How to write an article for your school newspaper

Sometimes it is hard to know what to write about. Since we specialize in printing school newspapers, we have a good idea of what schools like to write about. Below are a compilation of article ideas that we have found schools utilizing in their newspapers.

Other Essential Newspaper Tools

Student Spotlight

Interview a student or more than one (even a particular group) and write an article about that individual or group. Try to discover some atypical information from them that would make an intriguing article. Ask questions such as:

    If you had a magic wand and could change anything about the school, what would be the number one change you would make and why? If you were the principal and found yourself in charge of us, what would be the first thing you would do? What makes a good teacher/principal? What makes a good student? Here is a list of 10 teachers and administrators, what move/TV actor most resembles each teacher or administrator? If school were a movie, what movie would we all be in? What is fame and what is the route you intend to take to get there? How do you define peer-pressure and is it dangerous? Why? If you had the power to hire anyone in the world to be your teacher, who would you hire and why? What is the best kept secret on campus that you’re willing to spoil?

Popular Culture

Write articles about the latest movies, music, literature and art. You can write reviews, make recommendations, take polls, and become a critic. Be sure to add screen shots or photos to enhance the article.

Student Life

Write articles about the daily happenings around the school. Write about sporting events, activities, accomplishments, changes in policy, rules, teacher changes, and more. Things to consider writing an article about are:

    Your sports teams Your clubs Your teachers Your administrators School changes The cafeteria food Extra-circular activities Field trips School needs Information about upcoming events and activities

Rivalries and School Elections

Every school has that arch “enemy” so to speak, that other school that always seems to be the one school everyone wants to beat in sports. Writing about them and past and future rivalries make for good articles. Write stories on those running for class offices and talk about their strengths and weaknesses.

School History

Every school has history. Some of it can be quite interesting. Try writing articles about the founding of the school, the history of the school name and/or mascot, former principals, former accomplishments and more.

Local News

Write articles about local news. You might even be able to interview the mayor, city council, and other city or county officials. In writing about local news, make sure it relates to the students in your school in some way.

Editorials and Opinion Pieces

Solicit students to write opinion articles,letters to the editor, and editorials. Some great topics to write on are:

    New governmental policies Trending stories – stories that polarize people, cause social upheaval, or that most people are following. Social issues (parenting, divorce, dating, religion, marriage, diversity, racism, etc). School policy and rules School curriculum

Self-Help Articles

You can write articles that help people overcome certain addictions, bad habits, and fears. Write articles on what to do if someone tries to take advantage of you, how to overcome the fear of authority, how to approach the principal, what friendship really is, how to make friends, how to study, ways to get better grade, study tips, and so forth.

Other Ideas

These ideas should get you going in the right direction. Don’t forget to add things like:

    Comics (particularly student drawn ones) Guest articles (from staff and faculty) Polls Contests Puzzles Hide an icon, picture, or logo in your newspaper for students to find Popular product reviews Popular services reviews

Free Cloud Designer Templates

Our templates are 100% customizable, super user-friendly, and designed specifically to help you create outstanding school newspapers with our free Cloud Designer. Below are a few of the 100s of templates available to you.

It’s similar to writing academic papers, but with vital differences

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How to write an article for your school newspaper

  • M.Ed., Education Administration, University of Georgia
  • B.A., History, Armstrong State University

Techniques for writing a news article differ from those needed for academic papers. Whether you’re interested in writing for a school newspaper, fulfilling a requirement for a class, or seeking a writing job in journalism, you’ll need to know the difference. To write like a real reporter, consider this guide for how to write a news article.

Choose Your Topic

First, you must decide what to write about. Sometimes an editor or instructor will give you assignments, but you’ll often have to find your own topics to cover.

If you get to choose your topic, you might be able to pick a subject related to your personal experience or family history, which would give you a strong framework and a dose of perspective. However, this route means you must work to avoid bias—you may have strong opinions that could affect your conclusions. You also could pick a topic that revolves around a personal interest, such as your favorite sport.

Research for Your News Article

Even if you end up with a topic close to your heart, you should begin with research, using books and articles that will give you a full understanding of the subject. Go to the library and find background information about people, organizations, and events you intend to cover.

Next, interview a few people to collect more information and quotes that give perspective on the topic. Don’t be intimidated by the idea of interviewing important or newsworthy people—an interview can be as formal or informal as you want to make it, so relax and have fun with it. Find people with backgrounds in the topic and strong opinions, and carefully write down or record their responses for accuracy. Let the interviewees know that you will be quoting them.

Parts of a News Article

Before you write your first draft, you should be aware of the parts that make up a news story:

Headline or title

The headline of your article should be catchy and to the point. You should punctuate your title using Associated Press style guidelines unless your publication specifies something else. Other members of the publication staff frequently write the headlines, but this will help focus your thoughts and maybe save those other staffers some time.

  • “Lost dog finds his way home”
  • “Debate tonight in Jasper Hall”
  • “Panel chooses 3 essay winners”

Byline

The byline is the name of the writer—your name, in this case.

Lead (sometimes written “lede”)

The lead is the first sentence or paragraph, written to provide a preview of the entire article. It summarizes the story and includes many of the basic facts. The lead will help readers decide if they want to read the rest of the news article or if they are satisfied knowing these details.

The story

Once you’ve set the stage with a good lead, follow up with a well-written story that contains facts from your research and quotes from people you’ve interviewed. The article should not contain your opinions. Detail any events in chronological order. Use the active voice—not passive voice—when possible, and write in clear, short, direct sentences.

In a news article, you should use the inverted pyramid format—putting the most critical information in the early paragraphs and following with supporting information. This ensures that the reader sees the important details first. Hopefully they’ll be intrigued enough to continue to the end.

The sources

Include your sources in the body with the information and quotes they provide. This is different from academic papers, where you would add these at the end of the piece.

The ending

Your conclusion can be your last bit of information, a summary, or a carefully chosen quote to leave the reader with a strong sense of your story.

News articles are designed to relate the news. The article is written to inform readers. It is factual, meant to present information in a quick, digestible form. The following elements of writing a newspaper article are important, so heed them well.

Research and Fact Gathering

Perhaps the #1 rule of writing a newspaper article is that you are factual. You do not want to make assumptions or fabricate information. Before you can write your article, you must have as many of the facts as you can gather. Here are some facts that you will need to find out:

    What? The specific event that took place. Who? The people involved. Where? Places. When? Date and time. Why? Reasons for the event taking place. How? Connecting the facts.

You will also need to gather as much detail as you can. This will involve:

    Interviewing people connected to the story. Gathering quotes from people (be exact…never paraphrase what they said). Cite names, unless they specifically request to remain anonymous. Resolving conflicting facts from individuals. Researching public information (always cite your sources, so write them down).

Once you have all your facts, you can begin to write your article.

The Headline or Title

For a news article, this is where you have most of your creativity. The headline must grab the attention of the reader. It needs to be catchy, emotion evoking, or creates curiosity. Be creative with it. In many instances, you will spend more time trying to come up with the perfect headline than you will in the actual writing.

The Article Body

The main news article itself is written from bottom down. In other words, the most important information comes first and each paragraph gives less and less details. Whereas a novel, for example, starts you out with little information and you must read to the end to get all of it.

In news article writing, however, you want to provide the key information right up front. You start with the 6 questions you should have already answered in your research:

    What?Who?Where?When?Why?How?

Your first two paragraphs need to answer all these questions. For example:

The Varsity football team beat Smith High School last Saturday, 21 to 7, in a rematch that vindicated Coach John’s prediction of a win during Friday’s pep-rally. Our first home win this season at our very own Jane Doe Field was a morale booster to the entire student body. Quarterback, Joe Baker completed 18 out of 24 passes to cement the win.

This was only a simple example, but almost all the questions are actually answered in the first two sentences. From here you can add more inconsequential details, such as receiving yards, rushing yards, and so forth. You will at some point include quotes from people such as the coach, the quarterback, a receiver, a fan in the stands, and perhaps the principal. Although for quotes, you don’t want to include too many, but having two or three is important. By the time you get to the end of the article, you are simply expanding upon what the reader already knows from the first two paragraphs you wrote.

Don’t make your paragraphs long—two to three sentences each. Your word count will need to stay around the 500 word count or less, generally speaking.

SEE WHAT OTHER SCHOOLS ARE DOING

Below are just a few examples of what other schools are doing with their newspapers. Take a look and become inspired and find ideas.

How to write an article for your school newspaper

This article details the various types of school newspaper articles you can write. For ideas on what to write about, click here.

News Articles

These articles are all about the news. Specifically, you want to write about school news. You can write about local, national, or world news—but we recommend only doing so where they are relevant to the student body.

You have the opportunity to go so much further than what is posted on social media sites. Social media reports rumor, gossip, and assumptions. You will report the truth, having done all the relevant research and fact checking. You want your article to be the definitive source on the issue—the source others will point to and say, “But that’s not what so-and-so said.”

To learn how to write a school news article, click here.

Editorial (Opinion Piece, Commentary)

These articles are about influencing popular opinion and represents the consensus view of the newspaper editorial staff. It can also be about entertainment. People need to read your article and become engaged with it, even if they completely disagree with you. Some may read your piece because they completely agree. Others will read it because they just like the way you say it. Still others will read it because they feel a need to respond and disagree with you. Regardless of the reason, you have engaged the reader in such a way that your opinion has an impact. This is the main purpose of an editorial.

To see tips on writing editorial pieces, click here.

Feature Story

A feature story is probably the longest article you will write. It takes a news article and expands upon it, trying to explore reasons as to why the particular news story happened. To some degree, your opinion is inserted into the article, but in general, your opinion is based on the facts you have been able to gather, not on a personal bias.

A feature story will also make predictions on the consequences or ramifications of the news story. Likely scenarios are presented that might in some way effect the student body you are writing to. In general, a school newspaper will have one, maybe two, of these types of articles.

To learn how to write a feature story, click here.

Columns

A column can be written by the same author each issue of the newspaper. It will reflect the personal opinion of a single individual and can follow a similar theme through each issue. In general they are editorials, but written from one person’s perspective and opinion, and it may be laser-focused on one particular area: advice, polls (and responses to), school announcements, school policy, question and answers, rival school news, and so on.

For more tips on writing columns, click here.

Review Article

A review article is a first-hand experience (good or bad) of a product, service, person, group, or idea. Your job here is to give as an unbiased experience of the good and negative aspects of your experience. You want to inform readers of what to expect. You also want to be thorough and honest about aspects you did not experience.

To learn how to write a review article, click here.

Promotional Article

The idea here is to encourage your readers to join in, engage in, participate in, purchase, or otherwise become involved with an activity, a group, a product, or an opportunity. For instance, the Newspaper Club can write an article about why joining them would provide members with an expanded resume that could help them land a job someday. An upcoming school activity might also be written about to encourage students to participate.

For tips on writing a promotional article, click here.

How-To Articles

These types of articles have become much more popular in recent years. For a school newspaper, writing about how to study, how to memorize better, how to utilize certain school resources, or how to best take advantage of the school cafeteria. All of these ideas, and many more, might be of interest to the student body and are potential articles for your newspaper.

To learn how to write a how-to article, click here.

Free Cloud Designer Templates

Our templates are 100% customizable, super user-friendly, and designed specifically to help you create outstanding school newspapers with our free Cloud Designer. Below are a few of the 100s of templates available to you. The first three show the various sizes we offer.

It’s similar to writing academic papers, but with vital differences

  • Share
  • Flipboard
  • Email

How to write an article for your school newspaper

  • M.Ed., Education Administration, University of Georgia
  • B.A., History, Armstrong State University

Techniques for writing a news article differ from those needed for academic papers. Whether you’re interested in writing for a school newspaper, fulfilling a requirement for a class, or seeking a writing job in journalism, you’ll need to know the difference. To write like a real reporter, consider this guide for how to write a news article.

Choose Your Topic

First, you must decide what to write about. Sometimes an editor or instructor will give you assignments, but you’ll often have to find your own topics to cover.

If you get to choose your topic, you might be able to pick a subject related to your personal experience or family history, which would give you a strong framework and a dose of perspective. However, this route means you must work to avoid bias—you may have strong opinions that could affect your conclusions. You also could pick a topic that revolves around a personal interest, such as your favorite sport.

Research for Your News Article

Even if you end up with a topic close to your heart, you should begin with research, using books and articles that will give you a full understanding of the subject. Go to the library and find background information about people, organizations, and events you intend to cover.

Next, interview a few people to collect more information and quotes that give perspective on the topic. Don’t be intimidated by the idea of interviewing important or newsworthy people—an interview can be as formal or informal as you want to make it, so relax and have fun with it. Find people with backgrounds in the topic and strong opinions, and carefully write down or record their responses for accuracy. Let the interviewees know that you will be quoting them.

Parts of a News Article

Before you write your first draft, you should be aware of the parts that make up a news story:

Headline or title

The headline of your article should be catchy and to the point. You should punctuate your title using Associated Press style guidelines unless your publication specifies something else. Other members of the publication staff frequently write the headlines, but this will help focus your thoughts and maybe save those other staffers some time.

  • “Lost dog finds his way home”
  • “Debate tonight in Jasper Hall”
  • “Panel chooses 3 essay winners”

Byline

The byline is the name of the writer—your name, in this case.

Lead (sometimes written “lede”)

The lead is the first sentence or paragraph, written to provide a preview of the entire article. It summarizes the story and includes many of the basic facts. The lead will help readers decide if they want to read the rest of the news article or if they are satisfied knowing these details.

The story

Once you’ve set the stage with a good lead, follow up with a well-written story that contains facts from your research and quotes from people you’ve interviewed. The article should not contain your opinions. Detail any events in chronological order. Use the active voice—not passive voice—when possible, and write in clear, short, direct sentences.

In a news article, you should use the inverted pyramid format—putting the most critical information in the early paragraphs and following with supporting information. This ensures that the reader sees the important details first. Hopefully they’ll be intrigued enough to continue to the end.

The sources

Include your sources in the body with the information and quotes they provide. This is different from academic papers, where you would add these at the end of the piece.

The ending

Your conclusion can be your last bit of information, a summary, or a carefully chosen quote to leave the reader with a strong sense of your story.

August 3, 2020 by Veerendra

Article Writing: Do you know exactly how to write an article to get maximum audience traffic? you have come to the right page. Here we are going to discuss what is it, format for Article Writing, Article Writing Topics & Examples, How to Write an Article? and Article Writing Rules for creating unique, inspiring & influencing articles.

Article Writing Format, Topics, Examples | How To Write an Article and Article Writing Rules

Check out this entire article & know complete idea about writing perfect articles on various topics like person, place, things, current trending issues, technical & non-technical advancements, etc. However, you will also find a wide range of Article Writing Topics on different subjects here. Look no further just dive into this ultimate article writing guide.

Topics & Examples of Article Writing

This section is the heart of this article where you can view the most awaiting content about article writing ie., Topics & Sample examples. The best & traffic attained article writing topics like health, education, creativity, technical developments, productivity, and many more are shared here in the accessible links. From this list of the collection, you will definitely find interesting articles that are important for your board exams or competitions or magazines.

Are you ready to dive in? Check out the below list & pick any of the article writing topics that you are excited to publish.

What is Article Writing?

An article is a written work published in a print/electronic medium. It may be for the purpose of delivering news, researching results, academic analysis, or debate. Usually, an article is a piece of writing that is published in a newspaper or Magazine for guiding a large audience on a particular topic or subject. The main objective to write an article is to make some changes to the world by presenting facts, stats, or views.

Well, there are so many objectives of Article Writing on various topics like society, persons, locations, rising-issues, and technical developments. It influences some readers and some may fail in audience perception because of messiness in your article writing. So, following the correct format of writing an article may convey your views, facts, or stats to the world.

Article Writing Format

To write a perfect article, one should have in-depth knowledge about the topic to deliver 100% information regarding the product, services, brands, etc., Well, you need to do some research and also planning before start writing an article. To make your article stood out of the crowd & gain max audience traffic; some basic format for article writing is necessary. The article writing format is given below.

The format of an article consists of the following parts:

  1. Heading / Title
  2. By Line
  3. Body (the main part of the article, 3-4 paragraphs)
  4. Conclusion (Ending paragraph of the article with the opinion or recommendation, anticipation or an appeal)

1. HEADING: It should be catchy & also need to relate to the reader’s search term. The length of the heading shouldn’t cross 5-6 words. Think creatively & impressed audience or readers with this one line & increase their anxiety to continue their read in your article.

2. BY LINE: It means the name of the person writing the article. It is generally given in the question. If asked then only write your personal details.

3. BODY: The body is the main part of article writing which carries more weightage of marks. Usually, the body of the article consists of at least 3 to 4 paragraphs.

4. CONCLUSION: Final paragraph of an article should be like recommendation, anticipation, views, appeal, etc where readers’ must feel happy with your article.

Checking out this format & try to implement it during the article writing as it is very important for all students of CBSE and other boards to secure more marks & readers’ attention.

How To Write an Article?

The following steps guide you on how to write an article in a well-structured manner which helps you grab your audience’s attention & traffic for web-based published articles.

  1. Choose/Pick your topic which is required for your target audience.
  2. Do some research and collect the needed information for your selected topic.
  3. Organize all important topic related facts & stats in a logical way.
  4. Write all your reader’s needs to influence & help them.
  5. Make your views unique & specific.
  6. Read, Revise, and Repeat.
  7. Cross-check the grammatical mistakes & avoid unnecessary & repetitive lines.

Article Writing Rules – Rules for Writing a Good Articles

  • Rule 1: Minimize your barrier to entry.
  • Rule 2: Conduct in-depth Research
  • Rule 3: Structure & Form
  • Rule 4: Keep your paragraphs short and your text visually appealing
  • Rule 5: Be Succinct
  • Rule 6: Always proofread your writing

FAQs on Article Writing Format | Topics of Article Writing & Article Writing Tips

1. What is the format for article writing?

There are four stages that students should remember while writing an article on any of the subjects. By following the structure you can reach more audiences with your article. So, check out the structure for article writing & publish it in that form for gaining a huge traffic. The article writing format is as follows:

  1. Heading/Title
  2. By line
  3. Body/Paragraphs
  4. Conclusion

2. Where can I get a huge variety of article writing topics to fulfill the reader’s needs?

You can find a wide range of article writing topics from our page along with related information about article writing like tips, rule, format, & how to write it uniquely.

3. What are some good topics to write an article?

You can avail the list of good article topics on our website Aplustopper.com along with some enough examples of article writing on our page.

4. What are some best tips to write good articles?

Here are some of the important tips to write good articles:

  1. The topics of the articles should be unique and relevant
  2. The title must be eye-catching, clear and attractive
  3. The article has to get attention
  4. It has to be interesting & easy to read
  5. Use clear statements and make assertions
  6. Write a good and logical ending
  7. Avoid repetition of ideas

–>

This article was co-authored by Alicia Oglesby. Alicia Oglesby is a Professional School Counselor and the Director of School and College Counseling at Bishop McNamara High School outside of Washington DC. With over ten years of experience in counseling, Alicia specializes in academic advising, social-emotional skills, and career counseling. Alicia holds a BS in Psychology from Howard University and a Master’s in Clinical Counseling and Applied Psychology from Chestnut Hill College. She also studied Race and Mental Health at Virginia Tech. Alicia holds Professional School Counseling Certifications in both Washington DC and Pennsylvania. She has created a college counseling program in its entirety and developed five programs focused on application workshops, parent information workshops, essay writing collaborative, peer-reviewed application activities, and financial aid literacy events.

There are 7 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page.

This article has been viewed 129,167 times.

Starting a school newspaper can be a great learning experience. You get to hunt down stories and write about what is going on around you. Plus, it shows you have initiative and drive. Starting a paper will be hard work, though, so be prepared to give as much time and effort as you can, especially when you’re first starting out. You’ll need to get school support, then decide how you want your newspaper to be set up. Once you’ve got that figured out, you can get down to business writing articles.

You’ve received by fax or email a press release from a public relations officer promoting the latest film, or issuing a statement on behalf of a major personality, or publishing earnings for a top company. What should you do? Here are some tips on how to turn what is usually a very dull and dry press release into a full-fledged news article.

Where is the news?

Skim through the press release to identify the piece of information that answers the question: Why should I care? This is the essence of news. If you don’t care, your readers most likely won’t, either. Press releases are often long. They can even be dozens of pages long. Your job is to find the one issue that’s the most interesting.

Start your article with the most interesting or most unusual piece of news from the information you’ve decided is important enough to publish to the general public. This will be your news angle or the “wow” factor. For example, if the press release deals with the opening of a new Mexican grill and Sylvestor Stallone is noted as one of the owners, you could begin your article lead with “Sly likes it hot.”

Write your article in a light, conversational tone and do not copy anything from the press release. This is plagiarism. You’ve got the general idea of what has happened. Your job is to make people want to know more than what you do. To do that, you have to draw them in with good writing. Press releases are usually dry and are not always written by good writers.

Feel free to use any quotes from the press release in your article if you think it adds something extra to your story and don’t forget to attribute them. Ror example “quote quote,” Person A said in a press release issued by Name of Company. Note that if they quotes are boring, they will not enrich your article and instead just bore the reader.

Use the contact information of the public relations officer or publicist provided at the bottom of the press release to call the company and ask for any clarifications for any information you may have not understood. You may also opt to request more information about what they have conveyed in the press release. Perhaps he has contact information of other people who would be interesting to interview.

Take the initiative to interview your own sources as well. People who may offer a critical view opposite to the praising tone in the press release, or clients of the company in question. They may offer more insight and give you a much more interesting angle, making your article seem more critical and objective than a regular press release.

Don’t allow any public relations officer to pressure you into writing an article promoting his or her firm or person he is representing. Your job is to be a critical watchdog and publish stories you think will interest the public. If there is no news, there is no news article.