How to use the federal inmate locator

To improve public safety the Department of Corrections publishes information about currently incarcerated individuals. All information provided through the application is subject to the agency’s Disclaimer and Terms of Use. You may contact us to obtain more information about current and former inmates and supervisees.

Enter a DOC Number or name to browse for a specific inmate. Special characters, other than hyphens and apostrophes, cannot be used. (What is a DOC Number?)

Inmate search results

DOC Number ↑ Name Age Location WA VINE Notification
21090 ROLLINS, JOHNNIE 103 Washington State Penitentiary Register to be notified for ROLLINS, JOHNNIE
28255 FRIEND, GERALD A 84 Airway Heights Corrections Center Register to be notified for FRIEND, GERALD A
116950 PAAKONEN, DUANE D 82 Monroe Correctional Complex-WSR Register to be notified for PAAKONEN, DUANE D
118006 NELSON, BRUCE W 84 Washington State Penitentiary Register to be notified for NELSON, BRUCE W
118079 ROSE, STANLEY D 80 Reynolds Work Release Register to be notified for ROSE, STANLEY D
118369 GRISBY JR., HENRY 82 Washington Corrections Center Register to be notified for GRISBY JR., HENRY
118603 SMITH, STEPHEN M 80 Airway Heights Corrections Center Register to be notified for SMITH, STEPHEN M
125311 JOHNSON, CURTIS L 77 Airway Heights Corrections Center Register to be notified for JOHNSON, CURTIS L
126260 WILLIAMS, CLARENCE 77 Stafford Creek Corrections Center Register to be notified for WILLIAMS, CLARENCE
126339 GEORGE, RODNEY W 72 Washington State Penitentiary Register to be notified for GEORGE, RODNEY W
126426 FLOCH, JAMES J 75 Washington State Penitentiary Register to be notified for FLOCH, JAMES J
126465 ROBERTS, ALFRED W 79 Washington State Penitentiary Register to be notified for ROBERTS, ALFRED W
126591 SMEDLEY, REGINALD 75 Reynolds Work Release Register to be notified for SMEDLEY, REGINALD
126645 NICHOLSON, ROBERT W 77 Coyote Ridge Corrections Center Register to be notified for NICHOLSON, ROBERT W
126696 JOHNSON, ROBERT E 74 Coyote Ridge Corrections Center Register to be notified for JOHNSON, ROBERT E
126774 STAGGS, BEN J 89 Washington State Penitentiary Register to be notified for STAGGS, BEN J
127261 BOGGS JR., GEORGE M 72 Monroe Correctional Complex-TRU Register to be notified for BOGGS JR., GEORGE M
127688 GRANT, GARY G 70 Monroe Correctional Complex-SOU Register to be notified for GRANT, GARY G
127707 SPIVEY, CLIFFORD E 72 Olympic Corrections Center Register to be notified for SPIVEY, CLIFFORD E
127942 WILLIAMS, MATHEW 78 Monroe Correctional Complex-WSR Register to be notified for WILLIAMS, MATHEW
128395 ELLIS, JEROME C 66 Airway Heights Corrections Center Register to be notified for ELLIS, JEROME C
128402 EDE, MICHAEL T 78 Airway Heights Corrections Center Register to be notified for EDE, MICHAEL T
128478 ELMORE, CLARK R 70 Washington State Penitentiary Register to be notified for ELMORE, CLARK R
128481 HAY, PATRICK 72 Monroe Correctional Complex-WSR Register to be notified for HAY, PATRICK
216255 CHICK, DEXTER L 81 Stafford Creek Corrections Center Register to be notified for CHICK, DEXTER L

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  • DOC Headquarters:
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  • PO Box 41100 • Olympia, WA 98504-1100

The Washington State Department of Corrections acknowledges that its facilities, offices and operations are on the ancestral lands and customary territories of Indigenous Peoples, Tribes and Nations. Corrections is thankful to the Tribes for caring for these lands since time immemorial and honors its ongoing connection to these communities past, present and future. We welcome the opportunity to collaborate with the Indigenous populations and communities, and strive to work with our Tribal partners to improve the lives of Indigenous People and non-Indigenous neighbors throughout the state.

Western Union provides simple and reliable money transfer options, available 24/7, to loved ones currently in a correctional facility.

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More information for sending to an inmate

Sign up and verify your free profile

Log in or Sign up and verify your profile and select ‘Pay inmate.’

Complete the required fields

Enter the name of the correctional facility, the inmate’s name and their account number.

Select a secure payment method

Choose whether to pay with your credit/debit card 1 , or with your bank account.

Confirm, send and track your transfer

Your money is on its way. We’ll send you a confirmation email with the MTCN to track your transfer to track the funds.

Sign up and verify your free profile

Log in or Sign up and verify your profile and select ‘Pay inmate.’

Complete the required fields

Enter the name of the correctional facility, the inmate’s name and their account number.

Select a secure payment method

Choose whether to pay with your credit/debit card 1 , or with your bank account.

Confirm, send and track your transfer

Your money is on its way. We’ll send you a confirmation email with the MTCN to track your transfer to track the funds.

More ways to send money

Transfer money with our app

Send money on the go, anytime, from wherever you are with the Western Union ® app.

Pay by phone

Easily send money over the phone to a correctional facility by calling 1-800-225-5227.

Send money in person

Send money to an inmate in person from over more than 57,000 agent locations 2 in the U.S.

Frequently Asked Questions about sending money to an inmate

Yes, Western Union gives you four convenient ways to send money into an inmate’s account. Send online, by phone, with the Western Union ® app or in person at one of our 55,000 agent locations 2 around the country.

1. If you already have the Western Union ® app, log in with Touch ID or your credentials. If you don’t have our app yet, simply download it on the Apple App Store or Google Play Store. New users can follow the steps to register a profile with your email address. You can verify your profile using your driver’s license, passport or government-issued ID.
2. Select ‘Send money to an inmate.’
3. Enter the name of the correctional facility, the inmate’s name and account number.
4. Pay for your money transfer via credit/debit card 1 .
5. We’ll provide the tracking number for your transaction (MTCN).

There are a number of programs, resources, guidance documents and information provided by the Federal Bureau of Prisons to help you succeed in being safe and productive while in custody, and to prepare for release before the time comes. Please reference the documents, information, and links below.

OPERATIONS

Federal Prison/Facility locator (by facility name, state, region, type) and Facility Maps. The USBOP operates institutions at five different security levels to include minimum, low, medium, high, or administrative as explained here.

Facility designations are done following the most current BOP Designation Directives and Procedures. Also, here is a list of personal property items allowed and not allowed with the BOP, as well as an excellent ABCs of the BOP document (courtesy of the Southern District of Illinois) that answers a lot of questions about what to expect and how things work.

Handling Juvenile Offenders within the USBOP

USBOP Facility Address Database for inmate mail, physical address, shipping, and staff mail (search by location/facility type)

USBOP Communication System (vitiation, mail, email, and telephone communication)

RESTORATIVE INTERVENTIONS

(such as treatment, employment training and readiness, education, religious programs, etc.)

The Bureau of Prisons provides services and programs to address inmate needs, structure use of leisure, and facilitate the successful reintegration of inmates into society. Each Bureau facility offers a set of programs and services that vary based on the characteristics and needs of its specific inmate population.

Upon arrival at a new institution, an inmate is interviewed and screened by staff from the case management, medical, and mental health units. Later, an inmate is assigned to the Admission and Orientation (A&O) Program, where he or she receives a formal orientation to the programs, services, policies, and procedures of that facility. This program provides an introduction to all aspects of the institution.

Research has conclusively demonstrated that participation in a variety of programs that teach marketable skills helps to reduce recidivism. Additionally, institution misconduct can be significantly reduced through programs that emphasize personal responsibility, respect, and tolerance of others. Accordingly, the BOP offers a wide variety of program opportunities for inmates that teach pro-social values and life skills. These programs include literacy and occupational training, the Life Connections Program, parenting programs, mock job fairs, etc.

For a more in-depth discussion of each program (e.g., inmate training, women’s issues, education, medical care, computations, designations, religious programs, etc.), go to the USBOP link on Inmate Programs.

U.S.BOP Substance Abuse Programs (includes education, residential and non-residential programs, transitional treatment, FAQs, etc.)

REENTRY INFORMATION

Opportunities and Expectations – Reentry Programming (USBOP Director Charles E. Samuels, Jr. – Jan. 2012 document)

Residential Reentry Centers (RRC) – commonly known as halfway houses (operations, locations, FAQs, etc.). Description from the USBOP of the overall program design, processes, and expectations are listed here.

Refer here for the Rules and Regulations for the 3 RRCs in the Northern District of Texas: Dallas-Hutchins (house rules and facility handbook), Fort Worth, and Dismas House (Lubbock area).

The Sentencing Reform Act of 1984 was signed into law more than three decades ago. As part of the comprehensive reform package, Congress created compassionate release. According to the Act, federal prisoners can apply for early release when they present certain “extraordinary and compelling” reasons that warrant a reduction of sentence. This is what constitutes compassionate release in federal prison.

The Bureau of Prisons (BOP) promulgated regulations and policy in order to implement compassionate release. The governing regulations can be found at 28 C.F.R. § 571.60 et seq., and the policy is available in Program Statement 5050.49, Compassionate Release/Reduction in Sentence.

The “extraordinary and compelling” reasons that may qualify a federal prisoners for compassionate release fall into three categories: medical, non-medical and elderly.

Medical: Terminal or Debilitated Prisoners

The Bureau has determined that certain terminal medical conditions amount to extraordinary and compelling reasons that may justify early release. Generally, the prisoner must have been diagnosed with a terminal, incurable disease that will lead to death within 18 months. While the BOP may consider the functional impairments of terminally ill prisoners, they are not dispositive to the final decision on whether to grant compassionate release.

Read our Terminal Medical Condition page for more information on this category of compassionate release.

Regulation and policy also allow for the compassionate release of certain prisoners who suffer from a debilitated medical condition, but are not necessarily terminal. A prisoner must be completely disabled or confined to a bed or chair more than 50 percent of waking hours in order to qualify as debilitated. In addition to physical disabilities, the BOP shall consider cognitive impairments when reviewing a prisoner’s claim of a debilitated medical condition.

Read our Debilitated Medical Condition page for more information on this category of compassionate release.

Non-Medical: Need to Care for a Child or Spouse/Partner

The death or incapacitation of the family member caregiver of a federal prisoner’s child may qualify as an extraordinary and compelling reason to grant compassionate release in some circumstances. As a rule, the caregiver must have either died or become completely incapable of caring for the child, who must be under eighteen. Additionally, the prisoner must be the only available family member caregiver. The Bureau will consider the best interests of the child when reviewing a prisoner’s claim of need to care for a child.

Read our Death or Incapacitation of the Family Member Caregiver page for more information on this category of compassionate release.

Compassionate release may also be granted when a federal prisoner’s spouse or registered partner becomes incapacitated and the prisoner would be their only available caregiver. The relationship must have been established before the prisoner’s arrest. The Bureau considers incapacitation to mean complete physical disability, such as when a spouse or partner cannot carry on self-care and is confined to a bed, or a severe cognitive deficit that has severely affected the spouse or partner’s mental capacity or ability to function.

Read our Incapacitation of a Spouse or Registered Partner page for more information on this category of compassionate release.

Elderly: Non-Medical

Certain federal prisoners who have reached the age of 65 may be eligible for compassionate release. The Bureau will consider those who have served the greater of 10 years or 75 percent of their term of imprisonment for possible release. Ordinarily, an elderly person will not be eligible if they were sentenced for a crime of violence at age 60 or above.

Read our Elderly Inmates without a Medical Condition page for more information on this category of compassionate release.

Alternatively, an elderly federal prisoner who is 70 years or older and has served 30 years or more of their imprisonment may be considered for compassionate release. Under this alternative, the prisoner’s crime must have been committed after November 1, 1987.

Read our “New Law” Elderly Inmates page for more information on this category of compassionate release.

Elderly: Medical

The Bureau has established criteria for medical compassionate release specific to the elderly. In order to qualify for such consideration, a federal prisoner must meet all of the following criteria:

  • Age 65 or older.
  • Suffer from chronic or serious medical conditions related to the aging process.
  • Experiencing diminished mental or physical health that diminishes the ability to function in a prison.
  • Has no hope that conventional treatment will improve the mental or physical condition.
  • Has served at least 50 percent of the sentence.

In addition to these criteria, the BOP will consider the age at which the offense was committed, whether the medical conditions existed at the time of offense, and whether the prisoner’s presentence report mentions the medical conditions.

Read our Elderly Inmates with Medical Conditions page for more information on this category of compassionate release.

Factors Considered in Evaluation of All Compassionate Release in Federal Prison Categories

No matter what the extraordinary or compelling reason justifying compassionate release for an inmate in federal prison, the Bureau will consider a host of factors when weighing a federal prisoner’s application. The factors are not weighted or exclusive, and include the following:

  • The nature and circumstances of the offense.
  • Criminal history.
  • Comments from victims.
  • Unresolved detainers.
  • Supervised release violations.
  • Institutional adjustment.
  • Disciplinary infractions.
  • Personal history from the presentence report.
  • Length of sentence and time already served.
  • Prisoner’s age now, and at the time of offense.
  • Release plans.
  • Whether release would minimize the severity of the offense.

Improving Your Chances of Compassionate Release Success

If you or a loved one are considering applying for compassionate release, it is highly recommended that you retain competent counsel who can ensure that you qualify and help put your best foot forward. The experienced attorneys at the Law Offices of Brandon Sample understand the ins and outs of compassionate release, and stand ready to provide professional assistance with the process. Contact us to learn how we can help give you the best chance at an early release from Bureau of Prisons custody.

If you have other questions about compassionate release in federal prison, please don’t hesitate to call us at 802-444-4357.

After you have been sentenced to incarceration by a United Stated District Court Judge for a violation of the Federal Criminal Law, you will be remanded to the custody of the Federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP). Soon thereafter, the BOP will be making a variety of determinations regarding your housing and your “out date.” The out date is the date an inmate first becomes eligible for release. A prisoner’s out date is rarely based on the actual sentence, but instead is based on a variety of factors and formulas, as will be discussed below. This means that a person sentenced to a minimum period of five years in prison rarely actually serves 5 years or 1,825 days.

How Does the BOP Calculate Good Time?

As it relates to your out date and the awarding of good time credits, the BOP will be applying 18 U.S. Code § 3624, which provides that any prisoner sentenced to a year or more may receive up to 54 days credit for each year of the prisoner’s sentence. However, this 54-day credit is subject to the BOP’s determination that a prisoner has exhibited “exemplary compliance” with BOP rules and regulations. Additionally, the BOP must also consider whether the prisoner is making good progress toward receiving a high school diploma or equivalent.

The statute clearly indicates that a prisoner should be afforded 54 days of good time for each year of the prisoner’s sentence. While this seems straightforward, prior to 2018, the BOP would not simply take 365 days and subtract from that 54 days to calculate a prisoner’s out date. Instead, they used a rather complicated math formula that often resulted in prisoners only receiving a maximum of 47 days of good time credit for each year of the sentence imposed instead of 54 days. This had something to do with a way of interpreting the phrase “term of imprisonment” contained in 18 U.S. Code § 3624 to mean “time served.” This method of calculation was upheld by the United States Supreme Court in Barber v. Thomas, 560 U.S. 474 (2010).

In 2018, Congress passed the First Step Act which indicated that all eligible prisoners receive 54 days rather than 47 days. As noted above, before this 2018 law, the BOP calculated the 54 days of good time for each year served. Based on the BOP’s interpretation of 18 USC 3624(b), the final year of incarceration was pro-rated. With the 2018 law, all qualifying inmates receive 54 days of good conduct time for each year. This is essentially a 15% reduction of the actual sentence imposed.

Are Time Credits Different from Good Time Credits?

In addition to the initial prisoner screening described above, The First Step Act also provides that the Department of Justice (DOJ) must develop a “risk and needs assessment system.” This system is then used by the BOP in its assessment of a prisoner’s risk to commit another crime, also known as recidivism. As part of the assessment, the BOP is required to place prisoners in programs and activities to reduce this risk of recidivism. As a reward for the successful completion of such program, a prisoner can earn additional time credits. These time credits are in addition to “good time” credits. These time credits, or said perhaps more properly, “earned time credits,” may result in the prisoner being placed into pre-release custody earlier. Pre-release custody includes things like home confinement or placement into a Residential Reentry Center.

Because the terms “time credits” and “good time credits” sound similar, it’s better to use the phrase “earned time credits” to distinguish between the two. Good time credits result in a 15% reduction in actual time served, whereas earned time credits may result in early release to a prerelease facility.

Do All Prisoners Compliant with BOP Rules Receive Earned Time Credits

Unfortunately, the answer is no. According to the First Step Act of 2018, § 3632, certain prisoners are ineligible to receive earned time credits if they have been convicted of one of the listed offenses, and there are many. Some examples include many forms of homicide, kidnapping, fraudulent use of a computer, carjacking, child pornography, many forms of sexual abuse, failing to register as a sex offender, and drive-by shootings.

Although these individuals are precluded from earned time credits, such prisoners can nevertheless use successful completion of recidivism reduction programs to earn other benefits. These include, for example, more visitation time, more minutes for phone calls, additional commissary privileges, or even possibly earn a transfer to a different, more desirable prison. A more desirable prison might be one with better accommodations or that is closer to the prisoner’s home.

What About Earned Time Credits for Child Pornography Charges?

Persons convicted of charges under chapter 110, which defines various kinds of child pornography, are not entitled to any good time credits. This prohibition specifically applies to the following sections of chapter 110, which is the Chapter of the United States Code broadly addressing various sex crimes and abuse toward children. The First Step Act specifically mentions sections 2251, 2251A, 2252, 2252A and 2260. These are the sections addressing such crimes as the possession, receipt, production, and distribution of child pornography. If you are facing a child pornography charge, then you should discuss how the First Step Act may impact your assessed out date and your eligibility for early release to a prerelease facility.

If you're looking for a prison inmate, a mugshot, or more information about the United States criminal justice system, the internet hosts a number of websites that can help. The resources below can be used to locate inmate pictures, find which facility an inmate is located at, see where prisons and jails are in each state, and learn other details related to the penal system.

A facility might not update its online information on a prisoner for 24 hours or longer after incarceration.

Find Prisoners With a Federal Inmate Locator

The easiest way to do a nationwide inmate search to locate which prison an inmate is located at (or where they were held before release), is to search for the person using the Find an Inmate search tool on BOP.gov. It works for any offender incarcerated from 1982 to present day.

If you know the person's BOP register, DCDC, FBI, or INS number, you can search by it for a super-targeted search. Otherwise, try finding the inmate by their name, age, and gender.

Find Information About State Prison Systems

VINELink, a service of the National Victim Notification Network, lets you search criminal cases and offender information state by state, using their name or offender ID number. You also have the opportunity to obtain information about current criminal cases and the status of offenders.

The same BOP.gov website from above can be used to find more information about federal prisons, such as the prison’s primary email address and phone number, its judicial district and county, how many inmates are in the prison, and more. Visit Bop.gov’s Search Locations page for these details.

Locate Inmate Pictures and Mugshots

Since most states keep an online database of people in the penal system, you can usually find mugshots with identifying information such as the date of the crime and the length of the sentence.

To do this, open a search engine like Google and type your state followed by department of corrections to find your jurisdiction’s offender database. Like this:

Once you get to your state's Department of Corrections page, you might have to do a little bit of searching for penal records. Each state has them listed differently; some might have a link to Offender Search or Inmate Search.

Every state's penal search form has a couple of things in common. You'll need at least a last name just to get started, and if you have a first name, you'll have even better results. Unless you have a lot of specific information, try a general search first and narrow it down until you find what you're looking for.

If you want a copy of your own individual arrest images, you can go to the jail where the initial booking took place and make inquiries. The process differs by county and state, but you'll most likely need to make a formal records request to obtain this information. If the mugshot is part of an ongoing investigation, it may be exempt from any kind of public records request depending on where you're located.

Mugshots.com is another way to find mugshots. Unlike the websites above, it isn’t offered by the government, but it still provides millions of records, all browsable by state and searchable by name.

Not every person who gets arrested gets their picture taken, and arrest information isn't necessarily public record unless you're a celebrity or similar person of public interest.

Searching for an inmate is easy and simple if you know how to do it. There are databases that are freely available online to anyone, if you know where to find them. Usually the database will only show people who are currently in custody, but some states do give you access to past and current records, allowing you to see people who were at one time in custody and have since been released. Please be aware: many websites out there will try to charge you to access this information, but you should never pay for this, as this information is provided for free, if you know where to look for it.

To do a successful inmate search you will have to know a minimal amount of information. For starters you will at the very least need to know where the inmate is incarcerated, or at least the State they are serving their time. If you search through the state database and cannot find the inmate it is possible that the inmate is in either a Federal facility or they could be in a jail that is not included in the state databases. We will also show you how to search the jail databases through a single website for free.

You will need to know the name the inmate was arrested, or committed to an institution under. Some of the databases let you do a search using an alias or partial name but for the most part a full first and last name is required. Don’t be surprised if you search for a common name and get many results. If this happens you will be able to filter out your inmate using the date of birth that they have listed with the information, or sometimes they will actually give you images of the inmate.

Below I have placed links to all the inmate databases. They are organized by state, with Federal and Immigration searches on the top. If you search and cannot find who you are looking for try searching with less input. For example, if you are looking for John Anthony Smith and get no results you may want to redo your search using less information. For instance, it is better to just search a first and last name, then first last and middle because the inmate may not be listed with their middle name. If you still cannot find the inmate, try your search using an alias or with just a last name, or last name and first name initial.

Finding Inmates Who Were Recently Arrested/Inmates Who Are In Jail

If you still cannot find your inmate, or they are not in a prison but a jail you will want to search using a website called VINELink. VINE stands for Victim Notification system, and it covers almost every state and will allow instant notification of a change to an offenders status. You can choose to be notified if the inmate is moved, or released. You can be notified via Text Message, Email, or Telephone.

Start by accessing the various inmate searches by clicking on the corresponding State/Agency Below:

Most of the search results will give you a ton of information including the current facility and housing information. You can also sometimes get photos and vital statistics, as well as a list of charges, tattoos, release date etc.

If you have any other tips, recommendations, or questions related to doing an inmate search leave a comment below.

Offender Public Information Search / Inmate Locator – Search by name or inmate ID for up-to-date information on North Carolina state prison inmates, probationers, and parolees. This database from the NC Department of Public Safety and the former NC Department of Correction contains historical information back to 1972. Does not include county jail information. Includes special search tools for Escapes/Captures, Absconders, Inmate Releases and provides bulk downloads of data for statistical analysis.

Automated System Query (ASQ) – This search tool queries the same NCDPS database as the public offender search above, but allows you to create specialized reports based on criteria that you select. Returns counts and demographic information on offenders but not specific offender identities.

NC SAVAN Search – As part of North Carolina’s commitment to support victims of crime, NC SAVAN (North Carolina Statewide Automated Victim Assistance and Notification) provides free, confidential notifications about an offender’s custody status to victims, their families and their circles of support. County jail inmates, state prisoners, probationers, parolees, and registered sex offenders are all included in this service. Notifications can be received via phone call, email, text message or TTY for the hearing impaired.

NC Sex Offender Registry – This database shows residential locations of registered sex offenders in North Carolina. Maintained by the State Bureau of Investigation,

Interstate Compact Offender Tracking – This search tool from the Interstate Commission on Adult Offender Supervision provides information on probationers or parolees whose supervision has been transferred to another state.

Law Enforcement Search – Search NCDPS Adult Correction database by last name or ID for up-to-date information on North Carolina inmates, probationers and parolees. Create offender photo lineups and access offender information for law enforcement investigators.

The Federal Bureau of Prison (BOP) manages all inmate records for people incarcerated in federal prisons throughout the United States. Anyone who violates federal law and is sent to prison has a criminal record that is a collaboration of everything that has happened to them since they were arrested.

These records will include the person’s name and any aliases they use, their age, race, gender, release date, and where they are being detained. These records are updated daily and are publicly accessible so you can perform federal inmate search with pictures and find someone using just their name.

How To Search and Locate Inmates Held in Federal Prisons?

The BOP keeps an extensive database maintained on every federally incarcerated inmate. You can use a federal inmate locator system to find federal inmate case information and the facility prisoners are held in, if you want to visit or send them money.

You can also use online search portals to search for a federal inmate and get a report including their entire criminal history, all charges, offenses, sentences, and other jail stays.

There may be additional information available per the Freedom of Information Act, and you can fill out Form DOJ-361 to inquire further about someone to get more details about them.

Federal Prison Inmate Search & History

Before 1891, federal prisons existed but operated autonomously without any government involvement. Then the Three Prisons Act in 1891 changed that, and the federal government opened three prisons and self-managed them. Before 1907 the Justice Department’s General Agent handled all federal prison matters. Once abolished, the new Office of the Superintendent of Prisons and Prisoners took over in the 1920s. This entity eventually evolved into the Bureau of Prisons (BOP) around 1930.

President Herbert Hoover oversaw the first BOP, tasking it with "management and regulation of all Federal penal and correctional institutions." At that time there were only 11 federal prisons to manage. By 1940 it grew to 24 institutions and 24,360 inmates incarcerated in the federal prison system.

Alaska is the only state that retains jurisdiction over their correctional system. They declared this independence on January 3, 1959. Before that, the BOP managed their inmates. All information about federal inmates can be found through the federal prison inmate search tool online.

Federal Inmates and Their Charges

Federal prison inmates are people who have committed federal crimes and broken strict felony laws. Many are quite dangerous and violent and will end up in facilities best equipped to handle them during their stay.

Men and women are housed in different prisons or buildings for safety and ease of management. They are kept completely separate to maintain inmate and employee protection.

The majority (58.3%) of federal inmates are white (106,913), and 37.8% (69,244) are black. The remaining are Native American (2.3%) and Asian (1.6%).

How to use the federal inmate locator

Convicted and sentenced to death for the killing of a prisoner in a federal prison.

Allen, Billie Jerome**

Convicted and sentenced to death for his involvement in an armed bank robbery during which a bank guard was killed. (Co-defendant of Norris Holder.)

Barnette, Marcivicci Aquilia

Convicted and sentenced to death for the killing of his ex-girlfriend, as well as another man in a carjacking.

[Barrett, Kenneth Eugene^]

Convicted and sentenced to death for the fatal shooting of a state police officer who was serving a ‘no-knock’ warrant on his house for suspicion of drug activity. Death sentence reversed by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit on January 19, 2021 for ineffective assistance of counsel in the penalty phase of trial. Awaiting determination of whether federal prosecutors will pursue a capital resentencing.

Convicted and sentenced to death for the kidnapping and death of a woman following an escape from prison. (Co-defendant of Chadrick Fulks)

Convicted and sentenced to death for the killing of a prison guard.

Brown, Meier Jason

Convicted and sentenced to death for the fatal stabbing of a postal worker.

Convicted and sentenced to death for the killing of a prisoner in a federal prison.

Convicted and sentenced to death for the killing of a fellow prisoner in the mental health unit of a federal prison. (Co-defendant of Charles Hall)

Corley, Odell (Nasih Ra’id) +

Convicted for actions stemming from an attempted bank robbery committed with several others during which two bank employees were killed.

Police officer convicted and sentenced to death for ordered the killing of a witness for an internal affairs investigation into a police misconduct complaint against him.

Convicted and sentenced to death for the killing of a prisoner in a federal prison.

Pled guilty to and sentenced to death for the fatal shootings of two campers on federal land.

Pled guilty and sentenced to death for the kidnapping and death of a woman following an escape from prison. (Co-defendant of Brandon Basham.)

MI***

Convicted and sentenced to death for klling a woman on federal land.

Convicted and sentenced to death for the fatal stabbing of a fellow prisoner while incarcerated in a federal prison. (Co-defendant of Mark Snarr.)

Convicted and sentenced to death for a drug-related killing.

Convicted and sentenced to death for the killing of a fellow prisoner in the mental health unit of a federal prison. (Co-defendant of Wesley Coonce.)

Convicted and sentenced to death for the fatal shooting of a security guard during a bank robbery. (Co-defendant of Billie Allen.)

Jackson, Richard Allen

Convicted and sentenced to death for the fatal shooting of a woman while on federal property in North Carolina.

Convicted and sentenced to death for his involvement in the killings and kidnappings-for-ransom of five Russian and Georgian immigrants. (Co-defendant of Iouri Mikhel.)

Convicted and sentenced to death for the fatal shooting of a special-duty police officer during an attempted bank robbery.

MD

Convicted and sentenced to death for his involvement in the kidnapping and death of an alleged drug dealer.

Convicted and sentenced to death for his involvement in the killings and kidnappings-for-ransom of five Russian and Georgian immigrants. (Co-defendant of Jurijus Kadamovas.)

IL

Convicted and sentenced to death for the killing of a federal grand jury witness in a Medicare fraud investigation. +

Paul, Jeffrey Williams

Convicted and sentenced to death for his involvement in the robbery and killing of a retired National Park employee on federal land.

Roane, Jr., James H.**

Convicted and sentenced to death for his participation in a series of drug-related killings. (Co-defendant of Corey Johnson & Richard Tipton.)

Convicted and sentenced to death for the killing of two men in drug-related incidents in Ft. Worth.

[Rodriguez, Jr., Alfonso]

ND

Convicted and sentenced to death for a kidnapping resulting in the death of a college student. Death sentence reversed by the U.S. District Court for the District of North Dakota on September 3, 2021 for ineffective assistance of counsel in the penalty phase of trial.

Convicted and sentenced to death for the fatal shooting of nine parishioners in a church in South Carolina.

Convicted and sentenced to death for his involvement in the death of a Naval officer in a murder-for-hire plot in Newport News.

Sanchez, Jr., Ricardo**

Convicted and sentenced to death for involvement in the drug-related killing of a family, including two children. (Co-defendant of Daniel Troya.)

Convicted and sentenced to death for the kidnapping resulting in death of a 12-year old girl.

Convicted and sentenced to death for his involvement in the killings of 12 people in connection with a drug enterprise.

Convicted and sentenced to death for the fatal stabbing of a fellow prisoner while incarcerated in a federal prison. (Co-defendant of Edgar Garcia.)

Convicted and sentenced to death for the carjacking, kidnapping, and death of a restaurant owner.

Convicted and sentenced to death for his participation in a series of drug-related killings. (Co-defendant of Corey Johnson & James H. Roane, Jr.)

Ex-marine convicted and sentenced to death for the killing of a fellow service member.

Convicted and sentenced to death for involvement in the drug-related killings of a family, including two children. (Co-defendant of Ricardo Sanchez, Jr.)

MA

Convicted for offenses committed in the Boston Marathon bombing and sentenced to death for two of the victims killed.

Convicted and sentenced to death for the fatal shooting of two brothers in a North Carolina restaurant.

Note: Names in [ ] are defendants whose conviction or death sentence have been reversed by the courts but the reversal is not yet final, or who are awaiting capital retrials or resentencings after an initial conviction or death sentence was overturned. Those awaiting retrial or resentencing are marked with a caret (^). From time to time, this list may include defendants whose cases are marked with an asterisk (*). This indicates that the defendant has received a verdict of death from the jury, but the judge has not yet issued a formal sentence. In the federal system, the judge is obliged to follow a unanimous jury recommendation. (Source: Federal Capital Habeas Project.)

Because of different definitions of what constitutes being “on death row,” some organizations such as the Federal Death Penalty Resource Counsel or the Bureau of Justice Statistics may have a slightly different list of those currently under federal sentence of death. The DPIC total includes individuals whose capital convictions and/or death sentences have been overturned and who face continuing jeopardy of the death penalty until their retrial or resentencing proceedings are completed, although those individuals do not have a valid death sentence and are presumed innocent of the death penalty.