How to write a drum cadence

A cadence is a piece of music played by a drumline. It is usually used functionally as a way to keep time for the band as they are marching from point A to B, either during a parade or other live performance. Cadences are usually written to be fun to perform and fun to listen to. They often borrow rhythmic ideas from popular styles of music such as Afro-Cuban, Pop, R&B, and more. Sometimes, cadences are arrangements of a particular song, while others are original compositions. By reading this guide, you will hopefully get some ideas to inspire your next drumline cadence!

Practical Considerations

How to write a drum cadence

Think through these things before getting started. (Photo credit: James Scott)

Begin with some practical considerations. Will this cadence be performed during parades and/or while the drumline is moving? If so, consider keeping it within a comfortable walking tempo of around 108-124bpm. If not, you have much more flexibility when it comes to tempo.

Next, consider who will be performing this music. Is it for mostly beginners, very advanced performers, or somewhere in between? What skills does your target audience have in terms of rudiments, pulse control, and metric modulation abilities? Do you have any specific skills or rudiments you wish to focus on more heavily?

Notation

How to write a drum cadence

Capture your musical ideas by writing them down. (Photo credit: Weston MacKinnon)

Now it’s time to determine how you will notate the music. Will you write it by hand? If so, find some staff paper and a pencil. Will you use computer software? Sibelius, Finale, and MuseScore are some great options that each come with a learning curve. For someone just starting out, MuseScore may be the best in terms of cost (free) and ease of use. Learning how to notate music can be challenging at first, but it is worth it because it unlocks your creativity and allows you to express yourself musically.

Consider Restrictions

How to write a drum cadence

Restrictions can inspire creativity. (Photo Credit: Utsman Media)

Sometimes I find that I am the most creative when I have some type of restriction placed on my compositional process. Maybe it’s a self-imposed challenge, such as: “I am going to write an exercise using only paradiddles and double paradiddles.” Maybe it’s something as simple as a deadline beyond my control (“I have to finish the piece by tomorrow night so I can hand it out to the students on Monday”). Giving yourself a deadline or some type of restriction can serve to focus your attention and get creativity to flow. It’s up to you to decide if that makes sense for your current project.

Coming Up with Ideas

How to write a drum cadence

Make yourself available for inspiration. (Photo credit: Patrick Tomasso)

Sometimes an idea for a piece of music jumps out at you. This can happen at any time, so it’s best to keep a recording device with you. Luckily, most mobile devices have some type of voice recorder. This allows you to tap or sing the rhythmic idea into the recording to be notated later. Some of the best composers in the world use this method to keep track of new ideas.

Other times, you may need to look for an idea. This might mean listening to some of your favorite music. It might also mean listening to musical genres that you have never listened to before. Rhythm is everywhere. I recommend not listening to a bunch of other drumline cadences for inspiration. Instead, try to capture musical ideas from other genres and bring them to life in a new and unique way in the drumline idiom!

Notating Your Ideas

How to write a drum cadence

Capture your musical ideas by writing them down. (Photo Credit: Philipp Katzenberger)

Once you have a few musical ideas, it’s time to write them out. Most cadences are written out in three or four staves, with the top line being for snares, the next for tenors, then followed by bass drums, and finally cymbals. With your staves lined up, begin recording your ideas on the page. Try moving the rhythm from one voice to another (example: maybe you have an idea for a snare part… try repeating that idea in the tenor part). I like to put an idea down, then leave a bunch of blank measures before jotting down another idea. This gives me room to expand upon the idea, leave it and work on something else, and then come back to it later. The benefit of using computer software for this task is that you can easily cut and paste ideas around the score. A pair of scissors and tape could accomplish the same task with handwritten music.

Developing Your Ideas

How to write a drum cadence

Your ideas need to be shaped and refined. (Photo credit: Alice Dietrich)

So now your score has a bunch of ideas that don’t necessarily connect to each other in any meaningful way. If you like all of the ideas, then it’s time to find what does connect those ideas musically, and develop more similar content to bridge the gaps. This could be as simple as writing a 2-4 bar transition between two unrelated ideas, with the transitional material borrowing concepts from each idea. Or maybe your 2-4 bar transitional idea evolves into a new idea of its own and becomes a 16-bar phrase. Don’t be afraid to let your musical ideas grow where they want to.

If you have a good idea for one instrument, but not much going on in the other three parts, here are some ideas to help fill out your score:

· Consider making it a solo for that instrument, and just fill in some sparse accompaniment parts.

· Try copying the rhythm note-for-note into another instrument. For example, a tenor part that is in unison with the snare part rhythmically, but adds “rounds” (playing on different drums).

· Create counterpoint. Example: a snare part that moves from eighth notes to 16th notes could be paired with a tenor part that moves from 16th notes to eighth notes.

· When in doubt, introduce syncopation. For example: a snare part playing straight 16th notes would fit nicely overtop a dotted eighth and 16th note pattern in the bottom bass drum.

· Use repetition to reinforce your musical ideas. That being said, avoid repeating something too many times without introducing new material. Too many repetitions can get stale.

Continue developing your ideas until you reach a point where the cadence has a form. Musical forms that we learned about in theory class (AB, ABA, ABACA, etc.) can serve as a guide to give you structure. Some composers decide on this structure before finding and developing their musical ideas, so perhaps that is something you want to do as well.

A drumline cadence is a musical arrangement for percussionists that is usually played to maintain the correct rhythm in a drum corps or marching band. The tempo of the drumline cadence provides all performers the speed at which they should be stepping in unison when this type of marching ensemble is moving in formation. Different marching groups typically have their own unique cadence that is sometimes specifically written for their percussion section. Both parade and field show performances are often preceded by the ensemble marching to the drumline cadence before beginning to play their selected pieces.

The origins of the modern drumline cadence are usually traced to similar drum beats used in military marching. These cadences are intended to help recruits keep in step when either marching or even running in formation. Military cadences are either played on a percussion instrument or chanted vocally during basic training exercises. The types of drumline cadences used for marching music ensembles are sometimes more rhytmically intricate, depending on the group. Various versions of the same basic cadence can also be adapted for drum corps, pipe bands, or indoor percussion ensembles.

Marching percussion sections usually use a drumline cadence to practice the fundamentals of drum technique, as well as to keep the rest of the ensemble in time. The typical cadence is written with combinations of each of the four specific strokes used to strike the drum surface and produce the desired notes. Each of these strokes are designated the up stroke, the down stroke, the full stroke, and the tap. Combining at least two of these strokes in succession will produce rhythms with changing accents on different notes. The more varied the drum stroke combinations, the more complex the resulting cadence generally sounds to the listener.

Since different marching ensembles often compete with one another in field show performances and parades, the percussion section of each one often wants an intricate drumline cadence to stand out from the rest. Professional musicians often compose drumline cadences, although some percussion instructors or even experienced performers can write signature cadences as well. The process of writing a marching percussion cadence typically requires a good working knowledge of rhythm, tempo, and drum stoke technique. Musicians with experience in writing cadences often recommend starting with a basic structure of quarter notes and then adding more complicated variations as the drum section masters the basics of a new cadence.

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Discussion Comments

@cardsfan27 – The drums you’re thinking of are called toms. In the band, they are usually called quads because they typically have the four drum heads you mentioned.

A lot of people think playing a bass drum would be easy, and it is to a certain extent, but some might argue otherwise.

A lot of the difficulty in playing the bass drum is that you have to be in sync with all of the other players. Since a bass drummer doesn’t play every single stroke like some of the other members of the section, they have to be ready to jump when it is their turn to hit their beat. Hitting the drum itself isn’t that hard, but being able to remember the counts for your part can be very difficult. cardsfan27 September 3, 2011

I have seen a few drumlines play. I really like the drums that are a set of four or five smaller drums all together. Does anyone have any idea what I’m talking about?

I’ve always kind of thought the big bass drums were overrated. At least to me, it doesn’t seem like they would be that hard to play. Maybe I’m wrong.

How many hours does it usually take before a drumline perfects a cadence? What are the hardest and easiest parts of learning it? matthewc23 September 2, 2011

@Emilski – You are right about that. Where I go to college, the drumline members are outside every morning at 8 am and back at 4 pm working on their cadence and drumming skills. Rain or shine, they are there.

I was never in band and don’t know much about music, but I think listening to the percussion section is one of the ways anyone can relate to a band, since anyone can pick up a beat. Not to mention, the drum rhythms sound very hard to play, so I think that gets them more respect, too.

At least our band has the percussion section do a lot of moving and acting on the field. The cymbal players even do a set of cartwheels in one part of the performance. Emilski September 1, 2011

When I was in marching band in high school, the drumline cadence was one of the biggest parts of the whole band. Our drumline spent hours and hours after school trying to make sure it was perfect. I don’t think you can underestimate how important it is.

A lot of people judge a band by the quality of the percussion section, so the cadence has to be good. Besides that, a cadence is a sort of calling card for the band. Different bands have different styles, so before you even hear the band play, you can have a sense of their style just by hearing the cadence and seeing how the percussion section acts.

Once I got to college and started watching marching bands, you could tell they only got more serious about it.

Sub-Sonic is a simple cadence for beginner drumlines. This drum cadence offers a fun and entertaining sound while still being simple enough for new drummers. Sub-Sonic is an excellent cadence for 6th, 7th and 8th grade drumlines.

By Cassidy Byars

Diagram Above: Minimum Instrumentation

Recommended Instrumentation:
1+ Marching Snare Drum
1+ Marching Multi Tenor Drum – 4 Drums
1+ Marching Bass Drum
1+ Crash Cymbals

Bacon & Eggs is a basic drum cadence for fresh drumlines. This cadence is simple and fun and is managable for most beginner drummers. Bacon & Eggs is an excellent drum cadence for 6th, 7th and 8th grade drumlines.

By Cassidy Byars

Diagram Above: Minimum Instrumentation

Recommended Instrumentation:
1+ Marching Snare Drum
1+ Marching Multi Tenor Drum – 4 Drums
1+ Marching Bass Drum
1+ Crash Cymbals

Zombie Squirrels is an exciting beginner drum cadence that introduces a few new rhythms. This drum cadence is great for younger groups or for programs that are in need of a quick fun cadence. This drum cadence is recomended for 7th and 8th grade drumlines.

By Cassidy Byars

Diagram Above: Minimum Instrumentation

Recommended Instrumentation:
1+ Marching Snare Drum
1+ Marching Multi Tenor Drum – 4 Drums
1+ Marching Bass Drum
1+ Crash Cymbals

Storm is a very basic cadence that is simple enough for any drumline to play. This cadence consists of only a few basic rhythms and no accents. We highly recommend this cadence for 6th and 7th grade drummers.

By Cassidy Byars

Diagram Above: Minimum Instrumentation

Recommended Instrumentation:
1+ Marching Snare Drum
1+ Marching Multi Tenor Drum – 4 Drums
1+ Marching Bass Drum
1+ Crash Cymbals

Navigator is another one of our basic cadences. This cadence features several simple rhythms and is also very repetitive. Navigator is a great one for younger groups or can be used as an easy second cadence for groups that are capable of playing a Level 2 Cadence.

By Cassidy Byars

Diagram Above: Minimum Instrumentation

Recommended Instrumentation:
1+ Marching Snare Drum
1+ Marching Multi Tenor Drum – 4 Drums
1+ Marching Bass Drum
1+ Crash Cymbals

Time Travel is a great cadence for any beginner drumline. This is also a great cadence for first time tenor drummers as it helps demonstrate how the hands need to move and flow around the drums.

By Cassidy Byars

Diagram Above: Minimum Instrumentation

Recommended Instrumentation:
1+ Marching Snare Drum
1+ Marching Multi Tenor Drum – 4 Drums
1+ Marching Bass Drum
1+ Crash Cymbals

Tadpole is a great cadence for younger drumlines who will be soon be transitioning to a more advanced group (such as a high school drumline). This cadence is simple, fun, and packs quite a punch for a Level 1 cadence!

By Cassidy Byars

Diagram Above: Minimum Instrumentation

Recommended Instrumentation:
1+ Marching Snare Drum
1+ Marching Multi Tenor Drum – 4 Drums
1+ Marching Bass Drum
1+ Crash Cymbals

Bumper is the easiest cadence in Street Beatz Pack #1. This cadence is perfect for middle school drumlines that are looking for a fun and simple cadence to learn quickly.

By Cassidy Byars

Diagram Above: Minimum Instrumentation

Recommended Instrumentation:
1+ Marching Snare Drum
1+ Marching Multi Tenor Drum – 4 Drums
1+ Marching Bass Drum
1+ Crash Cymbals

Cargo is a simple Level 1 Cadence but is slightly more complex than Bumper. This cadence utilizes 2 bass drum and a quint tenor drum configuration.

By Cassidy Byars

Diagram Above: Minimum Instrumentation

Recommended Instrumentation:
1+ Marching Snare Drum
1+ Marching Multi Tenor Drum – 5 Drums
2+ Marching Bass Drums
1+ Crash Cymbals

ProJam is considered to be a difficult Level 1 Cadence. If you are debating betwen selecting a Level 1 or 2 Cadence for your drumline, we recommend that you choose ProJam. This is a great cadence that’s simple but won’t put more advanced players to sleep.

By Cassidy Byars

Diagram Above: Minimum Instrumentation

Recommended Instrumentation:
1+ Marching Snare Drum
1+ Marching Multi Tenor Drum – 4 Drums
4+ Marching Bass Drums
1+ Crash Cymbals

Earthquake is perfect for young drumlines and is a great first cadence for any group. This cadence features unison bass drum parts to make finding the beat as simple as it can possibly be.

By Cassidy Byars

Diagram Above: Minimum Instrumentation

Recommended Instrumentation:
1+ Marching Snare Drum
1+ Marching Multi Tenor Drum – 4 Drums
4+ Marching Bass Drums
1+ Crash Cymbals

Raven is a short basic cadence that is broken down into 3 simple sections in order for it to be learned quickly and efficiently. Raven is the perfect cadence for 6th grade drumlines.

By Cassidy Byars

Diagram Above: Minimum Instrumentation

Recommended Instrumentation:
1+ Marching Snare Drum
1+ Marching Multi Tenor Drum – 4 Drums
4+ Marching Bass Drums
1+ Crash Cymbals

Vampire is a very simple cadece that consists of 3 repetitive sections. This is a great, fun sounding first cadence for any beginner group.

By Cassidy Byars

Diagram Above: Minimum Instrumentation

Recommended Instrumentation:
1+ Marching Snare Drum
1+ Marching Multi Tenor Drum – 4 Drums
4+ Marching Bass Drums
1+ Crash Cymbals

A powerful extension for marching percussion

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How to write a drum cadence

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How to write a drum cadence

Pictogram notation.

A picture’s worth. well, more than words. Two full palettes of instrument changes, mallet changes, strokes, playing zones, and even visuals (Hi Mom!).

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How to write a drum cadence

Guide to percussion notation

MuseScore Drumline helps to unify the written language of marching percussion
with a comprehensive notation guide for each instrument.

How to write a drum cadence

Played live and recorded by John Emrich, a retired Chief Musician with the US Navy Band in Washington, DC

Includes 56 cadence grooves, 39 snare rolls and 22 additional rudiments

Played in 2/4, 4/4 and 6/8

Includes 285 MIDI files of unquantized grooves

Formatted for BFD2 ® , BFD3 ® , EZdrummer ® , Superior Drummer ® , Addictive Drums ® , Cakewalk ® Session Drummer ™ , SSD4, Accent & *General MIDI Standard MIDI Files (all included)

*Works with all VST, Core Audio & GM compatible drum software and hardware

Buy more than one MIDI Groove Library at the same time
and get 15% off each MIDI Groove Library

About the Military Cadence Groove Library

Military Cadence is a collection of grooves in 2/4, 4/4, and 6/8 time signatures. This collection also includes common Rolls and Rudiments. Rudiments are the foundation of the drumming vocabulary. Every serious drum instructor has received a set of hand written rudiments from their teachers and continue to pass them along to new students. We have included these sheets as well.

Performed by John Emrich, a retired Chief Musician with the US Navy Band in Washington, DC. John has spent a great deal of time working with rudiments. Rudiments themselves can be traced back to military drummers. Back in the days when an army would assemble in a massive formation to do battle, the drummer was the key to controlling the movements and tempo of battle. All rudiments are made up of four basic drum strokes: a single hit, a double stroke, a flam, and a buzz stroke. Every rudiment is made up of combinations of these four stroke types. The key is that rudimental drumming actually has a “swing” to it. This collection of grooves, rolls and rudiments are all played live on an electronic drum set to preserve the correct feel.

When a march is performed as a concert piece, a military band will often double up the rudimental snare with a second concert snare drum. The rudimental drummer will play the correct metered rolls while the concert snare drummer will play closed rolls to produce a very full sound. The Military Cadences in this collection were all recorded using this technique. This economical collection of grooves can be added to any style of music.

Military Cadence includes 56 cadence grooves. Each of the cadences includes each part split off into it’s own lane for maximum compatibility with any drum VST program for a total of 224 parts. Think of them as building blocks. Military Cadence also includes 39 examples of snare rolls and an additional 22 examples of different rudiments.

This multi-format collection includes grooves formatted for BFD2 ® , BFD3 ® , BFD Eco ® , EZDrummer ® , Superior Drummer ® , Addictive Drums ® , Steven Slate Drums 4, Accent, Cakewalk ® Session Drummer ™ as well as General MIDI Standard MIDI Files which can be used with any GM compatible drum software or hardware — this includes drum machines and synthesizers which have drum sounds.

Platinum Samples and John Emrich are two of the foremost producers of drum samples in the world, with over 50 years of experience in the professional music industry, and now they have turned their attention to developing MIDI Grooves. Military Cadence was recorded by John Emrich on a Yamaha DTX900 electronic drum set. No quantization, mouse clicks, or pastes were used – we leave that to you.

BFD3, BFD Eco and BFD2 are registered trademarks of FXpansion

EZDrummer and Superior Drummer are registered trademarks of Toontrack Music

Addictive Drums is a registered trademark of XLN Audio

Cakewalk is a registered trademark of Cakewalk, Inc.

Digital Sheet Music

By Sean T. Kelly

How to write a drum cadence

  • Look inside(2) Look inside(2) Listen (1) Listen (1)
  • Instrument:

Drums – Digital Download
Composed by Sean T. Kelly. Contemporary. Score. 6 pages. Sean T. Kelly #2845517. Published by Sean T. Kelly (A0.908321).

Item Number: A0.908321

Sticky Street Beat is a fairly straightforward cadence composed of two distinct sections, which can be repeated as much as the performers need, where they can eventually end the cadence with the 2nd ending as desired. Though traditional grip is specified in the score, match grip for the second section works just as well! In the first section, the snares have the left stick across the drum doing rim knocks, a technique that is often underutilized in drumline music and for young performers, may be new. This cadence is a good introduction to this technique and has a repeated pattern that won’t take long to learn. For the tenors, the right hand holds a steady beat on the spock by playing 3’s while having a more independent left hand, which might be a technique that is difficult for newer players, though is a style for tenors that can be found throughout drumline music. Though the bass part has splits (especially in the second section) which may be intimidating to a younger bass line, there is only one primary split that is repeated, and once the line gets it, they’ll have the rest of the cadence! A band can both march to this cadence even at a quicker 132 bpm, or it makes a great filler for in the stands. Enjoy!

Total time: 1:02
Tempo: 132 bmp
Difficulty: Intermediate
Instrumentation: Snares, Tenors (4 standard drums + 1 spock), 4 basses (5 can be used if 4th and 5th bass play the same part), Cymbals (optional)

This product was created by a member of ArrangeMe, Hal Leonard’s global self-publishing community of independent composers, arrangers, and songwriters. ArrangeMe allows for the publication of unique arrangements of both popular titles and original compositions from a wide variety of voices and backgrounds.

About Digital Downloads

Digital Downloads are downloadable sheet music files that can be viewed directly on your computer, tablet or mobile device. Once you download your digital sheet music, you can view and print it at home, school, or anywhere you want to make music, and you don’t have to be connected to the internet. Just purchase, download and play!

PLEASE NOTE: Your Digital Download will have a watermark at the bottom of each page that will include your name, purchase date and number of copies purchased. You are only authorized to print the number of copies that you have purchased. You may not digitally distribute or print more copies than purchased for use (i.e., you may not print or digitally distribute individual copies to friends or students).

Drums – Digital Download
Composed by Sean T. Kelly. Contemporary. Score. 6 pages. Sean T. Kelly #2845517. Published by Sean T. Kelly (A0.908321).

Item Number: A0.908321

Sticky Street Beat is a fairly straightforward cadence composed of two distinct sections, which can be repeated as much as the performers need, where they can eventually end the cadence with the 2nd ending as desired. Though traditional grip is specified in the score, match grip for the second section works just as well! In the first section, the snares have the left stick across the drum doing rim knocks, a technique that is often underutilized in drumline music and for young performers, may be new. This cadence is a good introduction to this technique and has a repeated pattern that won’t take long to learn. For the tenors, the right hand holds a steady beat on the spock by playing 3’s while having a more independent left hand, which might be a technique that is difficult for newer players, though is a style for tenors that can be found throughout drumline music. Though the bass part has splits (especially in the second section) which may be intimidating to a younger bass line, there is only one primary split that is repeated, and once the line gets it, they’ll have the rest of the cadence! A band can both march to this cadence even at a quicker 132 bpm, or it makes a great filler for in the stands. Enjoy!

Total time: 1:02
Tempo: 132 bmp
Difficulty: Intermediate
Instrumentation: Snares, Tenors (4 standard drums + 1 spock), 4 basses (5 can be used if 4th and 5th bass play the same part), Cymbals (optional)

This product was created by a member of ArrangeMe, Hal Leonard’s global self-publishing community of independent composers, arrangers, and songwriters. ArrangeMe allows for the publication of unique arrangements of both popular titles and original compositions from a wide variety of voices and backgrounds.

About Digital Downloads

Digital Downloads are downloadable sheet music files that can be viewed directly on your computer, tablet or mobile device. Once you download your digital sheet music, you can view and print it at home, school, or anywhere you want to make music, and you don’t have to be connected to the internet. Just purchase, download and play!

Sabtu, 21 Oktober 2017

Drum Cadence – Easy Drum Cadences

In music, a drum cadence or street beat is a work played exclusively by the percussion section of a modern marching band (see marching percussion). It is stylistically descended from early military marches, and related to military cadences, as both are a means of providing a beat while marching. Usually, each instrument will have a part that mimics a specific drum or drums on a drum set to create a sound similar to a drum beat.

According to Hiro Songsblog a drum cadence is, “‘a drumline piece played in a parading marching band between or in place of full-band pieces’. Cadences, are also: ‘a chant that is sung by military personnel while parading or marching’.”

Cadences employ the four basic drum strokes and often directly include drum rudiments. They have a wide range of difficulty, from simple accent patterns to complex rhythms including hybrid rudiments, and are played by virtually every modern drum line. Cadences are important from a performance standpoint, as a good drum cadence can make the band stand out from the rest in competition. Field shows are often preceded by the band marching to the beat of the cadence.

Marching percussion generally consists of at least snare drums, tenor drums, cymbals, and bass drums, and may include timpani.

Marching 110

Since 1967, the Marching 110 has been playing the newest and most popular music of the day. However, there are just some songs in the Marching 110’s repertoire that have become fan favorites, and are still played today. These tunes are referred to as the “standards,” and are played by the Marching 110 each season.

Here you can read about and listen to the “standards” of the Marching 110.

Alma Mater, Ohio

In 1914, Ohio University held a nationwide contest for composers to write an Alma Mater for Ohio University. In total, 19 entries were submitted. The winning selection was composed by World War I Veteran and accomplished composer of school songs from Princeton University, Kenneth S. Clarke. For his winning entry, Clarke was paid the sum of $25. Alma Mater, Ohio was rearranged for the “new” look of the marching band in 1967 by John Higgins.

Stand Up and Cheer!

Stand Up and Cheer! was written by George Bowles and became the Ohio University Fight Song in the 1910’s. In 1967, along with the redesigned look and sound of the “Marching Men of Ohio,” the Ohio University Marching Band debuted a new arrangement of the school fight song. Arranged by John Higgins, “Stand Up and Cheer!” now contains an opening fanfare and modulation, which is still used today by the Marching 110.

Ain’t Been Good

Ain’t Been Good is an original composition by John Higgins that made its debut during the 1968 season. A down and dirty blue’s song, Ain’t Been Good was one of the first songs the Marching 110 danced as an ensemble to. A routine created by Drum Major David Fowler was taught to the members of the band, who danced for the duration of the song.

Long Train Runnin’

Arguably the most popular selection in the Marching 110’s repertoire, Long Train Runnin’ was originally played during the 1973 season, and immediately became a crowd favorite. Arranged by Martin Osborne, the Doobie Brothers’ hit originally featured the whole band dancing, but today features four members of the tuba section.

Light Up

Featuring the 110 cymbals, Light Up was arranged by Geoffrey Horn in 1980. The Styx song has been the opener for the second half of Varsity Show and Ohio Theatre for many years.

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    What is your favorite drum cadence

    How to write a drum cadence

    User Info Menu

    Re: What is your favorite drum cadence

    Not to be rude or anything but what kind of question is that? It’s been well over 40 years since I was in high school and did street parade cadences. I wrote many cadences for marching bands throughout the years. all different. There must be thousands upon thousands of cadences available.

    User Info Menu

    Re: What is your favorite drum cadence

    well among the thousands of cadences that have been made up at my high school my favorite would be cannabis. I am pretty sure that most high schools make their own.

    User Info Menu

    Re: What is your favorite drum cadence

    Maybe if people had recordings of their favorites.

    “You have to love music more then food. More than air. More than yourself.”-The Wizard (August Rush)

    I think I can realistically say that I will never be too old to laugh at a fart. Ever. -dave0549jv

    If we give up, we will never know what we might have been. – Pastor Bob

    DC Record for most users online at once! Be there or be square! http://www.drumchat.com/showthread.p. ers-12079.html
    RIP Frank

    User Info Menu

    Re: What is your favorite drum cadence

    I Heard A Drumline Doin “What Is Hip” By Tower Of Power Yesterday. Funny Thing Was ,even Wif All Da Players. Garibaldi Is Still 10 Tomes Phunkier .

    “FEEL DA GROOVE & PLAY IT FORWARD. “

    “BEAUTY IS IN THE EARS OF THE BEHOLDER ,
    ENJOY IT ALL. MY BROTHERS & SISTERS”

    COMMANDER & CHIEPH OF
    “PHROGGE’S AQUARIAN ARMY”

    LEGEND IN MY OWN MIND
    & FORCE BEHIND DA
    “PHX AZ LEGEND OF DA ZYDECO GROOVE VEST”
    (AND OTHER TOYZ) INCLUDING PIZZABOX SNARE DRUM

    IT’S ALL ABOUT DA SHOW .

    User Info Menu

    Re: What is your favorite drum cadence

    would someone be able to explain to a drumline noob what a cadence is?

    jimbolimbo99 Mapex Mafia

    Mapex M Birch
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    User Info Menu

    Re: What is your favorite drum cadence

    its what the drumline plays between songs or whenever no other instruments are playing.

    “You have to love music more then food. More than air. More than yourself.”-The Wizard (August Rush)

    I think I can realistically say that I will never be too old to laugh at a fart. Ever. -dave0549jv

    If we give up, we will never know what we might have been. – Pastor Bob

    DC Record for most users online at once! Be there or be square! http://www.drumchat.com/showthread.p. ers-12079.html
    RIP Frank

    User Info Menu

    Re: What is your favorite drum cadence

    would someone be able to explain to a drumline noob what a cadence is?

    Take a march, you know, a famous one would be stars and stripes forever. Now, strip off the instruments, leave nothing but the drums. Now, instead of the drums playing something over and over again, give the drums a chance to show off and go to work on the drums. Do this while marching to keep some entertainment, so your not moving on taps. A cadence =)

    Unless your talking piano cadences, thats like the end of a phrase or something.

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    Re: Your schools cadence names

    Posted: Fri May 27, 2011 10:00 am

    Re: Your schools cadence names

    Posted: Fri May 27, 2011 10:07 am

    How to write a drum cadence

    Re: Your schools cadence names

    Posted: Fri May 27, 2011 11:32 am

    How to write a drum cadence

    Re: Your schools cadence names

    Posted: Fri May 27, 2011 12:25 pm

    How to write a drum cadence

    Re: Your schools cadence names

    Posted: Fri May 27, 2011 12:32 pm

    “There is no feeling, except the extremes of fear and grief, that does not find relief in music.”

    ’08 KHS Vibraphone
    ’09 KHS Bass 1
    ’10 KHS Bass 1
    ’12 KHS Quads

    ’11 Oregon Crusaders Bass 1

    How to write a drum cadence

    Re: Your schools cadence names

    Posted: Fri May 27, 2011 3:34 pm

    We only have one cadence, which every school in our district knows. It’s GHHS’s Thunder Cadence. It’s awesome to play because we can be ridiculously loud but it’s easy so we can’t mess it up.

    But damn, I wish someone would write us some new cadences already -_____-

    “No one has their drill papers? BS it.”

    And in the end. only one tenors person made it out alive.

    One mile–no good.

    Two miles–No sweat.

    Three miles–Better yet.

    Four miles–All the way.

    Six miles–follow me.

    Seven miles–Ranger run

    One mile no sweat,

    Two miles better yet,

    Three miles oh no,

    Four miles gotta go,

    Five miles, gotta run

    Six miles, to the sun

    Seven miles feeling good like I should.

    C-130 rolling down the strip,

    Airborne daddy’s gonna take a little trip.

    Mission uncertain, destination unknown,

    Don’t even know if we’re ever coming home.

    Stand-up, Hook-up, shuffle to the door,

    Jump right out and count to four.

    Slip to the left and slip to the right

    Slip on down to a firefight.

    Hit the drop zone with my feet apart

    Legs in my stomach and feet in my heart.

    And if my main don’t open wide,

    I’ve got a reserve by my side.

    And if that one should fail me too,

    Look out below, I’m coming through.

    And if I die in the old drop zone,

    Box me up and ship me home.

    And if I die in the Korean mud

    Bury me with a case of Bud

    Bury speakers all around my head

    So I can rock with the Grateful Dead

    Bury speakers all around my toes

    So I can rock with Axel Rose

    Pin my medals upon my chest,

    And bury me in the leaning rest.

    Up in the morning at the break of day

    Work so hard we never play

    Run through the jungle where the sun don’t shine

    And all I do is the double time

    Up in the morning and out of the rack

    Grab my clothes and put them on my back

    Run thru the swamp and up in a tree

    First sergeant chasing after me

    I like whiskey and I like wine

    But all I do is double time

    Up in the morning before the break of day

    I don’t like it no way

    Eat my breakfast too darn soon

    Hungry as hell by noon

    Went to the mess sergeant on my knees

    I said mess sergeant, mess sergeant, feed me please

    Mess sergeant said with a big old grin

    If you want to be airborne, you got to be thin.

    When I get to heaven,

    Saint Peter’s gonna say,

    How’d you earn your living boy?

    How’d you earn your pay?

    I reply with a whole lot of anger,

    Earned my living as an Airborne Ranger.

    Livin’ a life of Guts and Danger,

    Blood, Sweat, Guts, and Danger.

    That’s the way, of an Airborne Ranger

    When I get to hell,

    Satan’s gonna say,

    How’d you earn your living punk?

    How’d you earn your pay?

    And I replied with a boot to his face,

    Earned my livin’ laying souls to waste!

    When my granny was 91,

    She did PT just for fun.

    When my granny was 92,

    She did PT better than you.

    When my granny was 93,

    She did pushups just like me.

    When my granny was 94,

    She did PT more and more.

    When my granny was 95,

    She did PT to stay alive.

    When my Granny turned 96,

    She did situps just for kicks.

    And when my granny turned 97,

    She double-timed straight up to heaven.

    She met St. Peter at the pearly gate,

    Said, Gee, St. Peter I hope Im not late.

    St. Peter said with a big wide grin,

    Drop down Granny and knock out ten.

    Saw an old lady walking down the street

    Had a ruck on her back and jungle boots on her feet

    I said “Hey old lady where you going to?”

    She said “U.S. Army Ranger School”

    I said “Hey old lady, now ain’t you been told?

    Ranger School’s for the young and the bold!”

    She said “Hey now son don’t be a fool

    I’m an instructor at the Ranger school”

    Saw an old lady walking down the street

    Had a chute on her back, and jump boots on her feet

    I said “Hey old lady where you going to?”

    She said “U.S. Army Airborne School”

    I said “Hey old lady, you’re too darn old

    You’d better leave the jumpin’ to the young and the bold”

    She said “Hey now sonny can’t you see?

    I’ve got master jump wings and my CIB”

    Saw an old lady walking down the street

    She had a tank on her back and fins on her feet

    I said “Hey old lady, where you going to?”

    She said “U.S. Army Scuba School”

    I said “Hey old lady, now ain’t you been told?

    How to write a drum cadence

    A history of excellence.

    A future brighter than the sun.

    How to write a drum cadence How to write a drum cadenceHow to write a drum cadence How to write a drum cadence How to write a drum cadence How to write a drum cadence

    FAQ

    What are auditions like and how should I prepare?
    Auditions are held both in the summer and at the beginning of band camp in August; percussionists typically move in a day earlier than the rest of the band to allow extra time for this. Beginning in 2019, the Drumline began a virtual audition process. In this process, an audition packet (containing warm-ups, a cadence, and fight songs) is sent out in July, and prospective members are asked to send in a video audition. This audition gives our percussion instructor and section leaders a preliminary idea of skill level and capability on different instruments. The line is not necessarily set based on these auditions alone, but it allows for a much more time-efficient, in-person audition during band camp. The line is set by our percussion instructor and section leaders, who rotate drummers on and off of instruments until finding the arrangement that sounds the best. During this process, you may be asked to play in a small group and/or individually. The best way to prepare is to keep your chops up – don’t wait until the night before your video audition to pick up some sticks for the first time in months. Basic exercises like double and triple beat, 16th note and triplet rolls, and accent-tap are also very beneficial to practice on your own over the summer. Essentially, the better you are at the instrument you want to play, the better chance you have of being assigned that instrument.

    What is the difference between marching band and pep band?
    During marching/football season, we use a full battery (historically 5-6 snares, 2-3 tenors, 6 basses, and a varying number of cymbals). We do not have a front ensemble. During pep band/basketball season, we use a drumset, a bass drum, and two sets of cymbals. Participation in marching season guarantees you a spot in the pep band. You will be assigned to half of the men’s and women’s home basketball games, but you may attend as many as you want. You will also have the opportunity to participate in tournament travel, should the team(s) make it to the NCAA tournament (and they will).

    I’ve never played a marching percussion instrument before. Can I still audition for Duke’s drumline?
    Absolutely! We have had drum set players, concert percussionists, and even non-drummers join our ranks. Our marching technique is not difficult to learn and as long as you can read music, have a sense of rhythm, and are willing to work hard, you stand a good chance of making the line.

    Do you play matched or traditional?
    Our snare line plays with traditional grip. However, we have had several drummers join us who played matched in high school and picked up traditional very quickly. We will work with you.

    Why should I join the drumline?
    How could you deny yourself a future brighter than the sun?

    I’m interested in joining. What should I do now?
    Fill out this form so we can get you on our information distribution list. Then go spend some quality time with your practice pad and a metronome.

    Free to use drumline warmups, exercises, cadence and street beats!

    How to write a drum cadence

    This set of free drumline warmups, exercises, cadence and street beats are composed for all skill levels from beginner to advanced, and include audio examples. Download the PDF and use them with your drumline for free, nothing, nada, zilch, etc! Each warmup and exercise builds upon the previous one and are great learning tools to progress through and develop your skills. They’re also great workouts for both the hands as well as the mind to build physical chops and also mental chops too! Be sure to check out the various skill levels for great variations.

    Below is each warmup, exercise, cadence / street beat divided into three separate skill levels which lets you find the right amount of difficulty for the application you need. Also included is an on-field warmup to prepare you for the show, and a warmdown that slowly loosens your muscles at the end of a long day.

    Some of the warmups are compatible with the pit warmups as well (as noted below). If you’re short on time at rehearsal and need to warm up the entire percussion ensemble at the same time you have the tools to do so here at your disposal!

    Download Drumline Warmups Below!

    How to write a drum cadence

    The Drumline & Pit Information Packet includes all the warmups, exercises, cadence and street beat below as well as the on-field warmup and warmdown. In addition there is a long explanation of everything you’d want to know before joining a drumline, from overarching ideals to techniques! You can pay what you want for the digital Drumline Information Packet or you can purchase a physical copy at many online retailers! (Don’t worry pit percussionists, this also includes all of the pit warmups, exercises, and songs too!) Use this with your ensemble!

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    How to write a drum cadence

    Zac Mayfield brings the noise. When he gets behind a drum set, bystanders don’t hear his beats so much as they feel them. But anyone can go berserk on a snare drum; Mayfield plays with the kind of metronomic precision drummers can spend a lifetime trying to achieve.

    Mayfield is 20. And in April, he’s touring Europe with a heavy metal band.

    “I’ve never even been outside the East Coast,” said Mayfield. “I don’t think I understand exactly what’s about to happen.”

    Some may remember Mayfield, who lives off Robinsville Road near Long Neck, from the 2008 Cape Henlopen High School drum line – he’s the skinny kid with green eyes and a cocky grin. He rocked the Cape stands, and in April he’ll rock Glasgow, Scotland, his band’s first stop in the Old World. But Mayfield’s infatuation with rhythm began with an old blue snare drum. He was 9 when he found it in his uncle’s attic.

    “I got ahold of it and took it from there.” After a few years of his begging and nearly beating the blue snare to death, Mayfield’s parents agreed to buy him a drum set. His father drove him to Earle Teet Music in Dover and bought him a five-piece kit made by Gretsch.

    “I thought it was the greatest thing in the world,” he said. “It probably kept me out of a lot of trouble.”

    Time that might be spent on homework went instead to the drums. His grades were never great, he said, but they weren’t terrible, either. Instead of paying attention in class, he drummed lightly on the desk with his fingers.

    “I think it drove a lot of my teachers crazy,” he said.

    Clever thieving

    He devoured styles as they came to him. From the radio, he learned the rudiments of rock; from Barry Eli, then director of Cape Henlopen High School Jazz Ensemble, he learned swing, funk, jazz and Latin. And he learned to love performance from Walt Hetfield, Rehoboth Elementary School music teacher and leader of a rock and roll summer camp.

    The camp culminated in a performance at the Rusty Rudder in Dewey Beach. Playing for a crowd wasn’t about the attention, Mayfield said – it was about getting a response.

    “I was doing something with my hands, and I was seeing the result,” he said. “It’s so visceral. It’s so primal.”

    It was settled, he said: This is what he was meant to do. But graduation came before stardom; and before graduation, he needed to beat Dover High School’s drum line.

    Dover’s drum line was large, disciplined and stone-faced. And it was good. Mayfield remembered facing it during a drum-off as a freshman.

    “They ripped us apart,” Mayfield said, laughing. “Bit by bit. I couldn’t believe what they did to us.”

    After getting embarrassed on his home field, Mayfield went to work. He studied videos of different drum lines, stealing a beat from one, a stick trick from another.

    “The best musicians are thieves who never get caught,” Mayfield said, paraphrasing Buddy Rich, a great jazz drummer. Working with Cape alumnus Anthony Baray and fellow drummer James Sudimak, Mayfield wrote “Spartan,” a marching cadence with punch and flair. When Cape faced Dover in 2008, the drum line cranked out “Spartan” with such verve that even Dover’s stoic drummers had to crack a grin.

    “It was like having to fight Batman,” he said. “But we broke their little shell.”

    Getting creative

    After graduating the following spring, Mayfield needed money. So he got creative.

    He ransacked his mother’s kitchen, drumming on pots and pans until he found the sound he wanted. He snagged a few buckets from the garage and headed to Ocean City, where he squatted on the boardwalk and started drumming (he tried drumming on Rehoboth’s Boardwalk, he said, but several appeals to City Hall were met with disappointment).

    Unlike his drum set, his street-drumming kit would fit in the back of his coupe, and it only took minutes to set up. It wasn’t long before crowds clustered around his makeshift drum set, dancing to his rhythms and filling the tip jar with bills.

    “You meet so many people who wanted to help me out,” he said. “I made so many friends.”

    He’d drum for three or four hours – fewer if the summer sun was particularly brutal. His mother lamented the loss of her pots, but Mayfield said his parents supported him nonetheless. It was great experience, and it allowed him to quit his landscaping job. And he was making music.

    “I can’t do anything else, you know?” Mayfield said.

    He got a call from Travis Orbin, drummer for metal band Sky Eats Airplane and Mayfield’s mentor. He said Oh, Sleeper, a Fort Worth, Texas-based metal band, was looking for a drummer to join them on a European tour. Was he interested?

    Mayfield didn’t take him too seriously. He filmed drumming demos, but without much hope. He was sure his bid would be one in a hundred, well-intentioned but ultimately overshadowed.

    About a week after he posted the videos, he received a call from an area code he didn’t recognize. It was Micah Kinard, front man for Oh, Sleeper. The gig was Mayfield’s, if he wanted it.

    More than a month later, Mayfield said it’s still sinking in. When Kinard called again to ask what Mayfield wanted for the tour, Mayfield wasn’t sure what he meant. Kinard clarified his question – the drums. Mayfield was free to build his kit however he wanted. What should the band order?

    “It’s weird how the puzzle comes together,” he said. “I don’t know if there’s someone out there looking out for me, but the pieces just fit too perfectly.”

    Ruminations on destiny aside, he said his strategy for dealing with the pressure of big-ticket crowds is simple: don’t think about it.

    “My plan is to keep my head down and play my ass off,” he said.

    Mayfield also signed on for a stateside tour, with dates and locations to be announced. Until he boards a plane to rendezvous with Oh, Sleeper in Fort Worth, Mayfield is behind his set, learning the band’s songs note for note. For now, the pots remain in their cupboards.

    TikTok has revived what’s arguably the most famous movie in the percussion film canon: “Drumline,” the 2002 film starring Nick Cannon as a teen snare drum prodigy who has to fight upperclassmen (and his own ego) for a spot on the drumline at Atlanta A&T, a fictional HBCU with a renowned marching band. Nearly 20 years after its premiere, one sequence from the film has found new life on TikTok as part of a meme that depicts people furiously typing to try and finish their work on time.

    The audio — a repetitive, energy-filled drumline cadence — is lifted from a sequence in “Drumline” in which Devon, Nick Cannon’s character, challenges upperclassman Sean for a snare solo on the field. While the sound was uploaded by user @soundsforslomo_bro, the original video appears to have been deleted.

    It’s not completely clear where the meme originated, although early instances trace back to the first half of January. One of the earliest instances appears to be a January 8 video from user @mrdapper_ captioned, “When you’re trying to get off at 5 on a Friday!” @mrdapper_ went on to post several other instances of the meme that same week.

    One of the earliest viral videos associated with the sound was a January 11 video from @tyerenae, whose current TikTok bio reads “CEO of the [snare drum emoji] sound.” In a video that’s amassed nearly 825,000 likes captioned “when your assignment is due at 11:59 pm,” @tyerenae furiously types on a laptop to meet a school deadline.

    On January 13, @mrdapper_ and @tyerenae collaborated on a video set to the “Drumline” sound that features an exchange between a professor and a student.

    Reply to @tyerenae when your teacher won’t open the assignments for you 😓 collab with @mrdapper_ 🤩 ##tyerenae ##drumline ##drumlinechallenge

    Since those early days, the meme has taken off on TikTok, with people recreating similar scenarios like asking for a project extension, chatting with a boss, or cleaning the house.

    Just here to provide free, easy nutrition tips 🥰 ##dietitian ##weightloss ##nutrition

    As of now, the hashtag #drumlinechallenge has nearly 27 million cumulative views, and the sound upload is associated with over 12,000 videos.

    what’s your best call off excuse for the turn up?! ##drumlinechallenge ##work ##party

    Ultimately, the “Drumline” sound is so well-suited for TikTok — and this meme in particular — because of its nostalgia pull, dramatic arc, and resemblance to typing sounds. It’s easy to map any kind of intense exchange or deadline rush onto the mounting tension of the audio, which culminates in an explosive solo snare moment. It’s nigh-impossible not to feel the energy just from the sound alone.

    How to write a drum cadenceBack when I was shedding a lot of Philly Joe Jones and Vinnie Ruggiero stuff, I started writing out some cadences that came to me while practicing. What strikes me as I look over this material again is how musical it is. The phrases have space and are syncopated in that traditional jazz type of way. And that makes them sound great. I wrote a few of these, so I will look for the rest of them. In the meantime, this should do as a start.

    This one is called “King Cadence.” By the way, two of the definitions of “cadence” are:

    • The rhythmic flow of a sequence of sounds or words
    • A rhythmic pattern that is non-metrically structured
    • Author
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    Mark Feldman is a session drummer from NYC.

    He first gained attention as one of the winners of Modern Drummer magazine’s very first drum solo contest, judged by Rush’s Neil Peart.

    He’s played with Oz Noy, Will Lee, Alison Krauss, Curtis Stigers, Emily Remler, Joel Hoekstra, GE Smith, Andy York, Marshall Crenshaw, Tony Shanahan, The Drifters, The Marvelettes, Big Brother and The Holding Company, and many other artists.

    Your contribution will be matched dollar-for-dollar. Act by December 31!

    • Bird Library
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    News and Perspectives on Bird Conservation

    Birds make many amazing sounds, from trills and warbles to screeches, hoots, and quacks. While not exactly considered the virtuosos of the bird world, woodpeckers do make many incredible noises, vocal and otherwise. Understanding the sounds woodpeckers make can give birders interesting insights into these beautiful birds and how they communicate.

    How to write a drum cadence

    Black-backed Woodpecker. Video by Justin Hoffman/Outdoors

    A Feathered Drumline

    The most famous and familiar woodpecker sounds aren’t songs or calls, but drumming, which is also called rapping, tatting, and tattooing. Woodpeckers peck on objects to create sound patterns as communication. Resonant objects such as hollow trees, logs, and stumps are favored for drumming because their resonance increases the strength and volume of the drumming so it can be heard further away. Other objects that make popular woodpecker drumheads include:

    • utility poles and transformer boxes
    • metal chimneys and attic exhaust vents
    • rain gutters and downspouts
    • trash cans
    • exterior light covers.

    How to write a drum cadence

    Pileated Woodpecker by Jesse Seniunas/Shutterstock

    The tempo, rhythm, duration, and repetition of drumming patterns vary between different woodpecker species. Because these patterns can be very distinct, they can sometimes be used for species identification. In a particular area, birders can learn to decipher which woodpeckers are nearby just by hearing drumming patterns. But individual woodpeckers can tap and drum at different speeds and volumes, and sound travels differently depending upon weather and distance, so this takes practice!

    Drumming means a lot more than just identification to the birds, however. A strong, vibrant drumming pattern indicates a healthy, dominant bird, one that controls a rich territory or would make a good mate.

    Both male and female woodpeckers drum, most often in late winter or early spring when they are more actively seeking mates and establishing territories. Drumming is common in the morning, but woodpeckers may drum at any time of day.

    Other Woodpecker Sounds

    Woodpecker calls, even if they are composed of a variety of notes and cadences, lack distinct melodies, and are not considered “songs” in the same sense as those sung by warblers, cardinals, or mockingbirds. Nevertheless, woodpecker sounds can be just as varied and distinctive as other birds’ songs and calls.

    Calls may signal alarm, show agitation, or send a signal to a mate. Woodpeckers may not be as vocally adept as other species, but they do use churrs, purrs, rattles, chatters, screeches, and other short sounds, such as “peek” and “pik” notes.

    How to write a drum cadence

    “Red-shafted” Northern Flicker by Tim Zurowski/Shutterstock

    Like drumming, the tempo, length, tone, and rhythm of woodpecker calls vary widely between species. Larger birds, like the tremendous Pileated Woodpecker, have deeper, more robust voices, while smaller species, such as the diminutive Downy Woodpecker, have brighter, lighter voices and higher tones. The Northern Flicker is one of the most vocal of the North American woodpeckers, uttering a laugh-like “ha-ha-ha-ha” call, soft screeching begging calls, and “kreee” or “kwirr” calls.

    Using Woodpecker Sounds

    People enjoying the outdoors may simply appreciate the symphony of woodpecker sounds, but those sounds can also be useful for bird identification and so much more. Learning the precise rhythms, tempos, and durations of drumming and calls can help pinpoint which woodpeckers are around. Furthermore, even if the sounds aren’t precise enough for a positive identification, they can be useful to help triangulate a bird’s location for a closer look. The type of sound, such as a relaxed call note compared to an alarmed chattering, may also help explain the bird’s behavior and alert birders to other activity in the area.

    Hairy Woodpecker by female_rck_953/Shutterstock

    Protecting Woodpecker Sounds

    The more we learn about woodpeckers and their sounds, the more we can appreciate these birds’ diversity and distinctiveness. But without protection, it is possible that the drumming, chatters, laughs, and churring may be heard less and less.

    American Bird Conservancy is working diligently to protect woodpeckers’ habitats and to promote initiatives that can protect these birds. While many woodpeckers have healthy, even thriving, populations, increased habitat loss and pesticide use have put others at risk. The Ivory-billed Woodpecker, for example, likely went extinct following widespread habitat loss and shooting in the southeastern United States.

    Species with limited ranges and specialized habitat requirements, such as the Lewis’s, Red-cockaded, and White-headed Woodpeckers, especially benefit from targeted conservation efforts. These efforts include best practices for land management with birds in mind, increased awareness of the importance of forest conservation, and direct protection of the most critical areas of habitats.

    With your help, woodpeckers can continue to make their varied sounds for generations to come.

    It’s been my experience that learning how to drum is pretty invaluable too. I used to program drums for songs & my drummer buddies would carry on about how, “You can tell you’re a guitar player trying to do drums.” Even if you’re not using a kit and are programming on a piano roll or something you still want to have a clear vision of how the beats and everything need to come together.

    I found this site to be very helpful for getting some fundamental info on drumming http://www.freedrumlessons.com/drum-lessons/
    I’m an

    I put the song on repeat and imagine myself as a drummer, but it comes out forced and boring. Sometimes I get lucky and make something very interesting, but the fills sound janky or something doesn’t add up rhythmwise.

    I really do need to buy a tiny drum kit. I always play a kit whenever I see one.

    My specific case is:
    -acoustic/alternative pop/r&b
    -song-driven (lyric/melody/arrangement) more than production-driven
    -limited skills as a drummer
    -appreciation for streamlining my hardware/gear requirements
    -technological efficiency/simplicity during solo/duo songwriting sessions
    -‘sparkly demo’ quality of recording: sync catalogue and pitching to artists
    -songs written to exist fully on vocal + acoustic guitar; drums are supplemental
    -no DJ/electro vibes required
    -drums are not relied upon to carry any big transition moments
    -easily-achieved drum tricks: mute 1 snare hit before chorus, etc
    -song/lyric writing process is aware of drum limitations, accommodates them
    -not attempting to replicate rock format [E. bass, E. guitar(s), live kit, vocals]
    -Typically, no hihat/shakers at all required to convey said vocal catalogue
    -farthest thing from metal

    [If my specific case applies substantially to your situation]
    My recommendations are:
    -Get the Drum Pro plug-in (AU freebie, probably VST available too)
    -Set the lowest possible I/O Buffer Size (for minimal latency while recording)
    -Open “Musical Typing” (or equivalent) in Logic Pro (or other DAW)
    -Get comfortable playing “Boom Bap” (kick/snare) identities for your arrangements
    -You can either use 2 index fingers, or else do both boom+bap with one hand
    -Hi-hat/shaker programming = diminishing returns vs time invested
    -Even if free-tempo, have a conductor track for snap-to-grid right after tracking
    -Lastly: stray from musical concepts that call for drum mastery / prowess

    I know it’s not the artist way, but I often use rational, “time-cost vs benefit” forecasting in my production WHERE NEEDED, and it helps me avoid time traps: not trying to write sick guitar/drum/bass solos, or even transitions. though I can play those instruments, there’s greater value for me in lyric/melody/arrangement, and if it’s purely instrumental music, then just melody/arrangement. My instrumental pockets are quite basic, but ‘defined’ – or so I like to think. That’s partly because I know I have to keep my drum expectations low, or risk wasting much time.

    Wanna Stand Out?

    When you are learning how to rap one thing that will make you stand out from most of your colleagues is learning how to add character to your cadence. In my previous article “Cadence Explained” I broke down what cadence is along with a live demonstration of how I practice my cadences in the studio. Now, let’s go just a little deeper and discuss how you can add more character to your cadence.

    What’s The Goal?

    I would like to submit to you a theory that in art, perfection is not the goal but is rather creating something that is unique & interesting that is presented in a creative way that touches the audience emotionally. For example, if a painter were to paint an exact replica of a picture he or she took with a camera, tho it may be an amazing accomplishment it’s still just a copy from the original. But if the painter were to give their own unique perspective of the picture by exaggerating colors, shifting the focal point, increasing shadows and lighting then what you end up with is something that’s imperfect but unique with a lot of character!

    Houston We Have A Problem

    This same theory carries over into music as well. When music first made its way into the digital age we realized very quickly that something was wrong…something was missing. The audio sounded way to clean and lacked “warmth” and “grit”. The computer programmed drum loops sounded too perfect in time and seemed robotic. The issue we found was everything sounded too perfect and consequently, it lacked the character that live music and analog recording gear gave us. And ever since then we have intentionally used techniques to give our digital music back it’s analog character.

    It’s Ok To Swing

    So please remember when you are formulating your cadences to not overthink it. It’s perfectly fine if you are not saying words directly on top of the kick or snare drums at times as long as your cadence has a structure to it and sounds cool. In the music world, this is called “swing”. I demonstrated this in a past video where I show you 3 different ways to catch the beat. Think of a swing that is still as being perfectly in time on the beat but once you push it just a little bit it starts to swing back and forth. Now it’s moving outside of its initial center position “offbeat” from front to back but is still having to pass through that same center point “on beat” to get from point A to point B. So even though it’s swinging slightly offbeat it is also remaining on beat as well.

    How Did I Do?

    I hope I didn’t warp your mind with my swing analogy but the bottom line is not being perfect actually adds more character to art when it’s done in an intentional, interesting, and creative way. I hope that you found this article helpful. I would love to hear from you so please let me know how I did by dropping your questions and comments in the section below.

    “Brian came in heavy at that moment on his guitar, the rapid, high-pitched squeal ranging back and forth as his fingers flew along the frets. As the intro’s tempo grew more rapid, Bekka heard Derek’s subtle bass line as it worked its way in. After another few seconds Will came in, slow at first, but racing along to match the others’ pace. When their combined efforts seemed unable to get any heavier, David jumped into the mix.

    As the sound got nice and heavy, Bekka began to rock back-and-forth onstage. In front of her, hundreds of metal-lovers began to jump and gyrate to their music. She matched their movements for a moment, enjoying the connection that was being made, before stepping over to the keyboard that had been set up behind her. Sliding her microphone into an attached cradle, she assumed her position and got ready. Right on cue, all the others stopped playing, throwing the auditorium into an abrupt silence. Before the crowd could react, however, Bekka’s fingers began to work the keys, issuing a rhythm that was much softer and slower than what had been built up. The audience’s violent thrash-dance calmed at that moment and they began to sway in response.

    Bekka smiled to herself.

    This is what she lived for.”
    ― Nathan Squiers, Death Metal

    How to write a drum cadence

    Despite Let’s Eat Grandma and Girlpool hailing from opposite corners of the world — the former from the U.K. and the latter from Los Angeles — both groups share similar trajectories. Two creatively partnered duos occupying the same late millennial and early Gen Z age bracket, both Let’s Eat Grandma and Girlpool make music that pushes against the boundaries of indie rock and pop, and each has seen its members go through massive life changes in the years since their debut records. And two new albums out from both, Two Ribbons and Forgiveness, respectively, reflect a similar message: a sort of wistful acceptance of the inherent grief that comes with growing older, as both mark the passage of time through a self-reflexive form of maturity.

    For Let’s Eat Grandma, 2018’s stellar I’m All Ears found artists Jenny Hollingworth and Rosa Walton reaching adulthood, on the heels of a similarly acclaimed debut that was written when the duo were in their early teens. But as the two continued to record and tour, they started to grow apart as most childhood friends do. They spent time away from each other, Walton moving to London for some time, and the songs ache with the desire to be understood by anyone in the wake of losing those that do. “Levitation” pleads over a sprightly, ’80s-inspired instrumental, “Are you here or somewhere else?” followed by “Watching You Go,” a synth-pop track in the vein of Chvrches, anchored by a bittersweet lament for watching someone important in your life fade away, the vocals carried away into a glittery ether.

    These are songs that contain double meanings; they’re internal exchanges between artists, but also letters to loved ones lost. The split between two lifelong musical partners resulted in the duo writing songs to one another, reminiscing over a friendship that was temporarily severed only to come back together again. But outside of the group, the two were reckoning with external change, as Hollingworth’s boyfriend died of Ewing’s sarcoma in spring 2019.

    The record is divided into two halves, with a clear side A and side B. The first half is shiny, retro-inspired pop music, layered in waves of euphoric synthesizers. But the latter half, after the aptly named ambient breather “Half Light,” adopts more acoustic instrumentation. The songs take on a beautifully saccharine tone, reflecting on past bygone experiences with a sense of fitting bereavement. Multiple songs in this back half reference religious imagery; “Strange Conversations” has a prayer-like echo to it, as Hollingworth confesses she’s at the altar, on her knees, praying to an unspecified recipient, and “Two Ribbons” closes the album with the cadence of a contemporary worship song.

    The album traces a path to maturity, with the youthful flashiness of the first half fading away into more serious, downtempo songwriting. It’s a slight pivot away from their last album I’m All Ears, which rested more in what the duo called “experimental sludge pop,” working with collaborators like the late producer SOPHIE and being unafraid to write tracks that hovered around the ten minute mark. But the marked difference is that Two Ribbons is, at its core, a grief record. As Hollingworth grieves her lost lover, and Walton the state of their friendship, Two Ribbons grieves both members’ lost innocence as they reckon with the consequences of growing up.

    Girlpool’s Forgiveness is also a grief record, albeit in a slightly different fashion. Since their 2015 debut, Girlpool’s music has been steadily changing shape — the twee, Riot Grrrl inspired sound that propelled its previous records is absent on Forgiveness in favor of a darker, more electronic instrumentation. The guitars are still present, but behind synths, pedals and drum machines, particularly on the songs where Avery Tucker takes the lead. The album’s “Nothing Gives Me Pleasure” includes auto-tune and breathy vocal chops, “Country Star” features a fuzzy, darkwave sound while the brooding “Light Up Later” starts with a hymnal chorus of layered harmonies.

    Forgiveness finishes what 2019’s What Chaos Is Imaginary started, giving both Tucker and Harmony Tividad space to continue exploring the slowcore-adjacent territory they’ve found themselves comfortable in, this time aided by a bleak and even cynical soundscape to back them up. It contains a Depeche Mode sensibility, where the coldness of the instrumentals work to mask the true, candid emotions underneath, as the two singers use their individual discrepancies to their advantage — they play off of one another well enough to create a distinct portrait of each member while still making a cohesive record.

    There’s a yearning in these songs: “Dragging My Life Into a Dream” begins with a plea for the literal return of Tucker’s innocence. Other songs like “Faultline” and “Country Star” are about becoming in touch with the things you need while understanding the things you desire, and this sort of retroactive realization comes to a head in the closer, “Love333,” which expresses both a curiosity to understand the circumstances of the past to understand the future: “I don’t wanna feel this yet,” Tividad sings. “I wonder if there’s any truth sometimes.”

    Personal reflection and growth defines both albums, but in the case of Girlpool it takes a more biting tone. The duo grieve more intangible losses, namely previous versions of themselves and carefully crafted relationships. “See Me Now” has the timbre of an Elliott Smith B-side, with Tucker, who transitioned in 2018, wrestling with the knots of ingrained self-hatred that comes with the experience of always comparing yourself to cisgendered peers. With an album title named Forgiveness, these songs can function as letters of absolution — songs as attempts to reconcile with former presentations of the self, and battling the deep-rooted emotions that follow.

    Both records are about surrendering to change; Two Ribbons is about finding the beauty in the world and holding it close to you in times of adversity, and Forgiveness hones in on that adversity to find some meaning within it. The two albums tackle loss through lenses of optimism versus pessimism, both reflecting on unsaid trysts or regret of the past — where one album chooses forgiveness, the other holds a grudge. We all find ourselves inherently tethered to others throughout the good or the bad — connected, as Hollingworth sings, “two ribbons, still woven although we are fraying.” These entanglements — to ourselves, to other people — are what make us human, and when those connections become severed, it leaves us scrambling to cobble together some meaning out of the brokenness.

    How to write a drum cadence

    Despite Let’s Eat Grandma and Girlpool hailing from opposite corners of the world — the former from the U.K. and the latter from Los Angeles — both groups share similar trajectories. Two creatively partnered duos occupying the same late millennial and early Gen Z age bracket, both Let’s Eat Grandma and Girlpool make music that pushes against the boundaries of indie rock and pop, and each has seen its members go through massive life changes in the years since their debut records. And two new albums out from both, Two Ribbons and Forgiveness, respectively, reflect a similar message: a sort of wistful acceptance of the inherent grief that comes with growing older, as both mark the passage of time through a self-reflexive form of maturity.

    For Let’s Eat Grandma, 2018’s stellar I’m All Ears found artists Jenny Hollingworth and Rosa Walton reaching adulthood, on the heels of a similarly acclaimed debut that was written when the duo were in their early teens. But as the two continued to record and tour, they started to grow apart as most childhood friends do. They spent time away from each other, Walton moving to London for some time, and the songs ache with the desire to be understood by anyone in the wake of losing those that do. “Levitation” pleads over a sprightly, ’80s-inspired instrumental, “Are you here or somewhere else?” followed by “Watching You Go,” a synth-pop track in the vein of Chvrches, anchored by a bittersweet lament for watching someone important in your life fade away, the vocals carried away into a glittery ether.

    These are songs that contain double meanings; they’re internal exchanges between artists, but also letters to loved ones lost. The split between two lifelong musical partners resulted in the duo writing songs to one another, reminiscing over a friendship that was temporarily severed only to come back together again. But outside of the group, the two were reckoning with external change, as Hollingworth’s boyfriend died of Ewing’s sarcoma in spring 2019.

    The record is divided into two halves, with a clear side A and side B. The first half is shiny, retro-inspired pop music, layered in waves of euphoric synthesizers. But the latter half, after the aptly named ambient breather “Half Light,” adopts more acoustic instrumentation. The songs take on a beautifully saccharine tone, reflecting on past bygone experiences with a sense of fitting bereavement. Multiple songs in this back half reference religious imagery; “Strange Conversations” has a prayer-like echo to it, as Hollingworth confesses she’s at the altar, on her knees, praying to an unspecified recipient, and “Two Ribbons” closes the album with the cadence of a contemporary worship song.

    The album traces a path to maturity, with the youthful flashiness of the first half fading away into more serious, downtempo songwriting. It’s a slight pivot away from their last album I’m All Ears, which rested more in what the duo called “experimental sludge pop,” working with collaborators like the late producer SOPHIE and being unafraid to write tracks that hovered around the ten minute mark. But the marked difference is that Two Ribbons is, at its core, a grief record. As Hollingworth grieves her lost lover, and Walton the state of their friendship, Two Ribbons grieves both members’ lost innocence as they reckon with the consequences of growing up.

    Girlpool’s Forgiveness is also a grief record, albeit in a slightly different fashion. Since their 2015 debut, Girlpool’s music has been steadily changing shape — the twee, Riot Grrrl inspired sound that propelled its previous records is absent on Forgiveness in favor of a darker, more electronic instrumentation. The guitars are still present, but behind synths, pedals and drum machines, particularly on the songs where Avery Tucker takes the lead. The album’s “Nothing Gives Me Pleasure” includes auto-tune and breathy vocal chops, “Country Star” features a fuzzy, darkwave sound while the brooding “Light Up Later” starts with a hymnal chorus of layered harmonies.

    Forgiveness finishes what 2019’s What Chaos Is Imaginary started, giving both Tucker and Harmony Tividad space to continue exploring the slowcore-adjacent territory they’ve found themselves comfortable in, this time aided by a bleak and even cynical soundscape to back them up. It contains a Depeche Mode sensibility, where the coldness of the instrumentals work to mask the true, candid emotions underneath, as the two singers use their individual discrepancies to their advantage — they play off of one another well enough to create a distinct portrait of each member while still making a cohesive record.

    There’s a yearning in these songs: “Dragging My Life Into a Dream” begins with a plea for the literal return of Tucker’s innocence. Other songs like “Faultline” and “Country Star” are about becoming in touch with the things you need while understanding the things you desire, and this sort of retroactive realization comes to a head in the closer, “Love333,” which expresses both a curiosity to understand the circumstances of the past to understand the future: “I don’t wanna feel this yet,” Tividad sings. “I wonder if there’s any truth sometimes.”

    Personal reflection and growth defines both albums, but in the case of Girlpool it takes a more biting tone. The duo grieve more intangible losses, namely previous versions of themselves and carefully crafted relationships. “See Me Now” has the timbre of an Elliott Smith B-side, with Tucker, who transitioned in 2018, wrestling with the knots of ingrained self-hatred that comes with the experience of always comparing yourself to cisgendered peers. With an album title named Forgiveness, these songs can function as letters of absolution — songs as attempts to reconcile with former presentations of the self, and battling the deep-rooted emotions that follow.

    Both records are about surrendering to change; Two Ribbons is about finding the beauty in the world and holding it close to you in times of adversity, and Forgiveness hones in on that adversity to find some meaning within it. The two albums tackle loss through lenses of optimism versus pessimism, both reflecting on unsaid trysts or regret of the past — where one album chooses forgiveness, the other holds a grudge. We all find ourselves inherently tethered to others throughout the good or the bad — connected, as Hollingworth sings, “two ribbons, still woven although we are fraying.” These entanglements — to ourselves, to other people — are what make us human, and when those connections become severed, it leaves us scrambling to cobble together some meaning out of the brokenness.

    Gavin Harrison says it’s a “tough question” when asked what the future holds for King Crimson.

    A cryptic comment that leader Robert Fripp posted immediately after their final booked show in Japan last December led to speculation about whether the band was finished. He called that day “a significant moment in time as King Crimson ‘moved from sound to silence.'” The dates were also part of a run dubbed the “Completion Tour.”

    Still, Harrison argued that there was another way to interpret the situation.

    “Robert looks at things in a different way to the normal person,” the drummer tells Metal Injection. “He looks at things in actually very interesting ways of doing things. The band disbanded at the end of 2008. I heard nothing from Robert until 2013, and he said ‘I’ve got this idea for a project for the band. It includes three drummers at the front of the stage. The rest of the guys will be behind on a riser.’ He could see it all in his mind and the project in Robert’s mind lasted from 2013 [until it] completed in Japan in 2021.”

    Still, Harrison added, “that doesn’t necessarily mean that’s the end. It’s just we achieved what we set out to achieve. That project completed itself. Now, whether it needs reiteration or it needs to come back or a new King Crimson comes back or King Crimson never comes back, all those things are possible. To just say, ‘Oh, the band’s over,’ doesn’t really fit the way Robert thinks.”

    Harrison said he wasn’t trying to “skirt the question,” even if it seemed like it. “I don’t know whether that was really the last time King Crimson played,” he emphasized. “It did feel a bit like that when we were there, because we knew there were no more projected dates. Normally when we finish a tour, we already know in 18 months time we’re going to go to the States, we’re going to go to South America, we’re around Europe or whatever. … There were no further plans past 2021, and Robert said, ‘This band, it’s reached a completion.’”

    He hailed Fripp’s “beautiful” way of thinking, adding: “King Crimson, it’s always been King Crimson – but it hasn’t always been the same people. It’s a sort of idealism in a way that I’ve never experienced with any other band. Most other bands are pretty black and white: We’re finished or we’re starting, or it’s off or it’s on.

    ASHLAND ‘ More than 600 students walked out of their classes Wednesday as part of a national student strike to demonstrate against a possible war with Iraq and demand adequate funding for education.

    About 200 students from Southern Oregon University began the protest march down Siskiyou Boulevard to the Plaza shortly after noon, their numbers tripling as high schoolers and middle schoolers spilled out of classrooms and followed their beating drums. They chanted anti-war slogans and carried signs as they wended their way under sunny, blue skies.

    Once the students reached the Plaza, they erupted in loud cheers and kept up the drum beat under the watchful gaze of Ashland police.

    Although the marching students disrupted traffic flow, and a few climbed trees, statues and phone booths in order to see and be seen, the demonstration proceeded without incident except for a single arrest.

    Nigel Brooks, 19, of Ashland, was charged with disorderly conduct. Ashland Police Sgt. Teresa Selby said Brooks was arrested for intentionally blocking traffic near the university. Selby said Brooks is currently lodged at Jackson County Jail on &

    Student organizer Keith Quick said he was pleased the demonstration remained orderly.

    We did not want a flag burning, he said. Peace is not destruction.

    Two of the demonstrators ‘ costumed as Bush and a police officer ‘ staged a mock arrest of the faux president for crimes against humanity. The crowd roared its approval as Miranda rights were read to close the display of political performance art.

    Quick, an English major at SOU, gave credit for the energy of the movement to the younger students.

    Looking at the crowd overflowing the Plaza, Quick said it was the enthusiasm of a group of high school students attending an earlier SOU peace rally that energized the campus crowd.

    I wanted to get students involved, said Quick. But it wasn’t really going anywhere until the high school students got involved and said, ‘Yeah. Let’s do this!’

    Ashland High School student Hannah Clark said she wasn’t worried about academic repercussions resulting from the walkout, even though Principal Jeff Schlecht said today’s absences would not be excused.

    Schlecht said he used Rosa Parks as an example of civil disobedience, citing her willingness to be arrested to make her statement.

    I told them, if you have a deep conviction, you’ll be willing to accept the consequences, said Schlecht. But there are not a lot of consequences for one unexcused absence.

    Peace is more important today, said Clark.

    Schlecht said the middle school required students’ parents to pick them up at the campus in order to attend the peace rally.

    Two middle-school students, walking unattended by parents, were filming the noontime events for a school assignment: Watching Ashland Middle School.

    Parent Kay Jewell said she was proud of the activism of her middle-school daughter, Abigail Adams.

    Jewell said her daughter was organizing Feed your Enemy food programs in the middle and elementary schools.

    I told her, kids need to pay attention because it’s their world, said Jewell.

    Not everyone was dedicated to higher causes on the warm spring day. One hopeful youth had a handmade sign taped to his chest which read, Will make out for peace, with the parenthetical caveat (Must be hot!)

    When queried, the radical Romeo admitted he had not had any takers on his offer and was later seen in the crowd sans sign.

    1:20 p.m., the crowd had dwindled to one third its peak size. Lofting their Books Not Bombs signs, the students marched back up the boulevard to the cadence of their own chants and their drums of peace.

    Also at noon Wednesday, in Medford, more than 360 Women in Black stood silent in Vogel Plaza for the third consecutive week as part of an international vigil for peace.