How to transfer to an online public school

Learn how to submit a transfer request to switch schools. Students who are new to the district, previously enrolled, or currently enrolled need an APS ID Number to apply for a transfer.

Apply for a Transfer

Students who had approved transfers or approved rollover transfers for school year 2020-2021 and dis-enrolled from the transfer school to attend one of the following schools will be allowed to go back to the transfer school for 2021-2022:

  • eCADEMY K8 Magnet or eCADEMY Magnet High School;
  • a charter school;
  • a school in a New Mexico school district; or
  • a private school or home school

Students must enroll at the transfer school by December of 2021 or will lose the approved transfer. (Approved by Leadership, Jan. 13, 2021.)

Families who would like for their child to attend an APS school outside of their neighborhood in 2021-2022 may apply online for a transfer beginning January 1.

Apply Online

Apply In Person

You are also welcome to submit your application in person at City Center: 6400 Uptown Blvd. NE, Suite 100 West.

About Student ID Numbers

To apply for a transfer, you must have an APS ID Number.

  • New students who need to request a transfer must have a Student ID Number. Please read the directions for new students.
  • Currently or previously enrolled students who don’t know their Student ID Number may contact their school or check any of their official school documentation (e.g., IEP’s, Report Cards, or Progress Reports).

Remember: Use Your Legal Name

When applying for a transfer, remember to use your legal name and not a nickname. Parent and student names must match the information that is in the APS student information system (e.g., birth certificate, medical information, etc.)

Need Help?

Contact the Student Service Center at (505) 855-9040 or (505) 855-9050 if you have any questions need assistance with the transfer process.

Additional information is available online: Transfer FAQs.

Parents and families have more educational options today than ever before. And sometimes all those choices mean your homeschool family might decide to switch schools midstream—from home education to a private school or even to public school.

That’s the decision Melanie Wilson and her husband made when their 15-year-old son said he wanted to go to a public high school. It’s also the decision thousands of other homeschool families make at some point during their children’s school years.

That transition can be hugely intimidating, and that’s why we’re addressing it in today’s blog post. If you’ve thought about making the change to a public school, this post is perfect for you. But even if you plan to homeschool all the way through, don’t tune out the tips below! You never know when life circumstances will dictate a change. Let’s dive right in!

1. Keep detailed records

All homeschoolers should keep detailed records, even if you never plan to put your kids into a traditional school setting. Some states require that homeschooling parents keep an attendance log and maintain certain hours of school each day. Others are more lenient. But regardless of what your state requires, it’s best to maintain records of attendance, curriculum used for each year of school, grades earned, and any exam scores.

Being able to provide this information to the public school could make the difference between your child being placed into the grade level they should be or having to repeat a year or two of school.

2. Prepare for a classroom setting

Give your child experience taking notes and taking a variety of types of tests. The typical homeschool student usually doesn’t need to take a lot of notes, but it’s a valuable skill to teach your child once they are capable of reading and writing. If they end up in public school, you’ll both be glad you took the time to train in note taking!

The same goes for teaching your child how to take tests. You may want to make sure at least one curriculum you use in your homeschooling has a testing component to give your child some experience in being tested and understanding how to take tests. HSLDA has an excellent article on their website about teaching your child to take tests .

You may also want to have your child take a yearly standardized test such as the Stanford Achievement Test. Many private schools open up testing spots to homeschoolers. You also have the option to do the testing at home if you wish. One option is to sign up with a service such as Homeschool Testing Services .

3. Get the timing right

Some grade levels are better than others for enrolling your child into public school. I homeschooled my oldest daughter from 2nd through 8th grade and then decided to let her try public high school. It was quite easy to put her into 9th grade because we were not claiming that she had earned any credits. This put her on the same footing as all the other incoming freshman.

I have friends who enrolled 10th and 11th grade students from homeschooling to public school and it was not as smooth of an experience. Their children had to repeat courses already completed, which was frustrating to the parents and kids. Some schools will test students to place them, whether you’re enrolling in elementary or high school.

In Texas, where I homeschool, each school district makes their own decision on how to handle students who are coming from unaccredited schools. One way to get around this problem is to enroll your child in an accredited online school, so that if or when you enroll them in public school their previous work will be accepted.

4. Smooth the transition with an online public school

If you know for certain that you are going to enroll your child into public school, then you may wish to enroll in an online public school so that your child’s transition to public school is seamless. Be aware that online public schools are basically school at home, and expect the student to be in attendance for certain days and hours, to take standardized tests, and to adhere to other requirements that public schools have.

This is a good solution for many families who only plan to homeschool for just a year or two. An online public school is usually free, while an accredited online school has tuition.

5. Get wisdom from other parents

Talk to parents in your area who have put their homeschooled students into public school. They will be knowledgeable about the whole process and can advise you on what was helpful or what not to do. If nothing else, they’ll be able to be supportive and understanding of what you are going through.

Your family and friends who don’t homeschool may have a hard time understanding all the emotions and stress you and your child are under during this transition, so it’s important to surround yourself with like-minded folks.

Wrapping up

Whether planned or unplanned, transitioning from homeschooling to public school can be an emotional journey for your whole family. Hopefully the tips we outlined will help you to navigate this transition as painlessly as possible.

The Texas Virtual School Network Online Schools (TXVSN OLS) program provides full-time online instruction to eligible Texas public school students in grades 3-12 through enrollment in one of the TEA-accredited public school districts and open-enrollment charter schools approved to participate in the program. These free online public schools offer 100 percent virtual instructional programs to students across the state who are not physically present on campus. Students who enroll in one of the TXVSN online schools are public school students.

Courses comprising the TXVSN OLS program are reviewed to ensure they meet the state curriculum standards, known as the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS), and national standards for quality online courses. Courses must also align with accessibility standards. Teachers are required to be Texas-certified in the content area and at the grade level they are teaching and must be trained in best practices in delivering online instruction.

Authorized by Texas Education Code (TEC) Chapter 30A, the TXVSN OLS program is administered by the TEA under the leadership of the commissioner of education. TEA-accredited public school districts and open-enrollment charter schools participating in the program provide full-time online instruction to eligible public school students in grades 3-12 throughout Texas.

TXVSN OLS Students

Students in grades 3-12 who reside anywhere in the state, are eligible to attend public school in Texas, and meet the other eligibility requirements of the TXVSN OLS program may enroll in the full-time virtual instructional program. They will participate in rigorous, interactive online courses that emphasize extensive communication between the Texas-certified teacher and student and among students.

The full-time virtual TXVSN OLS program is available to students who meet eligibility requirements defined in TEC, §30A.002. A student is eligible only if the student meets requirements for enrollment in the Texas public education system and

  • was enrolled in a public school in this state in the preceding school year; or
  • is a dependent of a member of the United States military who has been deployed or transferred to this state and was enrolled in a publicly funded school outside of this state in the proceeding school year; or
  • has been placed in substitute care in this state, regardless of whether the student was enrolled in a public school in this state in the preceding year; or
  • is a dependent of a member of the United States military, was previously enrolled in high school in this state, and does not reside in this state due to a military deployment or transfer.

Some TXVSN virtual campuses may have additional eligibility requirements. Contact each OLS for more details.

Commissioner’s Rules for the Texas Virtual School Network

Administrative rules governing the TXVSN OLS program are available online. The rules provide guidance for school districts and charter schools participating in the TXVSN, in accordance with the Texas Education Code (TEC), Chapter 30A.

TXVSN OLS Funding

TXVSN online schools are free public schools; there is no charge to enroll. Eligible independent school districts and open-enrollment charter schools earn funding for a student enrolled in courses offered through the TXVSN OLS program in the same manner that the school earns funding for a student who is enrolled in a traditional classroom setting, provided that the student successfully completes the courses.

Resources

The following links are resources about TXVSN:

The Texas Virtual School Network Online Schools (TXVSN OLS) program provides full-time online instruction to eligible Texas public school students in grades 3-12 through enrollment in one of the TEA-accredited public school districts and open-enrollment charter schools approved to participate in the program. These free online public schools offer 100 percent virtual instructional programs to students across the state who are not physically present on campus. Students who enroll in one of the TXVSN online schools are public school students.

Courses comprising the TXVSN OLS program are reviewed to ensure they meet the state curriculum standards, known as the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS), and national standards for quality online courses. Courses must also align with accessibility standards. Teachers are required to be Texas-certified in the content area and at the grade level they are teaching and must be trained in best practices in delivering online instruction.

Authorized by Texas Education Code (TEC) Chapter 30A, the TXVSN OLS program is administered by the TEA under the leadership of the commissioner of education. TEA-accredited public school districts and open-enrollment charter schools participating in the program provide full-time online instruction to eligible public school students in grades 3-12 throughout Texas.

TXVSN OLS Students

Students in grades 3-12 who reside anywhere in the state, are eligible to attend public school in Texas, and meet the other eligibility requirements of the TXVSN OLS program may enroll in the full-time virtual instructional program. They will participate in rigorous, interactive online courses that emphasize extensive communication between the Texas-certified teacher and student and among students.

The full-time virtual TXVSN OLS program is available to students who meet eligibility requirements defined in TEC, §30A.002. A student is eligible only if the student meets requirements for enrollment in the Texas public education system and

  • was enrolled in a public school in this state in the preceding school year; or
  • is a dependent of a member of the United States military who has been deployed or transferred to this state and was enrolled in a publicly funded school outside of this state in the proceeding school year; or
  • has been placed in substitute care in this state, regardless of whether the student was enrolled in a public school in this state in the preceding year; or
  • is a dependent of a member of the United States military, was previously enrolled in high school in this state, and does not reside in this state due to a military deployment or transfer.

Some TXVSN virtual campuses may have additional eligibility requirements. Contact each OLS for more details.

Commissioner’s Rules for the Texas Virtual School Network

Administrative rules governing the TXVSN OLS program are available online. The rules provide guidance for school districts and charter schools participating in the TXVSN, in accordance with the Texas Education Code (TEC), Chapter 30A.

TXVSN OLS Funding

TXVSN online schools are free public schools; there is no charge to enroll. Eligible independent school districts and open-enrollment charter schools earn funding for a student enrolled in courses offered through the TXVSN OLS program in the same manner that the school earns funding for a student who is enrolled in a traditional classroom setting, provided that the student successfully completes the courses.

Resources

The following links are resources about TXVSN:

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GPA Entrance Requirements From High School to Texas Tech

There are many reasons why you might decide to transfer your child from homeschool into public school in Texas. Since homeschooling is widely accepted in this state, transferring to public school is straightforward. Each school district in Texas sets its own guidelines about this procedure. You will need to contact the school district you plan to enter to find out its requirements.

Begin the Transfer Process

Contact the school district to which you want to transfer. Consult the administration regarding required documentation, transfer procedures and deadlines. If they are not familiar with homeschool student transfers, research and network to find what you should expect to encounter in the process and be prepared to assert yourself, if necessary. Homeschooling is recognized with respect in Texas, so you should not have problems matriculating.

Compile a transcript for your student’s coursework. Include a listing of all courses, including those taught by a tutor, in a co-op setting or as dual credit in a community college. List the grade the student earned in each class. Depending on the age of your student, this may simply be a list of classes you taught. For a junior high or high school student, it should look like a traditional transcript. Ask homeschooling friends with older children to show you the transcript format they use, or search the web for a template. See link in Resources for a free online transcript. Decide what modifications need to be made to fit your needs. Complete the form and have it notarized.

Gather the required documents. Begin the transfer process. Elementary students can transfer into public school more easily than older students. Junior high students can transfer more easily than high school students, but if you determine that this is the best avenue for your high school student you should persevere in the transfer process. High school transfer students may be required to pass testing to demonstrate their knowledge and academic ability. This may be in the form of final exams for the previous year. For instance, a sophomore student may be required to take the freshman finals in history, English, mathematics and science. However, if your homeschooling has been under the sponsorship of an accredited organization such as Seton Home Study or Griggs International Academy, your student might not have to take tests.

Once the transfer is approved, help prepare your student for the change by visiting the school on numerous occasions. This may be particularly helpful for an elementary age student. Request permission for your child to join prospective classmates for lunch and recess. Meet neighborhood children who attend the school. Arrange play dates or invite a family to your home to get acquainted.

Plan ahead. It takes time to assemble a transcript. Also, the school may have a cutoff deadline for accepting new students for the next semester.

Transfer students normally matriculate at the start of school in the fall or after winter break.

Prepare your child for entry into public school by explaining classroom procedures and the routine of a typical school day.

Visit the school before applying for a transfer.

Transcripts for high school students should be professional in appearance and include all the data normally found on a transcript.

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Overview

There are limitations and requirements related to foreign (F-1) students attending public secondary/high schools (grades nine through twelve), under U.S. law. Student F-1 visas cannot be issued to persons seeking to enter the United States in order to attend a public primary/elementary school or a publicly funded adult education program.

Dependents of a nonimmigrant visa holder of any type, including F-1, are not prohibited from attendance at either a public primary school, an adult education program, or another public educational institution, as appropriate.

Requirements List

  • Secondary school attendance is limited to twelve months.
  • F-1 secondary school students are required to pay the school the full cost of education by repaying the school system for the full, unsubsidized, per capita cost of providing the education to him or her.
  • F-1 students are prohibited from attending public elementary schools or publicly-funded adult education programs.

Restrictions are for F-1 Students Only

The following restrictions apply to foreign students who are:

  • Students in F-1 status who need an I-20 to study in the United States;
  • Students in F-1 status in public schools who leave the United States and want to return to continue their studies; and
  • Students in F-1 status who want to transfer from a private school or program into a public school or program.

The following restrictions do not apply to foreign students who are:

  • Students in another visa status (i.e., J-2, L-1, M-2, or G-4) or
  • Students in F-1 status who attend private schools or private training or language programs.

How is the 12 month attendance limit applied?

The length of study indicated on the Form I-20 must be limited to 12 months. It should be noted that public secondary attendance in a status other than F-1 does not count against the 12-month limit. For example, if you were the child of an A-2 visa holder previously attending secondary school, this would not count toward the 12 month limit.

Students Must Pay the Costs of Secondary School Education

Foreign students who want to attend public secondary school (high school) must pay the full cost of education. This amount is listed under “tuition” on the student’s Form I-20. If the Form I-20 does not include the cost of tuition, the student must have a notarized statement, signed by the designated school official (DSO) who signed the Form I-20, stating the full cost of tuition and that the student paid the tuition in full. The full, unsubsidized per capita (for each student) cost of education is the cost of providing education to each student in the school district where the public school is located. Costs normally range between $3,000 and $10,000. The student secondary school cost reimbursement requirement is mandatory and school systems cannot waive the reimbursement requirement.

Can our school waive the tuition requirement for a high school student?

No. The law does not allow a student in F-1 status to attend public secondary school without paying tuition. The student must pay the full, unsubsidized per capita (for each student) cost of education in all cases.

Does the Section 625 of the law affect all foreign students?

No. The law affects only students in F-1 status, or applicants for F-1 visas, who plan to attend public schools or publicly funded adult education. The law does not affect other students, such as children of exchange visitors, diplomats or foreign workers.

How does the law affect F-1 students in private schools?

Students who attend private schools or privately funded adult education or language programs are not affected by the law. However, if a private school student wants to transfer to a public school or a publicly funded adult education or language program, he or she must follow the requirements of Section 625 of Public Law 104-208.

Can adult education programs issue I-20s if we charge full tuition?

The law prohibits the issuance of F-1 visas to attend publicly funded adult education programs. Publicly funded adult education is defined as: “Education, training or English as second language programs operated by, through, or for a local public school district, system, agency or authority, regardless of whether such a program charges fees or tuition.” Programs under this definition cannot accept students in F-1 status, even if tuition is charged.

Can organizations or individuals sponsor an F-1 student to attend public secondary school?

Yes. Nothing in the law prevents an organization or an individual from paying the full tuition costs for the student. However, the payment cannot come from public funds. The student must still show that he or she has sufficient funds to cover education and living expenses while in the United States.

As one of Wisconsin’s first free online high schools, we’ve helped countless students earn an accredited diploma and prepare for success in college and beyond. We’ve also answered countless questions from students curious about online learning. To become an online student, the main prerequisite is a desire to succeed academically. Our virtual academy has been designed to give high school students the tools to take control of their high school career, free from unnecessary restrictions like a fixed schedule and a brick-and-mortar building.

Online School Requires Commitment, and Offers Independence

Choosing online high school isn’t a decision to take lightly. It’s also an incredible opportunity to take an active role in your education. Students who thrive in online school develop crucial skills that prepare them well for college and adult responsibilities. Switching from a traditional school to an online high school is a big change. There are many resources available to help you, but students also need to put in plenty of effort on their own. Because there’s no set schedule with bells and attendance holding students accountable for being present, students need to have the self-discipline to keep up with their classes. Above all, having the right attitude will help you develop the skills you need. Wanting to learn and being willing to work hard to achieve your goals are character traits that will serve you well in online high school, college, and for the rest of your life.

Athletics

Typically, students who attend online school aren’t allowed to participate in WIAA-sponsored athletics. At eAchieve, students have the option to take all their high school courses online while staying enrolled (and continuing to play sports) at their local school.

Enrollment

Enrollment guidelines are different for students who live in or outside the school district where our virtual public school is chartered.

  • Waukesha School District residents may apply using an in-district transfer form.
  • Residents of all other WI school districts may apply during Open Enrollment.

In Wisconsin, the Regular Open Enrollment application period is held each spring for the following school year. There is also an Alternative Open Enrollment application for families who missed Regular Open Enrollment, whose circumstances have changed since the end of the Regular Open Enrollment period or who meet one of the other exception criteria specified on the application form.

The Cost

By law, our virtual public charter school is completely tuition-free for all Wisconsin residents under 21. This means high school students are eligible to apply no matter which city or school district they live in, as long as they’re age 20 or younger.

You don’t have to be a Wisconsin resident to attend eAchieve, but out of state residents do have to pay tuition.

Graduation

Wisconsin state high school graduation requirements specify 15 credits. Local school boards are encouraged to require additional credits at their discretion. High school students need a total of 22 credits to graduate from eAchieve Academy.

If you’ve already started high school, any credits completed at a public school or accredited private school will transfer to eAchieve.

To earn an accredited high school diploma online, students must meet the credit requirements and pass a civics exam, just like students attending traditional schools.

K-12 Education Options In Wisconsin

Your choices for K12 education continue to become more and more diverse. Students have many more options beyond a traditional brick-and-mortar education. The only way to make the best choice for your child is to know all of your options. You may elect public traditional brick-and-mortar schools, online schools, charter schools, independent schools, private schools and many different variations.

Full Time Students

By choosing to enroll in online school, as opposed to attending a traditional, face-to-face school, students take learning into their own hands. While attending eAchieve Academy, you are taught the same materials and courses as a traditional school.

Part Time Students

You can enroll in one or two online classes every semester and still go to the same school you currently attend. eAchieve Academy offers a wide range of core classes, honors classes, AP classes and electives.

Immediate Transfers

Students who want to transfer from their current school full-time to eAchieve for online high, middle or elementary school can do so for the remainder of the school year. To enroll immediately, you must meet one of the open enrollment exceptions

May 21, 2021 | Reese Lopez

Search for online colleges by subject.

The National Student Clearinghouse Research Center reports that 38% of all college students transfer at least once during their education. Students may transfer credits to an online college to pursue a new major, save money on tuition, or gain greater schedule flexibility.

The online college transfer process functions similarly to the regular college application process, requiring students to complete a transfer application and submit their academic transcripts. This guide highlights the major steps necessary to transfer credits, along with tips, strategies, and best practices for transferring.

Featured Online Programs

Find a program that meets your affordability, flexibility, and education needs through an accredited, online school.

The Benefits of Transferring Colleges

Students transfer to online colleges for various reasons. Enrolling at a new school may allow students to pursue a major unavailable at their current institution or access a greater selection of academic resources. Students may also find new research opportunities and other academic benefits at a new school.

Logistically, online learning can make college much easier to manage, particularly if students are juggling full- or part-time employment alongside school. Online courses typically offer more schedule flexibility, with many courses delivered asynchronously. Asynchronous courses do not require set meeting times, allowing students to complete coursework on their own schedule within set deadlines.

Transfer Credits FAQs

Q. What costs are associated with transferring?

Typically, transfer students only pay application and enrollment fees. However, they may incur costs by taking additional courses if some of their credits do not transfer.

Q. What effect will transfer credits have on my GPA at my new college?

Your GPA may affect admissions decisions, but it does not transfer to a new institution. Students can begin with a new GPA at their new school.

Q. Can I transfer credits to and from trade or vocational schools?

Credits from regionally accredited trade and vocational schools typically transfer to two-year and four-year colleges. However, credits from nationally accredited schools may not transfer to regionally accredited schools.

Q. Are all credits transferable?

Most credits earned through traditional courses transfer between schools, but some specialized or unique courses may not transfer as easily. Students can always confirm credit transferability with school counselors.

How to Transfer to an Online College Program

The process to transfer credits generally functions the same at most institutions, but specific factors, such as credit equivalencies and application steps, may differ among schools. Students should research prospective schools’ transfer processes to determine specific requirements. This list highlights several major factors to consider when planning to transfer credits between colleges.

1. Understand Your Credits

Before trying to transfer credits, students should research how many credits they have and which are likely to transfer to another school. Many colleges, particularly community colleges, maintain transfer partnerships with other institutions, enabling students to transfer seamlessly between schools. Transfer counselors can help learners identify potential partner schools, making the transfer process easier. If students have taken any specialized courses that fall outside of general education requirements, recognize that some of these credits may not transfer.

2. Research Your Options

When considering a transfer, it pays to consider a school’s academic strengths and transfer credit policies. Ideally, a new school will allow learners to continue their studies with as much continuity as possible, both in terms of academic subject matter and logistics. Students should always research each school’s prerequisites and credit equivalencies to determine what courses they may need to complete when transferring.

3. Reach Out to the School

Most schools detail their credit transfer policies online, but transfer counselors can answer more specific questions and offer assistance with the transfer process. Counselors can help ensure that learners complete all paperwork on time and transfer the maximum number of credits possible. In general, students should contact a potential transfer school several months before the start of the semester they intend to transfer into.

4. Complete the Credits Transfer Application

Most schools offer a standard transfer application, which requires degree-seekers to fill out personal information and submit transcripts from any prior colleges or universities. If students transfer credits during their first year, schools may also want to see their high school transcripts. Some schools also require letters of recommendation. In general, students hoping to transfer for the fall semester should submit their transfer application by March or April.