How to set up internet connection sharing for windows xp

Internet Connection Sharing (ICS) enables a Windows computer to share its Internet connection with computers on local area networks. It’s been around since Windows 98 SE, and with the launch of Windows XP, it’s only gotten better.

Windows XP ICS has some notable advantages over the versions of ICS in Windows 98 Second Edition and Windows Me:

  • It’s easier to set up. There’s no software to install, and it doesn’t add any network components or protocols.
  • It’s much more reliable and much less likely to cause network problems.
  • You can create a Network Bridgeconnecting two or more local area networks and share the Internet connection with the computers on all of them. This is especially useful if your XP computer is connected to both a wired and wireless network.
  • ICS client computers can use XP’s Internet Gateway to monitor and control the server computer’s Internet connection. If you have a dial-up connection, you can connect and disconnect when deciding whether to enable ICS.

However, XP ICS is missing some features of those earlier versions. You can’t disable the DHCP server, change the server computer’s IP address, or change the range of addresses allocated by the DHCP server.

Consider these points when deciding whether to enable ICS.

WARNING #1: When you enable ICS, the network adapter connected to the local area network is assigned a static IP address of 192.168.0.1. The client computers are assigned other IP addresses in the 192.168.0.x range. These addresses may not be compatible with an existing network

WARNING #2: Don’t enable ICS if any computer in your network is configured as a domain controller, DHCP server, or DNS server. Don’t enable it if another computer is running ICS or Network Address Translation (NAT).

WARNING #3: To enable ICS, you must be logged on as a user that is a member of the Administrators group.

WARNING #4: If you establish a Virtual Private Networking (VPN) connection while sharing a different connection, the client computers won’t be able to access the Internet until the VPN connection is ended.

Preparing for ICS

The ICS server computer must have two network connections: one for the Internet, and one for the local area network. The Internet connection may be a dial-up (PPP or ISDN), cable modem, DSL, or other broadband Ethernet connection. The LAN connection may be a wired, wireless, or even a USB Ethernet connection. Before enabling ICS:

  • Set up your Internet connection and test it so that you know you can connect to the Internet.
  • Decide whether to allow client computers to control the server’s Internet connection using the Internet Gateway. This feature is automatically available on clients running Windows XP. On clients running Windows 98, Windows 98 Second Edition, or Windows Me, you must run XP’s Network Setup Wizard to enable the gateway. If you have a Windows XP CD-ROM, you can run the Wizard from it. Otherwise, create a network setup disk containing the Wizard files.

Enabling ICS on the Server Computer

You can enable ICS either manually or by using XP’s Network Setup Wizard.

To use the Wizard, see our page on Server Setup Using the Network Setup Wizard. You must use this method if you need to create a network setup disk.

Configuring ICS Client Computers

Now configure the other networked computers as ICS clients. Follow these links for computers running Windows 95 or Windows 2000 Professional. For Windows 98, Windows 98 Second Edition, Windows Me, or Windows XP, stay with these instructions for XP Client Wizard.

Internet connection sharing host pc XP on an ethernet lan with client XP and client windows7.

Need step-by-step instructions for host pc client xp client windows 7

Not that it matters, but the host pc is accessing the internet via 3g usb modem.

1 Answer 1

Step by step instructions:

1. Go to Control Panel > Network Connections (In classic view).

You should have two connections, one is your network card, the other your 3G modem.

At this point, you can run the Network Setup Wizard by choosing Set up a home of small office network . Internet Gateway is an option here:

How to set up internet connection sharing for windows xp

If you want to proceed manually without the wizard:

2. Right click the connection that provides the internet connection and go to “Properties”

How to set up internet connection sharing for windows xp

3. Click the Advanced tab and tick Allow other network users to connect through this computer’s Internet connection .

How to set up internet connection sharing for windows xp

4. . Profit? . You may need a restart, but it should now work!

If you are having problems, it is possible your 3G stick uses a third party (crippled) driver/dialler program. In this case, all I can suggest is to uninstall it and manually install the generic (Huawei (Most likely)) driver, and adding it as a modem, effectively bypassing the dialler program. You may need to do a search for your providers codes/dialling numbers.

ICS Host Computer Setup in Windows XP! You need to enable Internet Connection Sharing feature on ICS host, so that it can share Internet connection with other computers.

Here are step-by-step instructions on how to do it:

1) Go to Start, click Control Panel.

2) Control Panel window will appear. Double click on Network Connections.

3) Network Connections window will appear. Right click the Local Area Connection that connects to Internet, then click Properties.

4) Local Area Connection Properties will appear. Click Advanced tab, tick the Allow other network users to connect through this computer’s Internet connection check box.

How to set up internet connection sharing for windows xp

Note: Only System Administrator can access Advanced tab.

Note: Please make sure you enable ICS on the connection that connects to Internet.

Note: If you want other network users to enable or disable the shared Internet connection, tick the Allow other network users to control or disable the shared Internet connection check box. This option is useful if you use modem dial up method to access Internet. For cable/DSL connection user, this option is better disabled and centrally managed by system administrator.

Note: Tick Establish a dial-up whenever a computer on my network attempts to access the Internet if you use modem dial up method to access Internet. This check box is only available on the dial-up connection’s properties.

Note: You should not use this ICS feature in a network with other domain controllers, DNS servers and DHCP servers. Those servers would affect the Internet Connection Sharing from working properly.

Note: If you have 2 or more home network connected by ICS host computer, you need to bridge those network for accessing shared Internet connection. For more information, read this network bridging in Windows XP.

5) You should untick Client for Microsoft Networks and File and Printer Sharing for Microsoft Networks check boxes on shared connection properties. This approach would better secure the network and won’t accidentally expose your home network resources to Internet. Firewall is also highly encouraged to be enabled on ICS host computer. Click OK at last.

How to set up internet connection sharing for windows xp

6) You will see there is a hand supporting shared network connection.

7) After enabling ICS feature, the network card connected to the home network would be assigned a static IP address 192.168.0.1 with netmask 255.255.255.0. The ICS host will act as a DHCP server assigning other IP addresses in the 192.168.0.x/24 range to other client computers.

8) In order to access Internet, client computers (Windows XP, 2000) should configure TCP/IP on their local area connection to obtain an IP address automatically. Then those computers will be assigned IP address in the 192.168.0.x range and able to access Internet through this ICS host computer.

This article describes how to install Internet Connection Sharing (ICS) on a Microsoft Windows Server 2003-based computer.

Applies to: Windows Server 2003
Original KB number: 324286

Summary

ICS permits you to use Windows Server 2003 to connect a small office network or home network over the Internet. ICS provides Network Address Translation (NAT), IP addressing, and name resolution services for all the computers on a small network.

The following hardware or software is required for this procedure:

  • A digital subscriber line (DSL) or cable modem connected to an Internet service provider (ISP) and an activated DSL or cable account.
  • Two installed network adapters. This article describes how to install a second network adapter.
  • A network already configured with functioning TCP/IP.

Before proceeding with the procedures in this article, note the following points:

Do not use ICS on a network that:

Uses static IP addresses

Has a Windows Server 2003 domain controller

Uses other DNS servers, gateways, or DHCP servers

Because ICS creates a static IP address for your network adapter and allocates IP addresses to other computers on your network, you will lose your connection to the rest of the network if other network computers already provide those services. If one or more of these conditions exist in your network, you must use Windows Server 2003 NAT instead of ICS. For more information about NAT, see Windows Server 2003 Help.

Do not create a virtual private network (VPN) connection to a corporate network from the ICS computer. If you do, by default all traffic from the ICS computer, including traffic from local area network clients, will be forwarded over the VPN connection to the corporate network. This means that Internet resources will no longer be reachable, and all the client computers will be sending data over the logical connection created with the credentials of the ICS computer user.

Do not configure ICS on a computer that is a VPN server. If your Windows Server 2003-based computer is serving as a VPN server, you must use Windows Server 2003 NAT.

Install a second ethernet network adapter to the ICS host computer

To install another Ethernet adapter to the ICS host computer, you must log on as a member of the Administrators group.

  1. Shut down your computer properly, and then physically add the network adapter.
  2. Restart your computer.
  3. When the Found New Hardware dialog box is displayed that lists the name of the network adapter that you installed, click Next.
  4. Click Next on the Install Hardware Device Drivers page.
  5. On the Locate Driver Files page, click the media option that contains the drivers for the network adapter that you are installing. For example, click CD-ROM drive, Floppy drive or Hard Drive Directory.
  6. On the Driver Files Search Results page, click Finish.

When you click Finish, the installation of the network adapter that you just installed is completed.

Configure the ICS host computer

The ICS host computer provides a connection through the second network adapter to the existing TCP/IP network. Log on as member of the Administrators group to set up the ICS host computer.

Click Start, click Control Panel, and then click Network Connections.

Right-click Local Area Connection (the network card that you just installed), and then rename it The Internet Connection.

In the Network and Dial-up Connections dialog box, two connections are displayed (for different network adapters): The Internet Connection and Local Area Connection.

Right-click The Internet Connection, and then click Properties.

Click the General tab, and then verify that Client for Microsoft Networks and Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) are displayed.

Click the Advanced tab, and then click to select the Enable Internet Connection Sharing for this Connection check box.

Make sure that firewall software or other Internet sharing software from any third-party manufacturer have been removed.

Click OK, and then return to the desktop.

Configure the Windows client

Because there are several versions of Windows, the following steps may be different on your computer. If they are, see your product documentation to complete these steps.

Log on as a member of the Administrators group to set up the Windows clients that will share the Internet connection.

Click Start, click Control Panel, and then double-click Network Connections.

Right-click Local Area Connection, and then click Properties.

Click the General tab, and then verify that Client for Microsoft Networks and Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) are displayed and selected.

Click Internet Protocol (TCP/IP), and then click Properties.

Click the General tab, click Obtain an IP address automatically, and then click Obtain DNS server address automatically (if these options are not already selected).

Click Advanced, and then make sure that the various lists on the IP Settings, DNS, and WINS tabs are all empty.

ICS provides these settings.

Click OK, and then return to the desktop.

ICS and Dial-up networking

You can use Dial-up Networking to connect to the Internet. However, Dial-up Networking typically has a lower bandwidth connection. This connection is not as useful when multiple computers share the connection. Additionally, Dial-up Networking is not persistent (you have to manually dial up to make a connection) and can cause initial delays when you connect to hosts on the Internet.

Troubleshooting

Note the following items to prevent issues from occurring when you configure ICS:

Do not connect a hub directly to your DSL or cable modem. If you do so, your internal network is vulnerable to other computers located on the Internet. If you do connect a computer directly to a DSL or cable modem, make sure that you turn off file and printer sharing to limit your vulnerability from the Internet. However, when you do so, your network is prevented from sharing files and printers, which may be your primary reason for networking in the first place.

Verify that firewall software or other Internet sharing software from third-party manufacturers has been removed. Make sure that only the ICS-enabled computer is providing IP addresses, forwarding DNS names, or acting as a default gateway. If not, ICS may not work or you may experience unexpected behavior.

You cannot modify the configuration of ICS. For example, you cannot prevent ICS from allocating IP addresses or modify the IP addresses that ICS has allocated. If these features are required, you must run NAT instead.

The ICS computer automatically assigns IP addresses, forwards DNS names to the Internet for name resolution, and assigns itself as the default gateway for connections to the Internet. If the ICS-enabled computer is unavailable, the other client computers on your network cannot access the Internet.

When you configure your network to use TCP/IP, remove instances of the NetBEUI protocol when you find them. NetBEUI is redundant and may slow down the network.

On some countries, more and more families have 2 (or even 3) PC’s:
– one for the parents, used for business work
– one for the children, to play (and to do some school-work. )
Also in small office (without a big central fileserver acting as proxy-server), several people
need to connect to the Internet, but not everybody has a modem in this system or there
maybe are not sufficient phone-extensions available on the telephone-switchboard.

First introduced with Windows98 SE and continued in Windows 2000 , also Windows XP
Home and Professional include :
Internet Connection Sharing ( ICS )

Before you try to use the Windows XP Internet Connection Sharing on an office network,
be aware of the possible limits :
Windows 2000 allows up to 10 (= TEN ) computers to simultaneously share a single connection,
either dial-up or broadband , to the Internet, and all Knowledge base articles on ICS for
Windows XP state "home use and small office", so I assume the same limit as for
Windows 2000 may also apply to Windows XP.

The system with the modem or broadband-interface, establishing the connection to the Internet,
is called the "ICS Host", while the other systems, which connect now to the Internet via the
network and the ICS-Host, are called "ICS Clients".

The setup of ICS on Windows XP is very similar to ICS on Windows 2000, which you can view
for full details and client connectivity ( like : Windows 98/98 SE/ME as an ICS client ) :

In the properties of the
Network connections,
right-click on your
Internet connection and
select "Properties"
on the tab:
"Advanced", you can activate
"Internet Connection Sharing",
and select, whether the connection
would be established automatically
if one of the connected client
systems tries to connect to the
Internet.
Warning: when using the ICS,
Windows XP changes now the
IP-address of your network
card for the LAN to the default
IP-address for an ICS-host:
192.168.0.1
You will need to configure your other
computers to use the same subnet
(192.168.0.x ) or to "Obtain the
IP-address automatically", because
as ICS-host, Windows XP will
now act as DHCP-server.
You can check in the
Properties of your LAN
connection, tab : Status
that your IP-address has been
modified to 192.168.0.1.

I keep this documentation short, there is a very good and detailed setup description on the
Microsoft website in the Knowledge Base article Q306126 , which even includes a few movie-files
with sound showing it in detail ( just right-click on the movies and select "Play")

Microsoft first introduced Internet Connection Sharing (ICS) in Windows 98 Second Edition. With ICS you can share a single Internet Connection across your (home) network, making it easier to connect to the Internet from your Networked computers.

There are several 3rd party products available, which let you do the same thing. The advantage of a 3rd party product over the Microsoft offering is that they are generally user-friendlier, and can be customized to suit your needs. For the average home user, however, Microsoft’s ICS should be a good alternative.

In Windows 98SE you needed to perform several steps (including a separate install of ICS) to get ICS up and running. In Windows XP, ICS is "build-in", all you have to do is activate it.

To use ICS to share your Internet connection, the host computer (the computer used to access the Internet) must have two network adapters: one network adapter configured to connect to the internal network, and one network adapter or modem configured to connect to the Internet.

To setup ICS, follow the steps below.

On the host computer (the computer used to access the Internet)

  1. Make sure you are logged on as Administrator or Owner
  2. Click Start > Control Panel
  3. In Control Panel, click Network and Internet Connections and next, click Network Connections
  4. Right-click the connection that you use to connect to the Internet, and click Properties
  5. Select the Advanced tab
  6. Under the heading Internet Connection Sharing, click the check box Allow other network users to connect through this computer’s Internet connection
  7. If you are sharing a dial-up Internet connection, you may choose to select the Establish a dial-up connection whenever a computer on my network attempts to access the Internet check box. In this case you do not have to dial a connection from the host computer when other computers on the network want to access the Internet.
  8. When you click OK, the following message appears:

When Internet Connection Sharing is enabled, your LAN adapter will be set to use IP address 192.168.0.1. Your computer may lose connectivity with other computers on your network. If these other computers have static IP addresses, you should set them to obtain their IP addresses automatically. Are you sure you want to enable Internet Connection Sharing?

The connection to the Internet is shared to other computers on the local area network (LAN). The network adapter that is connected to the LAN is configured with static IP address of 192.168.0.1 and a subnet mask of 255.255.255.0

On the client computer (any computer that needs to connect to the host which has the Internet connection)

To connect to the Internet using the shared connection you must first check the LAN Adapter IP Configuration then configure the client computer:

  1. Log on to the client computer as Administrator or Owner
  2. Click Start > Control Panel
  3. In Control Panel, click Network and Internet Connections and next, click Network Connections
  4. Right-click the connection that you use to connect to the Internet, and click Properties
  5. On the General tab, in the This connection uses the following items list, click Internet Protocol (TCP/IP), and then click Properties
  6. In the Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) Properties dialog box, check Obtain an IP address automatically (if it is not already selected), and then click OK

Note: You can also assign a unique static IP address in the range of 192.168.0.2 to 192.168.0.254. For example, you can assign the following static IP address, subnet mask, and default gateway:

IP Address 192.168.0.2
Subnet mask 255.255.255.0
Default gateway 192.168.0.1

The Default gateway has to be the same for every client computer; it is pointing to the host. The IP Address has to be different for each client.

To configure the client computer to use the shared Internet connection:

  1. Click Start > Control Panel
  2. In Control Panel, click Network and Internet Connections next, click Internet Options
  3. In the Internet Properties dialog box, select the Connections tab
  4. Click the Setup button
  5. The New Connection Wizard starts
  6. On the Welcome to the New Connection Wizard page, click Next
  7. Select Connect to the Internet, and then click Next
  8. Select Set up my connection manually, and then click Next
  9. Select Connect using a broadband connection that is always on, and then click Next
  10. On the Completing the New Connection Wizard page, click Finish
  11. Close the Control Panel

When you now start an Internet application (for example a Web browser), the client computer will attempt to connect to the Internet using the host computer’s shared Internet connection.

In most cases the Obtain an IP address automatically setting will work fine, but if you are having problems, you might try setting the IP addresses manually.

Troubleshooting

When you enable Internet Connection Sharing on the host computer, the host computer’s LAN adapter is automatically assigned the IP address of 192.168.0.1. Because of this, one of the following situations may occur:

IP Address Conflict

Each computer on the LAN must have a unique IP address. If more than one computer is assigned the same IP address, an IP conflict occurs and one of the network adapters is disabled until the conflict is resolved. To resolve this conflict, configure the client computer to automatically obtain an IP address, or assign it a unique IP address.

Loss of network connectivity

If your network is configured with a different IP address range than is used by ICS, you will lose network connectivity with the host computer. To resolve this issue, configure the client computers to automatically obtain an IP address, or assign each client computer a unique IP address in the range of 192.168.0.2 to 192.168.0.254.

Microsoft Knowledge Base Articles Relating to Windows XP ICS

Here is a list of Microsoft Knowledge Base articles dealing with ICS issues in Windows XP.

How to set up internet connection sharing for windows xp

Connect the first one of your computers (the server) to the Internet and test the connection to make sure that it is working properly. Then click Start -> Control Panel -> double click Network Connections -> right click the Internet connection and select Properties. Click the Advanced tab and check the Allow other network users to connect trough this computer’s Internet connection.

Leave the option Allow other users to control or disable the shared Internet connection unchecked or checked depending on your preferences. Click OK.

In order to share your Internet connection you need to network your main computer (the server) with your other computer (the client) – this can be done with cross-over cable connecting the two PCs’ network cards.

Configuring the client – on your second PC open Control Panel -> double click Network Setup Wizard -> click Next -> Next again and on the following screen select This computer connects to the Internet trough another computer on my network or trough a residential getaway.

if your computer has more than one connection select Let me choose the connections to my network, click Next then select the connection you want to configure (this is the connection between your two PCs) and then finish the Wizard (when prompted enter a computer description and computer name, and the name of your workgroup – this should be the same on both computers – MSHOME by default). After you’re done with the wizard right click on the Connection and choose Properties -> select Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) and click the “Properties” button -> make sure that Obtain an IP address automatically and the Obtain DNS server address automatically check boxes are selected.

Reboot both computers.

Troubleshooting. If you have followed the instructions and still can not share your connection do the following:

On the client computer click the Start button -> Run -> type cmd and press OK. In the Command Prompt type:

ping 192.168.0.1 and press Enter.

You should see something similar to the screen above which means that your two computers are connected properly. If you receive Ping request could not find host. or similar message that means that your two computers are not connected – in case of wired connection make sure that the cables that are connecting them are plugged in properly and that you’re using the right cables (cross-over cables).

On your main PC (the server) open Control Panel -> double click Network Connections -> right click your network connection (the one connecting the two PCs) and select Properties -> select Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) and click the “Properties” button. Click Use the following IP address and enter IP address: 192.168.0.1 Subnet mask: 255.255.255.0, leave default getaway blank. Select Use the following DNS server addresses but leave blank.

On your second PC (the client) open Control Panel -> double click Network Connections -> right click your network connection (the one connecting the two PCs) and select Properties -> select Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) and click the “Properties” button. Click Use the following IP address and enter IP address: 192.168.0.2 Subnet mask: 255.255.255.0, default getaway 192.168.0.1 select Use the following DNS server addresses and enter 192.168.0.1 for the first one and leave the second one blank.

How would you configure Internet Connection Sharing in Windows XP or Windows Server 2003 or Windows 10?

Right-click The Internet Connection, and then click Properties. Click the General tab, and then verify that Client for Microsoft Networks and Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) are displayed. Click the Advanced tab, and then click to select the Enable Internet Connection Sharing for this Connection check box.Saf. 17, 1443 AH

How can I share my mobile Internet with Windows XP?

Computer drivers Select the Network tab or scroll to and tap Network & internet > Tethering. Tap the USB tethering switch to turn on. When the ‘First Time User’ window appears, tap OK. If your PC uses Windows XP, tap Download Windows XP driver, follow the on-screen prompts.

How do I setup Internet sharing on my computer?

Select the Start button, then select Settings > Network & Internet > Mobile hotspot. For Share my Internet connection from, choose the Internet connection you want to share. Select Edit > enter a new network name and password > Save. Turn on Share my Internet connection with other devices.

How do I open network and Sharing Center in Windows XP?

How to Enable File and Printer Sharing (Windows XP)

  1. From the Start menu, choose Settings→Control Panel.
  2. Double-click the Network Connections icon.
  3. Right-click Local Area Connection and choose Properties.
  4. Make sure the File and Print Sharing for Microsoft Networks option is checked.
  5. Click OK.

How do I connect my Windows XP to the Internet using broadband?

Setting up dial-up Internet in Windows XP

  1. Click Start > Control Panel > Network Connections.
  2. Click Create a new connection.
  3. Click Next.
  4. Click Connect to the Internet and then Next.
  5. Click Set up my connection manually and then Next.
  6. Click Connect using a dial-up modem and then Next.

How to configure a network connection in Windows XP?

How can I Share my internet connection with another computer?

How do I set up an internet connection on my computer?

What does it mean to share Internet connection?

Internet Connection Sharing, or ICS, is a built-in feature of Windows computers that allows multiple devices to connect to the internet using one internet connection on one computer. ICS is a type of local area network (LAN).

ICS Features

ICS uses a single computer as the gateway (or host) through which other devices connect to the internet. Computers wired to the gateway computer or connecting to it wirelessly via an ad-hoc wireless network can use ICS.

There are several reasons why you might want to set up this type of network:

  • Allows most devices (including non-Windows and older Windows systems) to connect without installing additional client software.
  • Support for all connected clients to use many different protocols, including VPN and internet gaming.
  • Clients are automatically given an IP address and configured for DNS through the ICS computer.

In Windows 98 or Windows Me, ICS needed to be enabled or installed on the host computer from the Control Panel Add/Remove Programs setting. (To access this setting, go to the Windows Setup tab, and select Internet Tools > Internet Connection Sharing.)

Windows XP, Vista, and Windows 7 have this setting built-in. (Look in the Local Area Connection properties for a setting under the Sharing tab to "Allow other network users to connect through this computer's internet connection.")

ICS requires the host computer to have a wired connection to a modem, such as a DSL or cable modem, or an AirCard or other mobile data modem. The client computers must also be either wired to the host computer or connected via a wireless adapter.

ICS for Different Versions of Windows and Mac

For more information, learn how to share internet access on Windows XP, Vista, and Windows 7. You can also share your Mac’s wired internet connection via Wi-Fi; this process does not use ICS, but it is similar.

To share one internet connection among several computers, either use a router or, on Windows, enable Internet Connection Sharing so that other computers connect to one computer that has an internet connection.

The Problem with Multiple Network Connections & Network Bridging

Many laptop and some desktop computers have both wired and wireless network adapters or cards. These two cards allow you to establish simultaneous wired and wireless connections to the campus network.

While this simultaneous connection (also known as ‘network bridging’) may be useful on some home networks, it causes problems on the campus network.

You can use only one network connection at a time. Ethernet jacks on campus are set up to automatically shut off once they detect network bridging. Plugging your computer into another jack will disable that jack as well.

Note: Some computers and network adapters may use network management software other than the built-in applications included with an operating system (especially on Windows). If you find that this is the case, the process described below will be similar, but the steps may not apply exactly. Consult the Help documentation for your network management software or contact the IT Help Center if you need assistance.

Step 1: Disconnect or Disable Additional Network Connections

Please do not use more than one network connection at one time.

Disconnect Additional Connections (temporary)

  • To disconnect your wired Ethernet connection, unplug your Ethernet cable from its jack.
  • To disconnect your wireless connection:

Windows 7
On the Windows taskbar (bottom, right), right-click the connection icon and select Disconnect from [connection name]

Windows Vista
On the Windows taskbar (bottom, right), right-click the connection icon and select Disconnect from [connection name]

Windows XP
On the Windows taskbar (bottom, right), right-click the Wireless Network Connection icon and select Disable.

Mac OS 10.x
On the menu bar (top, right), right click the wireless icon and select Turn AirPort Off.

Completely Disable Unused Connections

This will keep your operating system from using the disabled connection until you re-enable it. To enable your connection, reverse the process you followed below. Consult the Help documentation of your operating system if you need assistance.

Windows 7

  1. Go to Start > Control Panel > Network and Internet > Network and Sharing Center.
  2. In the left-hand column, click Change adapter settings.
  3. A new screen will open with a list of network connections. Right-click Local Area Connection or Wireless Connection and select Disable.

Windows Vista

  1. Go to Start > Control Panel > Network and Internet > Network and Sharing Center.
  2. In the left-hand column, click Manage network connections.
  3. A new window will open. Right-click Local Area Connection or Wireless Connection and select Disable.

Windows XP

  1. Go to Start > Control Panel > Network Connections.
  2. Right-click Local Area Connection or Wireless Network Connection and select Disable.

Mac OS 10.x

  1. In the Apple Menu, go to System Preferences.
  2. Under Internet & Wireless, click Network.
  3. If the lock on the lower left corner of the Network window is closed, click it so you can make changes to the network settings (do not click the lock if it is already “open”), then enter your system password when prompted.
  4. From the options at right, select the connection you wish to disable:
    • Ethernet and from the Configure IPv4 drop-down menu, select Off
    • Wireless: and click Turn AirPort Off (at right).

Step 2: Make Sure Network Bridging is Disabled

If your laptop has more than one network adapter or card, you may have to disable network bridging, otherwise known as Internet connection sharing. Find your operating system and follow the instructions below.

SUMMARY Windows’ “Internet Connectin Sharing” (ICS) is a virtual network router that is located inside any computer that is running “Windows XP” and higher. It allows you to attach a new/additional computer to your local area network by attaching it to an existing Internetconnected computer. 2

Windows’ ICS Router •Steps for installing and using a virtual ICS Router in “Windows XP” and higher • Step 1: Open the “Control Panel”:

Windows’ ICS Router •Steps for installing and using a virtual ICS Router in “Windows XP” and higher (continued) • Step 2: Open the “Network Connections” window/applet:

Windows’ ICS Router •Steps for installing and using a virtual ICS Router in “Windows XP” and higher (continued) • Step 3: Use the RIGHT mouse button to click on the network adapter that connects “upstream” to the Internet. • Step 4: A pop-up, context menu will be displayed:

Windows’ ICS Router •Steps for installing and using a virtual ICS Router in “Windows XP” and higher (continued) • Step 5: Click on “Properties”. • Step 6: A “Properties” window will be displayed:

Windows’ ICS Router •Steps for installing and using a virtual ICS Router in “Windows XP” and higher (continued) • Step 7: Click on the “Sharing” tab in order to display it:

Windows’ ICS Router •Steps for installing and using a virtual ICS Router in “Windows XP” and higher (continued) • Step 8: Put a checkmark next to “Allow other network users to connect to this computer’s Internet connection”:

Windows’ ICS Router •Steps for installing and using a virtual ICS Router in “Windows XP” and higher (continued) • Step 9: Remove the checkmark from “Allow other Internet users to control or disable this computer’s Internet connection:

Windows’ ICS Router •Steps for installing and using a virtual ICS Router in “Windows XP” and higher (continued) • Step 10: Click on the “OK” button. • Step 11: The “Properties” box will disappear.

Windows’ ICS Router •Steps for installing and using a virtual ICS Router in “Windows XP” and higher (continued) • Windows’ virtual “Internet Connection Sharing” router does not show up as a separate device in the “Network Connections” window:

Windows’ ICS Router •Steps for installing and using a virtual ICS Router in “Windows XP” and higher (continued) • The only evidence that you have for the existence of an active, virtual ICS router is in the “Sharing” tab of the “Properties” windows of the upstream network adapter: 21

Hardware View of a single, Internetconnected “Windows XP”, “Windows Vista”, or “Windows 7” computer

“Windows 7” Computer

Upstream to the real Internet

A new “Windows” computer shows up.

“Windows 7” Computer

Upstream to the real Internet

“Windows XP” Computer

You wish to connect the new computer to the original computer in order to give the new computer access to the Internet

“Windows 7” Computer

Upstream to the real Internet

“Windows XP” Computer

Hardware View: This is what your hardware looks like:

Upstream to the real Internet

wired or ad hoc wireless connection between the computers

“Windows 7” Computer

“Windows XP” Computer

Physical View of the (virtual) Windows’ “Internet Connection Sharing” Router

Upstream to the real Internet

Real “Local Area Network” (LAN)

Virtual Windows “ICS” Router

“Windows 7” Computer

Two real network adapters in the “Windows 7” real computer but three virtual network adapters inside the virtual Windows “ICS Router” (Virtual network devices can have more virtual network adapters than in your physical network.)

“Windows XP” Computer

Logical View of the “virtual” Windows “Internet Connection Sharing”– it acts like it exists independently of either computer

Upstream to the real Internet

Real “Local Area Network” (“LAN”)

Virtual Windows “Internet Connection Sharing” router

“Windows 7” Computer accesses the Internet and the other computuer through the virtual “ICS router”

“Windows XP” Computer accesses the Internet but it cannot access files and printers in the other computer.

WINDOWS’ ICS ROUTER For “Windows XP”, see http://www.techrepublic.com/article/g et-it-done-connect-lans-with-windowsxps-network-bridge/5034572 and http://www.homenethelp.com/web/ho wto/windows-xp-bridge-setup.asp 29

WINDOWS’ ICS ROUTER • Microsoft’s official documentation on “Internet Connection Sharing” in “Windows Vista” is located at http://windows.microsoft.com/e n-US/windows-vista/Using-ICSInternet-Connection-Sharing 30

WINDOWS’ ICS ROUTER

• Microsoft’s official documentation for using “Internet Connection Sharing” in “Windows XP” is located at http://support.microsoft.com/k b/306126 31

WINDOWS’ ICS ROUTER

• Difference between virtual virtual “Internet Connection Sharing”(ICS) and Windows’ “Network Bridge”: two-way file sharing in “Network Bridge” versus one-way file sharing in “ICS” 32

Logical View of the “virtual” Windows “Internet Connection Sharing”– it acts like it exists independently of either computer

Upstream to the real Internet

Real “Local Area Network” (“LAN”)

Virtual Windows “Internet Connection Sharing” router

“Windows 7” Computer accesses the Internet and the other comptuer through the virtual “Network Bridge”

“Windows XP” Computer accesses the Internet and the other computer through the virtual “Network Bridge”

Logical View of the “virtual” Windows “Network Bridge”– it acts like it exists independently of either computer

Upstream to the real Internet

Real “Local Area Network” (“LAN”)

Virtual Windows “Network Bridge”

“Windows 7” Computer accesses the Internet and the other comptuer through the virtual “Network Bridge”

“Windows XP” Computer accesses the Internet and the other computer through the virtual “Network Bridge”