Pronation problems how to fix pronated feet

For such an uncommon word, overpronation describes a very common condition that affects millions of people — and can lead to heel pain, foot pain, and plantar fasciitis.

What exactly is overpronation? How can you tell if you overpronate when you walk or run? And what can you do about it?

What Is Overpronation?

The word “pronation” simply refers to the way your foot moves while you walk or run. As your foot strikes the ground, your arch rolls inward slightly, stretches, and flattens to absorb and distribute the impact.

Overpronation, on the other hand, is an abnormal gait that can happen when the foot rolls too far inward — making it more difficult for your arch to absorb impact. This condition is especially common in people with flat feet or people with damaged arches.

Causes of Overpronation

There are several possible reasons why you might overpronate while you walk or run. If you suspect you might overpronate (more on symptoms, below!) identifying the cause can help you correct the problem. The following are some of the most common causes of overpronation:

Genetics

For some people, overpronation appears to be genetic and is present from childhood. However, keep in mind that according to the American Academy of Pediatrics, some overpronation is normal in very young children, since the arch of the foot doesn’t develop fully until about age six.

Flat Feet

Individuals who have very flat feet or a collapsed arch tend to overpronate. Flat feet can develop as a result of genetics, standing for long periods of time, or wearing unsupportive footwear like flip-flops or slippers.

Wear and Tear

Strain, overuse, and wear on the muscles, ligaments, and plantar fascia (arch) of the foot can cause the foot to flatten too much–and roll inward excessively–as it strikes the ground, leading to overpronation. A damaged arch is one of the leading causes of overpronation since a compromised plantar fascia can’t “spring back” properly or distribute impact effectively.

Unsupportive or Worn Footwear

Standing or walking in high heels for an extended period of time puts a lot of strain and pressure on the arch and surrounding ligaments and muscles. Along those same lines, shoes that don’t fit properly, don’t have any arch support, are worn out in the sole, or slide around while you walk can cause the arch to flatten and roll inward excessively.

Plantar Fasciitis and Heel Pronation

Normal pronation helps the arch distribute impact properly so that no one part of the foot is forced to absorb too much strain or pressure. However, problems with heel pronation can lead to plantar fasciitis over time as the arch flattens and breaks down.

While overpronation is usually the culprit when it comes to plantar fasciitis and heel pronation, some people suffer from underpronation, or supination, which happens when the foot doesn’t roll inward far enough. This condition is usually the result of high arches, rather than flat arches.

Symptoms of Overpronation

If you overpronate while you walk or run, you’re likely to notice pain in the arch of your foot and heel. You may also notice that your feet generally don’t feel very stable while you run–which can lead to stumbles or falls.

Overpronation also causes the foot to turn outward during movement at the ankle, which means that you are effectively walking along the inner portion of your foot. This strain and pressure along the instep can lead to heel and foot pain, as well as pain in the knees, back, and hips.

One of the biggest clues that will help you determine whether or not you overpronate is the wear pattern on your favorite pair of sneakers. Severe overpronation will show a lot of wear along the inner edge of the shoe’s sole, near both the toe box and heel. Moderate overpronation will show wear near the inner edge of the shoe’s sole at the toe box, and along the outer edge of the sole at the heel.

Treatment for Overpronation

One of the best ways you can treat overpronation is by wearing supportive shoes. Shoes should have ample support and cushion in the sole, particularly through the heel and arch of the foot. Without proper shoes, the arch of the foot is left susceptible to strain and flattening.

The symptoms of overpronation can usually be corrected and relieved through a heel-cup style orthotic insert with Fascia-Bar technology. The cupped shape helps to stabilize the heel while you walk or run, while the Fascia-Bar lifts and realigns the arch so that it can properly absorb and distribute impact. For overpronators who have developed heel spurs or plantar fasciitis, Heel Seats also offer soothing cushioning that holds up to a significant impact from walking or running.

If you’re wondering how much you pronate while you run, you can stop by most running shops to have your gait analyzed (often for free!). Don’t be surprised if you learn that your gait isn’t quite properly aligned–and take comfort knowing that simple solutions like proper footwear and orthotic inserts can help!

Pronation problems how to fix pronated feet

Pronation describes the way in which your foot moves as you walk or run. Generally, as you step down on your heel your foot rolls inward as you move forward; this helps your body absorb impact, especially when running. Underpronation means you aren’t rolling enough, while overpronation means you are rolling too much. While some pronation is natural, too much can lead to injuries including problems with your feet, hips and back. Wearing the right kind of shoe can help correct pronation problems.

Check the pattern of wear on a pair of shoes that you have worn regularly. Since most people step down on the heel, look towards the front of the shoe. If there is excessive wear on the inside of the shoe, you are an overpronator; if the wear is more visible on the outside of the shoe, you are an underpronator. Even wear across the shoe means you have a neutral stride.

Wet your feet and stand on a brown paper bag. Step off carefully, being sure not to drag your feet. Examine your footprint. Both neutral steps and underpronation will show a clear curve on the inside of your foot, whereas overpronation will barely leave any curve. If you tend to overpronate, almost your whole foot will be visible in your print due to low arches; if you underpronate, only a tiny band will show connecting your baby toe and heel because of high arches. Neutral pronation footprints show less than half of the foot on the outside edge.

Stand with your feet flat on the floor and ask a friend to slide a coin underneath your arch. If a dime doesn’t easily fit, you likely overpronate and have flat feet. If a nickel can disappear you have a normal arch, while if a quarter can slide in easily you have a high arch and probably underpronate.

It is important to buy shoes that will support the type of pronation you have, especially if you run, jog or spend a lot of time standing. Proper support from your footwear will help prevent injuries. A specialty shoe shop or running store can help you choose the best shoes for your needs.

To ensure the best fit, shop in the afternoon when your feet are likely at their largest. If you haven’t been tested for gait or pronation, bring a pair of your old running shoes to show the salesperson and wear the same kind of socks you will be wearing with the shoes normally. People who wear orthotics should try new shoes with their orthotic to ensure a proper fit. If your feet are different sizes, buy your shoes in the larger size.

Choosing Your Shoes

If you overpronate, choose a straight shape for your running shoe; If your overpronation is severe you should look for motion-control shoes, but if you just overpronate a little choose support shoes. Motion-control shoes will provide support to your feet and prevent your foot from rolling inwards. These shoes will be very rigid due to the level of support provided.

If you lean towards underpronation, choose a shoe with a curved shape; this encourages motion of your foot in the right direction. You also need to look for running shoes that are cushioned to act as shock absorbers for your feet.

Semi-curved stability shoes are best for neutral pronators. These shoes mix cushioning, arch support and strength, but don’t control the direction of your foot as much a motion-control shoe.

There’s No Single Solution for Pronated Feet

Pronation problems how to fix pronated feet

Overpronation is too much of a good thing. Pronation is a natural movement of the foot and ankle that occurs in healthy humans when we walk and run that helps absorb the shock of your foot striking the ground.

Pronation is a combination of 3 movements:

1) Eversion
2) Dorsiflexion
3) Forefoot abduction

Pronation problems how to fix pronated feet

Overpronation is when too much of these movements occur, which can lead to repetitive stress injuries and pain because if you’re overpronating, you’re putting excess stress on medial ankle and medial knee tissues.

Some of the issues that can crop up as a result of overpronation include:

Achiles tendonitis: in fact, a 2017 study showed that achilles tendon blood flow was decreased in overpronators, which can lead to impaired tissue recovery and pain. [1]

Pronation problems how to fix pronated feet

Plantar fasciitis: this 2014 study from the Journal of Biomechanics shows that overpronation results in greater stress to the plantar fascia. [2]

Shin splints: also known as medial tibial stress syndrome, overpronation and a pronated foot posture showed strong evidence as a risk factor as outlined in this 2014 study. [3]

Pronation problems how to fix pronated feet

Patellofemoral pain syndrome: the same shin splints study also linked overpronation to PFPS.

As you can see, overpronation can result in a number of different issues.

So if you get knee pain and you have overpronation but your treatment only includes glute, quad and hamstring exercises and stretches, you’re missing a critical component of your rehab.

Pronation problems how to fix pronated feet

How to Correct Overpronation

In today’s video, we’re going to explore some of the root causes that can lead to overpronation in the first place, that must be addressed to correct the problem at the source.

These 3 causes are by no means comprehensive as the human body can compensate in creative ways to get around dysfunctions you have.

If you’re an overpronator, I hope this gives you more insight into the issue and gets you thinking about how to fix it.

One exercise that I love that’s a part of my Lower Limb Control course is the Seated 4-Way MTP Slide.

While the technique looks simple, there are a few important cues that must be followed to make it effective.

Check it out here:

This is a great technique to do when you’re at the office or sitting around at home. If you can’t slide your foot, no worries, just get to end range where you can keep your foot flat and apply metatarsal pressure and you’ll still benefit. But it is definitely done best on surface where you can slide your foot while applying metatarsal pressure the whole time.

BY ARIELA TEJADA / May 01, 2017

CATEGORIES

  • All
  • Achilles Tendon Pain
  • Arch Support
  • Arthritis
  • Back Pain
  • Ball of Foot Pain / Metatarsalgia
  • Bunions
  • Diabetes
  • Flat Feet
  • Foot Pain
  • Hammer Toes
  • Heel Pain/Heel Spurs
  • Knee & Hip Pain
  • Mortons Neuroma
  • Neuropathy
  • Overpronation
  • Plantar Fasciitis

Are You Suffering from Collapsed Foot Arches?

As OrthoFeet strives to share information with you about foot ailments, we’ve more than once raised the point that your feet support your entire body. When it comes to your feet, nothing should be taken lightly or for granted.

A very common biomechanical phenomenon is Flat Feet, or Over-Pronation, which occurs during standing or walking, when a person’s arch collapses upon weight bearing.

Pronation problems how to fix pronated feet

Causes

There are many conditions that can cause flat feet and over-pronation. Common foot deformities and flexible muscle structure are the most frequent causes. The structure of the foot begins to collapse, causing the foot to flatten and adding stress to other parts of the foot.

Other conditions including obesity, pregnancy or repetitive pounding on a hard surface, can weaken the arch and lead to over-pronation.

Symptoms

Often people with flat feet do not experience discomfort immediately, and some never suffer from any discomfort at all. However, when symptoms develop and become painful, walking becomes awkward and causes increased strain on the feet and calves. Over-pronation often leads to plantar fasciitis, heel spurs, metatarsalgia, tendonitis and/or bunions. In some cases over-pronation can affect your knees, hips and even lower back because when the foot pronates (flattens) it causes the leg to internally rotate, resulting in improper posture of the entire leg and back.

Treatment and Prevention

Over-Pronation can be treated conservatively with orthotic insoles that are designed with appropriate arch support to prevent the over-pronation. Stability shoes that feature a firm heel counter and wide soles help reduce over-pronation, as well.
Take a look at OrthoFeet shoes that are specifically constructed to support flat feet and over-pronation at https://www.orthofeet.com/collections/flat-feet-shoes

Other Recommendations:

  • Rest
  • Strengthen your foot muscles through toe curls, heel raises, and other exercises to improve foot support, stability and shock absorption.
  • Do not walk barefoot – Always wear proper fitting and supportive shoes
  • Avoid running or other high-impact sports

If you still experience foot pain, and your quality of life is affected by over-pronation you should seek the help of a podiatrist.

BY ARIELA TEJADA / May 01, 2017

CATEGORIES

  • All
  • Achilles Tendon Pain
  • Arch Support
  • Arthritis
  • Back Pain
  • Ball of Foot Pain / Metatarsalgia
  • Bunions
  • Diabetes
  • Flat Feet
  • Foot Pain
  • Hammer Toes
  • Heel Pain/Heel Spurs
  • Knee & Hip Pain
  • Mortons Neuroma
  • Neuropathy
  • Overpronation
  • Plantar Fasciitis

Are You Suffering from Collapsed Foot Arches?

As OrthoFeet strives to share information with you about foot ailments, we’ve more than once raised the point that your feet support your entire body. When it comes to your feet, nothing should be taken lightly or for granted.

A very common biomechanical phenomenon is Flat Feet, or Over-Pronation, which occurs during standing or walking, when a person’s arch collapses upon weight bearing.

Pronation problems how to fix pronated feet

Causes

There are many conditions that can cause flat feet and over-pronation. Common foot deformities and flexible muscle structure are the most frequent causes. The structure of the foot begins to collapse, causing the foot to flatten and adding stress to other parts of the foot.

Other conditions including obesity, pregnancy or repetitive pounding on a hard surface, can weaken the arch and lead to over-pronation.

Symptoms

Often people with flat feet do not experience discomfort immediately, and some never suffer from any discomfort at all. However, when symptoms develop and become painful, walking becomes awkward and causes increased strain on the feet and calves. Over-pronation often leads to plantar fasciitis, heel spurs, metatarsalgia, tendonitis and/or bunions. In some cases over-pronation can affect your knees, hips and even lower back because when the foot pronates (flattens) it causes the leg to internally rotate, resulting in improper posture of the entire leg and back.

Treatment and Prevention

Over-Pronation can be treated conservatively with orthotic insoles that are designed with appropriate arch support to prevent the over-pronation. Stability shoes that feature a firm heel counter and wide soles help reduce over-pronation, as well.
Take a look at OrthoFeet shoes that are specifically constructed to support flat feet and over-pronation at https://www.orthofeet.com/collections/flat-feet-shoes

Other Recommendations:

  • Rest
  • Strengthen your foot muscles through toe curls, heel raises, and other exercises to improve foot support, stability and shock absorption.
  • Do not walk barefoot – Always wear proper fitting and supportive shoes
  • Avoid running or other high-impact sports

If you still experience foot pain, and your quality of life is affected by over-pronation you should seek the help of a podiatrist.

The shape of the human foot and its mechanics are designed to minimize the stress of walking or running. When your foot pushes off, it propels you forward by rolling outward or supinating. When it strikes the ground again, it absorbs the shock of impact by rolling inward or pronating.

This process is normal and healthy. In fact, it’s crucial to protect your joints over the long haul. But when your foot rolls inward a little too much, that’s when you can start to have problems. This is called overpronation, and it’s the leading cause of most runners’ injuries.

Overpronation can destabilize your body when walking and running

Pronation problems how to fix pronated feetYour foot continues to roll inward even after it’s made its landing. What happens next depends on the structure of your feet, ankles, and calves, but many runners experience nasty stress injuries:

Overpronation can also play a role in acute injuries, like ankle sprains.

Are you an overpronator?

Overpronation isn’t always obvious. Most people take the way that they walk or run for granted. You can always have your gait analyzed by a foot and ankle specialist, but there are some ways to tell at home.

Flat feet

First, overpronators typically have flat feet and extremely flexible arches. That excessive movement makes it hard for your body to support your weight while running.

Wet foot test

Pronation problems how to fix pronated feetYou can check this using the wet foot test. Dip just the sole of your foot into a pan of water. Be careful not to soak the entire foot and arch – just the bottom!

Next, step onto a newspaper or paper bag. If your footprint leaves you asking “what arches?” then you’re probably an overpronator.

Wear and tear on your shoes

You can also tell from the wear and tear on your shoes. Flip your running shoes over. If the heel and ball of the foot leading into the big toe are all worn in, then overpronation is the likely culprit.

How to correct for overpronation

So, you’re an overpronator? Don’t worry; you’re in good company! Livestrong.com estimates that 20-30% of runners are severe overpronators, while up to 60% are mild overpronators. Keep reading to learn how to reduce your risk of injury.

Supportive shoes

To keep your arches from collapsing with every step, you need sturdy, supportive footwear. Shoes with proper arch support will keep your foot in alignment and give you stability. Avoid any shoes with flexible soles, especially trendy “minimalist” shoes.

Even if you get brand new, motion-controlling shoes, they may not be enough to correct the effects of overpronation. That’s why our doctors can’t recommend this next solution highly enough.

Custom insoles

Our patients LOVE their custom orthotic insoles. They’re specially fitted to your feet and tailored for your activity purposes. Insoles can both treat current injuries – like plantar fasciitis – and prevent new injuries from occurring.

According to a 2017 study published in the Journal of Biomechanics, custom insoles minimized the angle of pronation at ground strike and raised the height of the arch. “When feet are supported in correct alignment, also the position of the knees, pelvis, and hips are corrected, thereby providing a solid foundation for the entire body,” writes lead author Dr. J. Kosonen.

Forget the soft and foamy models you find at the drugstore. “What overpronators really need is structure,” said Dr. Bob Baravarian. “I’d recommend a semi-flexible plastic at a minimum, which can then be covered with a cushion for comfort.”

Tips to help pronate like the pros

Can’t afford new shoes or insoles at the moment? No sweat! There are steps you can take (see what we did there?) to reduce the impact of overpronation while you’re running.

Focus on your stride

Improving your form can help mitigate discomfort and prevent future injuries. Taking short, quick steps instead of long, drawn-out strides can minimize the foot’s rotation and decrease your chances of over-striding.

Stretches

You can also employ stretching and strengthening exercises (really, if you’re not already stretching after your runs, then you’re just asking for a stress injury).

Try some of these easy stretches that take five minutes or less.

Calf raises. Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart, toes pointed forward. Slowly, lift your heels off the ground and lower them back down. Repeat 10 times. You can even try these on one foot at a time.

Ball roll. Massage the arches of your feet with a golf ball or a frozen water bottle. Repeat with each foot for one minute.

Point, flex, curl. Sit on the floor with your legs straight out in front. Point the toes, then flex them back. Finish with a toe curl. Repeat this 10-12 times.

If you are experiencing problems with your feet or ankles we are here to help. Our nationally recognized podiatrists and foot and ankle specialists offer the most advanced foot and ankle care along with the highest success rates in the nation. We are leaders in the field of research and treatment of all foot and ankle conditions.

For more information or to schedule a consultation, please call (877) 736-6001 or visit us at www.footankleinstitute.com.

  • About
  • Latest Posts

Dr. Avanti Redkar is board certified in podiatric medicine and joined University Foot and Ankle Institute under a fellowship in sports medicine and ankle reconstruction. She attended podiatry school at the New York College of Podiatric Medicine and went on to complete her surgical residency at Good Samaritan Hospital in West Islip, New York, where she was trained in foot and rearfoot surgery, wound care, and hyperbaric medicine.

Dr. Redkar specializes in foot and ankle pathology and is available for consult at our Mid-Wilshire Los Angeles and Beverly Hills locations.

Pronation problems how to fix pronated feet

As a parent, it’s almost impossible not to play the comparison game. Is my child ahead of the curve? Right on track? Behind?

But when milestone deadlines come and go, questions aren’t far behind. There are many reasons a child faces developmental delays.

One is pronation. And there’s definitely something you can do to help.

What Is Pronation?

Pronation, often called flat feet, flexible flat foot, pes planus, or overpronation, refers to the inward roll of your child’s ankle.

When standing barefoot, the problem is easy to spot. The naturally occurring arch of your child’s foot is either reduced or gone altogether. And while it looks like a foot problem, it actually starts in the heel. The calcaneus (a fancy word for heel bone) rotates inward. Body weight then shifts in also, causing your child to walk and stand on the inside part of his or her foot.

Pronation problems how to fix pronated feet

What Causes Pronation In Kids?

There isn’t just one cause. But for kids who have low muscle tone , ligament laxity is a common culprit.

Ligaments, the flexible fibers that connect bones or joints, serve as your child’s checks and balances system. They make sure joints don’t move beyond the normal range of motion. But if these ligaments are overly relaxed, joints move too far. And in the case of pronation, this causes ankles to roll in.

What Problems Does It Cause?

You may see the effects of pronation even before your child starts walking. Developmental delays with pulling to stand and cruising are common.

And then there are the clumsy steps. The gait of a toddler who pronates is often sloppy or immature compared to other kids the same age. Additionally, your child may be slow to master gross motor skills such as:

· Standing on one foot

Pronation can also leave your child exhausted. His or her muscles work harder due to the body’s poor positioning. This may be why your child is more inclined to sit rather than run and play.

Keep in mind that pronation isn’t just a foot problem. It starts a chain reaction. That inward ankle roll can cause knees, hips, and back to shift out of alignment. If left untreated, expect pain in all three areas.

Pronation problems how to fix pronated feet

What Should I Do If My Child Pronates?

First off, remember that some pronation is normal. A toddler’s body is always growing and changing. A slight ankle roll while standing or walking doesn’t mean you need to rush off to a doctor.

What you should keep an eye out for is pronation that is excessive and symptomatic. This means watch for pain, fatigue, clumsiness, and developmental delays. They’re all symptoms of a bigger issue.

For kids who fall into this category, start with a pediatrician. He or she can get you moving on to the next step, which could be physical therapy or a trip to an orthotist. If a little education or convincing is needed, you can direct your doctor to a variety of helpful resources found here on the Surestep site.

What Ankle Pronation Treatment Options Do I Have?

One highly effective treatment is the revolutionary Surestep SMO . These little ankle braces are custom-made pediatric orthotics designed to correct pronation. With uniquely flexible plastic, it provides the stability and comfort your child needs.

To understand how the SMOs work, think about training wheels. When learning to ride a bike, kids tip back and forth. They’re still pedaling and using their own muscles. Training wheels just provide that necessary stop before tipping over. With practice, kids don’t need them anymore.

It’s the same with Surestep SMOs. They provide stability and won’t let the foot/ankle slide into that excessive position. But your child’s muscles continue to do all the work. With enough repetition and muscle memory, the SMOs can be taken away without your child becoming dependent on them.

Pronation problems how to fix pronated feet

Don’t let the ordering process confuse you: GET SURESTEP

How Do Surestep SMOs Fight Pronation? Why Are They Unique?

This gets a little confusing but stay with us.

Pronation is triplanar. This means it happens in three planes of motion. More simply, you can think of it as affecting three parts of the foot:

· Back (the heel bone rolls in)

· Side (the arch flattens out)

· Top (the forefoot pushes out, creating a boomerang shape)

Surestep SMOs treat pronation in all three of these planes. We start at the source. By moving the heel bone back into place, the arch reappears naturally. And Surestep’s unique trim lines (as opposed to full footplates) help move the forefoot back into position.

Most other orthotic devices try to take a shortcut by simply forcing the arch back up. But this doesn’t address the root problem. It’s like taking medicine to fight symptoms rather than the sickness itself. And many kids who use this type of product still pronate. They’re just pronating on top of an orthotic.

This is one of many reasons why it’s important to ask for Surestep SMOs by name. You don’t want an inferior substitute.

Your feet form the foundation of the body. It is from these 52 bones, 66 joints, 214 ligaments and 38 muscles that we are able to propel ourselves through our daily lives.

Further, the average person takes 8,000 to 10,000 steps per day. It is no wonder that when the foot begins to hurt, we take notice and want it resolved quickly.

In the work and sports world, the foot takes the brunt of the everyday stresses on the body. Think about the role the foot plays in sports like basketball, soccer, and squash or in jobs such as construction, teaching and letter delivery, and it is easy to understand how acute injuries occur. But, if we take golf as another example, one might be surprised that foot pain is as debilitating to a golf game as golfer’s elbow or a rotator cuff injury. If you can’t walk to the 1st hole, it’s tough to get the ball, let alone oneself, down the fairway.

People often think that it is normal to have sore feet. By the end of this post we hope that you have a better understanding of some common foot ailments that are the result of faulty foot mechanics.

The Purpose of the Foot – Foot Mechanics 101

The foot offers the body two very important functions. The first is stability. It provides a solid base of support (keeps us up against gravity) and a rigid lever for moving the body forward. The second function is mobility. This allows for shock absorption, maximum contact with the ground with uneven terrain and allows unusual forces in the hips and knees to be absorbed.

The anatomy of a normal foot allows for both to occur at the same time. Approximately 30% of the population have a normal foot.

The remainder of people either overpronate (95% of abnormal feet) or oversupinate (5% of abnormal feet). The important thing to know is that all feet pronate and supinate, but abnormal feet do one of these things too much or at the wrong time.

When the foot overpronates or oversupinates, several foot ailments can develop.

A foot that overpronates stretches and shortens structures in the foot and contributes to:

  • 1. plantar fasciitis (heel spurs)
  • 2. hallux valgus (bunions)
  • 3. achilles tendonitis
  • 4. corns, calluses and hammer toes
  • 5. navicular apophysitis
  • 6. shin splints
  • 7. fractures in the 1st and 2nd toes
  • 8. medial knee pain and patellofemoral dysfunction (improper tracking of the knee cap)
  • 9. hip pain
  • 10. low back pain.

Todays Lesson: Overpronation

It is the most common abnormality found in the foot, and for this reason, is the most studied.

The term that most people attribute to overpronation is “flat feet.” Pronation is the rolling in of the foot and the collapse of the arch. Every person pronates to some extent and this is a necessary moment in the normal walking cycle as it allows the forefoot to make complete contact with the ground. Overpronation is when a person pronates too much and for too long. This places excess stress on the tendons and ligaments in the foot and ankle.Pronation problems how to fix pronated feet

A foot that overpronates acts like a loose bag of bones during the walking cycle. This makes this type of foot very flexible but inefficient. The foot has to work much harder to propel the body, fatiguing easily and placing mechanical stresses on the lower body. We like to use the analogy of digging a hole in the dirt. Overpronating feet are like using a broom to dig the hole. It won’t break down quickly, but you will be digging for a very long time, or until eventually wear and tear will take effect. Wouldn’t you rather have a shovel to work with. This is in essence what an orthotic can do for your feet. This is why orthotics have become an evidence based treatment for so many foot ailments, as they can effectively manage overpronation.

In this authors opinion, not all “flat feet” need to be treated, but they should all be evaluated.

Posted by Grant Fedoruk

This information is not meant to replace the advice or treatment of a qualified physician or physiotherapist. It is meant for information only. Please seek an assessment and discuss your treatment options with your caregiver prior to making a decision about your treatment path.