How to travel all the hawaiian interstates on oahu

Oahu is a unique driving experience and has Interstates that don’t connect with any other state. Think of Oahu as a piece of pie in shape and the key highway is H1 and it runs east and west for the most part and connects to the H2 and H3 which are shortcuts to different parts of the island. Pick up a 101 Things to Do magazine at the airport baggage area for key section maps of the island. Oahu offers great day trips including the North Shore, Kailua beaches, Polynesian Cultural Center, Pearl Harbor and Ko ʻOlina.

Looking to rent a car? Special rental discounts are available for Hawaii.com members. Click here for more information.

You will find the roadways well-marked and signage is easy to follow.

Honolulu and Waikiki

Honolulu is a modern vibrant city with great night life and dining. The city has three major areas: Chinatown, Downtown and Waikiki.

  • Tip #1 Enter Waikiki via Kalakaua Ave and exit through Ala Wai Blvd. Within Waikiki, you’ll find many one way roads & there is really only one way in and one way out; but the good news is they lead back to Kalakaua or Ala Wai.
  • Tip #2 When traveling to Waikiki from the airport (drive, taxi or shuttle), take the Nimitz highway into Waikiki and you’ll cruise by Chinatown, Aloha Tower, downtown, and the world’s largest outdoor mall, Ala Moana Shopping Center. You’ll see how easy it is to get to many of the top attractions near Waikiki and in Honolulu.
  • Tip #3 King, Queen and Kapiʻolani streets are major surface streets in the middle of Honolulu and will quickly move you from Waikiki to downtown and back.

How to travel all the hawaiian interstates on oahu

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The culture of our Hawaiian Islands is steeped in the values of kuleana (responsibility) and aloha. Now that travelers can once again enjoy our islands, we are asking you to join in our efforts to help keep Hawaii safe.

Despite the CDC’s announcement on April 2, Hawaii continues with the state’s Safe Travels program, even for fully vaccinated passengers.

Beginning July 8, 2021, individuals fully vaccinated in the United States or its Territories may enter Hawaii on domestic flights without pre-travel testing/quarantine starting the 15th day after the completion of their vaccination. All other travelers must have their negative test results from a Trusted Testing and Travel Partner prior to departing as an alternative to Hawaii’s mandatory 10-day quarantine.

As of June 15, all passengers who are not in quarantine are free to travel between islands without restriction.

For more information visit hawaiicovid19.com/travel and register with the State of Hawaii Safe Travels online system. Only test results from Trusted Testing and Travel Partners will be accepted. Review new vaccination exception requirements at hawaiicovid19.com/faqs. All incoming travelers are required to have their temperatures checked and complete a health questionnaire online before they can leave the airport.
See full details below on steps and resources to efficiently plan your trip to the Hawaiian Islands.

INFORMATION FOR TRANS-PACIFIC TRAVELERS, INCLUDING U.S. AND CANADA
Effective January 26, 2021, this CDC Order went into effect. For international travelers coming to the State of Hawaii, only tests from Trusted Testing Partners will be accepted for purposes of bypassing the State’s 10-day traveler quarantine.
On January 21, 2021, the President of the United States issued an executive order related to travel. For the time being, no changes to the Safe Travels program.

Travelers from Canada may bypass the state’s mandatory 10-day quarantine if they have a negative COVID-19 test result from a lab identified by Air Canada or WestJet prior to departure.
Information for Japan travel may be found here
Information for Korea travel may be found here
Information for Taiwan travel may be found here
Information for French Polynesia travel may be found here

How to travel all the hawaiian interstates on oahu

Quick Links

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  • Individuals Violating Self-Quarantine
  • HTA Tourism Brief
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SAFE TRAVELS PROGRAM

The State of Hawaii’s online Safe Travels program is mandatory for all travelers. The form, which collects the required health and travel information, is critical to protecting the health of residents and visitors alike. Click here for FAQs and instructions.

Travelers are encouraged to enter their information, details and COVID-19 test result in advance of their flight. Once their health information is entered 24 hours before departure, travelers receive a QR code via email. The QR code on their mobile device or printed on paper gets scanned by the airport screener upon arrival.

New features and data elements will be added in future phases, as the Safe Travels process and State travel requirements evolve. Travelers without smart phones or computers can ask a friend or relative for assistance or receive assistance at the arrival airport. Travelers without email addresses will need to create one on an email service to comply with the conditions of quarantine.

Aloha! Oahu transportation options for visitors include renting a car, The Bus, taxi, limo, shuttle bus, motorcycle, moped, and bike.

In the articles below, you will find resources for comparing pricing. If you plan to explore the island of Oʻahu, we highly recommend renting a car. The Bus system is extensive, but it does not cover the entire island.

If you would like to rent a car, consider becoming a Hawaii.com member, as members are privilege to exclusive rates through our rental car partners.

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Sign up to receive discounts and specials on vacations to Hawaii from Hawaii.com, right in your email inbox — it’s FREE!

How to travel all the hawaiian interstates on oahu

Oahu Driving Trips

Oahu is a unique driving experience and has Interstates that don’t connect with any other state. Think of Oahu as a piece of pie in shape and the key highway is H1 and it runs east and west for the most part and connects to the H2 and H3 which are shortcuts to different parts…

How to travel all the hawaiian interstates on oahu

Oahu Driving Tips & Rental Rates

Oahu, nicknamed “The Gathering Place,” is a fitting moniker for…

How to travel all the hawaiian interstates on oahu

Riding the Bus on Oahu

Oahu’s public transit system, TheBus, goes practically everywhere on the…

How to travel all the hawaiian interstates on oahu

Those looking to travel from county to county within Hawaii, which incorporates most instances of interisland travel, have not had a simple go of it over the past year.

However, that has changed. All interisland restrictions and requirements were lifted on Tuesday, and travelers will no longer need to take a COVID-19 test or undergo a quarantine period. Getting vaccinated is not a requirement.

Another benefit that will be enjoyed by interisland travelers is not needing to stand in line after arriving at their destination, waiting to show proof of them being vaccinated or a recent negative test result.

In addition, everyone who has been vaccinated in Hawaii can now travel to the state from elsewhere without needing to provide a recent negative test result or, in lieu of that, quarantining. However, those who are unvaccinated or who have been vaccinated elsewhere must still provide a negative test result from the past 72 hours or participate in a 10-day quarantine period. Proof of valid in-state vaccination should be uploaded to Hawaii’s Safe Travels website prior to traveling.

Meanwhile, those simply traveling interisland should keep their plane ticket readily accessible as they may need to show it to prove that their travel was interisland and that they were not flying from outside Hawaii.

How to travel all the hawaiian interstates on oahu

What prompted these changes was, according to Gov. David Ige, the state experiencing relatively low positive cases and hitting a vaccination rate of 55% two days earlier. The next milestone will occur when 60% have been fully vaccinated. At that point, those who have been vaccinated elsewhere in the United States and can show proof of that will not need to adhere to any requirements.

Once that percentage has reached 70%, all travel restrictions will be lifted. At that time, the requirement to wear masks while indoors in Hawaii is also expected to come to an end.

However, Ige added that he may alter these targets and resulting guidelines if other information supersedes the importance of vaccination rates.

The state of Hawaii has announced a total of 23 travel restrictions for Tuesday, November 6.

The restrictions range from the most restrictive to the least restrictive.

Passengers may only travel on the following: public transportation, public transportation vehicles, ferry boats, ferries, ferrous-steel ferries.

Passports and ID are required for all passengers on public transportation and ferries except for those who are on a tour.

No more than two people may stay on any one boat at a time on a public waterway or beach.

No pets are allowed on a boat.

Pets are not allowed on ferries or ferries from a designated animal-friendly zone.

People who can’t drive may park in the designated animal free zone at their residence.

People traveling to a designated park or lake will not be allowed on any public waterways or beaches.

The Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources (DLNR) says it will start issuing citations for non-compliance with the restrictions.

The state says it is working to ensure everyone has access to all travel restrictions and will continue to enforce them.

Here are the details: Hawaii Governor David Ige announced that the state will begin issuing citations starting Tuesday for noncompliance with its travel restrictions.

This is a historic day for Hawaii, a state that is a leader in environmental and wildlife protection.

The proclamation was issued by Governor Ige in response to an ongoing statewide drought.

The drought has caused a significant decline in water levels in the state.

The governor said that if you are impacted by the drought, the best way to prevent further erosion is to conserve water and take action to preserve wildlife habitat.

Hawaiians should be aware that a significant portion of the state’s water supply comes from a large glacier, the Oahu Glacier.

The Oahu glacier is considered one of the most important sources of drinking water in the world.

This is a significant threat to our state’s tourism industry.

To protect this critical resource, the Governor is proposing to restrict all motorized vehicle travel to the following areas: Oahu, Waimea, Molokai, Kapolei, Waianae, Kona, Kauai, Hilo, Maui, Moloka’i, Kaupauha, and Oahu.

Travelers traveling from Hawaii to other states should be reminded that Hawaii has an established and comprehensive travel plan that provides essential information about travel and accommodations for the majority of our residents and visitors.

For more information, visit the governor’s website: www.stateofhawaii.gov/travel.

A group of Hawaiians have taken to the streets of Honolulu, calling for the Governor to reinstate the restrictions as soon as possible.

The demonstrators chanted “No travel ban, no compromise” as they marched down Oahu Street.

The group called on the Governor not to repeal the travel ban and to restore Hawaii’s unique tourism industry and economy.

They also want Governor Iges executive order to be rescinded.

“Our state has lost its tourist and economic engine.

We cannot allow our people to be put in danger by this,” said Alok Mukherjee, a spokesperson for the Hawaiian Land & Water Conservation Council.

Ige said he is taking the steps necessary to restore the tourism industry as soon it can.

“We will be working hard to ensure Hawaii continues to be a destination for travelers and our economy,” Ige said.

For more Hawaii news, visit: www.

“The state has announced that it will begin implementing the additional travel restrictions from Wednesday, November 9.

These new restrictions include: 6.

Public transportation is prohibited on public waters and beaches.

Vehicles must remain on public roads and trails, including those within designated designated park areas.

Passport/ID requirements will be lifted from all travelers except for certain groups.

Persons traveling to Hawaii from Hawaii must register their pets with the DLNR.

No longer may dogs be on ferrets or ferrous steel ferries on designated beaches.

No boats will be permitted on a waterway.

A designated animal safe zone will be established at any public property.

No additional ferries will be allowed at the Molokahana Lagoon and Waikiki Beach.

All ferries and ferrous iron-steel boat owners must register with the Department of Natural Resources.

A state park and lake is closed.

All state parks and beaches will be closed except those within a designated wildlife habitat or designated waterway, except when it is being used for recreation or other purposes.

No new ferries may be operated from Hawaii on any waterways except for recreation.

Persons will no longer be allowed to bring in their own food, water, or fuel on a ferry or boat.

How to travel all the hawaiian interstates on oahu

Oahu’s famous combination of city and country makes it one of the most unique places on earth. There aren’t many destinations where one can walk among 400-foot skyscrapers just a few short miles away from lush rainforests and natural waterfalls! Because of this special landscape, it takes an open-minded driver to expertly navigate Oahu’s streets and roads. Luckily, we’ve got all the information you need to be successful whether you’re driving through bustling Waikiki or laid-back Haleiwa.

Traffic on this island is some of the worst in the country, but avoiding rush hours and knowing the appropriate driving etiquette can make a road trip or commute much more enjoyable. Plan extra time for heavy traffic at any time of the day (Google Maps is especially handy), because on Oahu it may take you 45 minutes to travel 10 miles. The Hawaii government website is a useful resource for road closures and transportation updates as well.

Rules of the Road

When it comes to the rules of the road, Oahu follows the same laws as the rest of the United States—with a little extra aloha. Unlike the mainland where drivers can be a bit more aggressive, locals are used to being let in when merging lanes, and you definitely won’t hear people honking their horns as much. There isn’t an endless amount of space (it’s an island after all), which means plenty of one-way roads. Paying close attention to posted street signs is crucial.

  • Parking: Since there is limited parking throughout the island, most street parking spaces have posted regulations, and ignoring these signs will almost always mean a ticket or a tow. Hotels offer parking for their guests (valet averages $35 per day), and there are several paid parking garages available for those visiting an area just for the day. Make sure to find out if the stores and/or restaurants you visit validate parking!
  • Littering:Criminal littering is a petty misdemeanor on Oahu. Littering (including from a vehicle) can incur fines between $500 and $1,000.
  • Speed: The speed limit for most freeways is 60 MPH, and you probably won’t get away with going much over that especially during the day. Go with the flow of traffic.
  • Carpool: Most carpool lanes require two or more people. Oahu utilizes zipper lanes on the H-1 Freeway and Nimitz Highway Express Lane to help ease Honolulu-bound traffic during peak rush hours. There are no toll roads on Oahu.
  • Right-hand turns: Allowed on a red light unless otherwise noted with a traffic sign.
  • Under the Influence: Hawaii uses the same driving limits as the rest of the country. Driving with a BAC of 0.08 or higher is a DUI-punishable offense. It is illegal for anyone under the age of 21 to drive with any measurable amount of alcohol in their system.
  • Gas: The average cost of gas in Honolulu is about $3.40 per gallon, but it is generally significantly higher in Waikiki. In the center of the island in places like Mililani Town, gas can get as low as $3.20 per gallon. On other islands like Maui and Big Island, gas stations on lengthy remote roads can be sparse, but on Oahu, you won’t have too much trouble finding a gas station.
  • Emergency: The state removed emergency roadside call boxes in 2013, though there are still a few left in operation inside the H-3 tunnels and on the remote west side at Yokohama Bay. In the Honolulu freeway areas with the most traffic, the state offers a free roadside assistance service patrol that can be reached calling 808-841-4357(HELP). Call 9-1-1 for situations requiring immediate assistance.
  • Bicycles: Especially in Honolulu, bicycles are gaining popularity as an alternate mode of transportation on Oahu. Watch out for the light blue Biki bikes; anyone can rent them (and they might not be familiar with the streets).

Street Names

Most street names on Oahu are in Hawaiian. Since there are only 12 letters in the Hawaiian alphabet, it can get tricky for visitors who aren’t familiar with the language. It helps to figure out where you’re going in advance so you don’t get completely lost looking for your next turn.

Safety

Oahu has had a recent uptick in pedestrian accidents, so pay extra attention to crosswalks and bicycle lanes. In the more tourist-heavy areas like Waikiki and neighboring Ala Moana, visitors tend to get lost in their surroundings and try to cross the road without warning. As it should be driving in any place for the first time, added caution at intersections and vigilance while behind the wheel is essential. If you’re worried about becoming distracted at the gorgeous scenery along the way, hire a driver or a tour guide to take you.

Rental Cars

Check with your insurance company or credit card company before you come to Oahu, some mainland insurances won’t be valid with certain models of cars. You may not need a rental car at all, depending on where you stay and where you plan to go. If you prefer staying in Waikiki for your entire trip, a car really isn’t necessary and will just incur expensive parking rates (don’t bank on finding overnight street parking).

Hawaii law requires children under the age of four to ride in a child safety seat, and kids from age four to seven in either a safety or booster seat. US citizens visiting from another state must have a valid driver’s license if they are at least 18 years old. Travelers coming from another country must have a valid driver’s license from their home country and be 18 or older.

Some rentals companies will rent to drivers under 25 years old for an additional fee, but not all of them. Renting a car in Waikiki will cost much more than renting at the airport (and can almost double during certain times of the year), so if you want to save money plan ahead for a rental. While GPS devices are allowed, talking on the phone or texting while driving is illegal. Carrying open containers of alcohol in a car (even if they’re empty) is also against the law.

Traffic

Rush hour on Oahu is from 6 a.m. to 9 a.m. and from 3:30 p.m. to 6 p.m. Construction throughout Hawaii tends to run on “island time,” so be prepared to see plenty of construction blocking the roads even at the most inconvenient times. Sobriety checkpoints are common coming in and out of Waikiki, especially on holidays and special events.

Weather

Watch for weather advisories and remember that the roads are extra slick during the first few minutes of rainfall. The tropical climate in the middle of the Pacific Ocean can be temperamental and come without warning. Potholes can be problematic during poor weather—another good reason to slow down while driving on Oahu. If there is a flood warning, choose the safer option and don’t drive at all.

Public Transportation

Oahu has simple public transportation in TheBus. It is great for getting around Honolulu, though we wouldn’t recommend it for getting to the other sides of the island (it will get you where you need to go but take a long time to get there). Most tours and activities on the island provide transportation options to and from Waikiki as well.

How to travel all the hawaiian interstates on oahu

  • Post category:News
  • Post comments:0 Comments
  • Post author:Nick
  • Post published: 27/06/2021
  • Post last modified: 27/06/2021

Those looking to travel from county to county within Hawaii, which incorporates most instances of interisland travel, have not had a simple go of it over the past year.

However, that has changed. All interisland restrictions and requirements were lifted on Tuesday, and travelers will no longer need to take a COVID-19 test or undergo a quarantine period. Getting vaccinated is not a requirement.

Another benefit that will be enjoyed by interisland travelers is not needing to stand in line after arriving at their destination, waiting to show proof of them being vaccinated or a recent negative test result.

In addition, everyone who has been vaccinated in Hawaii can now travel to the state from elsewhere without needing to provide a recent negative test result or, in lieu of that, quarantining. However, those who are unvaccinated or who have been vaccinated elsewhere must still provide a negative test result from the past 72 hours or participate in a 10-day quarantine period. Proof of valid in-state vaccination should be uploaded to Hawaii’s Safe Travels website prior to traveling.

Meanwhile, those simply traveling interisland should keep their plane ticket readily accessible as they may need to show it to prove that their travel was interisland and that they were not flying from outside Hawaii.

What prompted these changes was, according to Gov. David Ige, the state experiencing relatively low positive cases and hitting a vaccination rate of 55% two days earlier. The next milestone will occur when 60% have been fully vaccinated. At that point, those who have been vaccinated elsewhere in the United States and can show proof of that will not need to adhere to any requirements.

Once that percentage has reached 70%, all travel restrictions will be lifted. At that time, the requirement to wear masks while indoors in Hawaii is also expected to come to an end.

However, Ige added that he may alter these targets and resulting guidelines if other information supersedes the importance of vaccination rates.