How to succeed in life as a late bloomer

This article was co-authored by Sandra Possing. Sandra Possing is a life coach, speaker, and entrepreneur based in the San Francisco Bay Area. Sandra specializes in one-on-one coaching with a focus on mindset and leadership transformation. Sandra received her coaching training from The Coaches Training Institute and has seven years of life coaching experience. She holds a BA in Anthropology from the University of California, Los Angeles.

There are 23 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page.

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Novelist Robert Louis Stephenson once said that “to be what we are, and to become what we are capable of becoming, is the only end in life.” [1] X Research source Maxwell, J. C. (2008). Today Matters: 12 Daily Practices to Guarantee Tomorrow’s Success. Center Street. In other words, the most worthwhile purpose in life is to become oneself, whatever that might mean to you. Individual development can unfold in diverse ways depending on one’s life conditions. [2] X Research source Gilligan, C. (1993). In a Different Voice: Psychological Theory and Women’s Development (Reissue edition). Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press. So, it would be a mistake to expect personal development to conform to previously conceived expectations for it. [3] X Research source Burman, E. (2007). Deconstructing Developmental Psychology. Routledge. Just because you feel like you haven’t reached your full potential by a certain age doesn’t mean you’ll never become what you are most capable of or truly desire. There are endless possibilities of what the mind and body can achieve, even later in life. [4] X Research source No matter what your age or social position, you can learn to actively pursue your desires. You might be a later bloomer who is just coming into your own later than those around you.

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How to succeed in life as a late bloomer

We loved our latest Fireside chat with researcher, podcaster and creativity coach Kendra Patterson last week.

She brought a refreshing honesty, warm energy and clarity of thought to the session. It appears others agreed!

How to succeed in life as a late bloomer

Kendra told us that late bloomers have a youthful and vigorous curiosity as they move through life. However far too many of us find that fears and limiting beliefs hold us back from being who we want to be.

She believes, like us, that we are full of potential at any age and it’s never too late to make a change.

Here are the main takeaways from our conversation below.

1. Being a late bloomer has nothing to do with age

But rather being out of of step with the mainstream culture. And this causes us to feel behind, even though this is an illusion.

2. You have to create your own yardstick of success

And that can take a really long time. Particularly if you get caught up in the standard measurements society uses to judge success.

3. You can be a repeat bloomer

Kendra is, by her own admission, one of them. A few years ago she experienced severe burnout – her ‘dark night of the soul’. However this set her on the path to reinvent herself again and again.

4. Beware the sunk cost bias

It’s hard to give up on the things we’ve been doing for a long time. Particularly those that give us the esteem of other people. Kendra shared that she was living the wrong way, but it wasn’t her fault. She was just doing what she thought she was supposed to do.

5. Nothing you’ve done this far is wasted

Everything you’ve done up until now has led you to this moment. Experimental people rarely have a trajectory or master plan. They enjoy the journey and feel their way through life, sending and responding.

6. Have faith in yourself and your ideas

We’re great at committing to others but not so skilled at committing to ourselves. It sounds so simple yet it’s the hardest thing to do.

7. Forget the gatekeepers

There might be people in your way that have the power e.g publishers, but they don’t have the power to decide whether your work is worthwhile. Don’t let them put you off. If you have something to say, say it.

8. Embrace your inner child and sense of play

Children live in the moment and have an innate sense of what feels exciting or fun for them. You have it too, you just need to start embodying it.

9. If you can feel yourself shrinking, maybe it’s time to make a change

Often we can feel ourselves becoming smaller. Anxiety, depression and burnout are all signs you’re on the wrong path. The hard part isn’t making change though, it’s the build up to it.

10. People want you, not a pale version of it

Don’t obsess about what other people want from you. Start by creating what is true to you. That way you’ll show up more as you, not a facsimile version of you.

Kendra’s parting mantra? Don’t obsess about a goal, just find the next guide post for yourself to pull you forward.

🍃 Join other late bloomers on our 2020 Vision program in September

Surviving the painful but extremely rewarding transition back to your true self

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When you quit Adderall, you will reclaim your soul and your proper direction. The downside to this is that you must come to terms with the years you lost while running in the wrong direction on Adderall. The longer you spent on Adderall, the more painful this will be for you; the more you will morn those lost years; the more behind you will feel.

I found an article that helped me with this feeling. Maybe it will help you to.

Here’s the intro…

Not all of us are quick off the mark and succeed early in life. Some of us are like slow-boiling pots, who need time to gather wisdom and make sense of the world around us. But watch out when a later bloomer finally gets it – late bloomers are often the driving forces in the world because they have spent a long time digesting ideas, information and knowledge just to come up with some amazing solutions to the world’s problems.

3 Responses to “ARTICLE: How to Succeed in Life as a Late Bloomer”

Dear Whomever,
: TOday has been so painful without any relief and it’s because I’ve not slept in two days and two nights. I’m dry on having natural energy and this is why I’ve taken the Adderall on and off for over 15 yrs. now. When I began this treatment, It was the miracle i’d long before given up on… this drug or whatever the hell has made me have a nervous breakdown and I’m so thankful that suicide is not an option for me, because, now is when I fight to live. God bless anyone with Adderall problems. Sincerely, Chad

How to succeed in life as a late bloomer

Late bloomers are people who achieved proficiency in some skill later than they are normally expected to. The key word is “expected.”

School Is a Machine, Learning Is Not

Ever since the 19th century, when education was first standardized, learning in popular imagination is highly connected to age. The school system, back then and now, is modeled after a factory – people get education in batches, based on their date of manufacture. If you were manufactured seven years ago, that means it’s time to learn the multiplication table, for instance. And if you are ten and you still have not mastered the table, you are reshuffled to the un-smart batch. Perfect logic. Except the lives of many successful people proved it wrong. They mastered a skill at an older age. They are late bloomers. Let’s see who they are and how they did it.

Learning Languages Late: At 20 Still Spoke No English

When Joseph Conrad became one of the titans of English Literature at 39, few people knew that at 20 Joseph still spoke no English at all. He was fluent in Polish and French, growing up in the part of Poland that is now Ukraine. He learned English at sea. When he started writing, he himself and his agent hesitated about Joseph’s ability to communicate in English with readers who at the time were members of one of history’s most class-conscious societies. His foreignness proved to be an advantaged, and his English writing style became iconic.

The Reasons Why People Bloom Later

Parents

The life circumstances of late bloomers suggest that they could bloom earlier had circumstances been a bit different. Paul Cezanne’s father protested his son’s plan to study art, envisioning his son a banker like himself, possibly delaying Paul’s education as an artist. Of course, if you really set your mind to something, even parents can’t stop you.

Geography

Joseph Conrad was simply born in a non-English speaking country. Ultimately, though, it may have been to his advantage, because he may have never developed his original exotic style was he raised in England.

Finances

Sylvester Stallone originally wanted to be an actor, but being evicted from his apartment lead him to performing in soft pornographic movie roles at $200 for two days work, delaying his big break with Rocky.

Non-Dream Jobs

For some people the reason is more trivial – they were simply in the wrong, but good, job for too long. Reid Hoffman enjoyed success at Paypal. Martha Stewart succeeded as a stoke broker. Julia Child had a stable job with the government. But as their lives later showed, they were capable of much more.

Simply Having No Clue

Fauja Singh knew what running was all his life, but it wasn’t until his son was beheaded by a flying sheet of metal, that Fauja took a different look at life. First he sank into depression. Then he moved on from India to England where he first learned what a ‘marathon’ was. He thought it was 26 kilometers when he showed up for training. It turned out marathons are 26 miles long (41 kilometers). He still ran, even at age 100. Sometimes, ignorance is bliss.

Is It Ever Too Late to Learn?

Learning something late in life might sound like a bad deal if you compare yourself to all the young talented folk. Understandable. The catch is that doing something earlier does not necessarily make you better at it than if you did it later. Could you say that Stallone is a worse actor than actors who started in their teens? Was Julia Child a worse cook just because she started cooking at 30? With Fauja Singh it’s even easier – just finishing the marathon at all he already wins.

The Rare Late Bloomers

To be fair, late bloomers in some fields, like music and computer science, are rare. We did our best to find them, but have not yet succeeded. If you know of one, be sure to write us.

How to succeed in life as a late bloomer

The term late bloomer took on an enlarged meaning for me last year. In early winter, I noticed that the butterfly bush in our simple, backyard perennial garden had really blossomed and grown. And I kept seeing a lone yellow butterfly fluttering around it, pausing every now and then to taste of the plant’s sweet nectar.

A little late for the season for both bush and insect, I thought.

Just for today, let’s focus on the butterfly. Every day, I saw this same beautiful butterfly, drinking from the tasty buds all by itself. I wondered if butterflies ever got lonely, but decided it was enjoying the late blooms too much to worry about being alone.

Does That Butterfly Represent You?

What could that butterfly represent to you? Did you grow up thinking you could’ve won the “Most Likely Not to Succeed” contest? Were you always the last chosen for a sports team? Instead of the “top 10% of your class,” did you barely pass–or even repeat a grade or two? Have the winters of your life left their scars, but you persisted and finally moved on?

Are You a Late Bloomer?

Have you just begun a new vocation or interest, and you’re now discovering new fields, new adventures, and new opportunities? Did you start late enough to call yourself a late bloomer–one who is experiencing a measure of success or simple joys later in life, rather than early on?

Have you spent numerous “winters”–fruitless years living totally for yourself? And you’ve just now discovered late in life the joy of becoming one of God’s children? Did someone introduce you to Jesus, and for you, has true “life” just begun?

Life Can Be Lonely

Regardless of what that butterfly represents to you, and no matter where you are, life for late bloomers may at times seem lonely. What about all the younger butterflies who have tasted the simple nectar already and have flown on to greater gardens more majestic and beautiful than yours? Here you are fluttering around in basic garden surroundings.

Am I the Only One?

Yet this butterfly in my garden had obviously found satisfaction and fulfillment late in the season–even past the normal time of productivity for both plant and creature. I imagined that little insect marveling at its blessings, but at the same time thinking, “Am I the only one?”

Several days later I walked quietly to the garden to snag a picture of that butterfly. Imagine my surprise when an array of 3-4 friendly butterflies now fluttered around that same butterfly bush–all enjoying and tasting the full fruits late in the season. Word must have spread.

Life As a Writer

Do you consider yourself one of those late bloomers in an area of your life? Sometimes I do, at least in writing. I started writing over 35 years ago and have enjoyed a measure of “success,” as some would call it. But early on, one year I netted over 1000 rejects in the process of writing greeting cards. I had always wanted to write a book, but I was in my 40’s before my first book was published. And it was several years later before a publisher accepted another one. God taught me persistence often, but He kept blessing my efforts.

Age Is Not the Prime Factor

In today’s world people may change careers several times in a lifetime–even seniors. Age is not really the prime factor for labeling one a late bloomer. At times you may wonder, “Am I the only one?”

Then we meet another and another, and before long we are fellowshipping with lots of late bloomers. And that just makes the sweet nectar taste even better.

God Has Room for Late Bloomers

God still has plenty of room for late bloomers. If you can breathe, that means you’re alive. God still has a purpose for you, and the best years may still be coming. Even though she was not a woman of faith, I like the quote attributed to George Eliot: “It’s never too late to become what you might have been.”

At any rate, wherever you are in life, still at the caterpillar stage, pulling and pushing to develop your wings and fly, crawling and inching your way to your goal, feasting on great gardens of grandeur, or simply just discovering the wonderful taste of good things late in life, God wants to bless you and use you, and feed you–with the finest of nectar: His own sweet fellowship.

“The righteous will flourish like a palm tree, they will grow like a cedar of Lebanon; planted in the house of the Lord, they will flourish in the courts of our God. they will still bear fruit in old age, they will stay fresh and green” (Psalm 92:12-14, NIV).

My Personal Prayer for You

Lord, help us to find joy and satisfaction in life no matter what season we are in. Bless all those who consider themselves “late bloomers,” and fulfill your purpose for them. Open up new avenues of service and usefulness for them. Give them new dreams and show them your truths about their lives and their future. Fill them with the joyful nectar of your sweet fellowship.

It’s Your Turn

What about you? Have you ever felt like a late bloomer? How have you overcome any difficulties in that season ? You can always write me through my contact page. Just fill out the basic name and address info, and then the email will come to me. Your name or info will never be shared with anyone without your permission.

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Using only the share buttons here or from my Facebook profile page, please feel free to share about my website or this blog post with others in your social media circles so we can work together in encouraging others toward intimacy with God. If you haven’t signed up for my weekly posts and newsletter updates, I hope you’ll do so soon. I think you’ll enjoy the complimentary ebook that you’ll receive when you sign up. Also, if you are visual like me, you can join me and follow my boards on Pinterest.

A groundbreaking exploration of what it means to be a late bloomer in a culture obsessed with SAT scores and early success, and how finding one’s way later in life can be an advantage to long-term achievement and happiness.

A groundbreaking exploration of what it means to be a late bloomer in a culture obsessed with SAT scores and early success, and how finding one’s way later in life can be an advantage to long-term achievement and happiness.

How to succeed in life as a late bloomer

We live in a society where kids and parents are obsessed with early achievement, from getting perfect scores on SATs to getting into Ivy League colleges to landing an amazing job at Google or Facebook–or even better, creating a startup with the potential to be the next Google or Facebook or Uber. We see software coders becoming millionaires or even billionaires before age 30 and feel we are failing if we are not one of them.

But there is good news. A lot of us–most of us–do not explode out of the gates in life. That was true for author Rich Karlgaard, who had a mediocre academic career at Stanford (which he got into by a fluke), and after graduating, worked as a dishwasher, night watchman, and typing temp before finally finding the inner motivation and drive that ultimately led him to start up a high-tech magazine in Silicon Valley, and eventually to become the publisher of Forbes magazine.

There is a scientific explanation for why so many of us bloom later in life. The executive function of our brains don’t mature until age 25–and later for some. In fact, our brain’s capabilities peak at different ages. We actually enjoy multiple periods of blooming in our lives.

Based on several years of research, personal experience, and interviews with neuroscientists and psychologists, and countless people at different stages of their careers, Late Bloomers reveals how and when we achieve full potential–and why an algorithmic acuity in math is such an anomaly in terms of career success.

Our culture celebrates whiz kids, but taking the long road to success is usually a better path.

How to succeed in life as a late bloomer

If you’re an Inc.com you don’t need anyone to tell you our culture valorizes whiz kids. Mark Zuckerberg, Bill Gates, and Steve Jobs are icons not only because they built world-changing companies, but also because they did it when most of us are still living off Ramen.

On the flip side, the media is full of dispiriting stories of middle-aged tech workers struggling to stay relevant by wearing hoodies, getting plastic surgery, and supporting each other at retreats for “over the hill” 30-somethings.

Young geniuses get all the glory. Those that take a slower route to success are far less celebrated. That’s stupid for a number of reasons.

Whiz kids get WAY too much hype.

First, because it’s both factually incorrect and hugely discouraging. The average age of successful tech founders is 47. The average age of scientists when they do work that leads to a Nobel Prize is 39. The average U.S. patent applicant is 47. If you’re unaware of these facts, it’s easy to think a couple of gray hairs means you’ve permanently missed the boat on success.

But our obsession with boy (and girl) wonders is harmful for other reasons too. Besides driving young people to record levels of anxiety and contributing to scandals like the rise and fall of Elizabeth Holmes, early success blinds us to the many important advantages of making it later in life.

1. Late bloomers are wiser.

This should be obvious as more years generally leads to more wisdom. Both neurology and experience show that as we get older we get better at planning, decision-making, and keeping things in perspective. When that accumulated wisdom meets a later-in-life career opportunity, magical things can happen. It’s a shame many employers are so reluctant to take a chance on late bloomers.

“Today’s obsessive drive for early achievement–and the taint of failure for those who do not attain it–has squandered our national talent,” Rich Karlgaard, a former Forbes publisher and author of Late Bloomers, a book celebrating the slow route to success, cautions in the Wall Street Journal.

2. Late bloomers have a unique and valuable type of creativity.

The strongest case against late bloomers is that they’re creativity has run dry. Isn’t it clueless newbies who come up with the breakthroughs ideas that change the world? Many ageist VCs think so, and young people are clearly great at coming up with half-baked ideas and charging wildly at them, sometimes with spectacular results.

But science actually shows creativity comes in two flavors and these two flavors peak at different times. Yes, on average younger folks are better at the single-minded pursuit of big ideas, but older folks are better at tinkering and thoughtfully piecing together the meaning of a lifetime of experiments.

“Our creative yield increases with age,” insists Karlgaard. According to new scientific findings “the brain’s right and left hemispheres are connected by a ‘salience network’ that helps us to evaluate novel perceptions from the right side by comparing them to the stored images and patterns on our left side. Thus a child will have greater novel perceptions than a middle-aged adult but will lack the context to turn them into creative insights.”

3. Late bloomers are more resilient.

Karlgaard isn’t the only author arguing that taking a more winding road to success has big benefits. Harvard business school grad turned Journalist Charles Duhigg makes the same case, though from a slightly different angle. His main point is that those who have taken a few knocks are more resilient.

The “also-rans” of his HBR class, Duhigg writes in the New York Times Magazine, were “passed over by McKinsey & Company and Google, Goldman Sachs and Apple, the big venture-capital firms and prestigious investment houses. Instead, they were forced to scramble for work — and thus to grapple, earlier in their careers, with the trade-offs that life inevitably demands.”

You might think these early setbacks would lead to less success later on, but Duhigg actually observed the opposite. “These late bloomers. learned from their own setbacks. And often they wound up richer, more powerful and more content than everyone else,” he contends.

The world may make us feel bad if we haven’t demonstrated brilliance by the time we’re 25. But a clear-eyed look at the advantages of being a late bloomer is a strong argument against losing hope if you’re early resume isn’t one big string of accomplishments.

“The critical thing to remember is that we cannot give up on ourselves or others, even–and especially–if society has made it harder to catch up,” Karlgaard concludes. Thanks to our culture’s worship of youthful achievement that’s a message many of us need to hear.

By Team Soulveda

14 September 2020

“You are never too old to set another goal or to dream a new dream.” – CS Lewis.

Every successful story starts with a dream. It is the innate element of human beings that inspires us to achieve the impossible. But not all dreams see the light of the day. Why? Because, sooner or later, life happens. The thing is, sometimes, as you age, distractions, responsibilities, and fears tend to become stronger than your aspirations. You stopped chasing your dreams and decide to settle down with what you have. And before you know it, your hair turns grey, and the memory of your dreams that used to keep you awake at night begins to fade away.

The thing about success is, it’s not defined by age. Whether you are in your 30s or 70s, you can still chase your dreams and turn them into reality. As long as your spirit of never giving up is alive, you can achieve anything. Just take a look around. We are surrounded by stories of people, also called late bloomers, who achieved success late in life. They never stopped chasing their dreams, despite the thrones and sharp stones in their path. If they can, so could you.

Here’s a list of late bloomers who inspired us and made us believe that, in life, anything is possible, at any time, if you never stop chasing your dreams.

Colonel Sanders

As of 2020, Kentucky Fried Chicken (KFC) is in over 150 countries. That’s quite an achievement for late Col Sanders aka Harlan David Sanders, who founded KFC at the age of 62. Most people plan their retirement at this age, but not Col Sanders. He wanted to taste success despite all odds.

One of the widely known late bloomers, Col Sanders was 5 years old when his father passed away. While taking care of his siblings in Indiana, he worked as a farmer, conductor, and insurance salesman before discovering his love for cooking.

The first KFC franchise was opened in 1952, after years of misfortune and failures. Legend has it that Col Sanders’ recipe was rejected over 1000 times. But once he found the secret recipe, KFC took off. Today, his recipe is relished by millions of people around the world. But more than anything, late bloomer, Col Sanders has left a lesson for everyone chasing their dreams—age is just a number.

JK Rowling

Everyone knows who JK Rowling is, one of the most popular late bloomers. A queen of the fantasy fiction genre who gave birth to the world of Harry Potter, Rowling is a magician with a pen. But her life wasn’t always kind to her. Before she turned 30, she had a miscarriage, a divorce, and a child to raise all by herself. She was jobless and had to survive on the government’s welfare fund to make ends meet. But, as she said in her speech at Harvard, she had two things that were enough for her: “an old typewriter and a big idea”.

In 1995, Rowling wrote her first manuscript of Harry Potter that was rejected by 12 publishers. But she kept going. Two years later, Bloomsbury Children’s Books signed a deal with her to publish 1000 copies. It was not much, but it was something. For her, it was everything.

A few months later, her hard work paid off, and she became a global sensation.

Grandma Moses

How old is too old? This was one question Anna Mary Robertson Moses aka Grandma Moses never bothered herself with. With a keen interest in embroidery, Grandma Moses picked up a paintbrush when she couldn’t sew anymore due to arthritis. At 76, she made her first painting. And for the next 25 years, until her death, she kept painting and mesmerising the world with her craft. Her work, Sugaring Off, was sold for US$1.2 million in 2006.

Julia Child

Julia Child has had one of the most inspiring careers. At 49, the late bloomer published her first cookbook Mastering the Art of French Cooking. At 51, she had her first televised cooking show, which premiered in 1963. At 69, she co-founded the American Institute of Wine and Food. And at 72, she finished a series of six videotapes named The Way to Cook. Julia Child’s life was also portrayed in her biopic Julie & Julia starring Meryl Streep.

Kathryn Joosten

Before becoming an actor, late bloomer, Kathryn Joosten was a psychiatric nurse in Chicago. She married a psychiatrist and hoped for a peaceful life. But due to her husband’s alcoholism, she ended her marriage, which also marked the beginning of a struggle in her life. She sold wallpapers and paintings, and also worked as a salesperson to earn bread for her children. At the age of 56, she moved to Hollywood to become an actress. With no agent or experience, it’s a dream a very few can dare to see. But she saw and she conquered. After doing some minor roles in television series, Joosten got her big break in Family Matters, The West Wing, and many hit television series. She won two Emmy awards for her role in Desperate Housewives.

Taikichiro Mori

An economics professor, Taikichiro Mori was 55 when he left his job and stepped into the world of real estate investment. He had inherited buildings from his father. When he died in 1993, he was already featured in Forbes magazine twice for being the richest man in the world.

Raymond Albert Kroc

How did a milkshake machine salesman become the owner of a billion-dollar fast-food company? Such is the story of the late bloomer, Ray Kroc. At the age of 52, while trying to sell a milkshake machine to a hamburger joint, Ray ended up buying McDonald’s. Kroc and his company underwent major financial hurdles, only to become the largest food chain in the world.

SOCIAL SCIENTIST, WRITER, PODCASTER

How to succeed in life as a late bloomer

Or better yet, how about being a repeat bloomer?

This blog post is now a podcast episode!

Why would you want to be a late bloomer, you ask? Why not? Even if you were an early bloomer, nothing is more liberating and life-giving than feeling that life can have a second act, or a third. Or more! In fact, instead of calling it late blooming, let’s call it repeat blooming. Why wouldn’t you want to be a repeat bloomer? If you’re feeling stuck or bored in life, or if you’re prone to existential despair at seeing your years slip away and your accomplishments remain mediocre, take heart. We are all capable of being repeat bloomers, and I’m going to tell you why that is and how to do it.

Let’s look at this through a lens of what holds us back from being late bloomers. First, we’re told our brainpower declines as we age, so we think there’s no way we’ll accomplish anything at a later age comparable with what we could have accomplished in youth – so why even try? Despite what we’re led to believe, overall cognitive function does not decline with age. One type does, but another type actually improves. The type that declines – it peaks around age 20, so it starts declining before life has even really fully begun – is called fluid intelligence. This is the basic reasoning capacities of our brains, the functions that don’t rely on prior learning. Crystallized intelligence, which is the kind that builds over time as you learn and experience life, continues to increase slowly and then remains stable for much of adult life. But even when it, too, begins to decline, this isn’t necessarily associated with the loss of an ability to continue functioning at a high level.

Dr. Sanjay Gupta tells a story about operating on the brain of a 93-year-old man who fell off a roof while using a leaf blower. Dr. Gupta found him waiting for the operation fully conscious and reading about elections in East Africa on his iPhone. This was clearly a very high functioning old guy, and Dr. Gupta was curious as to what shape he’d find his brain in. What do you think he saw in there? Here’s what: a shriveled-up 93-year-old brain. As Dr. Gupta puts it, this aged brain “had almost no correlation to his function… We think of our organs as having this natural deterioration, and they do, but that doesn’t mean they can’t function like they did when you were much younger.” The incredible plasticity of the brain well into old age is something new research is revealing. I don’t know about you, but it makes me feel a lot better about the prospect of aging.

But that’s just brain function. What holds most of us back from being late bloomers is psychological. Our culture tells us that we become irrelevant as we age, and that the time for achieving big successes or making great contributions has passed. The insidious part of this is that while it’s demonstrably false – there are plenty of examples of highly successful late bloomers – the fact that our culture believes it means that it has the power of truth in our lives. Dr. Nell Painter, a successful and lauded historian, found this out when she decided to get an MFA in art in her 60s. As she describes in her memoir, Old in Art School, her classmates, all many decades younger, weren’t even interested in evaluating her work during critique sessions, because her much advanced age created in them an “assumption of my inconsequence” (Dr. Painter is also Black, which added another dimension to this dismissal). Being a late bloomer means facing our own irrelevance in the eyes of the culture at large. As Dr. Painter’s experience shows, having the potential to be a “successful” artist is associated with being young. Indeed, potential is seen as equivalent with youth. And if you don’t have potential, i.e. youth, what’s the point?

Let’s take a closer look at potential. While youth is infused with hopes and dreams for the future, maturity is about having already arrived. As we mature and age, we are no longer looking at our potential as a future destination. We enter the era of living our potential. Knowing this is the key to being a late bloomer. When we start learning something new at an older age, we can leapfrog right over that stage where potential is something we are only ever grasping at and step right into the heart of it. The potential of youth is in the eyes of beholders, the gatekeepers who judge your progress and your possibility of future success. The potential of older age is something you possess and have sovereignty over. Put succinctly, you can do away with giving a shit what the gatekeepers and naysayers think. You’ve earned your right to define yourself and what your potential looks like.

In his book Late Bloomers, Rich Karlgaard lists the strengths of late bloomers, including insight, resilience, compassion, and wisdom, but one stands out to me more than others: late bloomers maintain a youthful and vigorous curiosity. Curiosity often appears as whims, and late bloomers tend to take those whims seriously, regardless of how “important” they seem or – and this is important – their future potential. Late bloomers know the secret, that pursuing your curiosity for the sake of appeasing it is what blooming is all about. The potential is in the pursuit. Something will come out of it, assuredly, because older people have more creative and wide-ranging cognitive resources at their disposal, but you can let that part develop naturally as you go along.

Being a late bloomer is a boon because there is less future ahead. It gives us reason to focus on what really matters about our activities: the process of actually doing them. Whereas a young “aspiring” artist may have big dreams about a career trajectory of prestige gallery showings and art-world esteem, an older artist can more easily understand and embrace the idea that it’s the practice that makes you an artist. And this goes for any activity you choose as your late-bloomer project. You no longer have the luxury of time to be “aspiring.” You must simply be. Being a late bloomer isn’t something you might be later if you accomplished something at some point. You must see yourself as a late bloomer now, as already having arrived there.

Late bloomers are people who achieved proficiency in some skill later than they are normally expected to. The key word is “expected.”

How to succeed in life as a late bloomer

School Is a Machine, Learning Is Not

Ever since the 19th century, when education was first standardized, learning in popular imagination is highly connected to age. The school system, back then and now, is modeled after a factory – people get education in batches, based on their date of manufacture. If you were manufactured seven years ago, that means it’s time to learn the multiplication table, for instance. And if you are ten and you still have not mastered the table, you are reshuffled to the un-smart batch. Perfect logic. Except the lives of many successful people proved it wrong. They mastered a skill at an older age. They are late bloomers. Let’s see who they are and how they did it.

Learning Languages Late: At 20 Still Spoke No English

When Joseph Conrad became one of the titans of English Literature at 39, few people knew that at 20 Joseph still spoke no English at all. He was fluent in Polish and French, growing up in the part of Poland that is now Ukraine. He learned English at sea. When he started writing, he himself and his agent hesitated about Joseph’s ability to communicate in English with readers who at the time were members of one of history’s most class-conscious societies. His foreignness proved to be an advantaged, and his English writing style became iconic.

The Reasons Why People Bloom Later

Parents

The life circumstances of late bloomers suggest that they could bloom earlier had circumstances been a bit different. Paul Cezanne’s father protested his son’s plan to study art, envisioning his son a banker like himself, possibly delaying Paul’s education as an artist. Of course, if you really set your mind to something, even parents can’t stop you.

Geography

Joseph Conrad was simply born in a non-English speaking country. Ultimately, though, it may have been to his advantage, because he may have never developed his original exotic style was he raised in England.

Finances

Sylvester Stallone originally wanted to be an actor, but being evicted from his apartment lead him to performing in soft pornographic movie roles at $200 for two days work, delaying his big break with Rocky.

Non-Dream Jobs

For some people the reason is more trivial – they were simply in the wrong, but good, job for too long. Reid Hoffman enjoyed success at Paypal. Martha Stewart succeeded as a stoke broker. Julia Child had a stable job with the government. But as their lives later showed, they were capable of much more.

Simply Having No Clue

Fauja Singh knew what running was all his life, but it wasn’t until his son was beheaded by a flying sheet of metal, that Fauja took a different look at life. First he sank into depression. Then he moved on from India to England where he first learned what a ‘marathon’ was. He thought it was 26 kilometers when he showed up for training. It turned out marathons are 26 miles long (41 kilometers). He still ran, even at age 100. Sometimes, ignorance is bliss.

Is It Ever Too Late to Learn?

Learning something late in life might sound like a bad deal if you compare yourself to all the young talented folk. Understandable. The catch is that doing something earlier does not necessarily make you better at it than if you did it later. Could you say that Stallone is a worse actor than actors who started in their teens? Was Julia Child a worse cook just because she started cooking at 30? With Fauja Singh it’s even easier – just finishing the marathon at all he already wins.

The Rare Late Bloomers

To be fair, late bloomers in some fields, like music and computer science, are rare. We did our best to find them, but have not yet succeeded. If you know of one, be sure to write us.

Wednesday, May 22, 2019

How to succeed in life as a late bloomer

How to succeed in life as a late bloomer

Kerry McDonald

At a dinner party several years ago, a woman and I chatted about education and parenthood. I had just met her and when I told her about our unschooling approach to education that prioritizes self-directed learning, she was visibly perplexed. “Don’t you worry about outcomes?” she asked. Yes, I replied. I want my children to be highly literate and numerate, to live a meaningful life tied to their interests and talents, and to have a strong sense of personal agency. “Well,” she responded, “for my kids, it might as well be either the Ivy League or jail.” She was only half-kidding.

A Social Obsession with Early Accomplishments

The recent college admissions bribery scandal shows the lengths that some affluent parents will go to make sure their children get into elite colleges. But it’s not just wealthy parents who are worried about their child’s early success and college and career prospects. In his new book, Late Bloomers: The Power of Patience in a World Obsessed with Early Achievement, longtime Forbes publisher, Rich Karlgaard, writes about our societal obsession with early accomplishment and its potentially negative impact on both individuals and communities. He writes:

What I suggest is that parents, schools, employers, the media, and consumers of media are now crazily overcelebrating early achievement as the best kind of achievement or even the only kind. We do so at the cost of shaming the late bloomer and thus shortchanging people and society.

Karlgaard is clear in saying there is nothing inherently wrong with early achievement. Indeed, we are all better off thanks to the inventions of young entrepreneurs like Bill Gates and Steve Jobs who both dropped out of college years ago to pursue their revolutionary technology companies. The downside is that now we often look to early markers of a narrow definition of success as defining a person’s worth.

How children perform at school, what kind of test scores they get, what college they get into at 18 become sought-after signals of accomplishment. Karlgaard suggests several problems with this outlook, including marginalizing highly-talented young people who may not perform well in conventional schooling and grow up with a sense of being less than their peers. He writes:

When so many people believe they are inferior based on a few narrow measurements made when they were children, society as a whole suffers.

Mounting Pressure During Childhood

More troubling is the mounting pressure on parents and children to begin this trail of achievement in preschool, depriving children of freedom and play in the name of academic rigor and triggering skyrocketing rates of adolescent anxiety, depression, and suicide. Karlgaard writes:

Excessively promoting the primacy of early measurable achievement—grades, test scores, glamour job, money, celebrity—conceals a dark flipside: If we or our kids don’t knock our SATs out of the park, gain admittance to a top-ten university, reinvent an industry, or land our first job at a cool company that’s changing the world, we’ve somehow failed and are destined to be also-rans for the rest of our lives.

Karlgaard explains that this “societal madness for early achievement” can be damaging to many children and young people. They may appear successful on the outside, but on the inside, many are hurting. He writes:

Early bloomers are in the headlines, but are they succeeding as much as the media lead us to believe? In fact, many early bloomers are suffering terribly. The pressure to achieve early success led to three student suicides in the 2014–15 school year at Gunn High School, a public school in Palo Alto, California, three miles from the elite Stanford University campus. All were good students striving for early achievement. By March in the same school year, forty-two Gunn students had been hospitalized or treated for suicidal thoughts.

Fortunately, Late Bloomers offers a dose of sanity for those of us who question the increasingly standardized, test-driven schooling model that can fuel a toxic early achievement culture, while also encouraging all of us that it’s never too late to pursue a passion, build a business, or change the world.

Late Bloomers

A late bloomer himself, Karlgaard had a hunch that there was great value in peaking later in life. His book is an extensively researched work that blends the latest findings in neuroscience and psychology with profiles of inspiring late bloomers to show that the push toward early achievement and career success may be unnecessary at best and harmful at worst.

While research shows that individuals on average have rapid brain functioning and memory skills in their 20s, it’s in their 30s and 40s that strong executive functioning skills, empathy, and level-headedness kick in, and wisdom really emerges after 50. These more mature qualities can be critical in helping late bloomers to launch new, successful endeavors and enterprises.

A primary characteristic of late bloomers is curiosity which, Karlgaard argues, is abundant in young children and is steadily eroded through what he calls “America’s early-blooming conveyor belt.” Late bloomers seem to hold on to their curiosity despite societal efforts to weaken it. They are seekers and explorers who aren’t afraid to experiment.

Quitting Your Way to Success

They also aren’t afraid to quit. Late bloomers tend to reject the myth that “winners never quit and quitters never win,” recognizing the opportunity lost when we spend our time in a job or activity that isn’t serving us well and that may distract us from pursuing our true talents. Karlgaard explains the importance of quitting to success:

As part of our obsession with early achievement, we’ve turned quitting into a pejorative, an insult that cuts straight to our sense of self-worth. And that’s not just unfair, it’s destructive. In a drive to suppress individuality and reinforce cultural norms, society has turned one of the most effective tools for self-discovery into a proverbial four-letter word.

Ultimately, Karlgaard’s Late Bloomers book is a refreshing reminder that it’s okay to slow down and move through life at our own pace, following our own pathway. Don’t let the societal conveyor belt of preschool-to-college-to-career achievement drown out your talents or derail your potential. Know that it’s never too late to begin or to peak, and that there is often great value that comes with time. Karlgaard concludes:

If we’re not forced to conform to standard timetables for success, we can—and will—bloom on our own schedules. And we can do it with a deeper sense of mission and a greater feeling of contentment.

This is sage advice, both for us to take and to give to our children.

Editor, Newsroom Labs, HuffPost

Being a late bloomer can be immensely exasperating. It’s frustrating to see your peers flourish and thrive while you struggle to find your footing.

However, finding your calling late in life has its upsides. No one wants to be the person who peaked too early, either professionally or personally. Pushing yourself 24/7 can lead to early burnout. And, often, it’s the people who take the time to experiment and know themselves deeply who set themselves up for sustained success. Just look at Julia Child, Toni Morrison, Morgan Freeman – the list of actors, writers and artists who found success late in life goes on and on.

Here are five reasons to be glad you’re a late bloomer.

1. You understand that life is a marathon, not a sprint.

It was true for Aesop and it’s still true today: Slow and steady wins the race.

Just look at Helen Mirren. Mirren began acting at the age of 18 with the National Youth Theatre in London, but she didn’t find mainstream success until her mid-forties with her breakout role in Prime Suspect. Since then, she’s nabbed four Oscar nominations and one win for The Queen.

“There are the privileged few who just seem to waft through life without having to ever meet any adversity or difficulty, which is really annoying,” Mirren told Gloucestershire Live. “The rest of us, we have to struggle and fight. We get knocked back and we have to come forward again.”

2. You fully appreciate your achievements once you’ve earned them.

Reed Birney, of House of Cards fame, won a Tony Award this year for his performance in ‘The Humans.’ In his acceptance speech, Birney acknowledged the years of hard work and disappointment he put in before his incredible big breaks.

“The last thing I want to say is I’ve been an actor for almost 42 years,” Birney told the audience. “35 of them were pretty bad. and that’s a lot of them, and I just couldn’t get anything going. So the last eight have been great.”

Unlike the people who find success early on in life, Birney understands exactly how long it’s taken to reach each new milestone. His road to success was littered with detours, but those can be the most valuable, instructive periods of the journey.

3. You know there’s no shame in failure.

In the moments when everything seems lost, late bloomers truly thrive.

In her mid-twenties, J.K. Rowling was a single mother struggling to support her daughter and get her work published. Rowling said she received “loads” of rejections before Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone was published. But by 34, Rowling was a literary sensation.

“Some failure in life is inevitable,” Rowling said in her 2008 Harvard Commencement Address. “It is impossible to live without failing at something, unless you live so cautiously that you might as well not have lived at all—in which case, you fail by default.”

It’s not the failures that define you – it’s the moments you got back up and tried again.

4. You don’t torture yourself with an unrealistic timeline.

Julia Child is one of the world’s most renowned chefs and television personalities. But did you know that Child didn’t start cooking until her late 30s? She didn’t publish Mastering the Art of French Cooking until her late 40s and didn’t become a cooking sensation until her 50s. Her late blooming success means that Child reminds us again and again that success doesn’t come overnight, and that you don’t need to have it all figured out right now.

Like Julia, you don’t bother setting expectations on an arbitrary timeline. You’ll reach life’s milestones on your own time, and you won’t agonize over how long it takes you. In doing so, you’ll avoid rushing headlong into jobs and relationships that don’t feel right, just because the timing aligns with your schedule. You also won’t close yourself off to opportunities that come late in life, when most people stop expanding their horizons.

5. You don’t settle until you’ve found your true passion.

Morgan Freeman worked in the U.S. Air Force before his illustrious acting career.

“I had this very clear epiphany,” Freeman told AARP Magazine. “You are not in love with this; you are in love with the idea of this.”

Even after Freeman began acting full time, it took years to break into movies. He didn’t become a true movie star until the age of 50, after his Oscar-nominated turn in Street Smart. Two years later, Freeman won a Golden Globe and earned a second Oscar nomination for Driving Miss Daisy.

Follow Freeman’s lead: don’t rest until you’ve found your calling. You know that a job or relationship shouldn’t just be a means of passing time; you should love every second of it.

In the company of these greats, anyone should feel proud to be a late bloomer.

Many people started 2018 worried about their achievement levels in life but the last two weeks have offered an opportunity to understand why some people are late achievers in life.

A late blooming adult is a person who does not discover his/her talents and abilities until later than normally expected. In certain cases, it happens well into retirement.

There are several examples and even worse case scenarios that make your case a rather simple one.

There are also several examples of famous achievers who were rejected or written off earlier in life as failures.

And for those who think they have been buffeted by the devil, the revelation is that there is something in you worth fighting for, which is why the devil is fighting you. He sees your huge potential, the glory in you, which is his target.

Some people have mistaken the devil to be just a wicked destroyer. He is more than that – smart enough to know your weaknesses; smart enough to know that if he gets to control your mind, he has got you tied; smart enough to keep you as far from God as possible. He is also a good organizer, which is why he is able control legions of demons. A legion, as used during the time of Jesus, was a Roman Legion which could be anywhere between 3,000 and 6,000 troops.

No matter how far back behind in life you are or how low you feel, you still have the ability to succeed.

The following are advantages of late bloomers in life. If you are a late bloomer:

You don’t judge people based on their appearance. You know what it’s like to be the ugly duckling, the less attractive friend, the one no one really paid much attention to. Because of that you’re less likely to judge people on what they look like because you know too well the experience of having an outside appearance that doesn’t quite match how seriously awesome you are inside.

You’ve stayed down to earth and genuine. You’ve spent so much of your life trying to get where you want to be and now that you’re finally coming into your own you never forget how you started or where you came from.

You never stop working hard for what you want. Late bloomers sometimes have the feeling that even after they’ve “made it” – whatever that means to them – that there’s the chance the rug could be pulled out from under them again. After they reach their goals, they create new goals to focus on because they never want to stop actively working on their progress.

You know you’ll never take anything for granted. There’s always an element of gratitude late bloomers feel towards the life they’ve created for themselves. They know how much longer it took them to get where they are, either because of past choices or circumstance, and they refuse to ever forget their journey.

You understand great things take time and because of that you’ve developed a great amount of patience for dealing with the lows of life. If something doesn’t happen the way you thought it would or you don’t get the results you’re after, you don’t get mad right away.

You know your mistakes and how to rise past them. You’re all too well aware of the things you did in the past that stunted your growth to some degree. Whatever it is, you know your faults, and by now how to recognize them. It’s just a matter of overcoming those flaws and past mistakes to continue to get you where you want to be.

There’s an extra degree of kindness within you. You understand just how mean other people can be and you vow to never treat someone the way you’ve been treated in the past.

When you finally get on the same level as your peers, you have more appreciation for reaching that milestone. Some things in life people just expect to get and experience because, for whatever reason, life has just been easier for them. But for you – you’ve been waiting your whole life to get the same thing someone else achieved years before. And when you finally get there you truly appreciate the moment.

Conclusion: Leverage what you have, the experience that made you who you are. The late bloomers remind us never to give up. Know your dream and chase it.

How to succeed in life as a late bloomer

Better Late Than Never

Is there a set age you should expect success to happen in life? There are those people who live a “normal” life where everything happens by a development basis as you go through stages of childhood and then gradually get into adulthood. Then you have others who are what’s known as “late bloomers.” These are the people who may be late to the game yet catch up with peers sometime in the future. Grasping at concepts and understanding things later than up who end up more successful than your peers.

As Oprah Winfrey says, “Everyone has a supreme destiny.” Late bloomers are those who find their supreme destiny on their own schedule, in their own way.

There are many reasons for why some people take longer to bloom than others. For some it may be that you haven’t had the opportunity to shine, or you just weren’t ready. Not an overnight success, late bloomers fulfill your potential later in life than you expect. Your skills and talent isn’t visible for others to see, yet you know somehow that you are not a failure even though you may feel that way.

“Not all those who wander are lost.” – J.R.R. Tolkien

If you are a Late Bloomer, what have you done to move your career forward and how successful are you as to what you expected? Many late bloomers have become successful leaders surpassing those who were not late bloomers they knew. A late bloomer is someone who achieves your potential in some part of your life later than your peers.

Getting Pushed Around by Life Forces

Novelist Robert Louis Stephenson once said that “To be what we are, and to become what we are capable of becoming…” Essentially pushing your boundaries from where you are to where you really want to go is a lot of work especially for late bloomers.

Most people don’t think of late bloomers. As long as it is not you, you don’t think or realize this. Yet there are many people who are late bloomers who are actually very successful leaders of companies. Could you be one?

“It is never too late to be what you might have been.” – George Eliot

Growing up in a time when everyone around you who are your age learned faster than you did, you wonder when is it your turn. You realize then that you are a late bloomer. It took you longer than others to think of what you really wanted to do. Your passion turned toward leadership because you didn’t like being bossed around by others. Earning a bachelor’s in psychology with a minor in leadership, you decided to put the two together. Learning more and more about behavior of the people around you, you then decided to complete an MBA in business leadership. Eventually earning a spot at the top of the ivory tower, you lead different from others before you.

There are those who were shy or introverted or slower than others in learning, yet you catch up at some point. Many of people became very successful were late bloomers. Find success later in life is a trait that is not uncommon among entrepreneurs. Some of the most iconic people in history have been late bloomers.

Everyone starts somewhere.

“Nobody can go back and start a new beginning, but anyone can start now and make a new ending.” – Maria Robinson

Working for years in your chosen profession before finding the recognition of who you really are takes many by surprise. “Everyone starts somewhere. No matter how small or insignificant your role feels at the time, just know that it counts on your way to the top.” -Anna Wintour

You never know what opportunities it might open up for you. Late bloomers learn resilience. Meeting new people can be awkward. When you finally get on the same level as your peers you have more appreciation for reaching that milestone.

Think different: If you think differently, then definitely you are a late bloomer. You do not follow the crowd. You take your own time to understand things

When You’re Ready

“Late-blooming success can be complicated. As people age, they are more likely to judge their accomplishments on their own terms; however, late bloomers often use the benefits of broader acknowledgment and publicity to help them meet their personal and professional goals.” ― J.M. Orend

Every day is an opportunity to learn something new. Everything happens for a reason. Don’t force something to be when it’s not ready to be. If you have the will and work hard for it, it will happen when the time is right. Many strong executives were late bloomers. You never stop working hard for what you want.

Rather than feel defeated by their early failures late bloomers learn invaluable lessons about business. Seeing setbacks, you are persistent in handling situations different from before or from how you’ve seen other people work it. You are determined to risk what you have to succeed in a task you feel you need to try to be good at.

Coming from Nowhere with No Connections

“I’m a late bloomer. It’s taken me a long time to find my voice, and I think all the records I’ve made over the years, I was finding my voice, and that’s part of the process.” -Jenny Lewis

Always believe in yourself, no matter how much the odds are stacked against you. When you really want something, don’t take no for an answer. You create the life you want once you feel comfortable with yourself. The confidence and courage you have allows you the opportunity to find what you are really looking for.

Let your mindset be your guide. Don’t lose sight of where you wanted to go. Sometimes you never know that you may go beyond your own expectation.

“Just remember, you can do anything you set your mind to, but it takes action, perseverance and facing your fears.”

How to succeed in life as a late bloomer

It’s the start of winter. The mornings are chillier, and it takes longer to get out of bed and get going for the day. But here in the subtropics winter is not as cold as it could be. I’m a ‘true’ Queenslander – I don’t like the cold weather.

On my morning walks, I’ve been taking photos of any flowers I can find. It’s more of a challenge this time of year, but there is still color around if you look.

Frangipani is one of my favourites and the trees at this time of year are usually bare sticks.

But there is one tree on my walk that has a single flower. A late bloomer. Tenaciously hanging on in the colder weather. Out of season. That single flower reminded me of… well me. I’m definitely a late bloomer when it come to this writing gig. (And I’m probably one of the oldest on the photo team at my church – most of the others are in their twenties. Precocious talent that I could only dream about at that age.)

Success Later in Life….

Of course, there are many people in the world who have had success later in life and maybe as a result, it’s appreciated more. A quick search on the internet reveals that: –

Harland Sanders started Kentucky Fried Chicken at 62

Grandma Moses had her first big break painting at age 78

Dame Judy Dench became famous at age 60

Morgan Freeman had his breakout year at 52

Laura Ingalls Wilder published her first book at 65.

Ray Kroc was 59 when he brought the fast-food company from the McDonald brothers in 1961, then built it to what it is today. *

(*some online reports vary slightly in age – but nonetheless – they all found success later in life)

So, I feel I’m in good company. It’s never too late to start on a new project. To chase a new dream or work on an old one.

Another thing…

When I looked at my photos later, I noticed that although initially I thought the flower was on its own – there were actually a couple of other flowers buds alongside as if they were waiting permission for their turn to bloom.

How to succeed in life as a late bloomer

I got so many ‘take-aways’ – that even though you feel like you are the ‘only one’ starting out at this late stage there are those who will be alongside for support. And that no matter how late in life you are going after new dreams – there will always be others on the sidelines watching what you do. Waiting for their chance and maybe for permission to have their day as well. People you can light the path for and help along the way.

So you see, this late blooming flower gave me much to ponder on as I continued my walk and then on into my day.

As a new report says life begins at 60 we look at the late-bloomers who have achieved great I things after reaching their seventh decade.

How to succeed in life as a late bloomer

Dame Judi Dench starred in her first film after turning 60

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If you’re plodding through your 30s, 40s or 50s and feel that life hasn’t really begun, just be patient, young’un.

Sixty is the new launchpad year for “adventure, opportunity and change” according to a fresh report by social scientists.

Studying for a degree, starting a business or flitting off on a long-deserved gap-year (or why not make it a gap-decade!) the report found that today’s sexagenarians have ambitious plans and the confidence of people in their prime.

There have always been high achievers between 60 and 100 who crowned a career with their best-ever work or chose a whole new life and nailed it.

As our life-expectancy improves it is the only way.

Golf, cruising and tending the roses were fine for a five-year retirement but try doing that for 30 years and you’d be better off in the ground.

No, watch your waistline, dodge the medical show-stoppers and we can all be like the late-bloomers here.

How to succeed in life as a late bloomer

Socrates is widely recognised as one of world’s greatest thinkers

LEARNING

More British people are going to college after retirement now that the age limit on student loans to cover tuition fees has been lifted but some folk have more catching up to do than others.

Priscilla Sitienei, a great-great-grandmother and former midwife in Kenya, enrolled in primary school at the age of 90.

Think of the guts it took to walk into that classroom if you are worried about being the oldest student on campus.

Even Socrates, one of history’s greatest know-alls, understood he could still learn and started on music in his 60s.

LOVE

Divorce among the over-60s has risen since 1990 according to the Office for National Statistics while falling among the younger population.

On the bright side, one divorce creates two vacancies and new love is always possible.

At 92, Marjorie Liggins from Sheffield married her 86-year-old dancing partner Norman Camm.

The wedding took just six weeks to plan – at 92 who needs a long engagement?

Even Gloria Steinem, who claimed “a woman without a man is like a fish without a bicycle”, finally got married for the first time at 66.

Bereavement also inspires change.

After his wife died Jim Robertson, of Buchlyvie, Stirlingshire, became at 69 the oldest person so far to have gender-reassignment surgery and lived happily as Gladys Paterson.

How to succeed in life as a late bloomer

Fauja Singh is the world’s oldest marathon runner at the ripe old age of 100

SPORT

Champion runner Fauja Singh, from Ilford, has a British Empire Medal and a telegram from the Queen.

At 100 his marathon time was a little over eight hours so he’s slowed down somewhat since he was 92 when he could do the 26 miles in five hours, 40 minutes.

There are lots of inspiring stories of achievements by older athletes but relating them might only suggest that physical fitness at 70 and beyond is exceptional.

It isn’t. It is normal barring major illnesses – if you work for it.

US military scientists monitored a large research group of soldiers for decades after they left the army as lean young men.

Some had stayed fit at 60, others had lived like slobs.

They put both sorts through an uncompromising boot camp and after a few weeks the slobs were in the same excellent physical condition as their fit counterparts.

How to succeed in life as a late bloomer

Sir Ranulph Fiennes battling frostbite after an adventure in the North Pole

ADVENTURE

A marathon at 71 is good going, a 156-mile run across the Sahara desert?

That’s Sir Ranulph Fiennes for you.

Fiennes is a great inspiration for the senior adventurer because he doesn’t make it look too easy.

Heart surgery, diabetes, frostbite and bereavement, he’s had the lot.

He proves that you can keep achieving even if health and family life don’t give you a smooth ride.

At 72 aviatrix Margaret Ringenberg completed the Round-the-World Air Race.

Yet sometimes adventure comes unsolicited. Jessamine Skuse smelled smoke from her neighbour’s flat in Bristol one evening, forced her way in and dragged him to safety before the fire could take hold.

She was awarded a Royal Humane Society bravery award at the age of 92.

How to succeed in life as a late bloomer

Daniel Defoe didn’t write Robinson Crusoe until he hit 60

WRITING

People who have been at the top of their field sometimes use their later years to write up all their expertise.

Hardinge Giffard, 1st Earl of Halsbury, sat down to pen a 20-volume encyclopaedia of English law when he was 90.

Peter Roget didn’t even start working on his thesaurus until he was 61.

Great work but it is better to live than write and if you must write it is better to write about pirates.

Daniel Defoe wrote Robinson Crusoe, his first novel and perhaps the first-ever modern novel, at 60.

Patrick O’Brian only hit his stride as a writer with his Master And Commander sea stories when he was 65.

Mary Wesley wrote 10 bestsellers including The Camomile Lawn after she was 70.

Writing is one career where it is best to be a late bloomer.

Think of novelists such as Martin Amis who start brilliantly in their early 20s and then embark on a weary, 40-year journey up themselves.

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How to succeed in life as a late bloomer

How to succeed in life as a late bloomer

How to succeed in life as a late bloomer

Dame Judi Dench starred in Bond thriller Skyfall, the most successful British movie in history

THE STAGE

Dame Judi Dench was a very distinguished stage actress but jumped to the parallel universe of the movies only in her 60s, playing to millions instead of thousands in the Bond films.

Comedian Lynn Ruth Miller broke into stand-up at 70, won an Edinburgh Fringe award but lost to a barnstorming dog on Britain’s Got Talent.

Caroline Melliar-Smith, from Cheshire, took up acting after retirement and has landed roles in radio drama and two films including 2011 comedy The Best Little Whorehouse In Rochdale.

She now gives talks to the Women’s Institutes, encouraging others to fulfil their life’s ambitions.

Let’s be clear about something, not everyone can achieve success and fulfillment in life when they want it. The fact of the matter is, this is something that can take many years of work to achieve, and that means people need to be patient and goal-oriented, and you need to have the long-term in mind. Make sure you have a goal or plan for your life and try to make sure you work on this as much as possible.

How to succeed in life as a late bloomerWhy is it OK to be a late bloomer in life

There are so many things you can do these days that are going to help you prepare for future success, and you might have some pretty ambitious goals for the future. However, you need to be aware of the fact that it might take a while to achieve this, and you need to be comfortable with that. In case you have doubts, here are some of the reasons why it’s okay to be a late bloomer in life.

You gain greater experience

One of the biggest benefits of being a late bloomer is the fact that you gain greater experience as a result. You are going to have lived your life, experienced hardships, and have a greater understanding of life as you get older. And this is why being a late bloomer is often such a positive thing, so you should understand that this is something that will benefit you greatly moving forward.

You may appreciate what you have more

There are a lot of things that you need to consider when it comes to improving your life, and another excellent thing about being a late bloomer is that it can often cause you to appreciate what you have more. The harder you have to work for something, and the longer you have to wait, the more you appreciate what you have. This also often means you work harder to keep what you have as well.

How to succeed in life as a late bloomerWhy is it OK to be a late bloomer in life

You have a different perspective on life

One of the key aspects of being a late bloomer in life is the fact that it can give you a new and different perspective. There are a lot of things that you need to think about, and when it comes to improving your life, you need to make sure you keep this in mind. As a late bloomer, you have already gotten a lot of life experience under your belt, and this can cause you to have a different perspective on things. So, make sure you do as much as possible to get this right and keep things in perspective.

You’re in good company

If you are a late bloomer, then you’re in good company as there are a lot of famous people who were late bloomers in life, and didn’t come to prominence until they were older. Van Gogh didn’t start painting until his late-20s, Roget didn’t invent his thesaurus until he was in his 70s, and Morgan Freeman didn’t break until Hollywood until he was in his 40s.

How to succeed in life as a late bloomerWhy is it OK to be a late bloomer in life

Don’t get caught up with what everyone else is doing, or with the milestones that society has set for you. Follow your own path, and be happy with who you are; when you eventually come into your own, you are going to be more well-rounded and fulfilled as a result. So, you need to understand that it is okay to be a late bloomer in life, no matter what people might tell you.

I am reading an advance copy of a new book coming out soon called Late Bloomers: The Power of Patience in a World Obsessed with Early Achievement. The book is by Rich Karlgaard, who is the publisher of Forbes, and is the story of how people who come late to the game often do better:

We live in a society where kids and parents are obsessed with early achievement, from getting perfect scores on SATs to getting into Ivy League colleges to landing an amazing job at Google or Facebook – or even better, creating a startup with the potential to be the next Google or Facebook or Uber. We see software coders becoming millionaires or billionaires before age 30 and feel we are failing if we are not one of them.

Late bloomers, on the other hand, are undervalued – in popular culture, by educators and employers, and even unwittingly by parents. Yet the fact is a lot of us – most of us – do not explode out of the gates in life. We have to find our way. We have to discover our passions, and talents and gifts. That was true for author Rich Karlgaard, who had a mediocre academic career at Stanford (which he got into by a fluke), and after graduating, worked as a dishwasher and night watchman before finally finding the inner motivation and drive that ultimately led him to start up a high-tech magazine in Silicon Valley, and eventually to become the publisher of Forbes magazine.

There is a scientific explanation for why so many of us bloom later in life. The executive function of our brains doesn’t mature until age 25 – and later for some. In fact our brain’s capabilities peak at different ages. We actually enjoy multiple periods of blooming in our lives.

Based on several years of research, personal experience, and interviews with neuroscientists and psychologists, and countless people at different stages of their careers, Late Bloomers reveals how and when we achieve our full potential – and why today’s focus on early success is so misguided, and even harmful.

Life is hard when everyone is measuring themselves and others on some arbitrary time period we have to succeed, whatever that means. Life is longer than age 25 or 30 and our talents ebb and flow throughout life.

One of the chapters I found interesting in the book is about how late bloomers often quit things. Quitting often leads one to find their true passion rather than hanging onto a goal just because they think they should. Everyone is burned out these days by 25 or 30; maybe the advice in this book can help to see that success can come at any age.

Minggu, 23 Agustus 2015

Late Bloomers, are you a late bloomer? Not all of us are able to succeed earlry in life. Some people need time to gather experience and make sense of the world around them. However, late bloomers can become the driving forces of the world simply because they have taken time to gather ideas, information, and knowledge bedore coming up with some incredible solutions to the world’s problems.

Many of the world’s most famous late bloomers were not good students. Other spent many years in a dead-end career, or not even knowing what career they were meant for. Still others were socially awkward and found it hard to make friends and talk to people.

History is filled with people who didn’t succeed at first, or who failed several times before they went on to accomplish much. Here are just a few of those stories.

Muhammed Ali
Probably the world’s best and famous boxer of all time graduated 376th out of 391 students in his high school. With the world championships under his belt, no other boxer on in history comes close to his success.

Winston Chruchill
Regularly puished by his teachers for his poor work in school and lack of effort, Churchill went on to become the prime minister of the United Kingdom twice, and led Britain through World War II. He is still considered one of the greatest leaders of all time.

Albert Einstein
Regarded as the most important scientist of the 20th century, Einstein was not always a good student. A childhood speech problem caused many of his teachers to regard him as ‘slow’.Now, his name is synonymous with the word ‘genius’.

So don’t worry if you think you are not as successful as other people your age. Just like these famour late bloomers, you might just have more to give than you know, and don’t forget do your best everytime ,Thanks for visiting.

How to succeed in life as a late bloomer

How to succeed in life as a late bloomer

Senior reporter, law & politics, DC.

There’s a simple formula for achieving long-term success. First, dash your dreams. Next, resume the slog. Try again. Finally, breathe and smile.

That may sound disappointing—who wouldn’t want to experience only victories? But loss is the salt that flavors our tears and positions us for the big wins.

That is the claim that Charles Duhigg makes in his New York Times Magazine story, “America’s Professional Elite: Wealthy, Successful, and Miserable,” and he’s got a point. If success is defined as leading a meaningful life with satisfying work and a sense of accomplishment, then struggling and overcoming obstacles is a sound way to build up the strength to persist, despite difficulties, and appreciate what you have.

The theory here is that getting pushed around by life forces you to deal, basically. Seeming “also-rans,” Duhigg argues, who aren’t stars in youth and who don’t land the plum jobs early on, have to cast about for direction and meaning. When they find their way, they’ve already trained in the mental habits of managing difficulty and reframing expectations.

The early achievers, by contrast, find later in life that not everything can go right. They take this hard because they have little practice managing struggle.

Duhigg’s contention is premised in part on his own experience. When he graduated from Harvard Business School (HBS), he was rejected from prestigious jobs and ended up in journalism. Circumstances pushed him to look beyond his original goals. He endured disappointment and went on to write about it in an esteemed publication, stating:

Some of my classmates thought I was making a huge mistake by ignoring all the doors HBS had opened for me in high finance and Silicon Valley. What they didn’t know was that those doors, in fact, had stayed shut—and that as a result, I was saved from the temptation of easy riches. I’ve been thankful ever since, grateful that my bad luck made it easier to choose a profession that I’ve loved.

Others like Duhigg at school, who were also “forced to scramble for work” and grapple with setbacks after graduation, wound up “richer, more powerful and more content than everyone else,” he writes.

Prize-winning failure

If you’re a little suspicious of this argument, fair enough. Duhigg is a Pulitzer Prize-winning writer at this point. Even in his supposedly failed youth, he was doing alright. By most measures, attending an Ivy League graduate school is quite an achievement, after all.

So maybe Duhigg’s idea of success is too strict? Or perhaps he’s just one of those “good-enough life advocates” that Edith Zimmerman calls out in a recent article for The Cut: an over-achiever who humbly claims to be making do and doing okay, all while actually striving and making it big. Zimmerman contends that the internet is overrun with thoughtful essays on the benefits of resignation and the pleasures of the so-so life, all written by people who are actually fantastically successful and are burning with ambition.

However, success is relative. In the world of HBS graduates, Duhigg was a dud, apparently. The fact that he now sees the fortune in what once seemed like bad luck does prove his point—failures that don’t embitter us can teach us to savor success.

Slow learner

More good news: You don’t need to go out of your way to struggle and stumble, because it will happen naturally to most of us. And many a great has failed before they bloomed.

Novelist Thomas Pynchon published a book called Slow Learner in 1984. It’s a confession about his evolution as a writer, followed by five early stories written before the publication of his acclaimed 1963 novel, V. These examples prove that one need not be spectacular from the start to become a star. Pynchon writes:

You may already know what a blow to the ego it is to have to read anything you wrote 20 years ago, even canceled checks. My first reaction, rereading these stories, was oh my God, accompanied by physical symptoms we shouldn’t dwell uponIt is only fair to warn even the most kindly disposed of readers that there are some mighty tiresome passages here, juvenile and delinquent too. At the same time, my best hope is that pretentious, goofy, and ill-considered as they get now and then, these stories will still be of use with all their flaws intact.

Pynchon then details the many problems with each of his short works, painstakingly. He criticizes his use of language, ideas, references, and his process. Basically, he points out what a bomb each tale is and why he feels terrible reading it again. It’s refreshing evidence that slow and steady can win the race—you just have to keep trying.

Resilience is the recipe

Late bloomers learn resilience. Early disappointments force concessions, as Duhigg notes, and they reshape expectations. It is no doubt sad that the best way to gain strength is by falling and continually bouncing back, practicing, working around obstacles. But this flexibility is critical to long-term success.

“Resilience is a personal act of defiance,’” writes author Jesse Sostrin, who heads the executive leadership coaching program at the audit firm PwC. It “affects everything,” he argues, including problem-solving skills, physical, mental, and emotional well-being, and innovation. “Resilience is like a super-competency, influencing many other related skills and abilities that you need to deploy in order to work, manage, and lead well.”

Emotional elasticity is a learned skill, says psychologist Anna Rowley, who counsels executives at corporations like Microsoft on cultivating existential “mastery.” In her view, flexibility provides a personal foundation of strength and sense of safety in a chaotic world. The only way to get this quality is to fail and try again. Rowley argues that “happiness” is a distraction and that in fact, the best way to ensure that you feel satisfied with life is by being a person who is good at managing disappointments and setbacks.

Famously late

Great late bloomers abound. The painter Anna Mary Robertson Moses, or Grandma Moses, took up a brush at age 75 and became a renowned artist before she died at 101. Harlan David Sanders, the colonel of Kentucky Fried Chicken fame, started his company at age 65. The writer Harry Bernstein published his first short story at 24 and his debut novel when he was 90. Julia Child didn’t learn to cook until she was 40, yet she managed to dominate the culinary world. Alibaba founder Jack Ma was a bad student as a child, was famously rejected from Harvard University ten times, could not for the life of him land a job, and then went on to become a business titan. All of them took a winding path. None could have anticipated their success, arriving at their calling by trial and error.

Looking back, it’s clear that the late bloomers always had what it took—they just took their time.

We tell our life stories retrospectively, which means that what happens next will inform what you think of the present. Whatever is going on can’t be understood from where you stand. Those fortunate enough to stumble while they’re young often grasp that early, and thus have a better chance of writing satisfying subsequent chapters.

How to succeed in life as a late bloomer

I’ve always known I wanted to be a novelist, and when I graduated, full of hubris and ambition, from college, I figured it was time to get moving. I wrote three novels over the next few years, each one more complicated and convoluted than the last. It perhaps should have been a red flag that my then-literary agent and I spent more time talking about who would star in the movie adaptation than we did about the book itself, but I was 22! What did I care? I was going to be an overnight success.

I was not an overnight success.

All three books were rejected. When I say they were rejected, I mean that my literary agents (I had two during this period) sent copies of my books to scores of editors, and every single one said no, over and over. This process lasted approximately four years. Four years is the time it takes to go all the way through high school! Some editors read all three books, rejecting me three times in a row. When I remember this period in my life, I picture those Whac-A-Mole games at carnivals, where a little furry badger pops up out of the board and you swing an oversize hammer at its head, and then it pops up out of a new hole and you whack it again, and again, and again. Every single hammer connected with my little badger head.

I kept popping back up, though. I was bruised and disappointed, but not defeated. What did those editors know? I was confident that I was a hard worker and a good writer, and that I had things to say. I set a deadline for myself—as long as I published a book by the time I was 25, I would be happy. When that didn’t happen, I made it that I just had to sell the book by 25. Then I was 25 and book-deal-less, and nothing bad happened to me. No pianos fell on my head, no witchy old ladies cursed me, I didn’t suddenly die in my sleep. Most important, nothing happened to my drive to write—there was no age limit on my imagination or creativity. This was a revelation.

The actress Susan Lucci became my guiding light. Lucci played Erica Kane on the soap opera All My Children for more than 40 years. I loved Erica Kane, the most powerful woman in all of Pine Valley, and so did the Daytime Emmy voters. For nearly two decades, Susan Lucci was nominated for best actress—but year after year, she lost. Susan Lucci lost that title 18 times before finally winning in 1999. When she finally won, the entire crowd stood and clapped for several minutes. I wanted to be the Susan Lucci of novelists, so dogged in my pursuit of my goal that by the time I got there, everyone would be on their feet and clapping for me. Not necessarily because they loved my book (which would have been wonderful, of course), but because they knew how long I’d been trying and failing, how dedicated I was, how much I wanted it. Because they felt I’d earned it.

Now, of course there is something completely ludicrous about that idea—no one deserves a book deal or a Daytime Emmy; those kinds of things are based not on merit or character but on some equation of popularity and perceived earning potential. But there is something to be said for the long haul. For working your ass off, putting in the hours and the months and the years, for giving something every last ounce of yourself. Because that is how you come to understand why you haven’t been successful so far, and how you learn what you need to know to get there. And this kind of hard-earned success feels bigger than the overnight kind. If Susan Lucci had won the first Emmy she was nominated for, I’m sure it wouldn’t have meant as much to her, and she wouldn’t have gotten that standing O. And if I had sold a book back when I was 22, I would have taken it for granted—back then I thought that I “deserved” success just because I wanted it. I thought that the writing life was going to be easy, like living inside a bouncy castle, with no sharp edges anywhere.

By the time I finally sold my first novel at the ripe old age of 30, five years after my initial deadline, I’d done a lot more living—I’d gone to graduate school to study writing more earnestly, moved in with my boyfriend, married my boyfriend, had a bunch of jobs, made new friends, moved out of New York and then back—and when it happened, it made sense. When I got the call that the book had sold, I felt a tidal wave of joy, gratitude, and relief. I cried for days, more happy tears than I thought were possible. Because I didn’t just feel “lucky”—though of course luck was involved. I felt proud of myself, because I knew everything that had gone into making this moment happen.

When my first book was sold, even though it had taken me years of work and rejection to get there, people acted like I had come out of nowhere, like an “overnight success.” But look closer at any “overnight success” and you’ll invariably find years of hard work. I recently watched Part of Me, the Katy Perry documentary, and was struck by how long it took for her to get to the moment when “I Kissed a Girl” became a hit—there were years of getting rejected by labels, getting dropped from labels, being told over and over that she would never make it, that no one wanted to hear the kind of music she made. Yeah, she was 24 when her first single hit, which is not “late” by anyone’s calendar, but she’d been recording music since she was 17. Or look at Leonard Cohen—he didn’t release his first album until the age of 32. Julia Child didn’t get her famous television show until she was 51. Wallace Stevens didn’t publish any poems until he was 38. A.C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada founded the Hare Krishna movement when he was 70. Most of us will not be child stars or wunderkinds. Some of us will take a very long time to be successful at what we want to do, or to even know what we want to do. There is time for all of us to figure out what it is we want to do—and to change our minds over and over again, if necessary. No one is timing you.

There’s a saying that I like, which has been attributed to both the Roman philosopher Seneca AND Oprah: “Luck is what happens when preparation meets opportunity.” Yeah, it’s cheesy, but it also happens to be true. So much of what goes on in your life is beyond your control. All you can do is work as hard as possible to get ready for those moments that might change everything. I don’t believe in God, but I do believe in myself, and in karma, and in having patience, and in working my ass off. Being human is a complicated business, and when one issue in life (WHEN WILL I PUBLISH A NOVEL. ) is resolved, others spring forward to take its place. It’s important to pause long enough to feel truly grateful for whatever goodness has occurred—and then, yup, get back to work. ♦

Success comes in many shapes and forms, and often at the most unexpected of times.

No one knows that better than these “late bloomers.”

Let’s take a look at their stories, and how they found success later in life.

7 Famous Late Bloomers

Let these people inspire you as you continue on your journey, learning from every step.

If you need further guidance, consider enrolling at a program like USC EMHA.

1. Stan Lee

Beloved creator of the Marvel universe, Stan Lee is a treasured author by many.

His works include the X-Men, Black Panther, and countless other characters that have become a cornerstone of American culture. Few know, though, that Stan Lee published his first comic, The Fantastic Four, at the age of 39!

Still, Stan Lee’s memory and legacy live on in the pages, screens, and hands of children and adults all across the world.

2. Julia Child

You’d think Julia Child had been a chef all her life, no?

Actually, she was a copywriter in New York City before joining the Office of Strategic Services during World War II. Aside from a shark repellent recipe she crafted, Julia Child had not much experience or interest in cooking until she met her husband and moved to Paris.

It wasn’t until the age of 50 that Julia Child published her first cookbook. From there, her success catapulted onto television screens all across America as one of the original celebrity chefs.

3. Charles Darwin

Founding father on the theory of evolution Charles Darwin is a household name in America — and that’s pretty rare for a scientist.

Many scientists go years before publishing their research, but not many nearly at Charles Darwin’s age. On the Origin of the Species was published in 1859, when Darwin was 50 years old.

4. Samuel L. Jackson

Though Samuel L. Jackson has seen much success in the past two decades as a Hollywood actor, he wasn’t always a staple of our cinema screens.

Many would say Samuel L. Jackson’s breakout role was in Spike Lee’s film, Jungle Fever, released in 1991. Jackson was 43 years old at the time of release.

5. Vera Wang

A respected name in the fashion industry across the world, Vera Wang has created quite the legacy.

As is the theme here, this happened much later in her life — at the age of 40.

Vera Wang studied art history in college and had aspirations of being a professional figure skater. She was even featured in the 1968 edition of Sport’s Illustrated before retiring from her skating career.

Forbes included her as one of America’s Richest Self-Made Women in 2018.

6. Momofuku Ando

Here’s a name you may have never heard, but now you won’t forget.

Momofuku Ando, at the age of 49, created what is beloved by many young adults across the nation. His legacy has been enjoyed abundantly by countless since it was first produced in 1958.

Momofuku Ando is the godfather of … instant ramen noodles.

7. Harland Sanders

Known to many as “The Colonel,” Harland Sanders is the founding father of KFC.

The Colonel Sanders mugshot has graced the front of every KFC meal since 1952 when Harland Sanders franchised the business. He did this at the age of 62.

Make Your Own Kind of Music

There’s no mathematical formula to success, but you can achieve it through persistence and willingness.

Whether it takes you until tomorrow to find it or you’re tumbling along like one of these late bloomers, learn to enjoy the present as it is. Your journey will take you the rest of the way.

For some inspiration, check out the how-to section on our site.

Inside: You haven’t missed the boat. If you’re one of the many late bloomers, it’s not too late. You can reinvent yourself and build a life you love. This post contains referral links. This a guest post by Emma Scheib of Simple Slow Lovely.

I have always been a late bloomer. Not in the physical sense, but in almost every other facet of life. I didn’t start university until I was 23, and I didn’t start my love affair with running until I was 25. I’ve spent my thirties raising small children, and at 40, I’ve only just figured out what I want to do career-wise

I have always felt ‘late to the party’ and somewhat underdressed. As if I didn’t get the memo about the things you ought to do for a good life. I’ve fumbled down my own path, often tripping and falling and then blaming myself for not having followed the status quo.

Many of my peers have been working in their chosen industry for well over a decade. They have a semblance of ‘sorted’ to this area of their life.

And yet here I am, drip-feeding a sizable student loan, working part-time at a real estate office (after ditching my dream job to slow down), and wondering if I need to retrain in some area.

How to succeed in life as a late bloomer

There’s hope for us late bloomers

I was pleasantly surprised to discover a new book. Late Bloomers: The Power of Patience in a World Obsessed with Early Achievement, by Rich Karlgaard (publisher of Forbes). He argues that while late bloomers have been chronically undervalued by society, we may actually be better off.

When we ‘find our way’ in our forties and even later in life, we are often better equipped for the new season, having more years of wisdom, compassion, resilience, and insight under our belt. Kalgaard proposes – that we “consider a kinder clock for human development”.

I sometimes question my bumbling path, and my choice to quit my dream job. I don’t regret the choice per se, but I often wonder, how exactly did I get here? Forty and reinventing my life, again.

How to succeed in life as a late bloomer

It’s never too late

That’s when I turn to other late-bloomers for inspiration and advice. Late bloomers are often women who have taken a break from work to raise children, only to find the career they left wasn’t one they wanted to return to.

My husband’s Aunty is a wonderful example of this. She trained in her twenties as a nurse and worked until she had her first child. Another 3 children later, and a husband who worked 80 hour weeks as a surgeon meant returning to nursing was too difficult.

But now, in her fifties, in an empty nest, she is retraining as an interior designer. She has decided to start fresh, work from the bottom up, and fuel her creativity through this new career.

And there’s no shortage of other inspiring examples. Steve Jobs was a college school drop out, and Julia Child didn’t publish her first cookbook until age 49. And one of my personal favourites, Kathryn Joosten. Joosten became famous in her 60s for her role in West Wing, after beginning her acting career at 53.

In case you didn’t get the message … It’s never too late.

What I want to know, and teach my two daughters, is that you don’t have to bloom when everyone else does. Additionally, just like our favourite rose bush, we get to bloom over and over again. You are not limited to blooming in one season of your life.

IMAGINE BEING PART OF A PRIVATE COMMUNITY TO TALK ABOUT THE THINGS THAT TRULY MATTER TO YOU

The Brave + Beautiful Membership Community is a place for brave and weary, growth-minded women to come aside and rest awhile, be nourished and strengthened, mind, body, and soul, so that you are able to show up fully to life and continue your journey to freedom.

Seasonal blooming

What if we embraced the idea that we could bloom later in life, in a time of our choosing. And that we could enjoy several ‘blooms’ across our lifespan.

Who’s to say we won’t become a chef in our forties or a children’s author in our fifties?

As someone who believes our lives are made up of seasons, this idea makes sense to me. Seasonal living allows us to give ourselves swaths of grace and the ability to reinvent ourselves when we ‘grow out’ of a current job or hobby.

In high school, I flunked every exam except English (and only just passed that one!). Living in a volatile home environment made education difficult to focus on. It wasn’t the right season for me to be learning and growing in this way.

I’m thankful that I gave learning a second chance in my twenties. And I’m convinced that part of my academic success in my late twenties was because it was the right season. If I had gone, fresh out of high school I doubt I would have had the same results.

When I left my full time ‘dream job’ two years ago it was so that I could be more present in the season of raising children. I’ll be in this season for at least another decade, and the way this season looks will change as my daughters grow.

And allowing myself to enter this season meant uncovering a flower that may not have bloomed otherwise. I am reinventing myself as a writer and a slow-coach and I’m grateful for the opportunity to do this work.

How to succeed in life as a late bloomer

REFRAMING to see the opportunity that awaits us

One of my favourite question to ask is ‘what if?’. So I’ll ask again.

What if we were able to disrupt societal expectations that demand we achieve certain milestones at certain ages?

I believe this would equate to children who aren’t marginalized for failing developmental milestones. Teenagers who are more comfortable in their own skin, even when it’s different from their peers. And as adults, we could be free to chase our dreams when the season is right, not when we are expected to.

If you feel like you’ve missed the boat, or haven’t ‘made it’ yet, I want to encourage you to reframe this. Instead, look at the remaining years of your life as full of opportunity, no matter what your past looks like.

You get to bloom, more than once, and when you are ready, not when the world thinks you should.

And we are waiting to watch each beautiful unfolding.

Emma Scheib gained her Masters in Psychology in 2013 and has since worked full time in corporate research positions for government agencies. She recently gave up her “dream job” to pursue being a (happier) mum, living a slower pace of life. She is also dipping her toes back into her long-lost love, creative writing. She writes regularly over at Simple Slow & Lovely, and you can also connect with her on Facebook and Instagram.

How to succeed in life as a late bloomer

Today’s post is by author J. M. Orend.

Writing is not for the faint of heart. It can take months or even years to create a piece of work, only to have it turned down multiple times for publication.

One way to stay motivated and productive as a writer is to learn about late-blooming authors whose work became better and more recognized later in life. Here are five terrific examples.

Harry Bernstein

Harry Bernstein wrote his best-selling memoir The Invisible Wall when he was in his nineties. The book was published when Bernstein was ninety-six years old. The Invisible Wall became an international best seller and was the most acclaimed work of Bernstein’s life.

What many people do not realize about Mr. Bernstein is that he wrote forty other books in his life prior to The Invisible Wall, none of which made it to publication.

However, buoyed the success of his first published book, Mr. Bernstein continued to write. His book The Dream was published when he was ninety-eight years old, and The Golden Willow was published when he was ninety-nine years of age. Mr. Bernstein continued to write until his death at a hundred and one years old.

Before his literary success, Harry Bernstein had worked as an editor of a construction magazine, wrote freelance articles, and worked on movie scripts. He “retired” at age sixty-two but continued to write. Thank goodness! Otherwise, he would not have been able to enjoy his late-blooming success.

Laura Ingalls Wilder

Laura Ingalls Wilder owned a farm with her husband for most of her working life. Ms. Wilder only started writing around age forty-four, when she was asked to write articles for the Missouri Ruralist.

When Ms. Wilder was sixty-five years old, she published her book Little House, which was based on her childhood. While it took her many rewrites and help from her daughter to get the book published, Little House quickly found an audience and led to a popular book series for Wilder. alls Wilder’s books were also made into the popular TV series Little House on the Prairie starring Melissa Gilbert and Michael Landon.

Frank McCourt

Frank McCourt grew up in a poor Irish slum. He managed to immigrate to New York when he was nineteen years old. He became a high school English teacher and taught in New York for thirty years.

As an English teacher Frank McCourt was always working with language and writing. However, it was only after Frank McCourt retired from teaching that he completed his finest work, writing the story of his childhood.

Frank McCourt’s memoir, titled Angelas Ashes, was published when he was sixty-six years old. The book sold over ten million copies and has been translated into twenty-five languages. Frank McCourt also won the Pulitzer Prize for Angelas Ashes.

Not one to rest on his laurels, McCourt continued writing and came out with three more books: Tis, Teacher Man, and a children’s book titled Angela and the Baby Jesus. Frank McCourt turned his retirement into a time of late-blooming success.

Elizabeth Jolly

Elizabeth Jolly was trained as a nurse but always had an interest in writing. She started writing in earnest in her twenties, but her work was frequently turned down for publication. In fact, Ms. Jolly’s first book was not published until she was fifty-three years old.

However, after Jolly’s first book was published, she continued writing and ended up publishing fourteen more books, including Mr Scobie’s Riddle and My Father’s Moon. Jolly won many awards for writing and became a professor in creative writing at seventy-five years old.

Wallace Stevens

Wallace Stevens worked as a lawyer and later as an insurance executive. However, he also wrote poetry during his off hours during most of his working life, except when his daughter was young. Stevens returned to writing around the time his daughter turned nine years old.

Wallace Stevens’s poetry matured and evolved as he got older, and his best work was done later in life, between the ages of fifty and seventy-five. In fact, Stevens won the Pulitzer Prize at seventy-five years old for the book The Collected Poems of Wallace Stevens.

Don’t Let Age Stand in Your Way

It is very common for people to stop writing if they believe that because of their age their ability to create valuable work has passed.

By learning about late-blooming writers, it is easy to realize that increasing age and life experience is not a disadvantage but often exactly what a writer needs to help create their best work.

What great authors do you know of who wrote in their late years? How do you think their age helped them write a terrific book? Any books or authors you recommend?

How to succeed in life as a late bloomerJ. M. Orend is a writer and artist who has written several books, including the recently released title Successful Late Bloomers, which tells about people who achieved late-in-life success and how they did it. You can learn more about her work at her website here.

How to succeed in life as a late bloomer

Recent studies have shown that more and more new business owners are coming from an older age demographic. So, proving it’s never too late to follow a dream, here are some of the world’s most successful late bloomer entrepreneurs who founded their most successful businesses – and made their millions – later on in life.

Colonel Sanders

The creator of KFC chicken had something of a rocky start to life, developing his cooking skills from a young age in his mother’s frequent absence. As a young man, he was never able to settle into a job, moving between roles as a farmer, a roadside fireman, lawyer, and steamboat operator to name just a few. Food and the service industry appeared to be at his core and he set up a service station with the woman who would go on to become his second wife.

At age 65 he sold his first restaurant and began focusing on his fried chicken recipe, with the aim of making it a franchise. At the age of 73, he sold KFC for $2million.

Martha Stewart

One of America’s most well-known business personalities, Martha Stewart is a serial lifestyle entrepreneur, who has taken her brand into publishing, broadcasting, e-commerce and merchandising. While studying architectural history at college she did some modelling for Chanel, but actually started her career as a stockbroker.

However, discovering she has skill and passion for cookery, she set up a catering home business. This led to a book deal with a major New York publisher in 1982. From there, her star grew with several more books, articles and television appearances.

Then came Martha Stewart Living Magazine, where she was editor in chief, and the creation of Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia. The company went public on the New York Stock Exchange in 1999 and made Stewart a billionaire. As well as the highs she has bounced back from some considerable lows, most notably when she was convicted of felony charges relating to stock trading fraud in 2004. After serving a prison sentence she clawed her way back to success and into public affections again, in particular catching people off guard with her new show featuring Snoop Dogg.

How to succeed in life as a late bloomer

Vivienne Westwood

It might be hard to imagine British punk icon Dame Vivienne Westwood as a primary school teacher, but that’s exactly what she seemed destined to be doing (while making jewellery on the side) before a meeting with the Sex Pistols’ manager Malcolm McLaren that would lead to her being propelled into the fashion design world.

From 1971 MacLaren’s King’s Road boutique (now World’s End) was filled with Westwood’s designs, and she became known as an architect of punk fashion, but her retail company Vivienne Westwood Srl wasn’t founded until 1988. Westwood has stayed true to her punk roots throughout her career, and has even broken the mould by encouraging consumers to buy less clothing; she strongly advocates against fast fashion and consumer culture, and advocates for a number of environmental causes.

Reid Hoffman

Now worth $3.2billion according to Forbes, Hoffman’s social media career began with a failure: his first major venture was a dating site called SocialNet, which was quickly consigned to internet history. Founded in 1997, it just tried to do a bit too much – as well as promising to improve your romantic prospects, it had a professional network, roommate finder and even helped match you to the ideal tennis partner! Hard to understand why that one never took off…

It may have been doomed from the start but Hoffman seized on the professional networking aspect and co-founded LinkedIn at the age of 35, and the site now has around half a billion active users.

It may have been doomed from the start but Hoffman seized on the professional networking aspect and co-founded LinkedIn at the age of 35, and the site now has around half a billion active users.

How to succeed in life as a late bloomer

Henry Royce

Frederick Henry Royce lost his father at a young age and had to work delivering newspapers and telegrams to help provide for the family. He had only completed one year of school by the time he was 15. It wasn’t until he was in his 40s that he made his name.

Royce gained engineering experience as an apprentice and worked for the Electric Light and Power Company in both London and Liverpool. He set up his own electric fittings company with business partner Ernest Claremont, but an increasing interest in motor cars led to a meeting with Charles Stewart Rolls, and the Rolls Royce Limited company germinated.

Within three years the company was winning awards for the reliability of its motor engineering. Rolls died when his Wright Flyer crashed in 1910, while Royce struggled with his health in later years, said to be due in part to his workaholic behaviour. He died in 1933.

How to succeed in life as a late bloomer

Estee Lauder

From a young age Lauder helped her family make ends meet working in their hardware store, and went on to help her uncle, a chemist in a lab that created beauty products. This sowed the seeds for what would eventually be the most recognisable beauty brand in the western world.

Lauder was 28 when the brand that bears her name launched (she was actually born Josephine Esther Mentzer but adopted her infant nickname Estee). Estee Lauder the company was founded with her husband Joseph in 1946 and began with flagship product Youth Dew bath oil perfume.

Estee Lauder sold 50,000 units of Youth Dew in its first year. By 1984 it was selling 150 million, with many more products developed by Lauder.

How to succeed in life as a late bloomer

Charles Flint

Flint was born in 1850, but didn’t found the company that would be his enduring legacy until 1911, at the age of 61. Flint wasn’t exactly a stranger to success before that – he started out in the shipping industry, first working with a ships supply firm and handling millions of dollars’ worth of shipment deals. He also later served as Chilean consul in New York City and consul general to the United States for Nicaragua and Costa Rica. But it was computing that would make his name go down in history.

He formed the Computing-Tabulating-Recording Company by amalgamating four existing companies. CTRC then became International Business Machines (IBM). Some of the game-changing IBM moments in history include their assistance of the space exploration programme, the Universal Product Code, as well as their near monopoly dominance across all aspects of the computing industry for many decades. Flint himself remained on the board of IBM until he was 80 years old.​

Kayleigh Ziolo is a freelance journalist and writer based in Ireland. Follow her @Kayleigh_Ziolo