How to start a sports blog

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Sports blogs are all over the place. Now the question is, would you like to start a sports blog of your own? If so, this is the ONLY blog training course you will ever need. Not only will I be showing you what it takes to create a successful sports or fan blog, I will also be walking you through the process step-by-step in my “7 Day Blog Challenge”, (my best selling blog training course valued at $195) which I’ve included for free in this course.

This course is the only guide you need to start your sports gossip WordPress Blog or website

  • Know how you can pick the right niche for your sports blog
  • Create a sports blog you are passionate about
  • Setup your sports blog in just 5 minutes (yes you read it right, just 5 minutes!)
  • Choose the best possible WordPress theme for your blog website
  • Install free WordPress plugin’s for blogging success
  • Optimize your sports blogging website for better SEO
  • How to analyze the competition and see where other sports blogs rank
  • Discover the best ways to build traffic and earn from your sports blog website

The first thing we are going to do in this course is we are going to pick the right niche for your sports blog. This is an extremely important part of the process, as it will lay the groundwork for the success of your blog in days and weeks to come. Create a sports blog you are passionate about, which we will help you discover. Find a passion that will also make you earn in the process. Since we already are going to be focusing on a “sports” concept, it’s just a matter of finding which direction and content topic you want to go after.

Once you decide on your sports blogging niche the second thing it that choose a unique but effective domain name for your blog website. I will walk you through the process of choosing a great domain name for your blog website. Make sure you come up with an original domain that represents the content on your site, but also making sure it’s something that is easy to remember and spell in the process.

After choosing a domain name, it’s time is to go live with your sports blog. I will walk you through the process of how to setup your blog in just 5 minutes with WordPress and without any coding. Choosing the right WordPress theme for your blog website is also an important, so I will lay out these guidelines for you as well — along with showing you some of my favorite sites where I get my own premium themes.

In this course, you will also get to understand why and how to use the top WordPress plugins that are required for blogging success. You will also discover how SEO works and which WordPress SEO tips you should be following to help you improve your WordPress blog website SEO and get more organic traffic. The more you focus on your site content and SEO now, the more chance you will have for ranking for sports gossip related keywords and search phrases.

At the end, I am going to show you the best methods to get free traffic to your blog. There are many ways to reach traffic on the internet today, but I’m going to only focus on four methods that I continue to use today — these are SEO, guest blogging, infographics and social media. I will also show you the best ways to make money from your blog. If you truly want to profit from your site, you will need to focus on your content creation and marketing efforts. This is something I have continually mastered and will show you how to as well.

In summary, this course is easy enough for a newbie blogger to follow, yet also loaded up with more than enough actionable tips and resources to teach veteran bloggers and marketers something as well. This is the only guide you need to get your blog fully functional and live. Be sure to visit bonus video material for more videos on the specifics of how to complete any of the actions discussed in the course.

A webinar on “How to Make $500 with a Blog” as a Bonus material inside the course.

As with all of my courses, I know they are top notch and the best around. If you don’t like the course for any reason then you can request for the refund in first 30 days from your purchase. Also, remember that this course comes with lifetime access to the course, that means you will get access to all the future lectures at FREE of cost.

Thanks for your interest in this course, hope you’re as excited to get started.

Go ahead and click on “Enroll Now” button. See you inside the course….

How to start a sports blog

Blogging about sports can be extremely fun. There are tons of stats, players, and games to write about. But along with all that fun, there’s some work that goes into creating a great blog that people will enjoy reading.

However, with a few rules and guidelines, even a novice can quickly attract an audience. So here’s the complete guide on how to start a sports blog that people will actually want to read.

How to Start a Sports Blog When You’re a Novice

Having sports as the theme of the blog is far too large of a subject for anyone to handle. There are simply too many sports to talk about. No one can be an expert on all of them. Who could remember all of the statistics and player’s names?

So a smarter way to start the blog is to choose one sport or a niche within a sport to cover. It should also be a sport where the blogger has previous knowledge and understanding of the history, players, rules, and techniques.

Another good theme idea would be to blog about the best sports clothing or equipment that’s available. The blogger could cover sites like Ec3dsports and discuss which of their products work best with particular sports.

Pick a Name for the Blog and a Hosting Site

Once the theme has been determined, it’s now time to settle on a name. It should be a name that’s easy to remember, easy to spell, and of course, isn’t already being used by someone else.

The next step is to figure out which hosting site will work best for the theme of the blog. Some bloggers choose to sell products or services while others just enjoy writing and sharing ideas to a wide audience.

There are plenty of platforms to choose from. Some are free while others provide services for a fee. However, before choosing the free platform, it’s worth it to take a look into the future to see if other services may be required once the blog becomes popular.

Write the First Post

The first post doesn’t need to be spectacular, it merely needs to be a topic that’s of interest to others. Of course, creating a blog post that is entertaining to read and looks great will help convert curious readers into instant fans.

How to start a sports blog

Try adding photos and video to attract more attention to the sports blog. Photos and videos also help back up points the blog writer is trying to make.

Another great way to quickly attract attention to the sports blog is to share it on social media. Finding the right keywords will also ensure that more people find and read the blog.

Lastly, write the blog consistently. No one wants to follow an inconsistent blogger. Try writing 1-4 blog posts per month and then continue writing the same amount or more.

Knowing how to write a sports blog isn’t hard. It really only takes a bit of research and teaming up with the right support system. Visit us for tips and suggestions to help write the perfect sports blog.

Office sports leagues can improve morale, reduce stress and increase communication. Here are tips to start your own.

Before we dive into the nitty-gritty of how to plan, manage, and promote your office sports league, let’s look at some of the reasons why you would want to start one in the first place. Creating or joining an office sports league has many benefits as a group and individually.

How to start a sports blog

Benefits of Office Sports Leagues

Reduce Stress

It’s no secret that physical activity reduces physical and mental stress. Exercise is basically a trial run for your body. When you voluntarily put yourself in a stressful situation, like playing basketball, your body has the opportunity to practice the interactions needed to respond to that stress. The more we practice handling stressful situations well, the easier those situations are to handle.

Build Morale

Giving co-workers a common goal outside of work will help to build morale. Feeling victory and failure together deepen trust and loyalty between co-workers. People tend to feel loyalty to peers rather than a company or title. This connection can lead to higher productivity and efficiency.

Open Communication

Building strong relationships on the field will improve workplace relationships. Allowing co-workers, supervisors, and managers to work in a new context will increase trust which carries into the office and can improve communication. A positive relationship on the field lends itself to a positive relationship in the office.

How someone plays a game and how someone solves a problem are very similar. Having the chance to see co-workers on the field can bring insight to how they work and how communication can shift to their problem-solving style.

Now that you’ve decided a sports league will benefit your office it’s time to get started on creating your league.

How to start a sports blog

Creating Your Office League

Choose a Sport

This sounds like a simple task but deciding on what game to organize will make a big difference on how you plan your league.

Consider the general activity level of your potential players

  • If you have a very sports inclined office a more aggressive sport may be appropriate. Soccer, basketball, and flag football are great options for this case.
  • On the other end of the spectrum, if you’re planning a lunch league or know your team doesn’t want to necessarily get sweaty, games like ping pong, badminton, and pickleball will be more appropriate.
  • Most offices will have a mixture of die-hard athletes and recreational players. If you have a large office, splitting your league into competitive and noncompetitive can be a great way for everyone to feel challenged.

Consider the supplies needed when choosing a sport

  • While crochet sounds like a fun game, it may end up being a large hassle to buy and move all of the supplies needed. A game like soccer requires very little.

Consider expenses

  • Some sports are more or less expensive than others. If you have a company budget for your league, keep that in mind when choosing your sport. If you are going to ask players or teams to contribute you want to keep costs low, to reduce any barriers to play.
  • If you require players or teams to play you’ll also want consider a way to collect payments. Whether it’s cash or using online registration(that’s us!), have a system in place.

Choose a Location

Make it easy for your employees and co-workers to attend your games by choosing a field or gym near your office. Even better if you’re able to host your game in the office.

Make Teams

If you’re choosing a sport that involves teams eliminate the potential for drama by creating teams rather than having players choose their own. Try to mix departments to give employees who don’t usually spend time together a chance to connect!

Make a Schedule

Again you want to make it easy for people to join your league. After work games can be tricky when many people have families and other commitments, plus not everyone will be thrilled about staying late. Weekends are even harder depending on where your players live.

The ideal times are lunch and weekday afternoons. When given the option to take a long lunch or end the work day early for a game, most people will be excited to join!

Will your league be competitive or recreational?

  • Recreational leagues are organized in a round robin fashion, where each team plays every team at least once.
  • Competitive games can be organized in a bracket with single or double elimination. If you choose a bracket but still want to keep people playing even after they are eliminated, a round robin group can be created.

Get Players Excited

The most important part of the equation is to get your co-workers and employees to join your league! Here are some ideas on how to build up excitement for your office league.

  • Promote your league as much as you can! Create flyers, post reminders on group messaging platforms, and tell people in person.
  • Offer prizes to winners. Even if it’s something small, prizes and the idea of winning creates excitement.
  • Create team names and shirts. Better yet have teams create and design their own!

I am frequently asked about this blogging thing that I’ve managed to turn into a full-time job. How did you do it? What do you focus on? How much time does it take?

Because of the necessarily wide range of incarnations a blog can take – not only in what you cover, but how frequently, in what style, with what focus, etc. – there isn’t a whole lot I can offer in a page like this to tell you how to run a successful blog. Given the amount of good luck that went into me turning BN into a full-time job, I’m also not sure I’m the right guy to offer that kind of advice. The short version of what I’d tell you on that end is simply: do what works for you, based on your definition of “success.” Maybe someday I’ll tackle that side of the equation – probably with an entirely separate blog, since it is such a voluminous subject – but, for now, my focus is something much more foundational.

Namely: getting started.

For many folks who have blogging aspirations, the functional side of getting started with a blog – actually setting up a site and creating content for it – can be a daunting challenge. Maybe so much so that you never even try. Although I can’t guarantee my suggestions will be the perfect fit for you, I can at least tell you how I did it. And it worked for me.

So, here go: the basics on starting a blog. How to do it, functionally.

The good news is, setting up your own site like Bleacher Nation is not as difficult as you might think. To get started, you really only need three things: (1) A Host, (2) a domain name, and (3) WordPress.

1.) A web host is essentially a company that owns a whole bunch of huge computers that specializes in creating the home where your website lives. For example, Bleacher Nation lives on a server out in California. There are a bunch of hosts out there, but Bleacher Nation uses DreamHost. I’ve been using it since day one of the site (and before on some other sites), and outside of the occasional blip you’re going to have with any computer enterprise, I’ve been very happy. Reliable, good customer service, good speed, and really inexpensive plans for folks just starting out. Mostly I’ve appreciated that when I have had issues – including stuff that wasn’t actually their responsibility – they help me promptly. Just responding quickly goes a long way to keep folks happy, I’ve found.

The truth is, there isn’t a huge difference between hosts, because it’s such a saturated market (meaning, they all pretty much have to keep up with each other). Search around, see what you like, but my recommendation is DreamHost. And, bonus for me: if you sign up with DreamHost, I get some credit back toward my own hosting costs. Schwing. And if you sign up via this link, they’ll even knock $25 off of the price.

2.) The domain name is essentially the name in the address where you want your blog to live (i.e., bleachernation.com is the domain name for Bleacher Nation). Getting one is really easy, as any host you sign up with can get you your domain name at the same time you sign up (I did all of this through DreamHost). Think long and hard before you choose your site name, because if your site is successful, you’ll be stuck with it for a long time. Be creative, because obviously a lot of the simplest names have long been taken. Generally speaking, shorter is better. More memorable is better. If you have to spell the name when telling a friend about it, that could be an issue.

3.) WordPress is basically blogging software, which is available from WordPress.org (not to be confused with WordPress.com, which is slightly different, and discussed below). It’s the program that use to create your web page and your posts. It’s free, open source, reliable, used by everyone everywhere, and it’s easy for beginners. If you can create an email, you can create a blog post using WordPress. To get it working, you install it on your host server, get a database set up, flip a couple switches, and you’re good to go.

And if even that sounds a touch complicated, good news: DreamHost (other hosts may do it, too, but I’ve only ever used DreamHost) will set it all up for you. In my early days of webbing around, I had no idea how to do any of this stuff, so it was pretty convenient to be able to sign up for hosting, literally click a button, and boom, I had WordPress completely set up on my site.

From there, you select a “theme” for the site (the basic way it looks), and you’re on your way. If you’re into learning a little HTML, you can tweak the site (Google is your friend), but it isn’t strictly necessary.

If that all sounds like too much, there are free options for blogging – WordPress.com and Blogspot.com are the big ones – which will handle everything above for you, and will do it for free. For a beginner, the free route might be a good option, as long as you understand that they limit your creative options slightly. Further, if you aspire for your site to be something more serious, having your own domain (i.e., YourSite.com as opposed to YourSite.blogspot.com) has become increasingly important.

That’s it. Follow those three easy steps, and you can have your site up and running. From there, it’s eminently customizable in both look and content, and I can’t tell you want to do in that regard. Just write what you know, and what you’re passionate about.

I am frequently asked about this blogging thing that I’ve managed to turn into a full-time job. How did you do it? What do you focus on? How much time does it take?

Because of the necessarily wide range of incarnations a blog can take – not only in what you cover, but how frequently, in what style, with what focus, etc. – there isn’t a whole lot I can offer in a page like this to tell you how to run a successful blog. Given the amount of good luck that went into me turning BN into a full-time job, I’m also not sure I’m the right guy to offer that kind of advice. The short version of what I’d tell you on that end is simply: do what works for you, based on your definition of “success.” Maybe someday I’ll tackle that side of the equation – probably with an entirely separate blog, since it is such a voluminous subject – but, for now, my focus is something much more foundational.

Namely: getting started.

For many folks who have blogging aspirations, the functional side of getting started with a blog – actually setting up a site and creating content for it – can be a daunting challenge. Maybe so much so that you never even try. Although I can’t guarantee my suggestions will be the perfect fit for you, I can at least tell you how I did it. And it worked for me.

So, here go: the basics on starting a blog. How to do it, functionally.

The good news is, setting up your own site like Bleacher Nation is not as difficult as you might think. To get started, you really only need three things: (1) A Host, (2) a domain name, and (3) WordPress.

1.) A web host is essentially a company that owns a whole bunch of huge computers that specializes in creating the home where your website lives. For example, Bleacher Nation lives on a server out in California. There are a bunch of hosts out there, but Bleacher Nation uses DreamHost. I’ve been using it since day one of the site (and before on some other sites), and outside of the occasional blip you’re going to have with any computer enterprise, I’ve been very happy. Reliable, good customer service, good speed, and really inexpensive plans for folks just starting out. Mostly I’ve appreciated that when I have had issues – including stuff that wasn’t actually their responsibility – they help me promptly. Just responding quickly goes a long way to keep folks happy, I’ve found.

The truth is, there isn’t a huge difference between hosts, because it’s such a saturated market (meaning, they all pretty much have to keep up with each other). Search around, see what you like, but my recommendation is DreamHost. And, bonus for me: if you sign up with DreamHost, I get some credit back toward my own hosting costs. Schwing. And if you sign up via this link, they’ll even knock $25 off of the price.

2.) The domain name is essentially the name in the address where you want your blog to live (i.e., bleachernation.com is the domain name for Bleacher Nation). Getting one is really easy, as any host you sign up with can get you your domain name at the same time you sign up (I did all of this through DreamHost). Think long and hard before you choose your site name, because if your site is successful, you’ll be stuck with it for a long time. Be creative, because obviously a lot of the simplest names have long been taken. Generally speaking, shorter is better. More memorable is better. If you have to spell the name when telling a friend about it, that could be an issue.

3.) WordPress is basically blogging software, which is available from WordPress.org (not to be confused with WordPress.com, which is slightly different, and discussed below). It’s the program that use to create your web page and your posts. It’s free, open source, reliable, used by everyone everywhere, and it’s easy for beginners. If you can create an email, you can create a blog post using WordPress. To get it working, you install it on your host server, get a database set up, flip a couple switches, and you’re good to go.

And if even that sounds a touch complicated, good news: DreamHost (other hosts may do it, too, but I’ve only ever used DreamHost) will set it all up for you. In my early days of webbing around, I had no idea how to do any of this stuff, so it was pretty convenient to be able to sign up for hosting, literally click a button, and boom, I had WordPress completely set up on my site.

From there, you select a “theme” for the site (the basic way it looks), and you’re on your way. If you’re into learning a little HTML, you can tweak the site (Google is your friend), but it isn’t strictly necessary.

If that all sounds like too much, there are free options for blogging – WordPress.com and Blogspot.com are the big ones – which will handle everything above for you, and will do it for free. For a beginner, the free route might be a good option, as long as you understand that they limit your creative options slightly. Further, if you aspire for your site to be something more serious, having your own domain (i.e., YourSite.com as opposed to YourSite.blogspot.com) has become increasingly important.

That’s it. Follow those three easy steps, and you can have your site up and running. From there, it’s eminently customizable in both look and content, and I can’t tell you want to do in that regard. Just write what you know, and what you’re passionate about.

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4 attorney answers

Maurice N Ross

  • Posted on Dec 25, 2012

Note also that you need to be careful when you use images of players that you are not violating their rights of publicity. It is one thing to use a photograph of a player to illustrate points you make in an article (i.e. a picture of a player shooting a basketball). It is quite another if you use photographs (or if others could reasonably conclude that you used photographs) for the purpose of marketing or promoting your blog. You need to be careful to avoid doing anything to suggest that athletes in the photographs endorse, are affiliated with, or sponsor your blog. You probably will want to include disclaimers that make it clear that your blog is not associated with or approved by the athletes or teams you discuss.

Trademark law does come into play here unless the player’s name is a trademark and you use it in a way that might confuse consumers into believing that your blog is associated with the products or services of the trademark owner.

Running a blog is a great idea, but it is not a hobby. You need to look at this as a business—because the legal liabilities you face if you make mistakes are no different than any other publisher. This means that you need to have an adequate budget to work with legal counsel. You also should look into procuring insurance protection against law suits for violating people’s intellectual property rights, privacy rights or engaging in defamation. Insurance policies exist at reasonable cost for people who publish blogs. Also, you might want to set up a separate corporate entity to operate your blog to immunize to the extent possible your personal assets. This is just the tip of the iceberg of the legal issues you should address when publishing your blog. Failure to lay the proper legal foundation can lead to financial disaster.