost as automakers invest in semi-automated and, soon, fully automated cars that rely on these technologies, so having two competing blind-spot systems might make LaneWatch a less cost-effective feature from a production standpoint. It also doesn’t help that LaneWatch can only watch one lane instead of two. But we like LaneWatch for its simplicity. Even with your mirrors properly adjusted to account for blind spots (as we’ve always recommended), this is a practical feature, like an auto-down window switch, that just works.

    Rear Safety Cross View Mirrors

    Sure Plus, the world’s best rear-mounted cross view “Blind Spot” safety mirror.

    How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots
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    How to set rear‐view mirrors to eliminate blind spots

    Unlike any other surface or hood mount mirror available, Sure Plus’ new “POD MOUNT” eliminates the potential danger and inconvenience of having to raise the hood to adjust the angle of arm orientation. Simply remove one set-screw on the pod cover and make all your adjustments with the hood down, where it normally rests. where you can see the mirror’s view angle rather than the old “set & guess” methods you must use with the others!

    Best of all, “POD MOUNT” is mountable at any angle, which allows vision and blind spot elimination in front of the cab and down the side preventing front end and lane change accidents.

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    Have you recently noticed problems with your vision, such as the presence of blind spots? If yes, you should seek immediate medical help as it can indicate a serious problem. Blind spots in vision, also known as a scotoma, can affect one or both eyes. These blind spots can occur in the center or in the edges of your vision. Seek medical care from an ophthalmologist if scotoma appears.

    What Are Main Symptoms of Scotoma?

    Scotoma is characterized by one or more dark, light or blurred spots in the vision. Once the visual field is affected, a person might need greater illumination or contract when reading, and there might be a difficulty perceiving certain colors.

    Main types of scotoma are:

    • Peripheral scotoma – a blind spot or decreased area vision located on the edges of the vision field which has a minimal effect on the vision and daily life
    • Paracentral scotoma – a blind spot or decreased area vision located near the central area, but not in the central area of the vision field, with a greater impact in the vision and daily life when compared to peripheral scotoma
    • Central scotoma – a blind spot or decreased area of vision located in the center of the vision field which severely affects a person’s ability to see, read and perform daily tasks
    • Hemianopic scotoma – a blind spot or decreased area of vision located on the half of the central visual field, with a great impact on daily life as well

    How Is Scotoma Diagnosed?

    In the initial stages of scotoma or blind spots in vision, a physical examination will help its diagnosis. The eyes are carefully examined accompanied by a detailed medical history. Medical tests and examinations which are used to diagnose scotoma include:

    • Examination of the eyes using a microscope which has a light attached to it, in order to look closely at the front and back of the eyes. This attached light to the microscope is known as the slit lamp.
    • Examination of the eyes using eye drops which help enlarge and dilate the pupils in order to examine the back of the eyes carefully using a slit lamp
    • Testing the visual field, which consists of using spots of light to measure the central vision and the peripheral vision

    What Causes Blind Spots in Vision?

    Various factors can lead to the blind spots. Common causes include:

    • Corrective surgical operation in the eye
    • Ocular infection which leads to a scar in the eye
    • A degenerative hereditary condition of the retina, known as retinitis pigmentosa which is characterized also by night blindness, changes of the pigment within the retina and even eventual loss of the eye vision
    • Glaucoma
    • Migraine
    • Stroke
    • Brain injury
    • Poor nutrition
    • Serious vitamin deficiency
    • Blockages of the retinal veins or optic nerve
    • Toxic substances such as methyl alcohol, and quinine
    • Side effects of high blood pressure
    • Side effects of multiple sclerosis

    Scotoma due to tumors of the pituitary gland is also possible, as the optic nerve is compressed. It is a less common type of scotoma, which can sometimes be cured or reversed with surgical removal of the tumor.

    Among pregnant women, scotoma is a sign of preeclampsia which requires proper medical treatment and monitoring in order to make sure that the health of the mother and the developing fetus is not in danger.

    How Can Scotoma Be Treated?

    The treatment of scotoma depends on its underlying causes. In cases when the scotoma is related to migraine headaches, no treatment is required, as these blind spots in vision are only temporary and go away within a couple of hours. Your healthcare provider will recommend certain aids which can help support your vision. Helpful tips include:

    • Using phones which have a larger keypad
    • Using large type printed books or enlarging the size of the character in an eReader
    • Using magnifying eyeglasses whenever you need to read something
    • Using large TV screens in order to enlarge the size of the letters
    • Using filters to reduce the glare on your computer screen
    • Using PC hardware keyboards, and software that magnify the computer screen, and even convert the text to speech if needed
    • Using audio books, magazines and newspapers that read the printed material, etc.