How to shoot an air rifle

Read through these air rifle shooting tips and bring your shooting up a few notches!

Air Rifle Shooting Tips to Improve Your Shooting

Stay on Top of Your Shooting Game

A lot of people think of air rifles as mere “toys,” something to use for fun or to cut your teeth when you’re just learning to shoot. But, an air rifle can be a serious weapon for hunting and self-defense. As with any weapon, of course, proper airgun shooting technique must be learned and executed to get the results you want. After all, a weapon is only as good as the person shooting it.

The secret as with most things is practice, practice, practice! The next thing you know is you’re getting better on how to shoot an air rifle accurately.

  • Designed specifically for .22 rimfire maximum airguns
  • Includes interchangeable spinning targets
  • All-steel construction with slots to hold targets
  • Also works with paper targets
  • 7.6″ x 10″ x 2.5″ and weighs 3lbs

Air Rifle Shooting Tips

Rifle’s Natural Alignment

There are a few different air rifle shooting positions namely, standing, sitting, kneeling, and lying flat on your stomach. Apparently, the latter is the most stable that allows the shooter to be more accurate and relaxed. With this stance, the rifle points naturally at the target. Place the rifle down and move your body positioned nicely behind the air rifle. This way, you’ll have a much better natural line position.

Hold the Rifle Firm Enough to Support It

Hold the air rifle firmly to have a good positive control. This is important the rifle is not flailing about all over the place. Maintain a good grip of the firearm without having a real muscular effort. Place the bipod at the front if you have one and your body nice and low to the ground. Make sure your chest is on the deck and you’re not up on your elbows.

Sight Alignment

Another important aspect of shooting is that the sight alignment must be correct. The shooter must have a nice and clear picture if the air rifle has a scope. Also, the front sight of the rifle should be centered perfectly in the rear sight aperture. Make sure that the target is properly focused for the distance you’re shooting at.

Shot Release

The shooter must be able to release the shot and follow through with less to no change in position. You can practice this in a dry fighting scenario. You’re not going to damage the rifle when dry firing and the natural progression of this is firing live ammunition.

There’s no need for you to lift your head away from the stock. Your shooting eye will give you that extra awareness, so keep both eyes open when looking at the target.

How to shoot an air rifle

Watch this video by Fieldsports Channel about airgun holdover tips:

Whether you’re using an air rifle or a firearm that chambers a more powerful ammo, these shooting tips are a great way to practice your shooting fundamentals. The only major difference is managing the recoil, but your stance, grip, and sights are basically the same. Keep these things in mind to give your air rifle shooting game a level ahead.

Got more rifle shooting tips to add to this short list? Tell us about them in the comments section below!

Editor’s Note: This post was originally published on February 11, 2016, and has been updated for quality and relevancy.

Introduction: How to Shoot an Air Rifle

The hold you learned in the Marines for center fire competition is totally wrong for a recoiling spring air rifle like the RWS 34. You get away with it when shooting a center fire because of the speed the bullet is moving, whether 5.56mm or 7.62mm. If you had been a small-bore target shooter, you would have learned a totally different carry.

For right correctness with an air rifle, grip it like this method

Allow the air gun relaxation on your off hand – nothing else. Don’t access the stock with your finger trips. DO not rest your air rifle directly on sandbags or your groups will undergo. Rest the forearm on the open palm of your hand. You can lay your hand on a sandbag, if you want.

Only contact your shoulder gently with the rifle’s butt pad – don’t grip it in hard. And grip the pistol grip with just like lamp a grip as possible. Let your cheek only touch the comb of the stock. But try to rest the forearm on the same location and put your cheek on the same place on the comb, all the time.

Every facet of this grip approves the air rifle to retreat as much as possible. Which is the top secret to proper shooting with an air rifle (and with any other small-bore target rifle, as well)?
The “safecracker “carry takes results!

Hold your rifle like a safecracker function a secure – lightly! That normalizes the retreat and vibration patterns from shot to shot. With a spring air rifle like the RWS 34, the pellet does not start to move in the cask until the weighty spring-loaded piston has slammed to a stop! No one can hold the gun yet with that movement.

In addition to recoil, your air rifle has many small vibrations when it fires. The hold narrated over allows those small vibrations and the two-way recoil of the rifle to repeat the proper way from shot to shot. When the pellet leaves the muzzle, it’s at the same point in the recoil/vibration cycle every time.

If you effort to hold the gun hardly, you set up counter-recoil nodes and counter-vibration, you set up counter-recoil nodes and counter-vibration nodes that differ from one shot to another and your groups will be open

Step 1: Aim Small, Miss Small

Many shooters don’t know this and they think they can just guess where to aim when the aim point is gone. That increases the size of their groups by an enormous amount. Of course, after you’ve shot your super-tight groups, don’t forget to readjust your scope so the aim point and point of impact are the same.

Step 2: Shoot Smaller Numbers of Shots

A 10-shot group will always be larger than a 5-shot group from the same gun when all other conditions remain the same. A 3-shot group will usually be smaller than a 5-shot group. To decrease the size of your groups, shoot fewer shots.

Step 3: Use Real Paper Targets

If you’ve never used real paper targets, you’re in for a treat. Real targets are printed on paper that doesn’t tear the way standard copier paper does. I’m always amazed at people who print their targets on a printer because they will have almost no idea how large or small their groups really are.

Paper targets are printed on special paper, which is why they cost a little more; but, if you care about accuracy, they’ll deliver the results you want. And, if you are going to use real targets, you should also use wad cutter pellets, because they cut perfectly round holes that are easier to score and measure. There are many brands and models of these pellets, but for my money RWS 10 light and high speed final match pellets get the highest marks. light and high speed final match pellets get the highest marks.

Step 4: Use a Good Scope

I can’t believe how many shooters give away 50% of the potential accuracy of their air rifle by not using a scope. When it comes to accuracy, there simply is no comparison between open sights of any kind and a scope. A target scope usually out-performs a hunting scope, but you have to be careful because a lot of makers call their scopes target scopes. Look for higher magnification and finer reticles on good target scopes, like this air force 4 16x50mm

Of course, if you just want to shoot with open sights, that’s a different story. But acknowledge that any rifle will be 50% more accurate with a properly-installed scope.

Step 5: Use Good Pellets

How do you know a good pellet when you see it? For starters, brand-name pellets are usually good. The best names in the world are H & N, RWS, and Crossman (for Premiers in the cardboard box, only). Pellets purchased at discount stores tend to be the cheaper brands and are often disappointing. If you need to stock up on good pellets, this is a great time to do it. Pyramid Air still has their pellet promotion going – buy 4 boxes of pellets and only pay for 3!

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How to shoot an air rifle

How to shoot an air rifle

Have you ever wondered about air rifles? They are a fun item to buy for outdoor enthusiasts. Whether you are a hobbyist or want to shoot professionally, investing in a great air rifle is a great way to ensure endless fun.

If you’ve ever been curious about buying an air rifle, we recommend you to do so. We know you’ll enjoy shooting – just make sure you familiarize yourself with gun safety first.

But have you ever wondered how does an air rifle work?

These are fascinating objects that have long been a great American tradition. We’ve put together this guide so you can understand how your air rifle works.

How Does an Air Rifle Work

Air Rifles and BB guns are a great item for both adults and kids to enjoy. While these are non-lethal weapons, they can cause damage if not used responsibly. They are also sophisticated weapons just as real guns are.

We also suggest you read up on the rules of owning an air rifle in your jurisdiction before buying one.

Here’s how they work:

1. Internal Mechanics

Within a few milliseconds, the air rifle fires as soon as you squeeze the trigger. When you squeeze the trigger, the sear disengages. When it’s disengaged, it causes the decompression of the mainspring. When this happens, the spring-piston pushes forward.

The piston then pushes the ammunition forward at rapid speed. This is how spring-piston air rifles work. The intensity and speed by which they fire depend on the model of air rifle you use.

Apart from spring-piston rifles, there are two other main types of air rifles:

  • Pneumatics: These air rifles have pneumatic potential energy that has pressurized compressed air. These air rifles have pumps that pressurize the air before you shoot
  • C02: These air rifles use external C02 gas cylinders (pre-filled). These cylinders provide the power for shooting and need replacing when the gas supply gets exhausted

2. Powerplant Modules

Next, let’s move on to the powerplant modules. These are for the air rifle’s operation – specifically for the creation of pressure in the air rifle.

Powerplant modules consist of two types. The first is the Break Barrel, in which the barrel is hinged. This barrel cocks the gun.

There’s also the Fixed Barrel, which is a stationary barrel. In this case, there is a lever for cocking the gun. There can either be an Underlever that is located beneath the barrel and is the most popular in air rifles.

The other two types of levers are the Overlever (though this is not found in air rifles specifically), and the Sidelever that is located on the side of the air rifle’s receiver.

3. Temperature and Velocity

The molecules within the air rifle have mass and are able to produce motion and kinetic energy. This is what causes them to push forward the ammunition.

The higher the temperature within your air rifle the higher the velocity at which the gun fires will be. Temperature gets measured in Kelvin (K). K is Celsius plus 273.

The temperature of the gas within the air rifle is what leads to the intensity of the velocity. The more gas that can enter the air rifle, the higher your velocity will be.

Now let’s understand how to use your air rifle.

4. Safety and Trigger

Let’s look a bit deeper into the safety and trigger on an air rifle. An air rifle will have a safety lever that has to be enabled to prevent accidental firing and disabled to begin firing. Many air rifles will have an automatic safety that is disabled when the gun is cocked.

When the safety is pushed forward the gun will fire when you squeeze the trigger. When it is pushed back, the gun is in safety mode and cannot be fired.

Some air rifles allow for adjusting the trigger to a position suited for the shooter. Usually, this is only used by experienced shooters. If an air rifle is semi-automatic, then the air rifle doesn’t need continuous reloading or pumping to fire. If it is automatic, then as long as the trigger remains depressed there will be continuous firing.

5. Choosing an Air Rifle

Now you know the basics of how an air rifle works – but you are still wondering how to choose the perfect air rifle for a beginner. As there are countless great air rifles available, you want to shop around before making your decision.

As a beginner, here’s what you want to look for when choosing your first air rifle:

You want to consider what the use of your air rifle will be. Is it for general target practice as a fun hobby? Or are you using it for hunting or pest control?

While all air rifles are great for target practice, you will need to pay attention to the specifications if you need them for more specific purposes. You want to consider if it has a scope for accuracy. Does it have a high velocity and the capacity for increasing its power? This is what you’ll need for far-flung targets including for hunting.

You want to consider how much power you want your air rifle to have. For example, PCP rifles have tremendous power and are a favorite for seasoned shooters. But as a beginner, you might only want to shoot casually and might want to opt for a standard hunting air rifle.

You also want to consider the accessories that you can add to your air rifle. As a beginner, you probably won’t give much heed to air rifles. But as you become more experienced with air rifles you will want to invest in accessories to enhance your experience of shooting.

Get Your First Air Rifle

Now you know the answer to the question “how does an air rifle work?” and how to choose your first air rifle, you are ready to start shopping. We recommend looking at our blog to learn more about making your air rifle purchase and about air guns in general.

Check out our collection of bestselling air rifles today!

Team Wild TV

Date: March 25, 2014 in Academy

As an avid airgun hunter, I am always on the look out for tips and tricks to help me improve my shooting.

Although I have been shooting airguns for around 30 years, I find that there is always something to learn!

The advancement in technology and manufacturing airguns means that the guns are now being built to higher tolerances which make them more reliable, and in turn, more accurate.

To get the best out of these guns, we have to shoot them to the best of our ability, so every now and again I scour the internet on the lookout for any tips that might help to improve my shooting (which is already pretty awesome ? )

Here’s a few tips that I noted down on a recent search……Enjoy!

1. PELLET SELECTION

To find the right pellet for your rifle, and the purpose you intend, buy a selection of quality ammo and test each tin to see what the results are.

Give each brand enough shots to settle down in the barrel before committing the results to paper, too – and shoot at a reasonable ranges to reflect your own skill level and the furthest distance you’re most likely to be taking shot.

Ammo that groups well at a distance will do so at close range, but not necessarily the other way round – so always undertake comparative testing at the ‘long end’.

Some of the better pellets also come in a range of head sizes – 4.51mm, 4.52mm, for instance – so you may even be able to refine your choice further, once you’ve settled on a shortlist. Yes, that probably means there’s a lot of testing to be done – but accuracy doesn’t get given on a plate.

How to shoot an air rifle

2. COLLARS AND RINGS

If your scope is parallax-adjustable (P/A), check its collar (or sidewheel) is set for the distance you’re shooting over – if it’s not, you could be shooting with parallax error.

And if you have a zoom magnification facility on your scope, be aware of which focal plane the crosshair is in.

Most are in the second focal plane, and they remain the same size regardless of the magnification setting; it’s only the target size that changes.

That means that the holdover reference point on the crosshair you’d use on, say, 5x magnification, will be different if you’re shooting at 10x.

It can all get a bit complicated – so pick a magnification setting that you’re comfortable with… and keep it there.

How to shoot an air rifle

3. A GOOD REST

A solid rest is a must. After my gun is seated in the rest, and I’m about to line up my shot, I wiggle the gun around some to make sure it is seated fully and is not going to move when fired.

Then I line up the target. I like shooting 1/4″ dots at 50 yds. Aim small, miss small. I always hold in the same exact center of that dot if there is no wind. Doping wind is a whole nother’ story.

I pull the rifle back into my shoulder firmly, then release the pressure and let it sit firm, but relaxed into my shoulder. I use a light grip on the pistol grip and NO grip on the gun with my left hand. I ALWAYS make sure my grip is the same, and that the pad of my finger is the same on the trigger every time.

When the shot is lined up, I close both eyes for about two seconds and then open them again. If the crosshairs have moved from dead center of the dot I’m aiming at, that means that when I settled into position fully, that I had some kind of unwelcome tension on the gun or in my body positioning.

So I resettle and do it again until when I open my eyes, the crosshair is still where it was when I closed them.

How to shoot an air rifle

4. BREATHING CORRECTLY

Now it is time for me to slow my breathing and zone in only on where I want the pellet to go.

When I am completely relaxed and breathing slow, I take up first stage on the trigger. I watch any movements of my crosshair, and notice how they rise and fall with my breathing. Next as I am ready to fire, and I’m just starting to exhale, I start a gentle, easy pull on the trigger’s second stage.

I increase pressure by miniscule amounts until about half of my breath is exhaled, and the trigger breaks.

If I am not “surprised “ by the trigger breaking naturally, then it means I pulled the trigger too fast. The center of that exhale and the breaking of the trigger MUST be timed right, BUT without me really having to think about it.

How to shoot an air rifle

5. SCOPE CANT

A way here, for an estimated 30% of us, to reduce group size immediately. All you need is a small spirit level, a few feet of masonry rope and a brick.

Put the gun on a rest. With the help of the spirit level, make sure the action of the gun itself is absolutely level.

Now, at 10 yards or thereabouts (keeping in mind the focusing distance of your scope), hang the rope with the brick tied to the bottom. You’ve now improvised a lead (or plumb) – so if the wind remains below gale force, the rope will be vertical after waiting for it to stop moving, of course.

Now, with the action being level, line up the gun with the rope so that the rope coincides with the vertical line of the reticule. Check if your reticule lines up with the rope.

Now, check if your gun’s action is Still level.

If the reticule and rope are NOT in line, it’s time to loosen the mounts and rotate the scope so that its vertical reticule lines up exactly with the rope while the gun’s action is precisely level.

Now, bit by bit, tighten the mounts, while checking that the vertical crosshair remains vertical (lined up with the rope with the action level).

When that’s done, you’re set. Now attach the spirit level to your gun in such a way that it enables you to check whether your gun remains level as you get into your favorite shooting position.

How to shoot an air rifle

6. TRIGGER FINGER POSITIONING

It is very important that every shooter checks the placement of their finger on the trigger.

The finger should be placed in such a position that the shooter draws straight back.

It is also very important that the shooter maintains the same position throughout their shooting. If the shooter moves their finger too far inward, they will be shooting more to the right. If they move their finger too far outward they will be shooting to the left.

Although these shooting positions are minimal this will cause a shooter to loose critical points during a match. The next time you are out shooting, check this technique to see what you are doing and see if this improves your score.

How to shoot an air rifle

There we have it then, a few tips from some of the experts in the Airgun field.

How is your shooting coming on?

Did you find this helpful?

What tips would you add to the list?

Recently, our airgun enthusiasts discussed how Mehuli Ghosh won gold in a 10m air rifle event and why her score was world record-worthy. This type of competition has influenced the advancement and innovation of airgun technology over the years. The competitive sport of air rifle shooting has made it possible for airgun enthusiasts such as yourself to not only use airguns in competition but also use it in serious hunting. Though competitive 10m air rifle shooting is basic in structure, it takes years of experience and dedication to master. Our professional team at Palm Beach Airguns has provided an exclusive guide on the competitive sport with a detailed explanation.

The History of 10m

If you’re new to the realm of airguns, you might be wondering: what exactly is a 10m air rifle shooting? Well, envision aiming a high power air rifle at the period at the end of this sentence and hitting your target exactly. Now, try shooting the period repeatedly in a series of 10 shots with the help of physical endurance and resilient determination. That’s the competitive sport of 10m air rifle shooting.

Every four years, many compete in this sport at the International Shooting Sport Federation (ISSF), the Olympics, and the annual national championships. Up until Ginny Thrasher snagged the first medal at the 2016 Olympics, [1] shooting an airgun in an Olympic event wasn’t even a thought for most. In fact, 10m air rifle shooting events have been part of the Olympics since the early 1980s and general shooting competitions have been part of the Olympics since 1896 in Athens. [2]

The Basics of 10m Air Rifle Shooting

When participating in an air gun competition at the Olympic and World Championship level, you’re allowed to only shoot in a standing position. During national competitions in the United States, the NRA allows two additional positions: kneeling and prone. [3] It’s worth noting that when someone discusses 10m air rifle shooting, they are referring to the highest level, so standing is the only position to focus on.

10-meter air rifle competitions are usually long – 60 shots fired within 105 minutes for men and 40 shots in 75 minutes for women. [4] However, local organizations tend to include women competing at the same level as men. Because of this, 10m air rifle shooting may be the most equal playing field between the sexes.

If you’d like to learn more about air gun competitions, or you’re shopping for the best air rifle scopes on the market, contact our air gun store in Florida at 561-331-6731 today!

Sources:

[4] International Shooting Sport Federation – Olympic Games

How to Set up an Indoor Shooting Range for your Airgun

When the weather turns against you, setting up an indoor shooting range can give you the same quality trigger time as the sunniest of days, but it does take some preparation to ensure proper shooting safety.

What constitutes a safe indoor shooting range? Well, it really depends on the airgun you’re using. A safe setup for an airsoft gun will be different from a BB gun, and it will certainly be different than a setup required for high-power for pellet guns.

The Code of Safe Indoor Shooting

1. Never Forget Rule #1: Safety Glasses, Safety Glasses, Safety Glasses: A pair of safety glasses, can prevent a lifetime of disability and thousands of dollars in medical costs. Your eyesight is one of your most precious resources – don’t compromise it. This includes anyone near the shooting area.

2. Never shoot with people, pets, or valuable objects downrange: This should be pretty self-explanatory.

3. Use BB/Pellet Traps and a Backer Board: Use BB/Pellet traps as your main target to prevent ricochets. Install a backer board for rounds that miss the trap to prevent damage to your home’s walls.

4. Where to Shoot: Use a proper distance from your target, about 20ft from your muzzle to the target should do it.

Indoor Shooting Ranges for BB Guns

The lower power of most BB guns is an asset for indoor shooting, but be warned–this classic round is known for bouncing back against hardened targets. Overcome this problem with a proper BB trap and sufficient backstop. For added protection, use BBs like H&N Smart Shot which deforms on impact – or even better, Dust Devil Frangible BB’s, that burst into a fine powder when they hit a hard target. Need more info? Use these guidelines for creating your perfect indoor BB range:

1. Shooting Location: Remember, you will need at least 20 feet from the gun’s muzzle to the target.

2. BB Traps: Because BBs can bounce back, DO NOT USE a traditional firearm or pellet trap. Many BB traps use cloth curtains or other methods to prevent this. An excellent example is the Leapers UTG Pellet and BB Trap.

How to shoot an air rifle

3. Backstop: We all miss sometimes. Make sure to install a proper backstop to ensure your inaccuracies don’t blast off your basement wall. For BBs, a thin piece of plywood about 3x3ft behind your trap should do it.

4. Paper Targets: Anything much harder than a sheet of cardboard can send BBs bouncing back. In a small range paper targets are the only safe way to shoot BB guns indoors.

Indoor Shooting Ranges for Pellet Guns

More power requires more responsibility–especially with the speeds and power a pellet gun can generate. For this reason, a lot of care needs to be taken before shooting a pellet gun indoors. Pellets need longer ranges and specific FPS speeds. Use the guidelines below for creating your perfect indoor pellet range.

1. Distance: 10 meters (33 ft.) from muzzle to target is the ideal distance for shooting a pellet gun indoors. The reason? 10m is the same distance competition shooters use for honing their skills.Be sure to leave enough room for the pellet trap and backer board behind it.

2. FPS and Lead: Pellet guns that shoot at 600 fps or carry a very low list of lead contamination because the pellets won’t fragment at that speed. Once speeds hit about 800 fps, lead pellets can fragment and create lead dust. Overcome this by using Lead-Free ammo or by keeping your speeds below 600 fps, our recommended FPS for indoor shooting.

3. The Best Pellet Traps are the Ones You Can’t Hear: With traps such as the Air Venturi Quiet Pellet Trap, your round is trapped in a ballistic putty once they punch through the target. Once the putty has had it, buy a refill and keep the shots coming. Since the pellets impact the putty, the impacts are nearly silent!

How to shoot an air rifle

4. Steel Traps: The steel pellet trap is the tried-and-true way to secure flying pellets indoors. Pyramyd Air features dozens of pellet traps to stop flying lead safely and securely when you need it most.

5. Backer Board: You will still need a sturdy backer board for those inevitable misses and “fliers”. A 3x3ft board will do the job, but make sure it’s thick enough by shooting it outdoors at the same distance you’ll be shooting inside. We recommend ¾” plywood minimum.

For more information, visit the Pyramyd Air Blog for more useful tips from Airgun Godfather Tom Gaylord.

How to shoot an air rifle

Airsoft Indoor Shooting Range

Airsoft guns are the easiest to set up for an indoor shooting range. Airsoft are designed to be shot safely against human opponents, so creating a safe shooting space is at home takes little time. Here are some quick tips provided by Tom Gaylord – the Godfather of Airguns.

1. Pick your Gun: Say no to full-auto guns, unless picking up lose airsoft BBs all over your basement floor is your idea of a good time. Likewise, long-range guns like airsoft snipers need more than 50ft to shoot a distance most houses don’t provide. Airsoft sidearms and low fps spring and co2 airsoft guns are the way to go indoors.

2. Target Traps: With low-power airsoft pistols ( 0.12g at 200 fps or less) a cardboard box with a hole cut out will suffice. For higher powered guns (0.20g at 300+ fps), use the same setup, but insert a thick piece of carpet or other material to absorb the shot impact.

How to shoot an air rifleHunting using an air rifle is a popular sport. Part of the American tradition, hunting offers men a great time out in the outdoors and every year, more and more enthusiasts flock to shooting of rifles for recreation and as an outdoor hobby.

So how easy is it to effectively shoot an air rifle? Surprisingly, it can prove to be very easy, provided that one follows some elementary steps and remembers to use the correct rifle for shooting.

So how to Shoot an Air Rifle properly?

This section will offer you the basic knowledge of how to shoot a target using an air rifle with ease. It is not all that difficult to shoot an air rifle and if done right, it can prove to be quite rewarding and a whole lot of fun too.

Here, we will take a look at the basic steps that you need to follow in order to shoot using an air rifle.

1. Picking the correct rifle

While you may be impressed by the glamorous looking rifle that your neighbor just bought, you must not go about blindly making a purchase. After considering a budget, it is very important that you pick out a rifle of the appropriate length ad weight as per your body size. As a rule of thumb, you should be able to hold a rifle 90 degrees to your body steady enough to take a shot so as to consider the rifle to be a good fit for you.

2. Buying additional equipment

After you’ve chosen your preferred rifle, you will also need to purchase some additional accessories. These may include a bipod, which allows you to rest the rifle on, some targets so as to help you practice and also some cushions for you to rest on when not using the bipod. You may also choose to buy long range scopes as an add-on.

3. Learning how to use the rifle

The first thing that you will need to learn is how to sight the target down the barrel hole. While holding the gun steady, look down the sight hole, down the barrel and straight at the target. The gun should be tucked comfortably into your shoulder and keep the grip of your dominant hand very tight. Never touch the barrel of the gun and use your other hand to grip as tightly as you can the other handle of the gun, under the body of the rifle. Keep your finger off the trigger for now, but keep the gun aimed steady. You should be able to hold the gun pointed right at the target for at least fifteen seconds waiting to fire a shot.

4. Taking the air rifle shot

Now that you have held the gun steady and it feels comfortable, take a deep breath and put your finger on the trigger. Let out half of your breath and slowly and steadily squeeze the trigger. Make sure not to push the trigger too hard as this will result in jerk backs and will dramatically reduce accuracy. In fact, every time you squeeze the trigger, the motion should be smooth. In such cases, the firing will surprise you and you will require absolutely no effort in taking the perfect shot. While you will find this to be slightly difficult in the beginning, the more you practice, the better you will get.

Conclusion

It is recommended that you take a careful look at the guide or manual that comes with your air rifle so as to ensure the best shot. While the steps we have outlined are more or less the basic steps that can ensure taking a comfortable and an accurate shot, some rifles may have special instructions on how they can be used better.

How to shoot an air rifleHunting using an air rifle is a popular sport. Part of the American tradition, hunting offers men a great time out in the outdoors and every year, more and more enthusiasts flock to shooting of rifles for recreation and as an outdoor hobby.

So how easy is it to effectively shoot an air rifle? Surprisingly, it can prove to be very easy, provided that one follows some elementary steps and remembers to use the correct rifle for shooting.

So how to Shoot an Air Rifle properly?

This section will offer you the basic knowledge of how to shoot a target using an air rifle with ease. It is not all that difficult to shoot an air rifle and if done right, it can prove to be quite rewarding and a whole lot of fun too.

Here, we will take a look at the basic steps that you need to follow in order to shoot using an air rifle.

1. Picking the correct rifle

While you may be impressed by the glamorous looking rifle that your neighbor just bought, you must not go about blindly making a purchase. After considering a budget, it is very important that you pick out a rifle of the appropriate length ad weight as per your body size. As a rule of thumb, you should be able to hold a rifle 90 degrees to your body steady enough to take a shot so as to consider the rifle to be a good fit for you.

2. Buying additional equipment

After you’ve chosen your preferred rifle, you will also need to purchase some additional accessories. These may include a bipod, which allows you to rest the rifle on, some targets so as to help you practice and also some cushions for you to rest on when not using the bipod. You may also choose to buy long range scopes as an add-on.

3. Learning how to use the rifle

The first thing that you will need to learn is how to sight the target down the barrel hole. While holding the gun steady, look down the sight hole, down the barrel and straight at the target. The gun should be tucked comfortably into your shoulder and keep the grip of your dominant hand very tight. Never touch the barrel of the gun and use your other hand to grip as tightly as you can the other handle of the gun, under the body of the rifle. Keep your finger off the trigger for now, but keep the gun aimed steady. You should be able to hold the gun pointed right at the target for at least fifteen seconds waiting to fire a shot.

4. Taking the air rifle shot

Now that you have held the gun steady and it feels comfortable, take a deep breath and put your finger on the trigger. Let out half of your breath and slowly and steadily squeeze the trigger. Make sure not to push the trigger too hard as this will result in jerk backs and will dramatically reduce accuracy. In fact, every time you squeeze the trigger, the motion should be smooth. In such cases, the firing will surprise you and you will require absolutely no effort in taking the perfect shot. While you will find this to be slightly difficult in the beginning, the more you practice, the better you will get.

Conclusion

It is recommended that you take a careful look at the guide or manual that comes with your air rifle so as to ensure the best shot. While the steps we have outlined are more or less the basic steps that can ensure taking a comfortable and an accurate shot, some rifles may have special instructions on how they can be used better.