How to use a punch down tool

The market is literally flooded with punch down impact tools. The pricing ranges from $9 to a whopping $75, depending upon the manufacturer and included accessories.

The low cost tools look good , but are typically of poor quality and offer little in the way of features. The expensive tools really are good, but will hit your wallet hard while not always offering the most desirable features.

How can trueCABLE redefine the simple ho-hum punch down tool?

Well, you start by asking an actual installer what they want! Namely:

  • Price it reasonably
  • Design it to be tough. and offer up a Forever Warranty to go with it
  • Have it use standard and easy to find “twist and lock” tool heads
  • Put thoughtful design decisions into the product
    • It needs to fit in hand. There are a lot of tools out there that look and feel like a wooden block in your hand. Not ours.
    • There should be some “grippiness” to the handle. The black outside molding is soft rubber.

    What is a kinetic energy punch down tool. really?

    Impact punch down tools are used to terminate wires into punch down patch panels and punch down keystone jacks.

    The idea is the tool head blade is used to push a wire conductor into a IDC terminal slot (Insulation Displacement Conductor). At a certain set point the mechanism is triggered and an internal spring uses kinetic force to shove the conductor down between the metal prong contacts to make an electrical connection. Oftentimes, the blade will also flush cut the conductor at the end of the process.

    The tool head blades come in four styles:

    • 110
    • 66
    • BIX
    • Krone

    Each of those blade styles handles different types of wire and terminals. Most often, you see the 110 type and Krone type that is by far the most common for Category 5e and above Ethernet terminations. Secondarily, 66 is next most commonly used for Cat3 (voice/telephone) punch down blocks for. BIX is rarely seen in the USA.

    This blog will focus on our trueIMPACT 110 Impact punch down tool.

    There is a short video demonstration of the trueIMPACT tool below. We recommend you watch the video and read this blog as both mediums bring something to the table.

    Our trueIMPACT 110 tool:

    • Comes with a double ended 110 blade (cutting side and non cutting side)
    • Has a HI and LO setting depending upon the wire gauge (thickness) that is being punched down
      • Use LO for 24AWG (typically Cat5e) conductor wires
      • Use HI for 23AWG (typically Cat6 or Cat6A) conductor wires
      • Spudger/screwdriver for general use
      • Hook for easily and safely removing improperly punched conductors

      Tool walk around

      How to use a punch down tool

      The spudger and hook tools shown to good effect. LO and HI force adjustment with tool head release dial

      How to use a punch down tool

      Double ended 110 tool head. The design is standard “twist and lock” and is compatible with any “twist and lock” tool head for sale on the open market. One end has the flush cut blade. it is sharp so be careful!

      How to use a punch down tool

      Punching down a keystone jack

      Final thoughts…

      Our 110 impact tool requires no maintenance at all. There are no user serviceable parts and it should never be oiled. After using your tool, it is a great idea to store the tool head in the hollow handle to avoid accidental injury.

      We hope you find this tool to be more useful than any other similar tool you have used up to this point. We would love to show off your photos of it in use with your permission.

      trueCABLE presents the information on our website, including the “Cable Academy” blog and live chat support, as a service to our customers and other visitors to our website subject to our website terms and conditions . While the information on this website is about data networking and electrical issues, it is not professional advice and any reliance on such material is at your own risk.

      Punch down tool (also known as punch down tool or krone tool) is used by electricians or communication technicians to assist in inserting wires into insulation displacement connectors on patch panels, keystone modules or punch down blocks. It’s not only a modular cable crimping tool for terminating Cat5e, Cat6 or Cat7 network cables, but it also will punch down a 110 IDC RJ45 jack. It’s a quality piece of equipment. Usually, a typical punch down tool consists of a handle, a spring mechanism, and a removable slotted blade. Crimpers are used to terminate RJ45 heads—the little plastic plugs that allow an Ethernet cable to fit either into an RJ45 wall jack or the Ethernet port on a computer.

      How to use a punch down tool

      Punch down Tool Features

      On the market, there are three different punch down tools for Ethernet cable terminations, including standard impact tool, universal automatic impact tool and corrosion resistant termination tool. Most punch down tools are of the impact type, consisting of a handle, an internal spring mechanism, and a removable slotted blade. They typically are 6-8 inches long with a blade at one end. The top and bottom of the tool are usually different colors to help users identify which side is used to cut the wire. Most models have a changeable blade and a pressure adjustment screw or knob.

      The dimensions of the punch down tool are not standardized. Some tools measure 5.35 in x 1.06 in x 1.06 in and weigh 4.69 oz. Others have dimensions of 5.25 in x 1.26 in x 1.26 in, 7.00 in x 2.02 in x 2.02 in and so on. Their weights also vary. Whatever the dimensions of the punch down tool are, usage is the same.

      How To Use A Punch Down Tool?

      1. Prepare to punch down a wire.
      Standing in front of the connection block, hold the punch down tool in one hand, with the cutting blade facing down. Hold the wire in your other hand and loop it through the selected connection block terminal.

      2. Punch down the wire.
      Holding the end of the wire firmly, place the blade of the punch down on the selected connection terminal and push forward until you reach the bottom of the terminal. Continuing to hold the end of the wire, punch the tool firmly with a straight-forward motion. If done correctly, this action should connect the wire to the terminal and cleanly cut off any excess.

      3. Check your connection.
      Make sure your connection is secure and there is no loose or broken wire left in the connection block. Tug on the wire to verify that it is securely fastened and connected to the correct terminal.

      Request a Quotation
      How to use a punch down tool CALL ME BACK

      The Krone Type Punch Down Tool is a small screw-driver sized tool utilized by network and telecommunication wiring professionals. The tool consists of a handle with a spring mechanism inside and at the tip a small square piece of metal with a square hole in it.

      To use the punch down tool, a wire is inserted in between the two metal blades on a punch down block, which is easily identifiable with its 45-degree angle. The punch down tool is pressed down on top of the wire and the two blades on the punch down block cuts away any excess wire cleanly.

      Refer to above PDF Data sheet

      Part number – RJ45-TOOL/4 Krone Type Punch Down Tool

      How to use a punch down tool

      How to use a punch down tool

      How to use a punch down tool

      How to use a punch down tool

      How to use a punch down tool

      Unit No 9, Skyview Retail Park Cnr C.R Swart Drive & Freda Road Bromhof, Johannesburg

      0861 11 33 99

      International +2711 793 1926

      [email protected]

      My account

      Information

      Terms & Conditions

      Newsletter

      Get all the latest information on Events, Sales and Offers. Sign up for newsletter today.

      How to use a punch down tool

      A punch down tool, also referred to as krone tool, is a small but primary tool for network technicians to install wiring for telephone, computer and various audio networks. It is widely used to terminate the Ethernet cables by inserting the cables wires into the insulation-displacement connectors (IDC) on the punch down blocks, patch panels, keystone modules, and surface mount of boxes. It works by inserting the wire for a corrosion resistant termination and then trims off excess wire, which ensures fast and precise connections with less effort.

      Common Features of Punch Down Tool

      The most common punch down tools available on the market include standard impact tool, universal automatic impact tool and corrosion resistant termination tool. A typical punch down tool consists of a handle, an internal spring mechanism, and a removable slotted blade. Punch down tools are typically 6-8 inches long with a blade at one end. The top and bottom of the tools are usually with different colors to help users identify which side is used to cut the wire. Most models have a changeable blade and a pressure adjustment screw or knob.

      How to use a punch down tool

      The dimensions of the punch down tool are not standardized. Some tools have dimensions of 5.35 in x 1.06 in x 1.06 in. Others have 5.25 in x 1.26 in x 1.26 in, 7.00 in x 2.02 in x 2.02 in and so on. Their weights also vary with their sizes. Whatever the dimensions of the punch down tool are, the usage is the same.

      Blade types of Punch Down Tool

      To accommodate various connector types, punch down tools have different types of blades with 66 blade or 110 blade. Different blades are used depending on whether you are terminating 66-block or 110-block which will be explained below.

      66 Punch Down Block

      The 66 block is a type of punch down block used to connect sets of wires in a telephone system. They have been manufactured in three sizes, A, B and M. A and B have six clips in each row while M has only 4. Each row of a 66 block is set up for one pair of wires to be spliced to another pair. however, any pair of clips can be used to connect any two wires.

      The A blocks spaced the rows further apart and has been obsolete for many years. The B style is used mainly in distribution panels were several destinations (often 1A2 key telephones) need to connect to the same source. The M blocks are often used to connect a single instrument to such a distribution block. 66 blocks are designed to terminate 22 through 26 AWG solid copper wire. 66 blocks are available pre-assembled with an RJ-21 female connector that accepts a quick connection to a 25-pair cable with a male end. These connections are made between the block and the customer premises equipment (CPE).

      110 Punch Down Block

      As an updated version of 66 block, 110 punch down block is the core part of the connection management system, used to connect wiring for telephone systems, data network wiring, and other low-voltage wiring applications. 110 type wiring block is flame retardant, injection-molded plastic to do the basic devices and the termination cabling system is connecting on it.

      The 110 block is designed for 22 through 26 gauge solid wire. This is the termination used on cat5e patch panel, cat 6 patch panel and RJ-45 jacks. They are also formed into block type terminations the size of small 66 blocks. The 110 block is designed for 500 MHz (1 gb/s) or greater bandwidth. 110 blocks are acceptable for use with AES/EBU digital audio at sample rates greater than 268 KHz as well as gigabit networks and analog audio. 110 type wiring block system uses easy quick-fit plug-hop loops which can be simply rearranged, so it provides a convenient cross-connect to non-professional and technical personnel management system.

      How to Use a Punch Down Tool

      When it comes to repair or install Ethernet cable, you’ll inevitably need to cut and position wires. Exposed wires can be dangerous and may cause your connections broken. Punch down tool thus is necessary to ensure that your wires are secure, and meanwhile to help trim and contain the wires in a basic jack. Then how to use a punch down tool? Just follow the following steps.

      Step One: Strip back the cable jacket

      What should be noticed is that always leave about 2.5 inches (6 cm) at the end of the cable. Insert the cable into the cable stripping tool or modular crimping tool, and spin it around a few times. Then remove the jacket.

      Step Two: Expose the wires

      After removing the cable jacket, you will have a few inches of exposed cable. Then gently pull away the wire pairs from the center of the cable so they fan out. Separate the wire pairs by twisting in a counterclockwise motion. Try to straighten the ends as much as you can in order to make them easier to terminate.

      Step Three: Place the cable wires in the jack

      Take the protective cover off the top of the jack and set the cable into the block of the jack. Insert each wire into its own separate slot, making sure that the wire matches the A or B configuration. The conductor wires should be extending out of the jack.

      How to use a punch down tool

      Note: Consider to choose between T568A or T568B wiring scheme. The T568B is becoming more popular since it can be used with older color codes as well as newer codes.

      Step Four: Terminate the conductor wires

      Take your punch down tool and press it down on the conductor wires to cut them. The angled part of the blade should contact with the long sturdy side of the jack. This will also make sure the wires that are cut are flush with the jack.

      How to use a punch down tool

      Step Five: Inspect the wires

      Check each wire to make sure there is no overhang out the side of the jack. You should also make sure that the edge of the cable jacket is near the base of the jack and the wires you just terminated. The wires should be securely in place. If you notice wires sticking out the side, take a wire cutter and carefully trim the wire so that it’s flush with the jack.

      How to use a punch down tool

      Step Six: Place a dust cap on the jack.

      Snap the dust caps in place to protect the wires. This will keep the connection secure and can prevent strain on the wires. The dust cap is also very easy to remove: simply pop off the dust cap using a flat-head screwdriver inserted into the indentation on the side.

      Note: Fail to set the dust caps back on the jack indicates that your wires may not be seated correctly. It is better to check the wires again and make sure they are secure and trimmed.

      How to use a punch down tool

      Recycling programs are sustained through the collection of an Environmental Handling Fee (EHF) enforced by provinces in Canada. They are paid at the time you purchase a new computer, notebook, monitor, television and other applicable electronics (outlined by Province below) – so you won't need to worry about paying a Fee to recycle your end-of-life electronics. Read More…

      What are Bonus points and how do I earn them?

      Bonus points are offered as part of our Shopper+ S-points Club program and can be collected on the purchase of most items sold on our web sites, Earn 20 S-Points for every 1 dollar spent on our websites or make use of our promotions.

      Note: the total s-points offered on individual items may be affected by other offers or discounts in your cart.

      You must have an account to collect s-points. It’s free to create an account — if you don’t have an account, just click create an account.

      Limited Quantity:

      Due to the delivery issue, limiting the quantity of the products to the single order and you may add the remaining items in a following order.

      On Sale:

      Products offered for purchase at a reduced price normally for a limited period. (Coupons do not apply to on sale products.)

      On Sale Limited Quantity:

      Products offered for purchase at a reduced price normally for a limited period. (Coupons do not apply to on sale products.)

      Are products made by the Original Equipment Manufacturer under its own name and branding. OEM products take on the warranty of the manufacturer and not of the vendor. (Coupons do not apply to OEM products.)

      Low Profit:

      Products sold at a low profit margin. (Coupons do not apply to low profit products.)

      Holiday:

      Holiday items may not be returned nor refunded after their respective holiday, this includes unopened items (holidays include Valentine’s Day, Saint-Patrick’s Day, Easter, Canada Day, Thanksgiving, Halloween, Christmas).

      Seasonal:

      Seasonal products at Shopper+ are special return and exchange Conditions Further details are available contact our Customer Service.

      Clearance:

      Final sale items or discontinued items at extremely discounted prices. All items tagged CLEARANCE may not be returned or exchanged as all purchases are final on clearance items. (Coupons do not apply to clearance products.)

      Local Delivery:

      Local delivery product(s) are shipped by Shopper+ Express and are only available for certain addresses. Please check if Local Delivery is available at your address before placing your order. Thank you.

      Free Shipping (Regular customer only):

      The product is eligible for free shipping within Canada shipped via standard delivery. Free shipping is not available when the shipping address is a remote location.

      How to use a punch down tool

      SPECIAL OFFER!
      • Easy to handle
      • Comfortable shape
      • Impact function for proper termination
      • Punch-Down Impact Tool for 110/88, Krone, and 66
      • Ergonomic handle design for comfortable, all-day use
      • There is a sure-lock blade holder and high/low impact pressure adjustment

      Punch-Down Impact Tool for 66 and 110/88 Type

      Provides exceptional quality and performance for long-lasting use

      This is a Punch-Down Impact Tool for 66 and 110/88. There is a sure-lock blade holder and high/low impact pressure adjustment. This high quality crimp tool is designed to crimp and cut RJ-45 wires quickly. The parallel action design maintains accurate alignment of the die with the plug for a precision crimp every time. The crimper features an easy to hold handle that helps reduce fatigue when trimming wire or seating connection block to the wiring base.

      How to use a punch down tool

      Punch down Tool Sleek ergonomic design for easy effective wire termination. Features include: Hi/Low impact setting , combination Hook/Spudger stored in the chassis. Use to properly set, seat and terminate wire. Simply position the wire, push tool, and listen for confirming pop. Wire is properly seated.

      Buy Online
      Find a Dealer
      Review this Product

      How to use a punch down tool

      How to use a punch down tool

      Blade Length 36mm
      Range Cutting and inserting cables into telephone accessories
      Product Weight 0.054kg

      Punch down tool used to cut and insert cables into telephone accessories. Spring-loaded impact with high and low settings, cable locking and insertion blades and built-in cable shears. Overall length 180mm.

      • 1 x Punch down tool 180mm

      How to use a punch down tool

      How to use a punch down tool

      This Silverline Punch Down Tool is guaranteed for a period of 30 days from date of purchase against a fault developing in either the materials or the workmanship during manufacture. You can register for your Lifetime guarantee by registering your product online. Any faulty goods will be repaired or replaced free of charge.

      How to use a punch down tool

      Punchdown tools are used to insert and cut voice and data cable terminations in a single motion. This adjustable punchdown tool has high and low actuation settings to meet the termination requirements or to fit user preferences. The impact punchdown tool features a reversible blade and can store a backup blade in the handle. This punchdown tool offers reliable and easy-to-use operation.

      • Inserts and cuts terminations in one simple operation
      • Includes a single blade for 110 and 66 (the 66 blade is cut style)
      • Safe storage for spare blade
      • Sure-Lock style holder provides fast, easy blade changes and prevents blade pullout

      Q: What’s the difference between Impact and Non-impact punchdown tools?

      A: Impact Punchdown tools are designed for any volume of terminations. They are spring loaded which provides a mechanical advantage when punching. Impact punchdown tools provide most of the force required. Another advantage of an impact punchdown tool is they will give a cleaner and more consistent punch because the tool controls the force applied to the wire.

      Non-Impact Punchdown Tools are designed for low volume terminations. They are a great choice for home users who only plan on installing a few lines. Unlike impact punchdown tools the user must provide all of the force required to punch seat and cut the wires. This can become tiresome for large installations. Non-impact tools a generally less expensive than impact tools.

      Q: What is the difference between 66 punchdown block and 110 punch down block?

      A: A 66 punch down block is typically used in telephone operations for connecting wires to the hubs. The 110 punch down block will typically be used in computer networking applications.

      Ergonomic, Cushioned Grip Make This Punch Down Tool Ideal for Large Volume Jobs

      • How to use a punch down tool
      • How to use a punch down tool |||videoviewer>player|||

      What’s special about this punch down tool?

      • Operator may select between high and low settings depending on termination requirements
      • Ergonomic, cushioned grip is especially comfortable for those non-impact, high volume jobs
      • Easy to use – insert and cut cable terminations easily
      • This tool has a turn lock that provides storage for replacement blades

      The Punchmaster Tool is perfect for jobs that require many punches thanks to the cushioned grips which make using the punch tool repeatedly easy on the hands. Simply insert and cut cable terminations without effort.

      • Excellent tool for paired conductors
      • Convenient locking compartment for replacement blade storage
      • Made in the USA; warranty for 90 days
      Part # ID-35-485
      Dimensions 10" x 5" x 1.5"
      Weight 0.5 lb
      Gross Weight 1.0 lb
      Tool Type BIX Connecting with 110 Blade
      Operation Punch Down/Cut
      Cable UTP
      Blade High Quality Steel
      Manufacturer Series Punchmaster II™, Turn-Lock™

      MANUALS & USER GUIDES –

      Designed for use with 22-26AWG solid or stranded UTP cable, these blocks and bases provide reliable and efficient Cat5e terminations.

      Ideal for providing a centralized termination point for security, high megabit, shared sheath, and high-speed voice and data applications.

      Premium deerskin, soft and form-fitting for maximum comfort. Gunn cut with seams away from wear surfaces. Inseam index finger. Sheep-like pile lining.

      Platinum Tools 110 Non-Impact Punchdown Tool is one of the best and economical tool of it class on today’s market.

      Did you know that we can give you a quote for most of our products, including shipping?

      Questions & Answers

      Do you have any questions about this product?
      Let our experts and customers resolve all your doubts

      The punch down tool is commonly used by telco and network technicians for inserting wire into punch down blocks. The tool itself consists of a handle, an internal spring mechanism, and a removable slotted blade. Punch down tools with spring loaded impact blade are recommended for projects requiring high volume work.

      Network technicians should never leave home without the Adjustable 66/110 Impact Punch Down Tool. This handy punch down tool comes equipped with a two sided 110 cutting/terminating blade and a two sided 66 cutting/terminating blade in the handle. It has an adjustable high/low actuation setting. The storage compartment on this punch down tool has a unique locking mechanism to store the spare blade.

      A popular hand held punch down tool we offer, is the Palm Puck Punch Down Tool. This convenient tool allows you to hold keystone jacks while terminating. Its design prevents plugs from slipping out of your hand or off the work surface prior to termination. It terminates and cuts excess wire for all eight wires in one squeeze reducing installation time. This palm puck punch down tool is compatible with CAT3/5E/6 keystone jacks.

      Complete the Network!

      We are a leading supplier of Ethernet cable for networking applications, so be sure to stock up before your next project. Our CAT6 Ethernet Cable is ideal for a wide variety of uses including: streaming internet, television, and data networking. Our Category 6 Ethernet cable can speed up your network even further, as ours is tested up to 600MHz. It is available for many applications including: indoor, outdoor, direct burial, and aerial purposes.

      Thank you for visiting our website. If you’re looking for great deals on reliable quality tools, look no further. We will provide you with all the equipment you require for your next project, while helping you stay under budget.

      If you have any questions, feel free to call or email us.

      I am looking to organize my old cat5e cabling at home and was able to get a hold of a couple 24 port patch panels (I only need 1).

      Well, I came across a used Panduit DP6 DP24688WGP and I pulled out all the old cables but my 110 punch down tool does not fit these connectors. They are not Krone connectors either. The connections where the wire would be making contact are all offset and my 110 tool will not slide onto these connectors.

      I can probably get by by using a small screwdriver and clipping all the wires (a pain) but I would rather find the correct tool—however, I cannot find the correct tool. The only thing I can find, and I am not sure it is the correct tool, is something like this.

      I can’t, for the life of me, see the other end of the tool to see if it matches the patch panel. Nor am I sure that the punch down tool fits either because I can’t ever see a good picture of the blade.

      Normally, I would be able to verify this with pictures, searching, etc. but this is just not my day I suppose.

      I await the flood of knowledge.

      ChrisOU812

      Popular Topics in General Networking

      ScorchedBacon66

      Understood, the Giga Plus system is a odd one. Though with some modification you could probably take a 110 punch bit and adapt it to work with the offset Giga Plus connector.

      Zoro appears to sell a compatible bit for around $10

      If the dust caps are in good order you could probably push the wires in place with a small flat screwdriver, trim with a small flush cut nipper and put the caps on and everything would likely work just fine.

      12 Replies

      redrumrudy

      Single pair punchdown tool terminates on the back of the DP6, 10Gig, DP6 PLUS, and DP5e patch panels. Reversible blade provides option of terminating without cutting wire. 5-pair punchdown tool seats 3, 4, or 5-pair connecting blocks onto 110 base.

      ScorchedBacon66

      If it were me, I’d not buy a one off tool to punch down on that patch panel. Spend about $10 more and get a Cat6 24 port patch panel from ICC

      Especially if that patch panel was used you may end up dealing with bits of wire etc left behind, and the termination caps are a major PITA to deal with and often fall off anyways.

      OP ChrisOU812

      ScorchedBacon66 wrote:

      If it were me, I’d not buy a one off tool to punch down on that patch panel. Spend about $10 more and get a Cat6 24 port patch panel from ICC

      ICC Cat6 Patch Panel

      Especially if that patch panel was used you may end up dealing with bits of wire etc left behind, and the termination caps are a major PITA to deal with and often fall off anyways.

      Thanks ScorchedBacon66 . You have to know me, I don’t like to do things hard (sometimes I just end up doing that) but if I find ‘free’ and it looks in decent shape and I find it reasonably useful, then I will forge ahead. that is it if the costs and time building up to using it are also free or minimal.

      Buying a patch panel is out and as this is going to be a limited use I won’t be buying the expensive punch down tool. I’ll make something or get by with a small screw driver (done that before in a pinch).

      Would be nice if my punch down tool would accept the blade for the GPST single wire tool. that I am also unsure of. I have a Klein Tools punch with 110 and 66 blades. But I am guessing, because Panduit went ahead and made their own special connector and punch down tool, that their blade wouldn’t fit mine. Doesn’t mean someone didn’t design one but I’ll have to search that out. Maybe I can have our HS maker bot a tool. that would be neat.

      Thanks for responding and I have some direction now.

      • local_offer Tagged Items
      • ScorchedBacon66

      OP ChrisOU812

      Thanks for responding redrumrudy and Christopher3630 . I thought those tools were correct but without seeing a close-up of either, I just couldn’t be sure. Very frustrating. seems like every picture for those tools are the same stock picture and not very useful in identifying what I need.

      Also, I have all the little cover panels for the back of the patch panel. Once I figured out how to get them off without damaging them (flat bladed jewelers screwdriver and leveraging off of each previous connector) it went pretty quick. No damage to any of the connectors and the panels will snap right back on.

      Also have the cable management part of it but not sure if I’ll need or use that.

      • local_offer Tagged Items
      • Christopher3630
      • redrumrudy

      How to use a punch down tool

      This standard impact punch down tool brings professional results at an economical price. This punch down tool includes a removable 110 cut blade with a 110 no-cut blade on the reverse as well as a 66 blade. Spring tension is adjustable and there’s a built-in spot for a spare blade storage that locks the spare blade in place so it won’t fall out or get lost. This tool is compatible with standard twist-lock punch tool bits. The edges of the handle are rounded for comfort and it features a finger groove near the front for ease of control. Handle includes a pick tool and insertion tool on either side for additional multi-functional use. The handle is two toned so you can easily identify which side of the bit is the sharp side; the grey side will always be the cut side and the blue side will always be the side that doesn’t cut off the wire.

      Having a punch bit without a blade is useful for daisy chaining cross connect on a block. Because the handle is spring loaded it makes it easier to punch down cable and you can be sure that the wire will remain in place on a keystone jack, block, or patch panel.

      Videos Hide Videos Show Videos

      How To Install A Cat5E Computer Jack

      Jim Gibson will show you how to install, cable, and punch down.

      1 Review Hide Reviews Show Reviews

      PUNCH DOWN TOOL WITH 110 AND 66 BLADES (PROFESSIONAL GRADE)

      Posted by Andrei C on Oct 19th 2020

      It's the best punch down tool hands down . I have no words it's the most professional punch tool that i started using recently I'm very happy with

      Adjustable Pressure Punchdown Tool with Reversible Blade for Punching and Cutting or just Punch Down.

      Are you looking to bulk purchase this product? If so, please see the below DISCOUNTED quantity breaks !

      All quoted prices exclude VAT.

      Volume discounts

      Quantity Discount You Save
      15 20% Up to £15.90
      10 15% Up to £7.95
      5 10% Up to £2.65
      3 5% Up to £0.79
      Quantity Discount You Save
      15 20% Up to £15.90
      10 15% Up to £7.95
      5 10% Up to £2.65
      3 5% Up to £0.79

      Colour = Orange
      Type = Used for both UTP & FTP cable
      Stock = Next Day from Stock

      How to use a punch down tool

      How to use a punch down toolTo start off with you will want to begin with preparing the cat cables you intend to punch into the patch panels. You with do so by removing the outer jacket with the cable stripper. If you do not have a cable stripper handy it can also be done with a sharp knife, but please be careful as this method result in both injury to yourself and damage to the inner copper cables.

      Ideally you should remove approximately 1 inch (25mm) of the outer jacket, this ensures a nice clean fit into the patch panel without the risk of exposing too much cable and damaging it. Once the outer jacket has been removed you will notice 4 pairs of copper cables, making up a total of 8 cables. In order to successfully punch down the cables into the patch panel you will need to gently untwist the pairs so that the 8 cables can be individually worked work with.

      Step 2: Prepare the Patch Panel

      How to use a punch down toolIn most cases full patch panels are made up various parts. That being said, it can prove very useful in most situations to break apart the patch panel into it’s small components. This allows for you to work with only the required parts of the panel and makes the entire project simpler to handle on the whole.

      Take the screwdriver and begin by unscrewing the section of the panel you are going to work with and place the remainder to the side. While doing so take note of the label on the inside of the panel with the color code printed on to it. This will be explained in the next step

      Step 3: Put Cat Cable into Patch Panel

      How to use a punch down toolIn order to correctly insert the Cat cable wires into the patch panel you will need to take a close look at the color code that is printed on the label adhered to the panel.Let’s take a closer look.

      First off you will notice that there are in fact 2 pin-out types, these are typically labelled A and B respectively. Generally most installations would use pin-out B, but please be sure to check which one is right for your specific application.

      Once you have selected a pin-out type you will see that each one has it’s own color code, with 4 solid colors and 4 stripes. Simply match the solid colored wires to the solid color slots and do the same with the stripes. Inserting the wires into the slots requires nothing more than gently pushing them in. Once all the wires have been correctly inserted it is time to being with the actual punching down.

      Step 4: Punching Down

      How to use a punch down toolFirst off you will notice that there are in fact 2 pin-out types, these are typically labelled A and B respectively. Generally most installations would use pin-out B, but please be sure to check which one is right for your specific application.

      Once you have selected a pin-out type you will see that each one has it’s own color code, with 4 solid colors and 4 stripes. Simply match the solid colored wires to the solid color slots and do the same with the stripes. Inserting the wires into the slots requires nothing more than gently pushing them in. Once all the wires have been correctly inserted it is time to being with the actual punching down.

      In order to correctly punch down the wires into the patch panel you will need to make use of a Punch Down Tool. The tool itself is fairly simple in that it has a pointed side and a flat size. The pointed side is the side that will trim the ends of the wires to leave a clean cut.

      Begin by positioning the tool over the wire you intend to punch down and then using as much force as required push down on the handle of the tool. This will both push the wire firmly into place and trim the ends at the same time., continue doing this for all the remaining wires. You may also notice that occasionally some of the wire ends remain, you can usually fix this by gently removing them by hand as the tool may not have cleaved all the way through the wires on the initial punch down.

      Want to watch it done? Check out the video below for a short tutorial which outlines most of what we have discussed in this guide.

      How to use a punch down tool

      Screwdrivers. Use a small, flat-head screwdriver as a common substitute for a punch down tool. When doing so it is vital that you do not break the already thin wire before it makes contact with the desired slot.

      What is the use of punch down tool?

      Punch down tool (also known as punch down tool or krone tool) is used by electricians or communication technicians to assist in inserting wires into insulation displacement connectors on patch panels, keystone modules or punch down blocks.

      How do you use the BT punch down tool?

      2:253:45How to use an IDC Punch Down Tool – ThatCable – YouTubeYouTubeStart of suggested clipEnd of suggested clipUp with the terminal. And press down until you hear a click the core will now be securely in placeMoreUp with the terminal. And press down until you hear a click the core will now be securely in place and you will have trimmed the end of the core to leave it with a professional looking finish.

      How do you punch-down a 110 block?

      1:063:47How to punch down a 110 block patch panel. – YouTubeYouTube

      How do you punch-down an Ethernet cable?

      2:355:48How To Punch Down Cat5/E/Cat6 Keystone Jack – FireFold – YouTubeYouTube

      How do you punch down?

      0:110:40Kitchen Basics – How To Punch Down Dough – YouTubeYouTube

      Are 110 blocks still used?

      In commercial settings, this style of home run or star topology wiring was already in use on 66 blocks in telecom closets and switchrooms. The 110 block has been slowly replacing the 66 block, especially for data communications usage.

      What does a 110 punch down block?

      What Is 110 Punch Down Block. A 110 punch down block is an updated version of punch down block, is the core part of the connection management system, used to connect wiring for telephone systems, data network wiring, and other low-voltage wiring applications.

      What should I look for in a punch down tool?

      Inspect the wires. Once you’ve finished terminating the wires, look at each wire to make sure there is no overhang out the side of the jack. You should also make sure that the edge of the cable jacket is near the base of the jack and the wires you just terminated. The wires should be securely in place.

      How does a techwalla punch down tool work?

      Techwalla may earn compensation through affiliate links in this story. Punch down tools install twisted pair Ethernet cables to an Ethernet jack or a small gauge bell wire to a jack of any kind. They work by forcing these small gauge wires into a bladed slot that peels back the insulation exposing the wire to the circuit-bearing surface.

      How does a punch down tool for Ethernet work?

      Punch down tools install twisted pair Ethernet cables to an Ethernet jack or a small gauge bell wire to a jack of any kind. They work by forcing these small gauge wires into a bladed slot that peels back the insulation exposing the wire to the circuit-bearing surface.

      How do you use punch down on wire?

      Take your punch down tool and press it down on the conductor wires to cut them. The angled (cut) part of the blade should contact with the long sturdy side of the jack. This will also make sure the wires that are cut are flush with the jack.

      If you don’t want to pay for delivery or need to ASAP, you can pick it up in store. Just bear in mind not all stores will have everything in stock. You’ll be able to see if they do during the checkout process.

      Free Delivery

      Most products are included in free delivery, however some are excluded as follows:

      • Orders and/or items under $99.
      • Orders and/or items that are deemed bulky, large or heavy.
      • Clearance items.
      • Orders that include or items that are classed as dangerous goods.
      • Remote areas are excluded from free delivery and you will either be charged delivery at checkout or may be contacted prior to delivery to confirm delivery charges if necessary.
      • Interstate deliveries.

      Total Tools reserve the right to change or withdraw free delivery at any time.

      Estimated Delivery Timeframes

      If you opted to collect in store you will receive an email to inform you when your goods are ready for collection.

      If you opted for delivery, you will receive an email when the goods have been despatched to the couriers with details so you can track our order.

      We aim to despatch all orders within 1-2 business days. In the unusual event of a delay to the despatch of your order you will be contacted at the earliest opportunity. Once the order has been despatched the estimated delivery time is as follows:

      • Metro (Excludes Hobart Metro) 1-2 business days
      • Hobart Metro 3-4 business days
      • Regional Areas 3-4 business days
      • Remote Areas 6-9 business days

      Please note that these delivery timeframes are estimates and are not guaranteed.

      Returns

      Changed your mind? No worries. You just need to get the product back to the store it was shipped from (this is on your receipt) within 30 days, unused and in its original packaging and we’ll give you a refund (excluding delivery costs). You can read our full returns & exchanges policy here (special order items are excluded from this returns policy).

      At Total Tools we offer Low Prices, every day, guaranteed. We will not be beaten!

      We check our prices daily against our competitors to ensure you can shop online or instore with the confidence you are buying at the very best price, every day.

      Should you find a lower advertised price for the identically stocked product elsewhere, we will happily match the price. [Subject to Terms & Conditions – see below for details]

      At times prices have moved in the market, and our in store and online price for printed catalogue items may be lower. Check online or instore for the latest price.

      How to Price Match

      Simply fill in price match form available on every product page or visit a Total Tools Store. We will verify the price, and then immediately match any current advertised price (Terms & Conditions apply).

      Terms & Conditions

      For eligibility, the following terms and conditions need to be met;

      • Product must be identical (same brand, colour, model #)
      • Product must be currently advertised in print or electronic media (Including newspaper, catalogue, radio, television advertising or online)
      • Product must be in stock at the competitor
      • The competitors price of the product must be inclusive of delivery fees, taxes and charges
      • The competitors price is lower than our price on the day the price guarantee is requested (day of purchase)
      • The competitors price excludes finance, installation, bundling, rebates, cash back, coupon offers, loyalty rewards or free bonus goods.
      • The competitor is located in Australia

      The following exclusions apply;

      • Trade/commercial quotes and/or large volume/bulk purchases
      • Products for sale via auction, stock liquidations, fire sale, sale or clearance (including eBay, Amazon)
      • Blemished, seconds, refurbished, damaged or ex demonstration stock
      • Advertising errors where competitor has published a rectification notice
      • Special event, club or membership offers, third party promotions or prices not available to the general public
      • Special order products

      Total Tools reserve the right to terminate or amend the price guarantee policy at any time without notice.

      How to use a punch down tool

      Punch down tool, sometimes called krone tool, is a small hand tool that technicians often use to connect telecommunication or network wires to punch down block, patch panels, keystone module and surface mount boxes. It usually comprises a handle, a spring mechanism and a removable slotted blade that can cut off excess wires. Having a dependable punch down tool can help you save time when installing cables, for it allows quick and effective cross-connection of wires. This article aims to introduce how to operate and choose a right punch down tool in cabling projects.

      How to use a punch down tool

      It’s common to cut down or secure wires when technicians are installing cables. In order to ensure the wires are secure, it’s essential to use a punch down tool to trim and contain them in a basic jack. Then how to use a punch down tool? Take punching down a jack for example.

      Step one. Strip back the cable jacket. Put the cable into a striping tool and spin it around a few times. Remove the jacket after making sure the jacket is out. Then gently pull away the wire pairs from the center of the wires to make them fan out. Try to strengthen the ends so that you can make them easier to terminate later.

      Step two. Put the wires in the jack. Get rid of the protective cover of the jack and put the cable into the block of the jack. Then insert each branch of the wires into its own separate slot, making sure that the wire matches the A or B configuration.

      How to use a punch down tool

      Step three. Terminate the conductor wires. Press the punch down tool on the conductor wires to cut them. Make sure the cut part of the blade comes into contact with the long sturdy side of the jack, which will ensure the wires to be cut are flush with the jack. In this process, try to punch straight down to prevent the jack from bending. Once you heard a loud click, it means you have terminated the wire correctly.

      How to use a punch down tool

      Step four. Check out the wires. Having finished the termination, do not forget to inspect it. Try to look at each wire to make sure there is no overhang out the side of the jack. Once ensuring the termination is finished successfully, remember to snap a dust cap in place so that the wires are protected.

      If you have experience of terminating cables like Cat5e, Cat6 or Cat6a which are needed to connect with keystone jacks, you may know clearly how important it is to have a suitable punch down tool at your side when installing cables. If you want to make your installation work faster and easier, the following considerations may help you.

      Improve speed. In order to finish work faster, the first factor to consider is speed. As we have mentioned above, technicians must first strip the outer jacket and put the wire in the right slots during the punch down process. Therefore, a good punch down tool needs to help technicians finish the procedure quickly.

      Increase accuracy. This is another factor technicians need to consider. You can image that if a technician has to terminate more than one hundred wires, how can he ensure that no mistake occurs all the time? Improper termination can result in network downtime and waste technicians’ time and resources. So whether a punch down tool can help workers increase accuracy or not should be taken into consideration.

      Reduce fatigue. After working for a long time, tiredness cannot be avoided. Reducing hand fatigue is a critical factor in wire terminations, especially for technicians who will work in large job sites. Because small mistakes may lead to lots of sources wasted.

      Usability. Good punch down tools should have features such as easy-to-use handles and easy for operations, which allow for high usability across a wide range of settings and requirements.

      Punch down tools are a necessary part in cable installations. A decent tool can make the work of technicians easier when installing and maintaining cable, and it also can help operators save money. In a word, it’s beneficial to choose a suitable punch down tool.

      RJ-45 RJ11 Impact Punch Down punchdown Tool for 5 Pairs use AT&T 110 terminal

      RJ-45 RJ11 Impact Punch Down punchdown Tool for 5 Pairs use AT&T 110 terminal How to use a punch down tool
      How to use a punch down tool
      How to use a punch down tool
      EAAOSw0vBUdzwN/s-l500.jpg” alt=”RJ-45 RJ11 Impact Punch Down punchdown Tool for 5 Pairs use AT/&T 110 terminal” />
      How to use a punch down tool
      How to use a punch down tool
      How to use a punch down tool
      How to use a punch down tool
      How to use a punch down tool
      How to use a punch down tool

      Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for RJ-45 RJ11 Impact Punch Down punchdown Tool for 5 Pairs use AT&T 110 terminal at the best online prices at,Free shipping for many products,Condition:: New: A brand-new,unused,unopened,undamaged item in its original packaging,where packaging is applicable,Packaging should be the same as what is found in a retail store,unless the item is handmade or was packaged by the manufacturer in non-retail packaging,such as an unprinted box or plastic bag,See the seller's listing for full details,See all condition definitions : MPN: : Does Not Apply,Brand: : Unbranded/Generic: UPC: : Does not apply

      Мы рады приветствовать вас в бесплатном и современном редакторе фотографий от Pixlr. Начните редактирование, нажав на “Открыть фотографию”, перетащите файл, вставьте его из буфера обмена (CTRL+V) или выберите один из наших шаблонов ниже.

      Последние проектыСмотреть все

      Сохраните ваши документы из локального кеша для дальнейшей работы и загрузите их в формате .PXZ (документ Pixlr).

      Рекомендуемые шаблоныПоказать ещё

      Модные и качественные шаблоны, вручную отобранные сотрудниками нашей команды

      Шаблоны

      Найдите подходящий шаблон, выбрав ниже тип дизайна, который вы хотите создать.

      Рекомендуемые

      Закрепленные проекты

      Все ваши временные проекты

      История сохраняется только в кэше вашего браузера. Обратите внимание, что все ваши документы будут удалены, когда вы очистите кэш браузера или выполните очистку вашей системы. Если вы хотите сохранить ваши документы для дальнейшей работы, пожалуйста, загрузите их в формате .PXZ (документ Pixlr).

      В вашей истории нет изображений. Пожалуйста выполните “Открыть изображение” или “Загрузить URL”, чтобы начать редактирование

      Поиск в запасниках

      Ошибка

      Не в сети

      Решение Pixlr E создано для настольных компьютеров. Вы используете мобильное устройство, либо ширина окна вашего браузера составляет менее 650 пикселей. Мы рекомендуем использовать мобильный редактор для фотографий или увеличить ширину окна вашего браузера.

      A Florida man pleaded guilty Monday to felony battery, nine months after he punched a Dunkin’ customer for calling him the N-word, causing him to fall and die three days later.

      Corey Pujols, 27, was charged with manslaughter in the death of 77-year-old Vonelle Cook in May, but was able to plead guilty to a lesser charge, according to the Tampa Bay Times.

      Cook, a regular client at the Tampa Dunkin’, began yelling at employees at the drive-thru on May 4, then got out of his car and went into the store, according to officials. Inside the store, the man continued yelling, then called Pujols, who worked at the coffee and doughnut chain, the N-word.

      Most Read

      Pujols told him not to say it again, but Cook did so.

      That’s when Pujols punched Cook in the jaw, knocking him to the ground.

      Cook was hospitalized and died on May 7.

      “Two of the primary factors were the aggressive approach the victim took toward the defendant and everyone working with the defendant and that the victim repeatedly used possibly the most aggressive and offensive term in the English language,” Grayson Kamm, a spokesman for Hillsborough State Attorney Andrew Warren, said, according to the Times.

      Pujols’ plea deal comes with two years of house arrest followed by three years of probation. He also must complete 200 hours of community service and attend an anger management course.