How to take care of a chorkie puppy

About Chorkie

How to take care of a chorkie puppy

There are many reasons why prospective dog owners may choose a specific breed. Some are looking for working dogs, while some value dogs who do well with children. Others seek a dog to fulfill certain therapeutic needs. There are almost as many reasons why owners choose their dogs as there are breeds themselves! Of course, the number one reason why most people choose their pup isn’t even remotely practical. It all comes down to cuteness. Chorkies are without a doubt one of the cutest breeds of designer dogs available to the modern dog owner. A relatively new breed created in the early 1990s, a Chorkie is the result of a crossing between a Yorkshire Terrier and a Chihuahua. So what happens when you put the two tiniest and cutest pups together? You certainly don’t end up with anything other than a cutiepie.

As with most mixed breed dogs, the Chorkie’s physical appearance can sometimes have subtle variances depending on the genetic contribution of the parents. However, like their parents, they are extremely small toy-sized dogs that make for excellent indoor pets. Chorkies generally retain the long and silky hair of the Yorkshire terriers and the head shape of the Chihuahua. Their ears are generally erect like the Chihuahua’s, but can sometimes be droopy. Unlike Yorkshire terriers which are usually tan, grey and black in color, Chorkies can come in a variety of colors due to their Chihuahua genetics. It’s all quite tricky to predict with hybrids, but rest assured that no matter which mixture of traits pop up in your Chrokie, the results will be absolutely adorable.

Some people also call these dogs Yorkie-Chi or Chiyorkie, but these are not common or official breed names.

Chorkies are without a doubt one of the cutest breeds of designer dogs available to the modern dog owner.

Although it is impossible to trace the first intentional Yorkshire Terrier and Chihuahua crossing, sources indicate that Chorkies were initially bred in the early 1990s. Sadly, little more is known about where these pretty pups came from. However, they have since gained a great deal of popularity and are an extremely beloved choice of designer dog. They aren’t going anywhere. This breed is growing exponentially.

How to take care of a chorkie puppy

The Chorkie is the result of crossing Yorkshire Terrier with Chihuahua, two extremely popular small breed dogs. Although his parents are purebred, the Chorkie himself doesn’t enjoy the same status. That means that these beloved dogs are not recognized by the American Kennel Club as a “real” breed. As a mixed breed dog, the Chorkie is not eligible for official pedigree papers, but there are smaller clubs that do recognize this hybrid and that offer their own certification for designer puppies, if that’s important to you.

Yet, even without a well-documented family tree, the Chorkie is a canine with quite an impressive ancestry. Both the Chihuahua and the Yorkshire Terrier have been around for centuries and their companionship has been treasured by generations of pet owners. If the puppy was not bought from a pet store or a puppy mill, you can expect your lovely hybrid to grow up into a fantastic dog that boasts the best of two beloved doggo worlds.

Like all dogs, Chorkie will do best on high-quality dry food for dogs. Kibble is a nutritionally complete food that meets all of your pet’s dietary needs (it also comes in a convenient and readily available form to boot). But how are you supposed to pick out the best dry food for your Chorkie? The key is to pay attention to all of your dog’s unique needs. Choose kibble that is suitable for their age (puppy, adult, or senior), size, and activity level (dog food formulated for small breeds).

In addition to picking out the right type of food, you’ll have to pay attention to the serving sizes. As a petite dog, Chorkie doesn’t need much kibble to be full, but their appetite is often voracious. Follow the recommendations of the manufacturers and never free fed your pet. They’ll gain weight quickly and their small frame doesn’t tolerate excess fluff well at all. Health issues pop up fairly fast if their belly gets too big.

As always, if you are ever worried about what to feed your Chorkie to suit their specific dietary needs, always consult with your veterinarian. While dog food manufacturers do their best at provided guidelines, all dogs are different and have their own needs. Only your vet will be able to identify the personal needs of your specific pup. So always look to a vet if you are worried about your doggo’s diet. That’s why you have a vet, after all!

Like Yorkshire Terriers and Chihuahuas, Chorkies are extremely intelligent and are highly trainable.

Like Yorkshire Terriers and Chihuahuas, Chorkies are extremely intelligent and are highly trainable. However, while their smarts and eagerness to please their owners certainly ensure that they pick up commands with ease, training this breed is not always smooth sailing. As the offspring of two small and spirited dogs, the Chorkie can have a stubborn streak just like his mom or dad. In that case, you’ll need just a little more patience with your new puppy and have to take the right approach! It’s important to assert yourself as the leader of the pack from the start. Don’t let your new adorable puppy boss you around as that will lead to behavioural problems that will last a lifetime. Exude confidence, be firm in your training routine and rely on positive reinforcement methods and you’re sure to succeed. Negative reinforcement and excessive punishment is abuse, not training. Not dog deserves that, so avoid it at all costs.

The Chorkie is also quite prone to small dog syndrome and excessive barking, so make sure you start training and socialization early on. It will help your pooch realize his own potential to be a perfect companion. Otherwise, you’ll be stuck with a grumpy, bossy, yappy small dog. No one wants that.

Chorkies usually weigh around 8 to 10 pounds.

The Chorkie is a designer breed mix of Chihuahua and Yorkshire terrier. Chorkies are small dogs, weighing around 10 pounds. They are energetic, affectionate and entertaining. The puppies are delicate and require a gentle touch. Training Chorkie puppies is a long process as housebreaking is often difficult. They are stubborn and require a persistence for proper training.

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Housebreaking Chorkies

Chorkies will respond to positive reinforcement like any other dog. They are however small, indoor dogs that will choose indoors over outdoors under some circumstances. Your Chorkie may defecate or urinate indoors when the weather is bad and does not like exposure to the cold. Prepare for these instances and clean the area thoroughly to remove scent and prevent a marking pattern. Feed at the same times each day and learn to read your Chorkie. He will become more active when he needs to release and you must take them outdoors. Provide a treat and praise when your dog goes outside. This pattern of positive reinforcement will encourage him to continue using the outdoor space.

Health Concerns

Hypoglycemia is a major concern in Chorkie and other small breed puppies. The issue is less relevant when they reach adulthood but it poses a serious risk to puppies and may result in a coma or death when left untreated. Monitor your puppy for energy loss and unusually lethargic behavior. Refusing food and water are also common symptoms. Immediately give the puppy sugar water or rub corn syrup on his gums to remedy the situation. Hypoglycemia requires immediate treatment. If the issue persists, take your puppy to a veterinarian.

Socializing Chorkies

Chorkies are social dogs but they are also protective. When your puppy bonds you, he will take on a protective role and show some aggressive displays when other dogs and people approach. Socialize your puppy with other dogs and children throughout his young life. This will prepare him for encounters as an adult. Your Chorkie will sometimes bark and snap at children and other people when he is not socialized. Beginning the process during the puppy phase creates positive social habits that carry through to adulthood.

Curbing Barking

Barking is a common issue with Chorkie puppies and adults. They respond to a variety of stimulus and are naturally vocal dogs. Curb barking with vocal commands. Vocalize the word “no” in a strong voice when your puppy barks. If the barking persists into adulthood, use a bark collar that beeps each time he barks. This will reduce the amount of barking but likely will not cease barking. You Chorkie likely will bark to some degree for life.

Do not use physical punishment for barking or housebreaking. Chorkies are small dogs and you will cause mental and possible physical harm. Focus on positive reinforcement to train your Chorkie.

Always check with your veterinarian before changing your pet’s diet, medication, or physical activity routines. This information is not a substitute for a vet’s opinion.

The Chorkie–a hybrid of a Chihuahua and a Yorkshire Terrier (or Yorkie)–is a lively, playful, often stubborn toy-sized crossbreed that only average eight pounds in weight. These energetic “designer dog” crossbreeds can be bold and fussy, but they’re affectionate towards their owners. Overall, Chorkie care and maintenance doesn’t take a great deal of work, and will consist mainly of providing obedience training and socialization to make sure the dog doesn’t develop Small Dog Syndrome.

Below you’ll find details of caring for a Chorkie, including info about puppy development, exercise needs, and shedding/drooling tendencies. For answers to your questions about owning this spirited little crossbreed, keep reading!

Chorkie Breed Development

As a toy-sized breed, Chorkie puppy development typically spans 13-15 months from birth to full maturity.

Physical Development: Chorkie puppies grow steadily in height and length for the first six months or so, then those growth rates slow somewhat while the adolescent “fills out” by gaining muscle mass and fat. A Chorkie normally reaches its full adult size (an average of eight inches at the shoulders in height and eight pounds in weight) at 9-10 months of age.

Social Development: Chorkies reach adolescence at about five months, sexual maturity at 8-9 months, and full mental maturity at about 14 months (though many will retain their playful, energetic puppylike behavior well into adulthood).

For specific milestones in Chorkie development, refer to the chart below.

(NOTE: Chorkies can be quite stubborn, and often develop Small Dog Syndrome, in which they become extremely selfish, disobedient, and fussy. This means new Chorkie owners will need to provide obedience training and socialization as early in the dogs’ lives as possible. If a Chorkie learns proper behavior as a puppy, that learned behavior will usually continue once the dog matures.)

Dog Age Development Milestone
2 Weeks Eyes/ears open, begins walking
6-7 Weeks Old enough to be separated from mother, housetrained, introduced to solid food; obedience training and socialization can begin at this early stage
10-11 Weeks Can begin exercising; vaccinations/de-worming needed
5 Months Adult coat growing in; adolescent period begins, characterized by increased independence, fear, disobedience, hyperactivity; training/socialization especially important during this stage
8 Months Sexual maturity; can be transitioned to adult food; can begin “adult” exercise regimen
14 Months+ Adulthood

Chorkie Exercise Needs

These hybrids are very energetic and lively–but they’re also extremely small, so Chorkie exercise requirements aren’t too extensive. Chorkies will fulfill some of their daily activity needs just running around being their animated little selves, but they’ll do well with a couple of short walks and a brief period of play as well.

The typical adult Chorkie, depending on its age and overall activity level, will only need about 30 minutes of proper exercise per day–which you can accomplish with short walks and a few minutes’ playtime. You can start exercising your Chorkie puppy at 10 weeks old by taking it on short (5-minute) walks, then you can increase the walks’ length and frequency as the puppy grows. And these short walks are a good opportunity to start teaching the young Chorkie obedience, through leash training: have the dog walk beside or behind you on the leash instead of being allowed to lead or “tug” on it. This, in the puppy’s mind, establishes you as the leader, and will make obedience training easier as the dog matures.

A few things to keep in mind when exercising your Chorkie: first, puppies younger than eight months old shouldn’t participate in activities that include a lot of jumping, running on hard surfaces, or navigating of stairs, as doing so can injure their still-developing joints and bones. And regardless of age, all Chorkies will need to be leashed when in public. These dogs are curious (and often bold and stubborn as well!), so they may run off to investigate interesting-looking people, animals, and situations if given the chance; at the same time, Chorkies can be seen as actual prey by large dogs and other predators. A leash will help you control and protect your Chorkie in these situations. And when walking your Chorkie on its leash, be mindful of your pace! These tiny dogs will have to trot faster on their little legs to keep up with you than will other, taller breeds, even at your normal walking speed–so you might want to slow up a bit. And finally: though Chorkies are fine in hot weather, they get cold rather easily, so it’s best not to exercise them in frigid temperatures.

Precautions aside, it’s important to exercise your Chorkie every single day. These little dogs can be quite fussy, and if they’re bored or restless they’ll become disobedient, destructive, and difficult in general. Consistent exercise will be great for the dog’s peace of mind–and for your own sanity as well. A few exercise ideas:

  • Walking: Two 15-minute walks per day is a good target
  • Fetch: Can be played indoors or out; use the dog’s favorite toy
  • Hide-and-Seek: Great indoor, rainy-day activity; give the dog a treat when it finds you
  • Laser Pointer: Chorkies will go nuts chasing that little red dot
  • Dog Park: If properly socialized, these hybrids enjoy the company of other dogs; be sure to use a leash
  • Blowing Bubbles: Your Chorkie will love “attacking” the bubbles you blow

When indoors, it’s a good idea to give your Chorkie access to one or more balls or toys that will allow the dog to burn excess energy. It’s also recommended that you establish a regular exercise schedule for the dog, such as walks after breakfast and dinner and a play period in the afternoon.

Chorkie Maintenance

In terms of shedding and drooling, these hybrids don’t need much care. Chorkie shedding is normally very low, and drooling isn’t an issue.

Chorkies usually have fairly long, silky coats. (Occasionally, if the dog is the offspring of a short-haired Chihuahua, its coat may only be of medium length.) Regardless, Chorkie coats don’t shed much at all, and many are considered hypoallergenic, so these are good dogs for allergy sufferers. Little hair cleanup will be necessary for owners of this crossbreed, though frequent brushing will be required to avoid tangles and mats.

And a Chorkie practically never drools. If your Chorkie is drooling excessively, it may be a sign of a medical issue, in which case a veterinarian’s care is recommended.

How to take care of a chorkie puppy

Height: 6 – 9 inches
Weight: 8 – 15 pounds
Lifespan: 13 – 15 years
Colors: Brown, white, silver, blue, and black
Suitable for: Families without small kids, apartment living, and multi-pet households
Temperament: Loyal, energetic, bubbly, loving, goofy, vocal, and smart

As designer breeds have taken off, one that has become increasingly popular is the Chorkie. A mix between a Chihuahua and a Yorkshire Terrier, a Chorkie has a wide array of appearances and traits that they can inherit from each parent.

Still, they’re loyal pups and extremely smart. They can be the perfect snuggle companion on a rainy day and full of energy for games just a few moments later. Additionally, their small size makes them great travel companions.

But is a Chorkie right for you or your family? Keep reading, and we break down everything that you need to know about these adorable companions.

Chorkie Puppies — Before You Buy…

Before you purchase a Chorkie puppy, you need to know what you’re getting yourself into. While there are tons of perks for these adorable dogs, they’re not always the ideal pets for every home.

They’re a high-energy breed, but their smaller size means that they’re well suited for apartment living — you should still take them for a daily walk, though. While they’re extremely smart dogs, they can be challenging to housebreak.

Their smaller size means that they have a longer lifespan, and their designer dog status gives them fewer health concerns than most purebreds.

Finally, while they socialize well with other animals, their smaller size and playful attitude mean they can easily get injured around larger animals or small kids.

What’s the Price of Chorkie Puppies?

While the Chorkie might be a designer breed, they don’t cost nearly as much as a purebred. For a Chorkie puppy, you can expect to spend anywhere from $400 to $500, which is on the lower end of things for a designer dog.

Just be sure to do your homework on the breeder and both parents before adopting, as there can be potential health or genetic problems if you simply find the lowest-cost breeder.

Also, keep in mind that many Chorkies aren’t first generation. That means you might have a Chorkie bred from two other Chorkies, which can impact how much they inherit from each parent breed.

3 Little-Known Facts About the Chorkie

1. You can have either a long-haired or short-haired Chorkie

Because of the differing hair lengths of their parent breeds, you can find both short- and long-haired Chorkies. Also, if your Chorkie takes after their Yorkshire Terrier lineage, they’ll be hypoallergenic, but if they take after their Chihuahua parent, they won’t be.

2. Chorkies are prone to separation anxiety

If you don’t have any other dogs for your Chorkie to hang out with when you leave the house, you and your Chorkie might run into problems. They don’t handle time alone well, so keep that in mind if you have to head to the office every day and are thinking of adopting a Chorkie.

3. Chorkies act like large dogs despite their small size

The Chorkie is considered a small companion/lap dog, but it seems like the Chorkie missed the memo. Despite their small size, they’re a bit fearless and love playing with larger pups.

While this can be adorable, if you have a larger dog that is a bit clumsy, they can accidentally injure your Chorkie.

How to take care of a chorkie puppy

The parent breeds of Chorkie: Left – Chihuahua (liggraphy, Pixabay); Right – Yorkshire Terrier (Pezibear, Pixabay)

Temperament & Intelligence of the Chorkie

While the Chorkie can be a bit stubborn at times, especially while housebreaking, there’s little doubt that they are extremely intelligent dogs. If you’re looking for a pup that you can teach different tricks, a Chorkie is an excellent choice.

Just stick with tons of positive reinforcement because they can get timid and introverted when they feel like they’re in trouble.

But most of the time, these are incredibly loyal and playful pups. They have bubbly, energetic, and goofy personalities, making them fun dogs to play with. However, they’re known to be a little vocal, so expect a few yaps throughout the day. While you might not mind too much, it’s something that you’ll want to get control of early on. Otherwise, your Chorkie’s watchdog instincts will take over, and they will yap at every noise or movement that they hear or see. This might not matter if you have a house and a bit of land, but if you’re in an apartment, this can lead to problems with neighbors. Fortunately, you can let your pup know when they can bark and when they don’t need to with training.

How to take care of a chorkie puppy

What do you get when you cross a Yorkshire Terrier with a Chihuahua? Well, this adorable breed of dog called Chorkie. Not only are they cute little dogs, but they are also very easy to care for.

Thinking of adopting a little Chorkie? Read this article to learn more about it. We will review its history, characteristics, care, health and more!

Origin of the Chorkie dog

Although the exact time and place of the appearance of the first Chorkie puppies is unknown, it is believed that they made their first appearance in the early 1990s. They are known to have been born by crossing the Yorkshire Terrier with a Chihuahua to achieve a similar breed with better health. As with many other hybrid breeds, the Chorkie has not been recognized as an independent breed, but has been recognized as a hybrid.

Chorkies Characteristics

Chorkies are small dogs that weigh between 4 and 5 kilograms. Its height ranges between 15 and 23 centimeters at the withers. Its coat is normally smooth and its most common colors are brown, black, gold and gray.
The body of the Chorkie breed dog is rectangular in shape, while its head is rounded. Its head resembles that of a Chihuahua more than that of a Yorkshire, although the distribution of its fur on the face makes it more similar to that of the Yorkie at first glance. It has large ears, more or less erect depending on the dog, triangular in shape and covered with hair. Their eyes are equally large, generally dark in color, while their nose is small and also dark.

Surely, if we see a Chorkie puppy, the most striking thing will be to see how small he is. These dogs are extremely delicate in their puppy stage, so we have to monitor their health at all times. Chorkies at this age are playful and, just as they will be as adults, awake, active and very sociable. They have a half-life of 10 to 15 years, although this will depend on the quality of your care.

Chorkie personality and character

Chorkies have a very special character, being remarkably autonomous and independent. However, they need to feel constant affection, otherwise they will start to suffer from high levels of anxiety and start to develop destructive behaviors.
They get along well with people, yet they may not be the best breed for families with young children as they are too restless and impatient. Their relationship with other animals is not always good, as they can sometimes be somewhat reactive. The best thing for a good coexistence is to socialize your Chorkie well from his puppy.

Chorkie care

When it comes to caring for a Chorkie, you won’t find too many complications. Aside from a high-quality diet and exercise, this breed needs a lot of affection. They should also brush their hair at least once a day, because the length of their hair is long in proportion to their body. Bathrooms are restricted to only when you really need them. Bear in mind that they are very sensitive to low temperatures. You should also keep him up to date with his dental hygiene and veterinary check-ups.

Chorkie Training

Like any other dog, Chorkies will need to socialize properly as a puppy. By interacting with different dogs, people, and experiencing different environments, they will be able to have a balanced temperament as adults.

Other than that, Chorkie breed dogs will benefit from basic training through positive reinforcement. Teaching them basic commands will not only be entertaining for them, but it can also help them stay safe in certain situations. By using positive reinforcement, you ensure that your dog has good experiences and feels more attached to you.

Chorkie’s health

Chorkies are generally healthy dogs. This is common in hybrid breeds, as the conditions of pure dogs tend to disappear. This is exactly the case when it comes to Chorkie. They have much better health than Chihuahuas and Yorkshire Terriers. Despite this advantage, they are prone to skin health problems. Therefore, we must be careful when taking care of their skin and take them to the vet as soon as we observe abnormal behavior.

Apart from that, as we always tell you, you should keep them updated with their deworming and vaccination calendar. Regular check-ups at the vet are also always beneficial. There is no better medicine than prevention!

How to take care of a chorkie puppy

Video answer: Chorkie designer dogs 101

  • How to take care of a chorkie puppy

    Top best answers to the question «How much is a chorkie puppy»

    To give you an idea of how much you can expect to pay for a Chorkie, consider the average price for purebred Chihuahua and Yorkshire Terrier puppies.

    A purebred Chihuahua from an AKC-registered breeder sells for anywhere between $400 and $600 for a pet-quality puppy and from $800 to $1,500 for a show-quality dog.

    Those who are looking for an answer to the question «How much is a chorkie puppy?» often ask the following questions:

    🐶 How much does a chorkie puppy cost?

    🐶 How much are chorkie puppies worth?

    To give you an idea of how much you can expect to pay for a Chorkie, consider the average price for purebred Chihuahua and Yorkshire Terrier puppies.

    A purebred Chihuahua from an AKC-registered breeder sells for anywhere between $400 and $600 for a pet-quality puppy and from $800 to $1,500 for a show-quality dog.

    🐶 What do you feed a chorkie puppy?

    Look for a puppy food with 25-30% protein coming from meat or meat byproducts.

    There is some debate about whether dry or canned puppy food is better.

    Dry food may help remove tartar from teeth.

    Dry and canned food are both nutritious, so choose whatever your dog prefers.

    Video answer: Take care of a chorkie puppy

  • How to take care of a chorkie puppy

    27 Related questions

    We’ve handpicked 27 related questions for you, similar to «How much is a chorkie puppy?» so you can surely find the answer!

    Of the small breed dogs, Yorkies and Chihuahuas are two of the longer-lived breeds.

    With a Yorkie’s average lifespan between 14 and 16 years and a Chihuahua’s average lifespan between 14 and 18 years.

    The Chorkie has an average estimated lifespan of 10 to 15 years.

    Be careful not to bathe your dog too often, because overwashing your dog’s skin can cause irritation. “Unless there is a medical reason for more frequent baths, overbathing your pet—say weekly or even every two weeks—can dry out the skin and coat,” says Weinand.

    A good rule of thumb is a ratio of five minutes exercise per month of age (up to twice a day) until the puppy is fully grown e.g. 15 minutes (up to twice a day) when 3 months old, 20 minutes when 4 months old and so on. Once they are fully grown, they can go out for much longer.

    Video answer: Cute chorkie puppy

  • How to take care of a chorkie puppy

    Is it possible for a puppy to sleep too much? The short answer is no. You will see variations on the amount of sleep according to age and breed, and activity, but young puppies need about 18 to 20 hours of sleep a day. (Adult dogs typically sleep about 14 hours a day, as a comparison.)

    Chorkie Full Grown. Chorkies are a mixed-breed dog.

    They are a cross between two of the smallest dog breeds: the Yorkshire Terrier and the Chihuahua.

    According to PetBreeds, adult Chorkies typically weigh between 8 to 15 pounds and are about 6 to 9 inches tall.

    Video answer: Chorkie

  • How to take care of a chorkie puppy

    Video answer: Chorkie. pros and cons, price, how to choose, facts, care…

  • How to take care of a chorkie puppy

    What kind of coat does a Chorkie have?

    • Chorkies usually have fairly long, silky coats. (Occasionally, if the dog is the offspring of a short-haired Chihuahua, its coat may only be of medium length.) Regardless, Chorkie coats don’t shed much at all, and many are considered hypoallergenic, so these are good dogs for allergy sufferers.

    What car attachments for chorkie prefer in portugal?

    What kind of dog is a Chorkie dog?

    • The Chorkie is a pint-sized powerhouse, a tiny hybrid with the confidence and attitude of a Dogue de Bordeaux produced by Chihuahua and Yorkshire Terrier parents.

    What car attachments for chorkie prefer in tuvalu?

    What is a Chorkie?

    • A Chorkie is a designer dog breed with a confident personality and lively temperament. When a bold and intelligent Yorkshire Terrier is on heat and mates with an out-going and sassy Chihuahua, the result is your Chorkie.

    What is the life expectancy of a chorkie?

    Chorkies have a fairly high life expectancy of 10 to 15 years.

    Video answer: Bella the chorkie dog sharing a carrot with merl the guinea pig…

  • How to take care of a chorkie puppy

    By around eight weeks of age your puppy should be eating solid food.

    Puppies should be fed three to four times a day therefore if you are currently feeding ¾ a cup of puppy food twice a day you should consider spacing it out by feeding ½ cup three times a day.

    What do you get when you cross a Yorkshire Terrier with a Chihuahua? You get this adorable dog breed called Chorkie. They are not only small and cute dogs but also very easy to care for.

    Are you thinking of adopting a Chorkie? Read this AnimalWised breed sheet to learn about this breed. We’ll go through their history, characteristics, care, health and more!

    • Europe
    • Muscular
    • Elongated
    • Long ears
    • Toy
    • Small
    • Medium
    • Large
    • Giant
    • 5-14
    • 14-18
    • 18-22
    • 22-27
    • 27-31
    • More than 31
    • 2-7
    • 7-22
    • 22-55
    • 55-100
    • 100-220
    • 8-10
    • 10-12
    • 12-14
    • 15-20
    • Low
    • Meidum
    • High
    • Strong
    • Intelligent
    • Active
    • Dominant
    • Flats
    • Surveilance
    • Cold
    • Hot
    • Moderate
    • Medium
    • Long
    • Curly
    • Straight
    1. Origin of the chorkie
    2. Chorkie characteristics
    3. Chorkie character
    4. Chorkie care
    5. Chorkie training
    6. Chorkie health

    Origin of the chorkie

    Although the exact time and place of the appearance of the first Chorkie puppies is unknown, they are believed to have made their first appearance in the early 90s. It is also believed that they were made by crossing the Yorkshire Terrier with a Chihuahua to achieve a similar breed with better health.

    As with many other hybrid breeds, the Chorkie has not been recognized as an independent breed but has been accepted by the American Hybrid Canine Club.

    Chorkie characteristics

    Chorkies are small dogs, weighing between 4 – 5 kilograms. Their height ranges from 15 – 23 centimeters at the withers. Their coat is smooth and their most common colours are brown, black, gold and gray.

    The body of the Chorkie dog is rectangular in shape, while their head is rounded. Their head resembles that of a Chihuahua more than that of a Yorkshire, although the distribution of its fur on the face makes it more like the Yorkie to the naked eye. It has large ears, which are more or less erect depending on the dog, being triangular in shape and covered with hair. Their eyes are equally large, usually dark in color, while their nose is small and also dark.

    Surely, if we see a Chorkie puppy, what will be most striking is to see how small it is. These dogs are extremely delicate in their puppy stage, so we have to monitor their health at all times. Chorkies at this age are playful and, just as they will be as adults, awake, active and very sociable. They have an average lifespan of 10 -15 years, although this will depend on the quality of their care.

    Chorkie character

    Chorkies have a very special character, being remarkably autonomous and independent. However, they need constant affection, otherwise they will begin to suffer high levels of anxiety and begin to develop destructive behaviour.

    They get along well with people, however, they are not the best breed for families with young children as they are too restless and impatient. Their relationship with other animals is not always good as they can be aggressive at times. The best thing for a good coexistence is to well socialise your Chorkie from their puppyhood.

    Chorkie care

    When it comes to caring for a Chorkie, they are quite easy to care for. Other than a high quality diet and exercise, this breed needs a lot of affection. They will also need to have their hair brushed once a day. Baths are restricted only to when they really need one. Keep in mind that they are very sensitive to low temperatures. You will also need to keep up with their dental hygiene and their veterinarian check-ups.

    Chorkie training

    Just like any other dog, Chorkies will need to be properly socialised as a puppy. By interacting with different dogs, people and experiencing different environments they will be able to have a balanced temperament as adults.

    Other than that, Chorkies will benefit from basic dog training through positive reinforcement. Teaching them basic commands will not only be entertaining for them but it can also help keep them safe in certain situations. By using positive reinforcement you make sure that your dog is having a good time and bonding with you.

    Chorkie health

    Chorkies are generally healthy dogs. This is common in hybrid breeds as the conditions pure dogs are prone to disappear. This is exactly the case when it came to the Chorkie. They have much better health than Chihuahuas and Yorkshire Terriers. Despite this advantage, they are prone to skin health issues. Therefore, we must be careful when it comes to caring for their skin and take them to the veterinarian as soon as we see an abnormal behaviour.

    Apart for that, we need to keep up to date to their deworming and vaccination schedule. Regular check-ups to the veterinarian are also beneficial.

    You are asking yourself, what is a Chorkie puppy? A chorkie is a miniature version of a poodle—a dog breed that is generally smaller than a Pomeranian and has short legs. Chorkies were originally bred as pets, but their size and gentle nature have made them increasingly popular as watchdogs and companions. They are cute little chihuahua in a chihuahua’s body. The Chorkie was originally designed as a small dog who could be kept indoors without being considered a threat to the average owner.

    The breed has a short, dense coat and is a hardy little dog. Chorkies can be very affectionate and intelligent, but they are prone to separation anxiety and do their best in an active family environment.

    Table of Contents

    What Do I Need To Know About A Chorkie?

    When people hear the word “chorkie,” they might think of a cuddly, affectionate, or cute puppy. For some people, their first reaction is one of excitement. And why wouldn’t it be? Chorkies are adorable, and cute puppies are always welcome in our homes. But, a chorkie is much more than just a cute puppy. Chorkies are usually very energetic and high-energy dogs, but they don’t make good watchdogs.

    The first time you let your dog out of your home, don’t leave your house for an hour or two. Instead, let him out when the sun is out and make sure he is not in a dark room. Chorkies are also not great with kids. They love to play, and they love to jump, but they have no respect for boundaries, so you need to keep them on a leash at all times. Chorkies can be wonderful pets, but they can also be dangerous and unpredictable.

    Don’t think of them as just cute puppies. Think of them as a member of the family, and be cautious if you think they may become a safety risk to you or your loved ones.

    History Of Chorkie Puppy!

    Chorkies are one of the world’s oldest dog breeds. They were developed in the 19th century in Scotland and were originally bred for herding sheep. Today, chorkies are still commonly used as herding dogs in many parts of the world. The American Kennel Club recognizes the breed as being one of the most popular herding dogs in the United States.

    They’re a great dog for anyone who enjoys hiking or camping with their family. Chorkies can be trained to be excellent watchdogs, and they’re often very friendly with other dogs and people. The breed also has some unique personality traits. For example, they’re very curious and intelligent and can be highly vocal.

    How to take care of a chorkie puppy

    The Chorkie Puppy: Health

    You don’t need to be a dog expert to know a puppy will have some health problems. The Chorkie is one of the most popular breeds of dogs today, and many owners are surprised to learn that the breed is susceptible to several serious illnesses, including hip dysplasia, eye problems, skin issues, and cardiac problems. The good news is that, though your dog may be ill, you can find ways to treat the symptoms.

    Understand How To Potty Train A Chorkie

    For some reason, chorkies are more challenging than most dogs to potty train. Many owners who attempt this task end up having to train the chorkie twice. That is, they first teach the chorkie how to use a bathroom inside a litter box, and then they have to retrain the chorkie to use the bathroom outside a litter box. This can be frustrating for both the owner and the chorkie.

    Conclusion On What Is A Chorkie Puppy!

    Chorkies are small dogs that look like small wolves and are bred for their intelligence, personality, and beauty. They’re usually small terriers, though they also include miniature schnauzers, Shih Tzus, Poodles, and Maltese. They’re known for their friendly, cheerful personalities and great temperaments. Chorkies are fun-loving dogs that like to play and socialize with other pets. They’re very intelligent and can be trained to perform a variety of tasks, including obedience, agility, herding, and tracking. This is the complete guide to chorkies!

    FAQ

    Chorkie dog breed information

    There are many different types of chorkies. You can find them in both colors. Most of the time, they are tan and black. Chorkies are very playful and very friendly. If you want a pet that you can play with, these are the kind of dogs you want. They are very loyal to their owners, so you will have to do a lot of work to train your chorkie to walk on a leash. You need to teach it to come when you call, and to go back home when you tell it to. This is the same as any dog. You have to practice and keep trying until your chorkie learns all the commands. Chorkies are very smart. They love to learn, and they’re not going to be happy if you don’t teach them what you want them to do. The only problem with chorkies is that they’re not always easy to train. They’re very active, and you have to be careful when you are playing with them.

    Chorkie temperament

    There are many benefits to owning a chorkie. These dogs are good for the family because they love to play. They are also good for people who don’t like other dogs. A chorkie is friendly, docile, and loving. This is why the dog is great for children who want a small, playful companion. The dog is not aggressive and does not try to bite anyone or anything. The owner should use a firm, but gentle, hand when training them. A chorkie can live with other pets, but the owners need to make sure that the dogs get along well. It is important to take them out for walks and to make sure that they get plenty of exercises.

    What is the Chorkie size?

    Chorkies are a mix of miniature poodle and chihuahua, and they are often called “miniature dogs”. These dogs are very cute and sweet. They are usually small and cute, but not too small. They are also very intelligent and can be trained and trained very well. Chorkies should weigh less than 6 pounds at the withers and have a maximum shoulder height of 11 inches.

    Collection of all the general dog breed info about Chorkie so you can get to know the breed more.

    How to take care of a chorkie puppy

    Chorkie Price and Availability

    Chorkie Size

    Chorkie Grooming, Hair and Care

    Coat / Hair Types 2-3 weeks

    Chorkie Personality / Temperament

    Temperament

    Low 🔽

    Between 100 and 200 PSI 🔽

    Chorkie Good With

    Stranger Friendly

    Chorkie Health

    Health Issues No Prefers average to warm weather conditions

    Medium

    Chorkie As a Working Dog

    Service Dog

    Not really

    Not really

    Not really

    Not really

    Not really

    Boat dogs were typically bred for their strength, stamina, and water resistance, as they were often required to perform tasks such as pulling in fishing nets, and jumping into the water to retrieve ropes or lines, or helping to move cargo.

    Sailor dog is a type of dog that was bred to accompany sailors on their voyages. They were typically used for three purposes: as a working dog, a watchdog, and as a companion. A boat dog is a term used to describe a type of dog that was traditionally bred and used as a working dog on boats.

    Not really

    Not really

    Chorkie Reproducibility

    Gestation Length

    60-64 days

    Once a year.

    Chorkie Recognition

    Chorkie Pros and Cons

    • Health Issues: Chorkies are commonly healthy dogs.
    • Apartment Friendly: Very house-friendly dog the Chorkie breed.
    • Shedding Level: Chorkies shed none to minimal.
    • Drooling Tendency: The Chorkie is a perfect example of a very low drooling tendency.
    • Impulse to Wander or Roam: Chorkies tend to escape less than other breeds.
    • Adaptability: Chorkies adapt very well to lifestyle changes and basically all living environments.
    • Cat Friendly: Chorkies are cat-friendly dogs.
    • Good For First Time Owners: Chorkies are good for novice owners, due to their easy-going personality.
    • Hypoallergenic: Chorkies don’t do well with allergy sufferers by causing allergic reaction.
    • Tolerates Being Left Alone: Chorkies tend to have separation anxiety when their owners left them alone at home because they bond very closely with them.
    • Child Friendly: Chorkies are not kid-friendly dogs.
    • Dog Friendly: Chorkies are not the most dog-friendly dogs.
    • Office Friendly: Chorkie is not the best dog breed for office environment.
    • Senior Citizens Friendly: Chorkies are not recommended for elderly people.

    Chorkie History

    The Chorkie is a designer dog breed, that was created around the early 1990s, presumably in North America. The trend of developing new hybrid breeds started around the middle of the 20 th century, by crossbreeding purebred dogs with each other, in order to create new breeds. These designer breeds were an instant hit, because they inherited the best and most desirable qualities and traits of the parent breeds.

    Even though most of the hybrid breeds were created during the 20 th century, from well-established purebred breeds, it is rarely known why and how breeders started developing them. In Chorkie’s case, it is believed that an accidental cross-breeding between the Chihuahua and the Yorkshire Terrier might have created the first litter. Just like its parent breeds, the Chorkie is also a really small, toy-sized breed. Unfortunately, breeders tend to exaggerate this trait, and trying to create so-called “teacup” sized dogs, which usually suffer from a wide range of health problems caused by the underdevelopment of their internal organs and bone structure.

    Regarding the Chorkie’s parent breeds, the Chihuahua is an ancient breed dating back to the 9 th century, in Mexico. During the early centuries, it was believed that the Chihuahua possesses some spiritual power, and have effects on the afterlife of the owner when they were buried together. The breed’s popularity never faced any significant decline over the centuries, and it is still very popular today. On the other hand, the Yorkshire Terrier can trace its origins back to Northern England, to the 19 th century. During the peak of the First Industrial Revolution, when Scottish people moved to England, to establish their own textile operations, they brought their dogs with them. The dogs were used to hunt and kill rats, mice, and other rodents in factories, mines, and cotton mills. Even though, both of the parent breeds are well-established and have extensive histories, if bred together, the litter might always vary from each other. This is the reason, why the majority of the designer breeds, and also the Chorkie are not recognized by any of the major kennel clubs, as distinct breeds. However, the American Canine Hybrid Club, Designer Breed Registry, Designer Dogs Kennel Club, Dog Registry of America Inc., and the International Designer Canine Registry recognize the Chorkie. These organizations and the breed’s fanciers and breeders are constantly working on standardizing the Chorkie, in order to gain full recognition. Yet, for the reason that many of the Chorkie specimens are F1, meaning that they are first-generation ones, from mating the two purebred parents together, the standardizing process is going to be quite long.

    Regardless of the recognition and the breed standard, it is obvious that these small-sized dogs are also very popular, just like their parent breeds. Nowadays, the Chorkie is no working breed, like its ancestors, the dogs are usually kept as family pets, and lapdogs. According to Chorkie owners, the breed is very different from any similar toy breeds, because the dogs get less clingy, and are less likely to suffer from separation anxiety than the other small-sized breeds.

    Small dog wandered off after traffic accident near Castlewood

    by Jeb Bing / Pleasanton Weekly

    Uploaded: Mon, Dec 6, 2010, 12:05 pm 15
    Updated: Thu, Dec 9, 2010, 7:34 am
    Time to read: about 2 minutes

    How to take care of a chorkie puppy

    The little 1-year-old Chorkie dog that wandered away from its owner after her car was in an accident on I-680 on Saturday, has been found.

    Juliana Pribela, 11, found the little dog in her back yard off Foothill Road around 3 p.m. Sunday afternoon after she spotted it out the window.

    The dog had been missing since the 7 p.m. Saturday traffic accident and its owner, medical student Melina Masihi who lives in Pleasanton, has been searching the freeway area near the Castlewood Drive/Sunol Boulevard exit for her cherished pet.

    Juliana and her mom Terri bathed the little dog, a Chorkie, which is a mix of a Yorkie dog and a Chihuahua, and removed the many burrs from his fur.

    “I thought probably someone has taken this kind of a dog to the darling little pet store downtown,” said Terri Pribela, and she brought the dog into Murphy’s Paw on Main Street on Monday.

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    She also wanted to buy him a coat, she added.

    Meanwhile the Pleasanton Weekly had posted a news story about the missing dog on its daily Express edition Monday at www.pleasantonweekly.com.

    “Monday, a lady brought the dog into our store and told me that she found him Sunday evening in a neighborhood off of Foothill,” said Melanie Sadek, owner of Murphy’s Paw. “I recommended that she go to a local vet and have his back scanned.”

    “When she left the store, I had kept her contact info,” Sadek said. “Chorkie also had a new fleece jacket to help keep him warm. Then this morning I read the Pleasanton Weekly Express edition and called everyone ASAP. Melina was so grateful, and Terri was happy to reunite Chorkie with his mommy.”

    No one was badly injured in the Saturday evening accident, including the Chorkie, who apparently walked down an embankment and disappeared. Masihi is bruised and received stitches on her forehead.

    How to take care of a chorkie puppy

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    How to take care of a chorkie puppy

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    Terri Pribela said when Masihi called her, she asked if she would wait until 5 p.m. to pick up the dog, whose name is Cookie, because she knew Juliana would want to say goodbye to her new little friend. When Masihi arrived, she’d brought several friends, a giant cake and a dozen roses, said Pribela.

    “They said, ‘Let me pay you,’ but I said, ‘Absolutely not, it’s a gift,'” she recalled.

    When they left, they gave Juliana an envelope, which turned out to contain the $300 reward they’d been offering for Cookie’s return.

    That was wonderful for Juliana, noted her mother, but they were happy to take care of little Cookie and were glad for the happy ending since they already have a house full of pets.

    “We have dogs and we would want someone to take care of our dog,” Pribela said.

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    “It’s a miracle,” Masihi said Wednesday morning, that Cookie survived after her night alone wandering through the city. “I’m crazy about this little guy.”

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    Small dog wandered off after traffic accident near Castlewood

    by Jeb Bing / Pleasanton Weekly

    Uploaded: Mon, Dec 6, 2010, 12:05 pm
    Updated: Thu, Dec 9, 2010, 7:34 am

    The little 1-year-old Chorkie dog that wandered away from its owner after her car was in an accident on I-680 on Saturday, has been found.

    Juliana Pribela, 11, found the little dog in her back yard off Foothill Road around 3 p.m. Sunday afternoon after she spotted it out the window.

    The dog had been missing since the 7 p.m. Saturday traffic accident and its owner, medical student Melina Masihi who lives in Pleasanton, has been searching the freeway area near the Castlewood Drive/Sunol Boulevard exit for her cherished pet.

    Juliana and her mom Terri bathed the little dog, a Chorkie, which is a mix of a Yorkie dog and a Chihuahua, and removed the many burrs from his fur.

    “I thought probably someone has taken this kind of a dog to the darling little pet store downtown,” said Terri Pribela, and she brought the dog into Murphy’s Paw on Main Street on Monday.

    She also wanted to buy him a coat, she added.

    Meanwhile the Pleasanton Weekly had posted a news story about the missing dog on its daily Express edition Monday at www.pleasantonweekly.com.

    “Monday, a lady brought the dog into our store and told me that she found him Sunday evening in a neighborhood off of Foothill,” said Melanie Sadek, owner of Murphy’s Paw. “I recommended that she go to a local vet and have his back scanned.”

    “When she left the store, I had kept her contact info,” Sadek said. “Chorkie also had a new fleece jacket to help keep him warm. Then this morning I read the Pleasanton Weekly Express edition and called everyone ASAP. Melina was so grateful, and Terri was happy to reunite Chorkie with his mommy.”

    No one was badly injured in the Saturday evening accident, including the Chorkie, who apparently walked down an embankment and disappeared. Masihi is bruised and received stitches on her forehead.

    Terri Pribela said when Masihi called her, she asked if she would wait until 5 p.m. to pick up the dog, whose name is Cookie, because she knew Juliana would want to say goodbye to her new little friend. When Masihi arrived, she’d brought several friends, a giant cake and a dozen roses, said Pribela.

    “They said, ‘Let me pay you,’ but I said, ‘Absolutely not, it’s a gift,'” she recalled.

    When they left, they gave Juliana an envelope, which turned out to contain the $300 reward they’d been offering for Cookie’s return.

    That was wonderful for Juliana, noted her mother, but they were happy to take care of little Cookie and were glad for the happy ending since they already have a house full of pets.

    “We have dogs and we would want someone to take care of our dog,” Pribela said.

    “It’s a miracle,” Masihi said Wednesday morning, that Cookie survived after her night alone wandering through the city. “I’m crazy about this little guy.”

    By: Chewy Editorial Published: September 10, 2016

    Chorkie Dog Breed

    Playful, energetic and a real lover of people, the Chorkie is a mix between a Yorkshire Terrier and a Chihuahua. Here’s everything you need to know about this exciting breed.

    Physical Characteristics

    As a toy-sized breed,the Chorkie only weighs between eight and 10 pounds once its fully grown.

    Popular colors include tan, grey and black from its Yorkie parent, but they can come in a variety of other colors thanks to their Chihuahua background, as well.

    Similar to the Yorkshire terrier, the Chorkie tends to have long, silky hair.

    Personality and Temperament

    As an energetic breed, the Chorkie makes a great pet for homes with kids. They are loyal and fun and they love to play.

    THINGS TO CONSIDER

    The Chorkie maintains a bit of confidence and stubbornness from its parent breeds. At times they can be very stubborn and proper training will be necessary to keep them in line. They also take their duty as a guard dog very seriously and bark often to warn their owners of anything they deem suspicous.

    IDEAL LIVING CONDITIONS

    Because of their small size, the breed does well in both small and large homes.

    The Yorkie requires daily brushing to avoid tangles, as well as a bath every other week or so. They also require daily exercise to avoid restlessness.

    Health

    Common health issues include hypoglycemia (low blood sugar), patellar luxation (dislocated kneecaps) and tracheal collapse, as well as potential skin problems and allergies.

    History and Background

    Relatively new to the breed scene, the Chorkie was first bred in the 1990s as a result of crossing a Yorkshire Terrier and a Chihuahua. They’ve grown in popularity as of late as an ideal designer dog for people looking for smaller breeds.

    How to take care of a chorkie puppy

    Are you interested in a small, adorable dog? The Chorkie is a hybrid dog that is a mix between a purebred Chihuahua and a purebred Yorkshire Terrier.

    Despite his small size, this dog has a huge personality, is very affectionate and loves his family members unconditionally.

    In our comprehensive guide below, you’ll view pictures and learn more about the Chorkie, including facts about his physical characteristics and temperament, as well as any health issues you should watch out for.

    Furthermore, you’ll find useful information about grooming and feeding your Chorkie puppy. So, keep reading. You’ll be glad you did!

    Table of Contents

    What is a Chorkie?

    As we’ve already mentioned, the Chorkie is a designer dog developed by crossing a Chihuahua with a Yorkshire Terrier (Yorkie).

    The Chorkie has several other popular names, including the Chihuahua Yorkie mix, Chia-Yorkie, Yorkie-Chi, and Yorkiehuahua.

    Since both parent breeds are considered to be toy breeds, your Chorkie will also be a very small dog. As such, it is also possible to use either a male or female dog of either breed when trying to produce Chorkie puppies.

    Since the Chorkie is a crossbreed, it can be difficult to tell what your puppy will look and act like as a full grown dog. To some extent, this is the case for all Chorkie puppies and mixed genetics can make the physical characteristics and personality traits of the puppies even more unpredictable.

    What we can tell you for sure is that all Chorkie puppies are small in size. Generally speaking, the Chihuahua cross Yorkie will fall anywhere between the two parents for aspects such as appearance, temperament, and health.

    Therefore, we need to learn more about each parent breed to get a good understanding of what to expect from your Yorkshire terrier cross Chihuahua puppy. However, it is still difficult to predict how he will look and act like as a Chorkie full grown dog until that time comes.

    So, let’s take a closer look at both parent breeds, starting with the Chihuahua.

    The Origin of the Chorkie Breed

    An Overview of the Chihuahua Breed

    The Chihuahua is one of the oldest dog breeds in the world.

    The Chihuahua breed traces its origins as far back as ancient Mexico and historians agree that the present-day Chihuahua is a descendant of an ancient dog called the Techichi. This ancient dog was bred by the Toltec people around the 9th century.

    Back then, the Techichi was believed to wield supernatural powers. However, there’s no tangible evidence with regard to the exact history of the Chihuahua breed before its emergence in Spain.

    The modern-day Chihuahua dog was actually bred in North America and the breed was officially recognized by the American kennel club (AKC) in 1904. These days, the Chihuahua ranks among the most popular breeds of dogs in the world.

    The Chihuahua is so popular among dog owners the world over partly because of his diminutive size. This dog reaches up to 5 inches in height and weighs no more than six pounds.

    These tiny dogs actually come in a range of colors, including white, black, red, fawn, brown, cream and more. These canines also come in many unique patterns, but one pattern is actually undesirable – the merle coat type. This is because there are many health problems associated with it.

    The smooth coated Chihuahua is easy to maintain and groom since he has short hair. On the other hand, the long-haired Chihuahua has more grooming requirements, including more frequent bathing and brushing.

    Despite being one of the smallest dog breeds around, the Chihuahua has a huge personality and makes for a great family companion. These dogs are also quite intelligent, which makes them easy to train as long as you use positive reinforcement training methods for motivation.

    In a family setup, the Chihuahua acts as a loyal companion. This dog sometimes builds a strong bond with one member of the family and he can be quite bossy. Chihuahuas are generally wary of strangers and aggressive towards other canines.

    This breed is a good choice for families with older children as they are often intolerant of small kids. However, if you have time on your hands to train and take care of your Chihuahua, he can be a very loving dog.

    Now, let’s talk about the Yorkshire Terrier.

    An Overview of the Yorkshire Terrier Breed

    Despite being a toy breed, The Yorkshire Terrier displays the lively personality that is typical of most terrier breeds. This dog has tons of energy and enjoys various family activities, but his most distinctive feature is his long, smooth coat.

    As his name suggests, the Yorkie was originally bred in Yorkshire, England in the 19th century. The emergence of this breed can be attributed to three different dogs with more contribution coming from the Maltese and the Paisley Terrier.

    During the formative years of the Yorkshire Terrier breed, there was no recognized standard for the breed, so any dog with a long, smooth, blue and fawn coat was said to be a Yorkshire Terrier. In the 1860s, however, one of the dogs was selected to define the breed standard. Soon afterwards, the Yorkshire Terrier made its way to North America.

    The Yorkshire Terrier was officially recognized by the AKC in 1885 and he became the breed of choice for the American nobility and English upper class. Apart from being a loyal companion, these dogs were also used to control rats and other pests in clothing mills.

    These days, however, the Yorkie is mainly a family companion dog, and constantly ranks among the most popular dog breeds in the US and elsewhere in the world.

    Now that you know more about each parent breed, let’s take a look at the Yorkie Chihuahua Mix in more detail.

    How Big Will a Yorkie Chihuahua Mix Get?

    One of the factors that makes the full grown Chorkie dog so popular is his small size.

    The Chihuahua is a toy breed and stands up to 10 inches tall and weighs anywhere between 4 and 6 pounds. The Yorkshire Terrier also falls under the toy group and reaches no more than 9 inches in height, and weighs around 4 to 7 pounds.

    With that information in mind, you can expect your Chorkie full grown dog to fall within the average height and weight range for the two breeds. This means your Chorkie puppy will stand no more than 10 inches tall and weigh anywhere between 4 and 7 pounds when full grown.

    However, the only way to actually know the size of a mixed breed dog like the Chorkie is to wait until his maturity age.

    General Appearance

    The Chihuahua and Yorkshire Terrier Mix is not only an excellent companion, but a very cute dog, as well. However, the exact physical characteristics of your Chorkie dog will depend on which parent dog he takes after most.

    Chihuahuas are known for their attractive coats, which could be either short haired or long haired. These small dogs come in various colors, which gives potential pet parents plenty of choices.

    How to take care of a chorkie puppy

    Chorkie Puppies: Temperament and Care Guide

    What is a ‘Chorkie’?

    A ‘Chorkie’ is the resulting offspring between a full blooded Chihuahua and a full blooded Yorkshire Terrier. Chorkie puppies are not considered to be purebred regardless of whether both of the parents were of pure bloodlines. Therefore, chorkie is not a registered breed of dog—it is a crossbreed. As with most crossbred dogs, there is no guarantee exactly how the resulting chorkie puppies will look, act, or behave. In some instances, a puppy will “take” better to one half of its breed in looks and/or temperament while in other cases, the puppy could end up being a nice mish-mash of both breeds. In order to get a good idea of what kind of puppy the chorkie can turn out to be, let’s take a look at the parent breeds separately.

    Physical Description: Yorkshire Terrier

    Ahh…the Yorkshire Terrier. This breed of dog has a positively “rascal” look to it. Although the typical terrier is considered to have a short but tough physique, the Yorkshire terrier is rather small boned and a bit more fragile in comparison to his cousins, the cairn terrier and the Scottish terrier. The Yorkshire terrier has long fur that must be brushed daily and clipped regularly. This breed has a very compact body comprised of a small round head, short back, and proportionate legs. The tail is typically docked with this breed. Yorkies are considered to be primarily blue-black with accents of gold or tan on the face and ears, the chest, the legs, and the feet. A standard sized yorkie should weigh in around eight pounds, although they do have a tendency to become overweight if spoiled too much!

    The Yorkshire terrier can seem quite energetic, but due to its size, most Yorkies are able to get an adequate amount of exercise indoors and through a daily walk or run around the yard. This is a breed that is often chosen due to its frailty and small bone structure. It is a dog that looks like it needs to be protected and mothered; therefore it is often chosen as a lap dog. A Yorkshire terrier may be at higher risk of sustaining a broken bone if it were to fall or attempt to jump from a high place. It is, however, very compact and is an excellent choice for someone who lives in a small home or apartment or who wants a lightweight dog that can easily be carried around or snuggled with.

    Physical Description: Chihuahua

    The Chihuahua is a purebred dog that hails from Mexico where this breed literally runs wild! The Chihuahua is the world’s smallest breed of dog (because “teacup” dogs don’t count as standalone breeds). The average Chihuahua will weigh anywhere from two to eight pounds, carrying the brunt of that weight in the midsection. Due to their small size and bone structure, extra care must be taken in handling a Chihuahua, as an adventurous leap from your arms or accidently stepping on him could easily lead to a broken bone. Chihuahuas have a characteristic apple shaped head topped off with large pointed ears. They can have either long or short hair and come in many colors, including tan, blue, silver, and tan and brown. Light brushing every couple of days is about the extent of this breed’s grooming needs. They also tend to live a long time, so that could be an added bonus for someone who is looking for many years with their companion.

    The Yorkshire Terrier’s Personality

    The Yorkie’s personality is easily described as lively, smart, and curious. They also tend to be a bit stubborn and will easily become ruler of the castle if ground rules are not enforced from a young age. For the most part, this breed will get along with other dogs but tends to scrap around with larger dogs (small dog syndrome). This type of terrier can live with cats although quick movements tend to spark his curiosity and set this dog running (and pouncing). If obedience is enforced at an early age, the Yorkshire terrier can be exceptionally bright and willing to please his family. Yorkies have been known to sway towards a willful and self-pleasing nature if this attitude is not quickly corrected. Loyalty isn’t a question with this breed—they are quick to bond with a loving family and will certainly not back down from the opportunity to protect loved ones. Be warned that Yorkies are quick to sound the alarm any time a foreign noise or scent crops up. Excessive barking can become an issue. In general, the Yorkie breed is fun loving and happy…and little bit stubborn. They have a tendency to act tough as nails but owners should remember that the Yorkie is a fragile breed.

    The Chihuahua’s Personality

    Chihuahuas have a very genuine disposition. They can be a little bit goofy and eccentric, but they would definitely keep their owner entertained! There are two extremes that crop up in Chihuahua personality. One is a suspicious nature that feels threatened by strangers. This type of Chihuahua personality is more likely to bark and growl at strangers and can bark excessively when new strange sounds are heard. The other type of Chihuahua personality is confident and a little feisty. This type is more likely to welcome strangers after being properly introduced. Chihuahuas must be socialized with humans and other dogs from a young age or they may become timid, overly suspicious, and snappy towards strange people and dogs.

    The End Result: Chorkie Puppies

    Chorkie puppies are undoubtedly going to be small in size and may either be long or short haired, depending on what type of fur the Chihuahua parent has. A short snout and good sized ears are another likely physical trait to crop up. As far as the chorkie personality goes, this could really be a gamble. The best you can do for your puppy is to socialize him well to discourage shyness and timidity, which is a common occurrence in both Yorkies and Chihuahuas.

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    How to take care of a chorkie puppyThe Chihuahua Yorkie Mix is a cross of a purebred Chihuahua and a purebred Yorkshire Terrier, also known as Chorkie. It’s a small dog breed at about 6 to 9 inches tall, weighing between 8 to 15 pounds. The lifespan of this crossbreed is around 10 to 15 years.

    Take a few minutes to see what Chorkies need in order to thrive, before deciding to buy or adopt such a dog.

    Contents & Quick Navigation

    Chihuahua Yorkie Mix Photo Gallery

    How to take care of a chorkie puppyHow to take care of a chorkie puppyHow to take care of a chorkie puppyHow to take care of a chorkie puppyHow to take care of a chorkie puppyHow to take care of a chorkie puppyHow to take care of a chorkie puppyHow to take care of a chorkie puppyHow to take care of a chorkie puppyHow to take care of a chorkie puppy

    You Can’t Know What Your Chorkie Will Look Like

    Chorkies usually have beautiful looks, but no one can predict what a puppy will be like as an adult. This is a common problem among crossbreeds, as parents have different characteristics and puppies can inherit any of them. A Chihuahua Yorkie Mix is a crossbreed between a purebred Chihuahua and a purebred Yorkshire Terrier. This generates a range of possibilities when it comes to puppies’ future appearance.

    The coat of a Chorkie is generally thick, fluffy, and soft. The length depends on the coat of her Chihuahua parent.

    Chorkie coat colors

    They can inherit any combination of black, brown, dark red, white, and grey.

    Depending on the parent’s traits she inherits, your future dog can have large or short ears. Their shape will also vary between rounded or triangular.

    Height and Weight of a Chorkie

    They can be tall (like the Chihuahua) or short (like the Yorkie).

    What you can be sure about, though, is the size of your Chorkie. As mentioned above these dogs are small, the average weight is between 8 and 15 pounds (3.6 – 6.8 kg) and is 6-9 inches tall (15-23 cm).

    You Must Start Training your Chorkie ASAP

    A Chihuahua Yorkie Mix is intelligent, and you can train her easily, as long as you start when she’s still a puppy. If you wait too long, there’s a high chance she’ll grow into a stubborn dog that doesn’t like rules. You should focus on potty training from her first days.

    Don’t give her time to make potty habits around your house, otherwise, training will be more difficult. Use positive reinforcement, and be patient, as small dogs have small bladders and it takes time for them to learn how to control their instincts.

    Obedience training and early socialization are also recommended, as they teach your dog to behave around people and other animals. If you have an untrained adult Chorkie, you’ll probably you’ll need professional help to teach her good manners.

    Chorkie is a Good Watchdog

    Both the Chihuahua and the Yorkie have great watchdog abilities, so your Chorkie will bark every time a stranger comes near your house. These dogs can inherit the Chihuahua’s barking habit, which can sometimes be annoying, but you can control this behavior with proper training.

    They also tend to challenge other animals, if they feel they might be in danger, so always keep an eye on your Chorkie when you’re outside, to avoid unpleasant incidents.

    Chorkies Are Good Friends For Busy Owners

    How to take care of a chorkie puppyOr for the lazy ones. They only shed a small amount of hair, require moderate grooming, and don’t need too much exercise.

    A Chihuahua Yorkie Mix is suitable for apartments and indoor life, as your Chorkie will prefer a nice playpen where she can feel safe, playing with her favorite toys, instead of a big yard.

    However, this doesn’t mean you should keep your dog locked up all day. She needs to move around the house a lot to burn off her energy.

    A 20-minute walk, twice a day, and a play session indoors is all they need to stay in good shape. If this is still too much for you, then don’t get a Chorkie, as lack of movement can cause obesity and other health issues related to excess weight.

    Grooming is usually easy, as with most small dogs:

    • brush her coat once or twice a week;
    • trim her nails every two weeks;
    • keep her clean. Chorkie tends to get dirty fast, so you should wash her regularly. However, bathing too often can cause skin allergies, so whenever it’s possible, clean her with a wet cloth instead;
    • brush her teeth 2-3 times a week.

    Chorkie Isn’t Suitable for Families with Small Kids

    Chorkies are playful, loyal, and always ready to protect their human families, but they have sensitive paws and tiny bodies, so you should watch them closely when small children are around. Kids tend to treat small dogs like toys, and this can be dangerous for your little friend.

    Furthermore, these dogs like to be the center of attention, so they do well with older children as opposed to younger ones.

    Conclusion

    I think Chorkie can be a good companion for both single people and families. As long as you’re ready to train her properly and give her the attention she needs, she’ll thrive in any house, no matter how small.

    I’d like to know your opinion about these dogs. Do you have a Chorkie, or are you planning to get one in the future? Let us know about your plans in a comment below.

    Table of Contents

    How Big Will A Yorkie Chihuahua Mix Get?

    How much is a chorkie worth? Breed Information
    —————–
    Weight
    Colors
    Litter Size
    Puppy Price

    What does a Chihuahua and Yorkie mix look like?

    Can Chorkies be left alone? Tolerates Being Left Alone: Chorkies tend to have separation anxiety when their owners left them alone at home because they bond very closely with them. Child Friendly: Chorkies are not kid-friendly dogs.

    How Big Will A Yorkie Chihuahua Mix Get – Related Questions

    At what age is a chorkie full grown?

    Weight Height
    ———– ————-
    8 to 15 lbs 6 to 9 inches

    What is the temperment of a chorkie?

    Chorkie Temperament Your Chorkie can be active, bubbly, bright, vocal, fun, smart, goofy, loving, loyal, tender and excitable. Because they are so loyal to their owners, they can be very aggressive with strangers.

    How to take care of a chorkie puppy

    How big will my chorkie get?

    The Chihuahua Yorkie Mix is a cross of a purebred Chihuahua and a purebred Yorkshire Terrier, also known as Chorkie. It’s a small dog breed at about 6 to 9 inches tall, weighing between 8 to 15 pounds. The lifespan of this crossbreed is around 10 to 15 years.

    How much does a Yorkie Chihuahua mix cost?

    How much does a Yorkie chihuahua mix cost? It costs an average of $400 to $800. Since Yorkies range from $1500 and Chihuahuas are generally cheaper, this makes sense that Chorkie can be in the middle in terms of the price range.

    Are Yorkie Chihuahua mix good dogs?

    The Chorkie is a mixed breed dog–a cross between the Chihuahua and Yorkshire Terrier dog breeds. Playful, devoted, and outgoing, these small pups inherited some of the best traits from both of their parents.

    What does a full grown chorkie look like?

    How big will a Yorkie Chihuahua mix get?

    That said, as a mix between Chihuahua and Yorkie parents, it’s safe to assume your Chorkie will be an itty bitty. Most weigh in at eight to 15 pounds and range in height from six to nine inches at the shoulder.

    Is a chorkie a good dog?

    Great Pet for the Right People. Although the Chorkie makes a charming pet, these dogs are not suitable for every family. They are a bit too small to make good companions for families with young children, but they can work well for families with older children who understand the need to be careful with their little pet.

    How much do Chorkies go for?

    The price of Chorkie breed ranges between $400 to $500 USD on an average.

    What does a Yorkie and Chihuahua mix look like?

    How often should you walk a chorkie?

    Chorkie Activity Requirements Your Chorkie family pet will require some exercise to keep him healthy and happy. He will need 30 to 60 minutes each and every day of exercise which can consist of daily walks, games of fetch and frisbee and obedience practice.

    What do I need to know about a chorkie puppy?

    A Chorkie is super friendly although they may be protective due to their Yorkshire Terrier heritage. They are very loyal to their owners and will always have your back, even if they can’t reach it. If trained properly, then they can get along well with children; but it’s not recommended. He will love to play.

    How much should I sell my Yorkie puppies for?

    Licensed breeders without papers Puppies from a licensed breeder are going to be more expensive. You can expect to pay at least $800 to $1,200 (and sometimes more) for a puppy with or without papers, that is not American Kennel Club (AKC) certified.

    How much do Chorkies cost?

    The price of Chorkie breed ranges between $400 to $500 USD on an average.

    Can a dog be left alone for 8 hours?

    Most experts agree you shouldn’t leave your adult dog alone for more than eight to 10 hours, but some dogs (especially ones with small bladders) can’t last that long. DO prepare your dog before you go.

    By Ashley Gallagher, DVM

    Puppies of any size or shape are just about guaranteed to be adorable. Even though they seem similar, puppies grow at different rates depending on their breed. Large breed puppies like Labrador Retrievers and Great Danes, for example, need a much different diet for optimal growth than a tiny Yorkie or Chihuahua.

    Proteins are the building blocks of the body and an absolute necessity for daily function and growth. Puppies require more protein than adult dogs because their bodies are busy growing. Puppy food should also be higher in calories than adult food to compensate for the energy puppies expend by growing and playing. About half of the calories they consume are spent on tissue growth and development.

    You should consult your veterinarian to determine a healthy food for your growing puppy. Excessive protein in a diet is not only unnecessary, but in large breed puppies, it can result in an unbalanced ratio of calcium to phosphorus. This can make a puppy’s bones grow too quickly, resulting in abnormal joint development. That can lead to arthritis down the road. Large breed puppy food has a specific calcium and phosphorus ratio to ensure the bones develop properly to help prevent joint disease.

    When Do I Switch My Puppy to Adult Dog Food?

    Depending on the breed, most dogs will not stop growing for the first year or two. You can continue feeding them a puppy formula until their growth plates have sealed, as long as they are not overweight. However, you must work closely with a veterinarian to assess your puppy’s body condition score. This will ensure that your puppy switches from puppy to adult dog food at the ideal time. Your veterinarian can also recommend how much adult dog food you should give your dog, as too many extra calories and nutrients may be harmful.

    Does it Make a Difference if My Puppy Has Been Spayed/Neutered?

    Generally speaking, a puppy’s energy requirements will decrease immediately after surgery. Again, it’s best to consult with your veterinarian, as the amount of food may need to be adjusted to prevent the animal from becoming overweight or obese.

    How to Choose the Best Adult Dog Food

    You should choose an adult dog food formula from a dog food company that has undergone AAFCO feeding trials. This means that the specific formulation of the diet has been fed to dogs to make sure there are no deficiencies. As surprising as it may seem, many dog food companies make their food based on a recipe and never feed it to actual dogs before sending it into the stores. You want to choose a pet food company that invests in scientific research and consults with veterinary nutritionists to provide a dog food that is specially balanced for the pet’s lifestage.

    You will also want to pay close attention to the AAFCO statement on the adult dog food formula. If the food is labeled as an “All Life Stage” food, the formula may have more fat and phosphorus than your adult dog needs. Discuss with your veterinarian what is best for your dog’s specific needs.

    How to take care of a chorkie puppy

    Dog fevers are defined by having a higher-than-normal body temperature, and they have a variety of causes.

    So how can you tell if your dog has a fever? How do you take their temperature, and what’s considered a fever in dogs? What causes dog fevers and how do you treat them?

    How to Tell if a Dog Has a Fever

    Dog fevers can be very difficult to detect at home and are often discovered at the veterinary office. This is because a dog’s temperature is naturally higher than a human’s, and it is almost impossible to detect a fever by touching a dog’s skin.

    How Do You Take a Dog’s Temperature?

    The only way of accurately knowing if your dog has a fever is to take their rectal temperature with a digital thermometer. This is done by lubricating the tip of the thermometer and inserting it into the rectum approximately 1 inch. It is important to have another person holding your dog’s head while you do this, as some dogs may not be tolerant of this at home.

    If a dog does not seem ill, there is no benefit to taking your dog’s temperature at home on a regular basis, because it can also go up with overactivity or if your dog has been outside in a warm environment.

    What Temperature Is Considered a Fever in Dogs?

    The normal range for a dog’s body temperature is between 100ºF and 102.5ºF. Anything above 102.5ºF is considered a fever or hyperthermia (overheating). A true fever is the body’s response to a disease process, whereas hyperthermia is caused by exposure to excessive heat or overheating from overexertion.

    What Are Some Symptoms of Dog Fevers?

    Dog fever symptoms can vary from mild to severe depending on how high the temperature is and what disease is causing it. Symptoms can include:

    What Causes Dog Fevers?

    There can be several different causes of dog fevers, but they generally fall into one of these categories:

    In some cases, despite extensive diagnostics, a cause is not found. This is called “fever of unknown origin.”

    Anything that can stimulate the immune system can cause a fever. For example, it is not uncommon for pets to get a low-grade fever after being vaccinated. This is because the immune system is being stimulated to protect the body against different diseases.

    Bacterial infections, fungal infections, or viral infections can all stimulate an immune response and cause a fever as well. Cancer is another disease process that usually stimulates the immune system, resulting in a fever.

    The most common cause of fever from inflammation is pancreatitis. This is an inflammation of the pancreas that can lead to vomiting, diarrhea, anorexia, and a painful abdomen. The cause is not clear and thought to be different in dogs than in cats and humans.

    Autoimmune diseases are a group of diseases that can stimulate the immune system to attack a part of the body with no underlying cause. Examples of autoimmune diseases include lupus, uveitis, and rheumatoid arthritis. These diseases can also result in dog fevers.

    What to Do if Your Dog Has a Fever

    If you feel that your dog may be ill, taking their temperature at home is a good start if you can do so. If your dog has a fever above 102.5ºF, that warrants a visit to the veterinarian. It is considered an emergency if your dog is extremely lethargic, has blood in their stool or vomit, stops eating, or has a fever above 104.5ºF.

    It is extremely important to never give your dog over-the-counter medications, such as ibuprofen, to reduce the fever. These medications are toxic to pets and can result in serious harm or death.

    Getting a diagnosis for dog fevers as soon as possible and instituting treatment will usually result in more favorable outcomes. Most causes of fever can be treated if caught early.

    How Are Dog Fevers Treated?

    Treatment of a fever in dogs is largely dependent on the cause of the fever. Oftentimes several diagnostics, such as bloodwork, radiographs (x-rays), and ultrasound, are necessary to determine the cause. In some cases, a cause cannot be identified.

    In dogs that have infections, the treatment is usually a course of antibiotics or antifungal medications. In other diseases, such as pancreatitis, there isn’t one anecdotal treatment, and medications are given to alleviate the symptoms until the inflammation subsides. This can take days to weeks and will depend on the level of severity.

    Cancer is treated with either chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy depending on the type of cancer that is diagnosed. Some types of cancer respond well to these treatments, where others may not respond as well or at all. Autoimmune diseases require drugs that suppress the immune system so that it stops attacking the different areas of the body.

    Most of these diseases are manageable but not usually curable.

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    Chorkie

    Chorkie Dog

    The Chorkie is a mixed breed dog cross between the Chihuahua and Yorkshire Terrier, they inherited both good qualities of their parents such as happy, active, playful, and affectionate dogs. They can live in a small place like an apartment because of their size, a simple walk or jogging in a day will keep them fit and healthy.

    ChorkieAppearance

    Chorkie has a coat that is the mix of their Chihuahua and Yorkshire Terrier, they have hypoallergenic medium-length silky coat that comes in a light color, the common color of their coats are brown, white, silver, blue, and black. They have a distinctive eyebrows which makes them cute. Like other breeds of dog, it is better to bathe and groom them as necessary, used the right shampoo and conditioner for their fur to make it soft, silky, and smell good.

    It is best to keep their dental hygiene and nail care properly too, periodontal disease is very common to dog whatever their size, brush their teeth several times a week to help remove tartar and bacteria and maintain the good condition of their teeth. Trim their nails once or twice a month to prevent injury in your dogs, long nails can also cause arthritis or other health concern in dogs. Short, neatly trimmed nails keep the feet in good condition and prevent our dog’s legs and our legs too from getting scratched when they excitedly jump up to greet us.

    Dog Ear Infections is a common condition in dogs that can affect one or both ears, check their ears at least once to twice a week for redness or a bad odor it is the indication of Ear Infections. To prevent ear infections in dogs always make sure that it is clean, use a dog ear cleaner and gently wipe it using a cotton ball dampened with an ear cleaner to your dog’s ears.

    Size

    Chorkie is a small breed of dog, weighing 8.63-6.80 kg. their height around 6-9 inches tall at the shoulder. Females is usually slightly smaller than males.

    Chorkie Personality

    Most of the Chorkie fur parent describe them as an happy, loyal, fun, playful, sweet dog. They are very affectionate and loves to cuddle with their owner a lot. Chorkie’s is energetic dog they need exercise to release this energy, a simple walk or jogging in a day will keep them fit and healthy.

    They are intelligent which makes them easy to train and discipline, they prepare around adults but they can be very good playmates to children too and will very protective of them but because of their size, they can get easily hurt by the children.

    Chorkie Health

    Chorkie dog has an average life span of 12 to 15 years, They are generally healthy but like other breeds of dogs, they are also prone to some diseases. Not all of them will get any or all of these diseases but the following are the common diseases they can have.

    How much is Chorkie?

    In buying to a legit Breeder you can expect to pay $400– $800 to Chorkie puppies.

    The legit breeder puts a lot of effort into high quality and healthy breeding of dogs. They provide healthy Dog Foods, visit the Vet for check-ups, Vaccinations, Vitamins, and proper Grooming of the dogs. The breeder will coup up all the expenses he/she spent to provide a healthy breed to you so expect a little expensive.

    Nowadays hundreds of thousands of dogs are being abandoned that’s why instead of buying I suggest you adopt! Support those in need give them love and a home to stay for the rest of their life.

    Note: The expenses of taking care of dogs do not end in buying one after you bought or adopt your dog you must provide their necessary needs, like visit vet once a year for their health check-up, complete and follow up vaccinations, foods and provide vitamins as their maintenance and the most important is time to play and cuddle with them, I think that’s the most affordable one, giving attention to them, proper care and lots of love from you…

    Chorkie Price In Panchkula: Mr n Mrs Pet is Panchkula’s most ethical place to buy, sell and adopt Chorkie puppies near you. Buy KCI Registered Chorkie for sale in Panchkula from verified Chorkie breeders.

    Chorkie Puppy price In Panchkula (Basic): In this category, Prices depend on the puppy’s health and quality, gender, age, and the breeder’s reputation.

    Chorkie Puppies price In Panchkula (KCI registered): For this category, Prices depend on the puppy’s parents’ lineage, genetics, bone quality, hair coat, gender, age, and the breeder’s reputation.

    Chorkie Dog price In Panchkula (Show Quality, Champion Bloodline): Prices for this category depend on the puppy’s parents’ lineage, genetics, bone quality, age, hair coat, gender, personality, color, and the breeder’s reputation.

    Buy Chorkie Dogs Online in Panchkula: Are you looking for Chorkie Puppies for sale in Panchkula? You’ve come to the right place! Mr n Mrs Pet has the best Chorkie puppies in Panchkula for sale. Best quality certified Chorkie dogs are available online with complete health check-ups and vaccination. Chorkie Puppies are easy to train and a good family dog for you. Chorkie is an intelligent dog breed globally at the best cost in Panchkula.

    Book your perfect companion Chorkie puppies for your family at Mr n Mrs Pet online pet shop. We connect the nation’s best Chorkie dog breeders and provide healthy, purebred puppies. Contact us and book your Chorkie puppy today! Whether You live in Gurgaon, Delhi, Bangalore, Hyderabad, Pune, Chennai, Mumbai, Lucknow, Indore, Kolkata, Panchkula, etc.

    We take pride and joy in raising high-quality Chorkie dogs in Panchkula. We are proficient in shipping and can arrange transportation to get your puppy safely to your home. Call us today at 7597972222, and we’d love to answer any of your pet-related queries.

    A playful, yet gentle dog, the bichon frise doesn’t need much room to romp and is suitable for apartment living. The breed is not known for barking.

    How to take care of a chorkie puppy

    The bichon frise requires considerable time for coat care. They need grooming, bathing and trimming on a regular basis.

    Weight Range:

    Male: 7-12 lbs.
    Female: 7-12 lbs.

    Height at Withers:

    Male: 12 in.
    Female: 12 in.

    Features:

    Floppy Ears (naturally)

    Expectations:

    Exercise Requirements: 20-40 Minutes/day
    Energy Level: Moderate
    Longevity Range: 12-15 yrs.
    Tendency to Drool: Low Tendency to Snore: Low
    Tendency to Bark: Moderate
    Tendency to Dig: Low Social/Attention Needs: High

    Bred For:

    Length: Medium
    Characteristics: Curly
    Colors: White with shadings of cream, buff or apricot
    Coat Less Allergenic: White with shadings of cream, buff or apricot
    Overall Grooming Needs: High

    Club Recognition:

    AKC Classification: companion
    UKC Classification: Companion Dog
    Prevalence: Common

    Bichons are similar to poodles in terms of their powder-puff coat, which consists of a silky but curly outer coat and soft undercoat. They are white, white and buff, cream, apricot or gray.

    The length of the bichon is somewhat longer than height. The plumed tail is carried over the back. Bichons have heads that are well-proportioned to their bodies, and drop ears. Their nose is pronounced and black.

    Both males and females of the breed stand just under 12 inches and weigh from seven to 12 pounds (three to six kilograms).

    Personality:

    The bichon frisé is considered a great all-around pet that is a playful yet gentle dog. Bichons get along well with other pets. They are generally considered very good with kids. In one survey, they ranked high on snapping at children, but caution is in order anytime dogs and small children are together. In the same survey, they were found easy to housebreak and train but some owners disagree with the easy housebreaking label.

    Living With:

    Bichons are active dogs, but because they are small, they don’t need too much room to romp and are suitable for apartment living. Bichons are not known for barking, which is a real plus for city dwellers, but don’t count on them to guard your home, either.

    They do require considerable time for coat care. They need grooming, bathing and trimming on a regular basis. Bichons are one of a few breeds recommended for people with allergies who want a dog, but beware. Some people with mild allergies may have fewer allergy problems with a bichon compared with other dogs, but there are no guarantees. Consult with your allergist and spend considerable time around adult bichons before deciding to live with one.

    History:

    The bichon frise (pronounced bee-SHON free-ZAY) is thought to be a descendant of the water spaniel and was known in the Mediterranean area as far back as the Middle Ages. Some historians believe the breed actually originated in the Canary Islands and was brought to Europe by sailors. Bichons have long been recognized as good companion dogs, mostly because of their cheerful, even temperaments. They were quite popular with European nobility, in the English court during Henry II’s reign, and were even included in paintings by Goya.

    By the 19th century, their popularity had declined. They were street dogs and some were used in circus troupes. Their popularity rose again after World War I. The breed was first brought to the United States in 1956 by a French family named Picault. The breed was recognized in 1973 by the American Kennel Club as a non-sporting dog.

    In recent years, bichons have become more popular as people learned about the desirable traits of the breed.

    Do Shorkies Shed?

    Did you decide to add an adorable Shorkie to your home? These dogs are friendly and loyal companions. As lap dogs, they great beginner dogs for first-time dog owners.

    But do they shed?

    The quick answer is no – Shorkies shed minimally. Today we will look at Shorkie’s coats and their care, as well as their hypoallergenic qualities.

    Table of Contents

    How much do Shorkies shed?

    In order to understand the Shorkie’s coat, we need to look at the coat of his parents. Shorkies are crossbreeds of Shih Tzus and Yorkies. As such, they will inherit coat qualities from both sides of their parentage.

    Shih Tzu Coat

    Shih Tzu’s have a single coat. This means that they only have guard hairs and no wooly dense undercoat. The undercoat is the part of the fur that typically “sheds”. Shih Tzus do require daily brushing and regular bathing with special shampoos. Their hair is often kept in a shorter haircut in order to make it easier to manage.

    Yorkie Coat

    Like the Shih Tzu, Yorkshire Terriers have a single coat. They shed minimally and don’t have any undercoat. Yorkies coat is especially fine and absolutely requires daily brushing in order to not mat or tangle. (This applies to both varieties of the Yorkie – the standard-sized and the Teacup Yorkie.)

    Yorkies are traditionally kept in a long and unclipped coat. However, if owners struggle to keep up with brushing or experience a lot of matting, it is always advisable to clip the Yorkie’s coat.

    How to take care of a chorkie puppy

    Shorkies don’t shed

    Because both parents have coats that shed minimally, your Shorkie is also going to not shed a lot. He will lack the undercoat which is the part of the fur that “sheds”.

    While you may find individual hair lying around, it will never be a lot and is very easily managed by daily brushing.

    Are Shorkies hypoallergenic?

    Shorkies are considered to be a hypoallergenic breed due to their minimally shedding coat.

    If you have suffered from dog allergies in the past it is crucial that you spend some time around Shorkies before purchasing a puppy.

    Dog allergies can be directed to the hair and dander. Some sufferers of allergies however also react to a protein that is found in dogs’ urine and saliva.

    The best way to determine of a Shorkie is the best hypoallergenic breed for you is to visit your future Shorkie breeder and hold and pet the dogs to see how you will react.

    How to take care of a chorkie puppy

    Are Shorkies high-maintenance?

    Your Shorkie’s coat will not be high-maintenance as long as you keep up with brushing. If you keep him in a long coat and skip brushing for a couple weeks, then he will be matted and require extensive grooming.

    However, if you brush him just 5 minutes every day it will be easy to stay on top of his coat maintenance.

    Many Shorkie owners opt to have their dog’s coat clipped in a short and convenient hairstyle. If you feel that you cannot keep up with your dog’s long coat, a shorter ‘do will make your life a lot easier.

    Of course, maintenance does not only include grooming. Like any dog, a Shorkie will need daily attention, interaction, mental and physical stimulation. While these dogs are small and easy, they still require enrichment and activities ever single day.

    Why does my Shorkie stink?

    If your Shorkie is smelling badly, it is probably time for a bath. Dirt and debris can get tangled in the long coat of these dogs and lead to unpleasant smells. The longer the coat is, the more often you should plan to bathe your dog.

    Sometimes their backside gets dirty when they poop as well. You can wipe them after they go potty to make sure that nothing sticks to their behind.

    If your Shorkie is smelling out of his mouth, chances are he is in need of some dental work. As a small breed, these dogs are prone to build tartar and developing teeth issues. You can prevent this by giving your dog dental chew such as Greenies and brushing his teeth regularly.

    Once past a certain age, you will probably need to get a dental cleaning done at your vet’s office every year or two.

    If you’re raising puppies, it doesn’t get more exciting than the moments after delivery when you finally get a chance to meet the new litter. How many puppies are there? What colors are they? How many males or females? It’s a heartwarming time as the mother dog forms a bond with her new puppies.

    How to take care of a chorkie puppy

    Even if you have a healthy mother dog that loves her litter, you’ll still be involved with newborn puppy care week by week. Here’s a rundown of some things you want to keep in mind.

    1-week-old puppy care

    • You’re a partner. Raising puppies is hard work, but thankfully you don’t have to do it alone! The mother dog is your partner in this task, and your role this week will be an “overseer” and someone to contribute in areas the mother can’t manage, like weighing the puppies and deworming them.
    • Are the puppies nursing? Newborn puppies receive all of their nutrition from their mother’s milk, so it’s very important to make sure each puppy is nursing properly. Another key factor is the colostrum the puppies receive from the milk, which contains important antibodies to protect the puppies during these early stages of life. In this instance, the mother dog will take care of deciding when to feed the puppies. In the event of a serious problem, you’ll need to take over bottle feeding the puppies with the aid of a newborn puppy feeding chart.
    • Weigh the puppies. Keep an eye on your puppies’ weight gain by weighing them every day. You should see a steady increase each day and you can expect each puppy to double its birth weight by the time they are seven to 10 days old.
    • Keep the puppies warm! Newborn puppies are still developing and aren’t able to regulate their body temperatures effectively. They receive some protection from their mother’s body heat, but it’s possible your new mother dog doesn’t spend all her time with the puppies in the whelping box. After all, she’s used to life with her family, and she may not want to have her daily routine entirely disrupted by her puppies. This is fine, except the puppies may need a heat source when she isn’t around. Once the puppies are older (after their eyes are open and they can move around easily) you can fill that need by providing the puppies with a puppy-safe heated pad designed to provide warmth without getting too hot. You could also give them a Mother’s Heartbeat Heated Puppy Bed with Bone Pillow to keep them warm and cozy. Heat lamps are also sometimes used to heat the general puppy area, but talk to your veterinarian first.
    • Keep the whelping box clean. You want to regularly change the bedding and absorbent pads and frequently clean the whelping box over the next several weeks.
    • Get a vet check. You may wish to have your veterinarian evaluate your puppies and their mother shortly after birth to ensure everyone is doing well.

    2-week-old puppy care

    • Turn down the thermostat. It’s still vitally important to keep the puppies warm at this stage, but you can start to ease it up a bit, working down towards about 80°F.
    • Keep an eye on their eyes. Puppies generally start to open their eyes at about this time. If they don’t, you probably should have a veterinarian take a look and possibly help assist the puppies by manually opening their eyes. At all times, be on the lookout for any kind of eye discharge or other signs of infection.
    • Watch their weight. Continue to weigh the puppies each day during week two to ensure everyone is steadily gaining weight.
    • Start deworming. Under your veterinarian’s guidance, the puppies should receive their first deworming treatment at about two weeks of age.

    3-week-old puppy care

    • Start handling the puppies. By about three weeks of age, you can—and should!—begin gently handling the puppies 1 for short periods for reasons other than basic health care. Once the puppies have their eyes open, you can try carefully picking them up, holding them for a bit, and placing them back in the box. It’s just a tiny, early step towards socializing them with people.
    • Watch them grow strong. Always keep an eye on the puppies’ health and physical growth progression. By three weeks, they might try to explore more of their environment. 2
    • Keep weighing the puppies! Continue to monitor their weight by weighing the puppies every three to seven days.
    • Lower the heat again. The puppies’ ability to regulate their body temperature is improving. You can probably bring the whelping box temperature down to 75°F.
    • Offer water. Your three-week-old puppies might begin to show an interest in a water dish. Place a shallow, puppy-safe bowl in the whelping box and see if they experiment with it. Some experts recommend trying a mixture of water and puppy formula in the water bowl.

    4-week-old puppy care

    • Check for proper development. Always keep a close eye on your litter’s physical growth and behavior. Are they advancing properly? Are they starting to walk? 3
    • Room temperature. The puppies are growing up fast; you can lower the whelping box temperature down to a normal room temperature.
    • Bring on the solid food. Well, not too solid at first, but more substantial than their mother’s milk. Introduce soft foods slowly, then transition to solid foods.

    5-week-old puppy care

    • Socialize! Pups are really starting to be on the move now. They might start to venture a little further away from their littermates and think they’re pretty independent. It’s important for your puppy to begin to develop “people skills” so they don’t show signs of fear later.
    • Introduce more solid foods. The puppies will gradually eat more solid food as the mother dog naturally slows the frequency of nursing.

    6-, 7- and 8-week-old puppy care

    • Don’t wait; vaccinate! When your puppies are six to eight weeks old, it’s time for their first vaccinations. The specific vaccines given at each visit may vary slightly depending on your region and the specifics of your puppies’ lifestyle. Additional vaccinations will be needed after ten weeks and in the coming months.
    • Register the puppies. If your puppies are purebred, now’s the time to register them. They’ll be so impressed with their papers! (Not those papers!)
    • Wean the puppies. By this time, the weaning process that began around week four will be completed.
    • Have a heart! You can help ease the transition away from the mother and littermates by offering each puppy a pillow that mimics the sounds of their mother’s heartbeat. It’s a reassuring sound that will help them feel relaxed in their new home. You can also mimic the warmth of their mother’s body heat with a heated heartbeat puppy bed or give them that same warm coziness with a heated heartbeat crate pad.
    • Say goodbye. After eight weeks, members of the litter often leave home to join their new families.

    The week-by-week care of newborn puppies is a lot of work, but there is a lot of satisfaction and enjoyment in the process as well.

    How to take care of a chorkie puppy

    If you don’t spay your female dog, you may eventually find yourself with an expectant pooch on your hands. Although puppies are cute and cuddly, there is a lot of care that goes into their development in the first couple of weeks. These are some things to know if you ever have to care for newborn puppies.

    Things You Can Do For Newborn Puppies

    Create a den

    The mother and the puppies need to have a den area that is all to themselves. A den with a small heating pad, blankets, and pillows will provide warmth and comfort. There may be some drainage and waste in the area for the next couple of weeks, so the bedding needs to be changed on a daily basis. Cleanliness is key to maintaining a healthy environment for both puppies and the mother.

    Keep them with their mother

    The presence of the mother is what sustains puppies when they are first born. They are not to be separated from the mother under any circumstances during this critical period. Given that the mother has just given birth, she should be given time to rest with her puppies undisturbed. It is the mother that provides nutrients from her milk to promote a healthy immune system and development. Feeding will normally take place every two to three hours for puppies and they are unable to eat solid food until they are at least four weeks old. Puppies between four and eight weeks can eat a mixture of dry food and milk and then they can shift to solid food completely after that period. If the mother is not present then it is recommended that you contact a veterinarian for an acceptable substitute for her milk as human milk is not appropriate for puppies.

    Watch for warning signs of sickness

    Time is of the essence for puppies because they are unable to do anything on their own. If you notice any type of abnormalities in their appearance or behavior, then it is recommended that you contact a veterinarian right away to correct the issue before it is too late. Some things to look out for include vomiting, excessive crying, diarrhea, rejection by the mother, or if the puppy is not nursing with everyone else.

    Contact your veterinarian

    The supervision of a veterinarian is recommended to provide a healthy start for puppies because there are a lot of dangers that lay-people are not aware of. Puppies are unable to hear, see, or even defecate on their own when they are first born and they can also fall ill due to a number of diseases and health problems. Ask your veterinarian for advice about how to care for the puppies when they are born.

    As a general note, breeding at home is not recommended as young puppies are vulnerable to a number of illnesses and they can potentially die if they are not cared for properly. Young puppies must be allowed to stay with their mother for at least twelve weeks to help them grow and develop before they are adopted out. Since puppies are delicate creatures in need of a lot of attention, stay in close contact with your veterinarian to ensure their good health.

    FEEDING YOUR PUPPY

    How to take care of a chorkie puppy

    Your puppy’s diet is essential to help support their growth and development and build a healthy immune system. Here you’ll find our top tips on feeding your puppy – their needs, choosing the right food and giving your little bundle of fun all the nutrients they need to grow into a healthy, happy dog.

    How to take care of a chorkie puppy

    How to take care of a chorkie puppy

    “PUPPYHOOD IS THE MOST NUTRITIONALLY DEMANDING TIME IN A DOG’S LIFE”

    PUPPIES GROW QUICKLY

    Puppies grow quickly in the first few months, so puppyhood is the most nutritionally demanding time in their life.

    As a general rule a puppy’s nutritional needs can be divided into two main phases – the fast growth rate of the young puppy, followed at about five months of age by the slightly slower rate of the adolescent.

    Large and giant breed dogs have a slightly different growth pattern, reaching their mature body size slightly later. Some large and giant breeds don’t stop growing until they are 15-18 months old, whereas some small breeds are at their adult weight at 6 months of age.

    YOUR PUPPY’S NEEDS

    Whatever their breed, because they are growing so fast, puppies have a higher requirement for protein, energy and calcium than an adult. In fact, from birth until they reach 50% of their adult weight, your puppy will have around double the daily energy requirements of an adult.

    Along with their exercise, diet will have the greatest effect on your puppy’s bones and joints, and hence their size, shape, strength and fitness as an adult.

    If your new pet is coming from a breeder, it’s most likely they will have been weaned before you go to collect them. Weaning tends to occur at around 4-8 weeks and is where the pups start to rely less on their mother’s milk and puppy food is slowly introduced. Our dry puppy food is for puppies 8 weeks +. If at this stage, you are still weaning, remember to introduce the puppy food gradually and only use tiny amounts. For weaning puppies, you should always soften the kibble by soaking it in warm water for a minimum of 30 minutes until it gives the consistency you desire, allowing it to fully hydrate. You may also want to mash it down further with a fork. Ensure the food is cool before allowing the puppy to dig in.

    If your pup is happily enjoying their food with ease, you can build this into their daily feed. However, remember pups only have tiny stomachs and so little and often is the best approach.

    Young puppies need to be fed a diet that has been specially formulated for growth, so it’s important to choose a diet that is labelled as being ‘for puppies’.